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Geology Resources - Indiana

  • Indiana Geological Survey
    • Following are some of the resources available on this web site:
      • Indiana Mineral Industry News
      • GIS Atlas for Southwestern Indiana
      • Public Land Survey System Data
      • GIS Atlas for Indiana
      • Read the latest IGS Newsletter
      • IGS Geologists Reach New Heights in Limestone Research, by Brian Keith and Todd Thompson.
      • A Geographic Information System Atlas for Indiana is now available on this site. "The initial version of the atlas allows users to construct custom maps with layers showing information about coal, geology, and hydrology. New layers, including layers with information about geologic hazards, caves and karst, biology, history, and infrastructure, will be added each month over the next two years."
  • IPFW Geogarden Tour, presented by Indiana University, Purdue University, Fort Wayne, Indiana.. Virtual tour of the IPFW Geogarden.  This site includes discussion of rock classifications and photographs of the rocks in the IPFW Geogarden.
  • Stone-Related Publications from the IndianaGeological Survey.  According to author John Park (A Guidebook to Mining inAmerica: Volume 2:  East (Minnesota,Iowa,Missouri,Arkansas,Louisiana, and farther East), Stonerose Publishing Co., 2000). The following publications are available from the Indiana Geological Survey:
    • High Calcium Limestone and High Magnesium Dolomite Resources of Indiana (B42B, 20p.)
    • Crushed Stone Aggregate Resources of Indiana (B42H, 38 p.)
    • Dimension Sandstone Resources of Indiana (B42M, 28 p.)
    • The Lime Industry of Indiana (B42J, 62 p.)
  • The First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianpolist, Alexander H. Conner, State Printer, 1869. (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)
  • Indiana Geology, presented by the Indiana Geological Survey.
  • Indiana State Minerals Information (USGS)
  • Compendium of Paleozoic Rock-Unit Stratigraphy in Indiana - A Revision, by  Robert H. Shaver, Curtis H. Ault, Ann M. Burger, Donald D. Carr, John B. Droste, Donald L. Eggert, Henry H. Gray, Denver Harper, Nancy R. Hasenmueller, Walter A. Hasenmueller, Alan S. Horowitz, Harold C.  Hutchison, Brian D. Keith, Stanley J. Keller, John B. Patton, Carl B. Rexroad, and Charles E. Weir. Modified From  Indiana Geological Survey Bulletin 59.  Indiana Geology Today, Indiana Geological Survey.  This is presented by the Indiana University Bloomington Libraries - Geology Library.
  • Indiana Geology Questions and Answers - Search Results Where are good mineral-collecting sites in Indiana?: Where are good mineral-collecting sites in Indiana?, FAQ 14, October 8, 1998, presented by the Indiana Geological Survey.
  • IndianaKarst Geology - Lapiés, Grikes and Terra Rosa presented by the Indiana Karst Conservancy. "When limestone is disintegrated by solutional processes, it leaves behind a clayey, residual soil known as terra rosa (Latin for 'red earth').Note the color of the terra rosa soil.  Similar features may be seen near the large quarry north of the town of Oolitic."  (The link to theIndianaKarst Geology site is still active, but the other link - from which the above description originated - appears not to be available any longer.)
    <http://www.caves.org/conservancy/ikc/slide15.htm>
  • Indiana University Bloomington Libraries - Geology Library
  • Joseph Moore Museum, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana. (This museum, located on the Earlham College campus, offers geological information, with emphasis on the local limestone outcroppings near Richmond, Indiana.)
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • Museums, Tours, and Places of Interest, presented by The-Vug.com – All things mineralogical online.
  • National Geologic Map Database, presented by the United States Geologic Survey.
  • Some Geological Aspects of the Carboniferous of Southern Indiana, Compiled by Thomas E. Hendrix, National Association of Geology Teachers East, Central Section, Annual Meeting April 1-2, 1966. Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana Field Trip Saturday, April 2, 1966. Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, Geological tour of Southern Indiana.
  • University of Cincinnati Campus, McMicken College of Arts and Sciences, Department of GeologyDiscover Cincinnati Geology
  • University of Southern Indiana - Department of Geology and Physics
  • U. S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet on Indiana

Research Resources - Indiana


The Indiana Stone Industry

Front cover of "Indiana Limestone: The Aristocrat of Building Materials," 1920 “Two views of quarrying operations showing with what precision the great blocks are channeled out and broken up.” 1920 Group showing the varied use of Indiana Limestone, 1920.

Front cover of Indiana Limestone: The Aristocrat of Building Materials, 1920

“Two views of quarrying operations showing with what precision the great blocks are channeled out and broken up.”

Group showing the varied use of Indiana Limestone, 1920.

  • Indiana Limestone- The Salem Limestone, or "the Salem," is the stone referred to as Indiana's most famous limestone.  The Salem limestone is "exposed in a narrow area that extends from the southern tip of Harrison County on the Ohio River northward to near Greencastle in Putnam County.  Most of the stone suitable for use as dimension stone and for building purposes is found in Owen, Monroe, and Lawrence Counties." (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.geobop.com/Symbols/Geo/1/Limestone/>
  • Indiana Limestone, presented by "Buffalo as an Architectural Museum."
  • Indiana Limestone: Old Quarry Photos – History – and About Us – Stone City Quarries, presented by the Weber Stone Company, Inc., Stone City Quarries (SCQ) (present-day company) in Anamosa, Iowa.
  • Indiana Limestone Economically Used as Veneer in Small House Construction (circa 1925). (The following advertisement is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York.)

    Indiana Limestone Economically Used as Veneer in Small House Construction.

    "Indiana Limestone used as a veneer for walls of stud frame construction, brick, or hollow tile is fast becoming popular among builders of small homes and bungalows. Short-length stock of about 4" thickness laid up as a random ashlar is the most economical form of stone construction. It is also thoroughly practical and highly pleasing in its effect. "Cut stone contractors who keep a large supply of this stock on hand will find it highly profitable, as the demand for it among architects and builders is rapidly increasing. "Our handsomely illustrated booklet, 'Indiana Limestone for School and College Buildings,' showing various interesting uses of the stone will be sent free upon request.

    Indiana Limestone Quarrymen's Association

    Box 772, Bedford, Indiana

    Service Bureaus in New York and Chicago

    Members:

    In Bedford, Indiana: Consolidated Stone Co.; Furst-Kerber Cut Stone Co.; Imperial

    Stone Co.; Indiana Quarries Co.; W. McMillan & Son; Shea & Donnelly Co.;

    Reed-Powers Cut Stone Co.

    In Ellettsville, Indiana: Perry Stone Co.

    In Bloomington, Indiana: Chicago & Bloomington Stone Co.; Crescent Stone Co.;

    Empire Stone Co.; J. Hoadley & Sons Co.; Mathers Stone Co.; Monroe County

    Oolitic Stone Co.; National Stone Co.; Star Stone Co.

  • Indiana Limestone Heritage Project
  • Indiana Heritage Limestone Park Project Report [PDF]
  • Indiana Limestone Institute of America - “The coordinating agency for information, education, and technical data for Indiana Limestone - The Nation’s Building Stone.
  • Indiana Limestone Quarried by Elliott Stone Company
  • Indiana Marble and Granite Dealer’s Association (1895) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 499.

    “President: Louis J. Goth, Indianapolis, Ind.; Secretary and Treasurer: Schuyler Powell, Logansport, Ind.”

  • Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association, Carmel, Indiana.
  • Indiana Mineral Industry News, presented by the Indiana Geological Survey.
  • IndianaOölitic Limestone - "A New 'Duplex' Channeler for Oölitic Limestone," by C. J. Levey, from Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, Vol. VII. No. 2, January, 1913.
  • Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods, by George D. Hunter of Bloomington, Indiana, Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, Vol. V. No. 4 - July, 1910, pages 410-421.
  • Indiana’s Export Base: A Comparison Export Industries Across Indiana’s Metropolitan Statistical Areas, by Wayne Bartholomew, Paul Joray, and Paul Kochanowski. [PDF]
  • Limestone History in Indiana, presented on the Indiana Limestone Heritage Parks web site.
  • Limestone Industry in Indiana (circa 1967) (From Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 27.)

    “Anyone who has traveled extensively will certainly have seen famous buildings faced in large part with Indiana limestone.

    “ Ind. 37. - Bloomington, Oolitic, and Bedford are centers of stone production (circa 1967). Many of the Nation’s most famous buildings are partially constructed of Indiana oolitic limestone from this area. Quarries are visible from Ind. 37 at Oolitic. Numerous quarries and finishing mills are in the area. Inquire locally for permission to visit finishing mills and quarries.”

  • Limestone Industry in Indiana - Resources Limestone Industry Resources from the Indiana Division, presented by the Indiana State Library.
  • The Mineral Industry of Indiana, reports presented by the Indiana Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1994 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1993, By Use; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1993, By Use and District.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1995 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1994, By Use; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1994, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1994, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1994, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Kentucky Stone Co.; France Stone Co.’s Greencastle ground limestone plan and quarry; Agrock Quarries, Inc.; ESSROC Materials, Inc.; Sellersburg Stone Co., Inc.; Liter’s quarry of Indiana, Inc.’s stone processing plant in Clark County; Erie Stone Co.’s crushed stone quarry in Huntington County (Erie Stone Co. is a division of Irving Materials Inc.); Mulzer Crushed Stone Co., Inc.’s crushed stone operation near Paoli, Orange County; and B. G. Hoadley Quarries Inc.’s dimension limestone quarry in Monroe County.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1996 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1995, By Use; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1995, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1995, By Major Use Category.
      • The stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Mulzer Crushed Stone Inc.’s quarry at Abydel west of Paoli (Mulzer Crushed stone Inc. announced the opening of a quarry in Harrison County ); Rogers Group Inc. reopened their old quarry near Orleans; D & R Crushed Stone Co. ceased production at the Indiana Limestone Co., Inc., Crown quarry in Monroe County; Hillside Stone Co.’s planned underground crushed limestone mine west of Bloomington; Indiana Limestone Co. Inc., under new management; and ESSROC quarries and Speed Plant.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1997 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1996, By Use; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1996, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1996, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1996, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: S&G Excavating’s crushed stone quarry in Putnam County called Lincoln Park Stone; Walton Quarries Inc.’s new dimension stone quarry in Lawrence County; Martin Marietta Aggregation acquired the Indiana holdings of American Aggregates with an exception (see report); Martin Marietta Aggregates sold their Harding Street crushed stone quarry in Marion County to Cornerstone/Benchmark Materials Midwest (the Kentucky Stone Co.).
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1998 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1997, By Use; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1997, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1997, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1997, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc., opened new on the Ohio River between New Amsterdam and Mauckport in Harrison County; Indiana Inc.’s Liters quarry; Tom Miller Quarries; Junction Limestone Inc. opened their Uland Quarry in Green County; Bybee Stone Co. repairs on Iowa State Capitol building and contract for the Pope John Paul Cultural Center in Washington, D.C.; Evans Quarries, Inc. received contracts for several schools in Chicago, Illinois, and finished the federal courthouses in Sacramento, California; Fargo, North Dakota; and Tallahassee, Florida; Indiana Limestone Co., Inc., “provided limestone from the original Empire Hole at its P.M. and B. Quarry, Lawrence County, for major renovations on the Empire State Building in New York City.” Mansfield Stone, Inc., a new dimension sandstone company, “opened a quarry in old workings near Mansfield, Parke County.”
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 1999 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1998, By Use; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1998, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1998, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1998, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: New crushed stone operations include: Hansen Aggregates Midwest, Inc., quarry and the Woodlawn II Quarry in Allen County; Limedale Quarry in Putnam County; J. W. Jones Crushed Stone, Inc., quarry in Putnam Quarry; Mulzer’s Crushed Stone, Inc.’s New Amsterdam Quarry; Indiana Limestone Co. Inc. Crown Quarry dimension stone quarry in Monroe County; Blackwell Moore Inc.; Martin Marietta Aggregates, Inc., Kentucky Avenue Mine in Marion County; Material Service Corp. of Chicago, Illinois acquired the Ward Stone, Inc. quarries, the Francesville Quarry in Pulaski County, and the Babcock Quarry in Jasper County; J. W. Jones Crushed Stone, Inc.; Jones & Sons, Inc.; Irving Materials, Inc.; Pipe Creek Stone Co.; Stoneco, Inc. Mill Creek Quarry in Miami County; Hanson Aggregates Midwest, Inc. Greencastle plant closed; Indiana Limestone Co. Inc. (producers of Salem Limestone); Phoenix Limestone Co. closed its quarry in Lawrence County; Dyckerhoff AG, “an international cement and building materials company headquartered in Germany acquired Lone Star Industries, Inc.; General Shale Products Corp. was acquired by Wienerberger Group, based in Vienna Austin; Carmeuse Group; the Lafarge Group (“Carmeuse operates the Marblehead lime plant in Lake County.”
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 2000 [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1999, By Use; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 1999, By Use And District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand And Gravel Sold Or Used in 1999, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand And Gravel Sold Or Used in 1999, By Use And District.
      • The stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Crushed stone quarry near Monon, White County, opened by Material Service Corp.; Aggrock Quarries, Inc., was aquired by Hanson Aggregates Midwest, Inc. - crushed stone quarry near Sellersburg, Clark County; Global Stone Co. (subsidiary of Oglebay Norton Co.) acquired J. M. Huber Corp. and renamed the plant Global Stone Portage LLC, which produced ground limestone at the time of the report; 10% interest in Pembrooke Calox Inc. acquired by of Baltic International USA, Inc., both companies to develop high calcium reserves near Stinesville, Monroe County; the following crushed stone quarries were closed during the year: Hanson Aggregates Midwest Region, Russellville Stone in Putnam County; Lowell Quarries Ltd., Lowell Mining, in Lake County; the Patton Hill Quarry in Lawrence County was opened by Star Stone Co., Inc.; Star Stone Co., Inc., also owns Hunter Valley Quarry (inactive) in Monroe County; Walton Quarries Inc., owns an inactive dimension limestone quarry in Lawrence County; Walton Quarries, Inc., quarried dimension limestone near Bloomington in Monroe County on property owned by C&H Stone Co., the quarry was formerly leased by B. G. Hoadley Quarries, Inc.; Hoadley Quarries, Inc., quarries dimension limestone from the Maple Hill Quarry.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 2001 (includes a mineral map of Indiana ) [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2000, By Use; (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2000, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 2000, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand And Gravel Sold Or Used in 2000, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Martin Marietta Aggregates to open “long-abandoned Standard Materials Corp quarry site at Waldron,” Shelby County; J. W. Jones Co.; Blackwell Moore, Inc., was acquired by Rogers Group, Inc., which produced crushed stone from overburden at Indiana Limestone Co., Inc.’s Crown Quarry and the Bloomington Crown Quarry; Indiana Limestone Co., Inc. continued to produce dimension limestone; Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc.’s New Amsterdam Quarry in Harrison County; Hanson Aggregates Midwest Region’s Woodburn Quarry in Allen County closed during 2001; the StarStone Co., Inc. Patton Hill Quarry near Oolitic, Lawrence County (opened in 2000); the StarStone Co., Inc., Patton Hill Quarry near Oolitic, Lawrence County; Independent Limestone Co. produced “about 425 cubic meters of stone for the Pentagon reconstruction project,” stone for the project “cut, detailed, and shipped the stone” was done by Bybee Stone Co. of Ellettsville.
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 2002 (includes a mineral map of Indiana) [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana; (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind; (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2001, By Use; (4) Table 4: Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2001, By Use and District; (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 2001, By Major Use Category; (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 2001, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Rogers Group Inc. was founded in 1908, received a Half Century Business Award from the Indiana Dept. of Commerce; Rogers Group Inc., opened underground mine near Bloomington, Monroe County; Liter’s Quarry of Indiana opened underground mine at Atkins crushed stone quarry near Jeffersonville, Clark County; Rogers Group Newton County Quarry at Kentland enlarged; the former Blackwell Moore aggregate plant taken over by the Rogers Group - the plant “produces aggregate from overburden limestone at Indiana Limestone Co.’s Crown Quarry,”dimension stone quarry in Monroe County; Limestone Material Supply opened new dimension limestone Luttrell & Galloway Quarry near Oolitic, Lawrence County; production at Hunter Valley Quarry, Monroe County, stopped in 2000 by Star Stone Co.; Star Stone Co. Patton Hill Quarry in the Oolitic area, Lawrence County; Walton Quarries quarry southwest of Bloomington, Monroe County; Walton Quarries abandoned its dimension stone quarry Oolitic Quarry in Lawrence County during 2002; “A panel of Indiana limestone mined by the Independent Limestone Co. and milled by the Bybee Stone Co.”was inscribed with a quote by President Bush: “Terrorist acts can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings but cannot touch the foundation of America.” The panel was signed by employees of the mill and other local dignitaries and placed on display at the Pentagon construction site in Washington, DC, where it was also signed by construction workers. Bybee Stone Co. completed the Pentagon repair project in record time and began a new project to provide carved stone for the Kennedy-Warren Center in Washington, DC.” “The Indiana Limestone Co. supplied dimension stone for the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, PA, which is scheduled to open in 2003. About 77,100 t of the Indiana stone will be used on the facade of the building, and a portion of the preamble to the Constitution later will be carved onto it. The South Carolina Museum of Natural Science received an Award of Excellence in the third annual Project Awards Program of the Marble Institute of America. The exterior of the building and paving stone were largely composed of Indiana limestone from the Indiana Limestone Co.” Indiana Limestone Co. offered for sale in 2002; “A limestone memorial was constructed at the entrance to the town of Stinesville, Monroe County, to commemorate the importance of the area to the development of the dimension limestone industry in Indiana. Dimension limestone was first quarried near the village in 1827.”
    • The Mineral Industry of Indiana - 2003 (includes a mineral map of Indiana) [PDF]
      • Tables included in this document are: (1) Table 1. Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Indiana, (2) Table 2. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used, By Kind, (3) Table 3. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2002, By Use, (4) Table 4. Indiana: Crushed Stone Sold Or Used By Producers in 2002, By Use and District, (5) Table 5. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 2002, By Major Use Category, (6) Table 6. Indiana: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 2002, By Use and District.
      • Some of the stone quarries and related companies included in this document are: Sellersburg Stone Co. acquired the Corydon Crushed Lime Company in Harrison County; “Rogers Group, Inc., listed the Orleans Quarry in Orange County, which had not produced for more than 2 years, as abandoned with MSHA; “Hanson donated 182 hectares including abandoned rock quarries and wooded areas valued at $5 million to DePauw University near Greencastle in Putnam County. It will become the DePauw University Nature Park, and rock climbing may be allowed on the quarry walls.; Shatter cones from Rogers Group, Inc., Newton County Quarry, the site of an ancient meteorite impact, are on display at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, CA.” “About Face Bronze Medallion Community Relations Award was awarded to Rogers Group, Inc.’s Bloomington Crushed Stone plant in Monroe County. Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc.’s Newburgh sales yard in Warrick County won a Showplace Award in that competition.” St. Meinrad sandstone quarry in Spencer County reopened by Mansfield Stone, Inc. - company also operates a sandstone quarry in Parke County; “A partnership was formed with the monastery that owns the property; the company that will operate the quarry is Mansfield-St. Meinrad Stone, Inc. While the stone will be marketed worldwide, it will also be used to maintain the monastery. The company will not be allowed to blast and must remove the stone by mechanical means. Once quarried, the stone will be trucked to Brazil in Clay County, a 200-kilometer trip, for milling. Initial jobs will focus on the restoration of buildings that had been constructed with the sandstone.” “The Indiana Limestone Company, Inc., which owns quarries in Lawrence and Monroe Counties, was sold to Johnson Ventures. Members of a family who own the Victor Oolitic Stone Company in Monroe County opened Big Creek Stone Quarry under the company name Big Creek LLC at a long-abandoned quarry near Stinesville in Monroe County.; “The Hoosier Calcium Corp., also near Stinesville in Monroe County, was sold to American Limestone, LLC. Hoosier Calcium Corp. had operated as an underground crushed stone quarry that produced crushed limestone for glass manufacture. American Limestone, LLC, however, is producing dimension limestone from a surface mine on the property. The company will be opening another dimension limestone quarry in Monroe County at the site of a quarry that has been abandoned for 75 years. American Limestone, LLC is a spinoff of Mansfield Stone, Inc. Walton Quarries is no longer producing dimension limestone from the C&H Quarry in Monroe County.”
  • Minerals associated with Lower Pennsylvanian conglomerate, Lawrence County, Indiana,” by Jack Allen Sunderman and Seymour Samuel Greenberg, in Journal of Sedimentary Research; December 1960, v. 30; no. 4, pp. 578-581, on the GeoScienceWorld (GSW) web site.
  • Oolitic Limestone in 1887 – “A Specimen Quarry in the Oolitic Limestone Region of Indiana  (This article includes two sketches of the Salem Stone & Lime Company quarries located at Salem, Indiana.)  The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 19, Issue 11, November 1887.
  • The Salem Limestone in the Indiana Building-Stone Industry, Occasional Paper 38, J. R. Patton and D. D. Carr, Indiana Geological Survey, 1982. 31 pp.  
  • Stone, Dimension, by Lloyd E. Antonides and Robert L. Virta. (includes information on the Indiana stone industry) [PDF]
  • Stone, Dimension (Dimension Stone), by Jim F. Lemons, Jr. (includes information on the Indiana stone industry) [PDF]
  • Dimension Stone (Stone, Dimension), by Thomas P. Dolley (includes information on the Indiana stone industry) [PDF]
  • "Types of Stone Used for Sacred Structures in Northeastern Ohio," presented by the Center for Sacred Monuments, Cleveland State University. This article includes some information on the use of Indiana limestone in Ohio structures.

Printed and Online Sources

Google Book Search: You can use Google Book Search to search for specific subjects in thousands of books available through the Google Book Search - both books under copyright and in the public domain. Hundreds of books are added regularly, so check back if you do not find books on the subject for which you are seeking information. Some of the books published prior to 1923 are available in their entirety and can be downloaded to you computer for your personal use.

  • Abandoned Railroads of Bedford (Indiana), by Elmer Griffith Sulzer, Indianapolis: Council for Local History, 1959.  [Chapters:  Dark Hollow to Switz City (CI&L RY), Riverdale to Bedford (B&O SW RR),  Bedford to Wallner (CI&L RY), Riverdale to Stonington (BS RY), Sanders to Harrodsburg Junction (CI&L RY), Corrine to North Bedford (I&V RR), Coxton  to Gilberson (C TH&SE RY)]

  • Age and Origin of Stone Quarried Near Fort Wayne in the Mid-1800's, by Michael C. Moore and Carl B. Rexroad, Bloomington: State of Indiana, Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey, 1974.
  • (Areal report/reference on building stone in Indiana - title of article unknown), by (?) Thompson, Indiana Geological and Natural History Survey, Seventeenth Report, 1891, p. 19. (Citation from Economic Geology of the United States, by Heinrich Ries, 1907.)
  • "The Bedford Oolitic Limestone of Indiana," by T. C. Hopkins and C. E. Siebenthal, in Eighteenth Annual Report, Part 5, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1897, pp. 1050-1057.
  • “The Bedford Oolitic Limestone of Indiana,” by T. C. Hopkins and C. E. Siebenthal, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897, pp. 291-427. (The following sections are included in this report: Chapter I. General Geographical and Stratigraphical Features; Chapter II. General Structural and Economic Features f the Bedford Oolitic Limestone; Chapter III. Commercial Features of the Bedford Oolitic Limestone; Chapter IV. Local Features of the Bedford Oolitic Limestone; Chapter V. Oolites and Oolitic Limestones in General.)
  • "The Bedford Oolitic Limestone (Indiana)," by C. E. Siebenthal, in Ninteenth Annual Report, Part 6, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1898, pp. 292-296.
  • The Bedford Stone Quarries” (in Indiana), in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884, pp. 277-278.
    "A View of the Bedford Stone Quarries" (in Indiana), "The Manufacturer and Builder," Dec. 1884

    “A View of the Bedford Stone Quarries" (in Indiana), ” The Manufacturer and Builder,”
    Dec. 1884

  • Bedrock Geology and Mineral Resources of Putnam County, Indiana, by John R. Hill, Michael C. Moore, and John C. Mackey, Bloomington, Indiana: State of Indiana, Department of Natural Resources, Geological Survey, 1982, Series: Geological Survey Special Report; 26.
  • Being Green,” by Brian Smith, Breaker, Drill Runner, Ledge Foreman, Superintendent, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 143. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • Bloomington and Indiana University, Indiana, Inc. Bloomington Restorations, Arcadia Publishing, June 1, 2002, 128 pp., ISBN: 0738519405.
  • Bloomington Past & Present, by Will Counts, James H. Madison, and Scott Russell Sanders, Indiana University, 2002, ISBN: 025334056X.
  • Bloomington Sketchbook, by Douglas A. Wissing, Indigo Custom Publishing, 2004, 92 pp., ISBN: 0972595155 .
  • Build It and They Will Come,” by Amy Brier, Master Carver, Sculptor, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 146. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • Building in War Times” (World War I), in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1917.  (photo caption)  “Residence of John Sherman Hoyt, New York – Corner of 79th Street and Park Avenue. Architects:  Howell & Stokes, New York.  Built of stone from Chestnut Hill, Pa. Trimming of Buff Indiana limestone.  Cut by J. J. Spurr & Son, Harrison, N.J.”  pp. 358)
  • Building Materials in Downtown Indianapolis: Introductory Field Trip, by Arthur Mirsky, Department of Geology, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, 1977, 5th ed. April 20, 1986.
  • The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83.  (The article includes a sketch of the Bedford stone quarries.  Stones mentioned in this article include:  North Vernon Blue Stone, Greensburg, or Flat Rock, Stone, and many others.)
  • “Buried in Stone: Workers for Independent Limestone Company, one of Bloomington’s limestone quarries, share their stories,” by Ashley Lough, in Independent Daily Student at IDSnews.com, Wednesday, October 5, 2005.
  • “Carthage Limestone” (Indiana), in Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Chicago, 1908, pp. 179-183. (This article is available in Google Book Search - Full view books in a bound book of “Mine and Quarry” magazine, although many pages are unreadable.)
  • “A Catalogue of the Fossils of Indiana,” by Edward M. Kindle, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898, pp. 407-514.
  • Compendium of Paleozoic Rock-Unit Stratigraphy in Indiana - A Revision, by  Robert H. Shaver, Curtis H. Ault, Ann M. Burger, Donald D. Carr, John B. Droste, Donald L. Eggert, Henry H. Gray, Denver Harper, Nancy R. Hasenmueller, Walter A. Hasenmueller, Alan S. Horowitz, Harold C. Hutchison, Brian D. Keith, Stanley J. Keller, John B. Patton, Carl B. Rexroad, and Charles E. Weir, hypertext file by Todd A. Thompson and Zinta Smidchens, modified from Indiana Geological Survey Bulletin 59.
  • Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana,” in The Monumental News, Sept. 1893.
  • Crushed Stone Aggregate Resources of Indiana (B42H, 38 p.) (Indiana Geological Survey)
  • Dimension Sandstone Resources of Indiana (B42M, 28 p.) (Indiana Geological Survey)
  • Directory of Industrial Mineral Producers in Indiana, 2006, Indiana State Geological Society (D11-2006).
  • Early History of Indiana Limestone, by Ron Bell, AuthorHouse, 2008.
  • An Economic History of theIndianaOolitic Limestone Industry, by Joseph Alexander Batchelor, Bloomington: The School of Business, Indiana University, 1944, Ip 650 I385s no. 27 [Pamphlet].  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • The Entrance Beautiful Assured by Use of Natural Stone,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVII, No. 10, October 1926, pp. 603-604.
  • The First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianpolist, Alexander H. Conner, State Printer, 1869. (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)
  • Follow the Limestone: A Walking Tour of Indiana University (brochure), by IGS senior scientist Brian Keith and produced by the Bloomington / Monroe County Convention and Visitors Bureau, circa 2009/2010.

    (From the Indiana Geological Survey web site) “‘The heart of the Indiana University Bloomington campus is meant for casual walking and exploration. The unique combination of green space and architecturally distinctive limestone buildings that span across three centuries continually provides me with interesting and enjoyable things to see, even after being here for many years,’ said Keith.

    “The brochure celebrates and commemorates the area’s limestone heritage as evidenced by the prolific limestone architecture on the campus of Indiana University, and is full of interesting facts about the architectural styles of the buildings and the stone that was used to construct them.

    “Brochures are available at the Bloomington Visitors Center on North Walnut Street, the Indiana Geological Survey at the corner of 10th Street and Walnut Grove Avenue and at the Indiana University (IU) Visitor Information Center on Indiana Avenue.”

  • Fortieth Annual Report of Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indiana, 1915, Edward Barrett, State Geologist, Fort Wayne Printing Company, Contractors for State Printing and Binding, 1916.
  • From the Quarry to the Mill to the Artist’s Studio: Stories From the Indiana Stone Belt,” in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 140-147. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • Gems, Granites, and Gravels: Knowing and Using Rocks and Minerals, by Brian J Skinner, Richard Vincent Dietrich, Cambridge University Press, Aug. 31, 1990, 182 pp., ISBN 0521344441.
  • A Geological Reconnaissance of the State of Indiana, 1838.
  • “Geological Scale of Indiana,” by W. S. Blatchley and George H. Ashley, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898, pp. 17-23.
  • “Geology and Natural History Report of Carroll County,” by Maurice Thompson, Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report 1891, Indiana Department, S. S. Gorby, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1892, pp. 171-191.
  • Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report 1891, Indiana Department, S. S. Gorby, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1892.
  • Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897.
  • Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898.
  • “Geology and Natural Resources of Jefferson County (Indiana),” by Prof. Glenn Culbertson, Hanover College, Fortieth Annual Report of Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indiana, 1915, Edward Barrett, State Geologist, Fort Wayne Printing Company, Contractors for State Printing and Binding, 1916, pp. 223-239.
  • “Geology of Dearborn County,” by a. J. Bigney, President Moores Hill College, Fortieth Annual Report of Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indiana, 1915, Edward Barrett, State Geologist, Fort Wayne Printing Company, Contractors for State Printing and Binding, 1916, pp. 211-222.
  • “Geology of Greene County,” by W. B. Van Gorder, Fortieth Annual Report of Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Indiana, 1915, Edward Barrett, State Geologist, Fort Wayne Printing Company, Contractors for State Printing and Binding, 1916, pp. 240-266.
  • “The Geology of Lake and Porter Counties,” by W. S. Blatchley, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898, pp. 25-104.
  • “Geology of Vigo County, Indiana,” by J. T. Scovell, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897, pp. 507-578.
  • “Geology of Wabash County (Indiana),” by Moses N. Elrod, M.D., Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report 1891, Indiana Department, S. S. Gorby, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1892, pp. 192-259.
  • Ghost Railroads of Indiana, by Elmer Griffith Sulzer,  Indiana University Press, ISBN: 0253334837. (Originally published in 1970 by Vine A. Jones Co., Publishers, Indianapolis, first reprinted by Indiana University Press 1998.)
  • A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana - Largest Producers of Oolitic Limestone in the World, Bedford Stone Quarries Co., Inc., R. R. Donnelly & Sons Co., Printers, published late 1800s - early 1890s.
  • Guardians of The Soul: Angels And Innocents, Mourners And Saints-Indiana’s Remarkable Cemetery Sculpture, by John Bower, Studio Indiana, October 2004, 144 pp., ISBN-10: 0974518611, ISBN-13: 9780974518619. (This book also includes information on some of the cemetery stones and stone carvers.)
  • A Guidebook to Mining In America: Volume 1: West (The Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and farther West), by John Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000, available at Stonerose Publishing Company.
  • A Guidebook to Mining In America: Volume 2:  East (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and farther East), by John Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000, available at Stonerose Publishing Company.
  • High Calcium Limestone and High Magnesium Dolomite Resources of Indiana (B42B, 20p.) (Indiana Geological Survey)
  • History of Crawford County, (Indiana), by Hazen Hayes Pleasant, Greenfield, Indiana: Wm. Mitchell Printing Company, 1926. (This book contains information the stone quarry at Marengo, Indiana.)
  • A Humble Stone,” by Bob Enochs, Sculptor, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 143. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • In Stone Country, by Scott Russell Sanders, Beacon Press, paperback ISBN: 0807063355. (Reprint of the text from Stone Country, by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985) (out of print).
  • Indiana, by Ann Heinrichs, Compass Point Books, Aug. 1, 2003, 48 pp., ISBN 0756503256.
  • Indiana, by Rich Clark, Browntrout Publishers, June 1, 2005, 168 pp., ISBN: 0763184640.
  • Indiana Department of Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report, 1891, S. S. Gorby, (State Geologist), Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1892.
  • Indiana Geology and Natural Resources, 1897, Twenty-Second Annual Report, by W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist. William B. Burford, Indianapolis, 1898. 1197 pp. (Includes information on Niagra limestone quarries.)
  • Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana.
Front cover of "Indiana Limestone: The Aristocrat of Building Materials," 1920 “Two views of quarrying operations showing with what precision the great blocks are channeled out and broken up.” 1920 Group showing the varied use of Indiana Limestone, 1920.

Front cover of Indiana Limestone: The Aristocrat of Building Materials, 1920

“Two views of quarrying operations showing with what precision the great blocks are channeled out and broken up.”

Group showing the varied use of Indiana Limestone, 1920.

  • Indiana Limestone Handbook (pdf), 22nd edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, IN, 154 pp.  (Includes “A Brief History of the Indiana Limestone Industry,” pp. 4)
  • Indiana Limestone: "The Nation's Building Stone." Indianapolis: Public Service Co. of Indiana, 1945, Ip 622.22 no. 4 (Pamphlet) (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Indiana Limestone Company. Bulletins. (periodical) I 691.2 I385b.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Indiana Limestone Quarrymen's Association. (periodical) Indiana limestone. Bedford: 1917-1927; I 691.2 I385a.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Indiana Minerals: A Locality Index, T. E. Huizing & R. E. Russell, Rocks and Minerals, 1986.
  • “Indiana Oölitic Limestone,” in Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Chicago, 1910, pp. 410-419. (This article is available in Google Book Search - Full view books in a bound book of “Mine and Quarry” magazine, although many pages are unreadable.)
  • TheIndiana Oolitic Limestone Industry, by Perry J. Richard. Indianapolis, 1937, Ip 553.5 no. 2 (Pamphlet).  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • "Indiana Oolitic Limestone: Relation of Its Natural Features to Its Commercial Grading," by G. F. Loughlin, U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 811-C, 1929.
  • Indiana's Stone Cutters and Carvers: Builders for the Nation (90-3041). Indiana Historical Bureau - Indiana Heritage Research Grant Abstracts - 1990. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.statelib.lib.in.us/www/ihb/resources/ihrg90.html>

    "The purpose of this project was to collect oral histories (on audiotape and videotape) of people who worked in the Indiana limestone industry in Monroe and Lawrence counties in the first half of the twentieth century. Among those interviewed are quarry owners, stone cutters, stone carvers, family members of men who worked in the industry, Indiana University geologists who have studied the Indiana limestone industry extensively, and an I.U. folklore professor who has studied the use of limestone carvings in the local community."  Contact:  Monroe County Historical Museum, 202 E. Sixth Street, Bloomington, IN 47408. 

  • Indiana Stonecarver: The Story of Thomas R. Reding, by Ann Nolan and Keith A. Buckley, Indiana Historical Society, 1984, 106 pp., ISBN-10: 999945447X, ISBN-13: 978-9999454476. (This book chronicles the life of Thomas R. Reding from Salem, Indiana. Details his work are included along with many black-and-white photographs of his carvings and tombstones that can be found throughout Indiana. Most of these older markers are carved from a fine-grained, light-colored sandstone. The engraving on these stones appears to be of consistently higher quality than that of the marble ones. Although the sandstone slabs date from 1830 to 1850, they have retained their sharpness and detail.)
  • "Industrial Limestone in Indiana," by J. B. Patton, Scientific Monthly, Vol. 72, 1951, pp. 252-265.
  • “Just Arrived From The East”:  Manufactured And Imported  Building Materials in Early Nineteenth-Century Indiana (pdf), A Thesis Submitted To The Graduate School in Partial Fulfillment of The Requirements For The Degree Master of Science in Historic Preservation, by M. Chris Manning, Duncan Campbell, Advisor, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, December 2010. 
  • Lawrence County, Indiana, by Maxine Kruse, Arcadia Publishing, Images of America series, by Maxine Kruse, 2001, ISBN: 0738508063.
  • The Lime Industry of Indiana (B42J, 62 p.) (Indiana Geological Survey)
  • Limestone is to Indiana what Granite is to New Hampshire,” by Kerry Hubartt of the News-Sentinel, June 7, 2014.

  • Limestone Lives: Voices from the Indiana Stone Belt, by Katherine Ferrucci, Quarry Books, Oct. 2004, 82 pp., ISBN: 025334512X.
  • “Linked by Limestone:  Seven draftsmen changed the face of the country” (pdf), by Claude Parsons, HeraldTimesOnline.com, Special to Living, July 31, 2001.
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • Manuscript Collections:Ingall Stone Company, 4th Floor; Mann, John L., S925; Millholland, C., S966; and Owen, Richard, S1036.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.) 
  • Map of Bedford-Bloomington Dimension Limestone Celt Showing Mills, Quarries, and Outcrop of Salem Limestone, Donald D. Carr, Bloomington: Indiana Geological Survey, 1967, I 557.I385ma no. 13.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Map of Indiana OoliticLimestone District, Monroe County, Lawrence County, and Owen County, Indiana. Bloomington: Building Stone Association, Inc., 1931, I 912.772 I31bu (1931).  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Map of Indiana Showing Bedrock Units Containing Thick Deposits of Limestone and Dolomite and Locations of Coal-Fired Power Plants and Crushed-Stone Mines, Indiana Geological Survey, compiled by Curtis H. Ault, drafted by Kari A. Lancaster, Rev. March, 1996, Indiana University, Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, Indiana, 1996.
  • The Millstone Industry:  A summary of research on quarries and producers in the United States, Europe and elsewhere,  by Charles D. Hockensmith, McFarland, Jun 7, 2009, 269 pp. (Portions of this book are available on Google eBook by clicking on “view sample.”)  (Chapters in this book include:  Early American Millstone Documents, Millstone Quarrying in the United States, Millstone Makers and Urban Factories, The Rise and Fall of the American Millstone Industry Producers Annual Values and Decline, Foreign Millstones Imported to America, The Millstone Quarrying Industry Outside the United States, Artificial Millstones, Tools Used in Making and Sharpening Millstones, Working Conditions and Hazards in the Millstone Industry, and Conclusion.)

    (Description from Google Books)  “Since prehistoric times, the process of cutting rock to make millstones has been one of the most important industries in the world.  The earliest rotary millstones, known as querns, were turned by human power.  Later, larger millstones were manufactured that required animal, water, or wind power to turn them.  These larger millstones required less human effort and ground greater quantities of grain, but also required regular maintenance and replacement.  As a result, millstone quarries increased greatly in number and size in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with the largest quarry sites extending as far as nearly a half-mile square to about 12 square miles.  The first part of this book compiles information on the millstone industry in the United States, which dates between the mid-1600s and the mid-1900s. Primarily based on archival research and brief accounts published in geological and historical volumes, it focuses on conglomerate, granite, flint, quartzite, gneiss, and sandstone quarries in different regions and states.  The second part focuses on the millstone quarrying industry in Europe and other areas. Of the European millstone industry, the quarries of France, Germany, and Great Britain are most extensively documented, although the quarries of Albania, Austria, the Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland are also covered. The extensive bibliography provides scholars with many sources for future research.  The book includes 84 photographs, 16 tables, and a helpful glossary of specialized and technical terms.”

  • "Minerals of the Rensselaer Stone Co. Quarry, Pleasant Ridge, Indiana," K. J. Brock, Rocks and Minerals, 1986, pp. 111-115.
  • Monon: The Hoosier Line, by Gary Dolzall and Stephen Dolzall, Indiana University Press, 2nd ed., 2002, 216 pp., ISBN: 0253340837.
  • Monuments .. For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Incorporated (pdf), Plymouth & Elkhart, Indiana, No date of publication.
Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana

Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages

“Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages

One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages

  • Notes on the Production of Rustic Monuments in the Limestone Belt of Indiana,” by Warren E. Roberts, in Markers VII, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1990. (Indiana, USA)
  • “The Natural Resources of Indiana,” by W. S. Blatchley, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897, pp. 7-26.
  • The Oölitic Limestone Industry of Indiana, by Oliver Cary Lockhart, Series: In Indiana University Studies, Bloomington, Indiana, 1910.
  • Oolitic Quadrangle, Indiana, Map, U.S. Geological Survey, Surveyed in 1934-1935. Edition of 1942. Scale 1:62,500 (1 inch = 1 mile).
  • Our Building Stone Supply” (pdf)  (Quarrying in the eastern United States circa 1887), from the Scientific American:  A weekly journal of practical information, art, science, mechanics, chemistry, and manufactures, New York, Vol. LVI.  No. 2 (new series), January 8, 1887.
  • The Patton Glossary of Building Stone and Masonry Terms, by John B. Patton, Bedford, Indiana, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, 1992 (?).
  • Power Economy and the Utilization of Waste in the Quarry Industry of Southern Indiana” (pdf), by Grover C. Mance, Ph.D., in Indiana University Studies:  Contributions to Knowledge made by Instructors and Advanced Students of the University, Vol. IV, No. 35, January 1917, pp. 1-204.  (Scroll down to the second book in this publication.)
  • Proceedings of the 40th Forum on the Geology of Industrial Minerals, May 2-7, 2004, Nelson R. Shaffer and Deborah A. DeChurch, eds., Bloomington, Indiana, Indiana Geological Survey Occasional Paper 67, 2007. (This book is available on the Indiana Geological Survey web site.)
  • Quarries and Mills:IndianaOolitic Limestone Industry. (periodical) Ellettsville: 1929-1931; I 622.22 Q125.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Rebuilding the Pentagon,” by Will Bybee, President, Bybee Stone, Inc., in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 144. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • Report of a Geological Reconnaissance of Indiana, with David Dale Owen, Indianapolis, 1862.
  • “A Report on the Geology of the Middle and Upper Silurian Rocks of Clark, Jefferson, Ripley, Jennings and Southern Decatur Counties, Indiana,” by August F. Foerste, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897, pp. 213-288.
  • “Report on the Niagara Limestone Quarries,” in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898, pp. 14.
  • “A Report on the Niagara Limestone Quarries of Decatur, Franklin and Fayette Counties, with Remarks on the Geology of the Middle and Upper Silurian Rocks of These and Neighboring (Ripley, Jennings, Bartholomew and Shelby) Counties,” by August F. Foerste, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-Second Annual Report 1897, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1898, pp. 195-256.
  • “Report Upon the Geology of Steuben County,” by Charles R. Dryer, M.D., Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report 1891, Indiana Department, S. S. Gorby, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1892, pp. 114-134.
  • “A Report Upon the Various Stones Used for Building, and Found in Indiana,” by Maurice Thompson, Geology and Natural Resources, Seventeenth Annual Report 1891, Indiana Department, S. S. Gorby, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1892, pp. 18-66.
  • The Rise and Fall of The Southern Indiana Railroad and Its Founder John R. Walsh, by Ron Bell, Authorhouse, 250 pp, ISBN 1425946232. (From the description: “John R. Walsh was a Chicago banker that financed a small belt line railroad and quarry in Bedford, Indiana.” To find further information about Ron Bell’s book, use the link above for Authorhouse and click on the “Book Store” section to search for the book on the web site.)
  • Roadside Geology of Indiana, by Mark J. Camp and Graham T. Richardson, Mountain Press Publishing Company, Incorporated, June 1999, Paperback, 326 pp., ISBN: 0878423966.
  • "Salem Limestone and Associated Formations in South-Central Indiana," by T. G. Perry, N. M. Smith, and W. J. Wayne, Indiana Geological Survey Field Conf. Guidebook 7, 1954.
  • The Salem Limestone in the Indiana Building-Stone Industry, Occasional Paper, 38, J. R. Patton and D. D. Carr, Indiana Geological Survey, 31 pp., 1982.
  • "The Sandstones of Western Indiana," by T. C. Hopkins, in Seventeenth Annual Report, Part 3, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1896, pp. 780-787.
  • "Selection of Quarry Sites in the Dimension Limestone Belt of Indiana," (abstract), by N. M Smith, Bulletin Geol. Soc. Amer., Vol. 68, 1957, p. 1797.
  • A Short History of Indiana Limestone, by McDonald, Bill.  Bedford: Lawrence County Tourism Commission, 1995, I 553.516 M135s.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.) 
  • “Some Notes on the Black Slate or Genesee Shale of New Albany, Indiana,” by Hans Duden, in Geology and Natural Resources, Twenty-First Annual Report 1896, Indiana Department, W. S. Blatchley, State Geologist, Indianapolis: Wm. B. Burford, Contractor for State Printing and Binding, 1897, pp. 108-120.
  • Something Different Every Day,” by Wilbern Terrell, Sawyer, Planerman, President of Stone Cutters Union, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 144. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • A Specimen Quarry of Oolitic Limestone, Region of Indiana,” The Manufacturer and Builder, November 1887, pp. 252.

  • Stone Country, by Scott R. Sanders, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985, Ip 553.51 S215s.  (Citation from Limestone Industry in Indiana, Select Resources, Indiana Division, Indiana State Library.)
  • Stone Diary: From the Quarry to the Mill to Artistic Studio From the Indiana Stone Belt,” in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, 140-141. (Includes a photograph from Limestone Lives: Voices from the Indiana Stone Belt. This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • Stone in California Church” (St. Vincent in Los Angeles), Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, October 1925.
  • Stonecarvers of Monroe County, Indiana, 1828-1890,” by Jennifer Lucas, in Markers VII, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1990.
  • Tree-Stump Tombstones: Traditional Cultural Values and Rustic Funerary Art,” by Susanne S. Ridlen, in Markers XIII, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1996. (Indiana, USA)
  • Unexpected Indiana: A Portfolio of Natural Landscapes, by Ron Leonetti and Christopher Jordan, Indiana University Press, 2004, 143 pp, ISBN: 0253344859.
  • Washington Crossing the Delaware,” by Vollie Staggs, Laborer, Drill Runner, Hooker, Stone Polisher, Epoxy Worker, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 145. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)
  • What a Penny Used to Mean,” Bob Thrasher: Railway Car Blocker, Hooker, Diamond Sawyer, Euclid Driver, in the Indianapolis Monthly Magazine, October 2004, pp. 142. (This magazine is available on Google Books.)

Stone Carvers, Stone Cutters, etc., in Indiana

  • Tom Blatt, Sculptor, Brooklyn, New York - Visit Tom Blatt Sculpture & Paintings web site to view photographs of sculptures in Indiana limestone and Vermont marble.
  • Ferdinand O. Cross, Master Stone Carver & John A. Rowe - Cross & Rowe Monumental Works,Bedford,Indiana.  The following material came from an article entitled, "Master carver brought stone to life - Limestone legacy still graces porch," by Mary G. Johnson, Times-Mail Staff Writer from tmnews.com, a supplement to the Times-Mail, July 30, 1999.  Ferdinand O. Cross lived and worked as a stone carver and a monument business owner in Bedford, Indiana.  John A. Rowe joined him and they established the Cross & Rowe Monumental Works. The business specialized in monuments created from dark blue Bedford stone.  The writer of the article believes their monuments can be found throughout Lawrence and Orange county cemeteries. (This link is no longer available.)
    <ttp://www.tmnews.com/stories/1999/07/30/ferdinand_cross_master_carver> 
  • Indiana's Stone Cutters and Carvers: Builders for the Nation (90-3041)  Indiana Historical Bureau - Indiana Heritage Research Grant Abstracts - 1990. (Scroll down to the entry.)

    "The purpose of this project was to collect oral histories (on audiotape and videotape) of people who worked in the Indiana limestone industry in Monroe and Lawrence counties in the first half of the twentieth century. Among those interviewed are quarry owners, stone cutters, stone carvers, family members of men who worked in the industry, Indiana University geologists who have studied the Indiana limestone industry extensively, and an I.U. folklore professor who has studied the use of limestone carvings in the local community."  Contact:  Monroe County Historical Museum, 202 E. Sixth Street, Bloomington, IN 47408. 

  • Jack Kendall - Indiana Carver - interview in Stone Country, in the “Three Carvers” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)
  • Monroe County - “Stonecarvers of Monroe County, Indiana, 1828-1890,” by Jennifer Lucas, in Markers VII, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1990.
  • Henry Morris - Indiana Carver - interview in Stone Country, in the “Three Carvers” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)
  • Robin Putnam - Carthage, Missouri, Stone Carver - Visit Robin Putnam’s web site to view photographs of many sculptures done in Indiana limestone.
  • Thomas Reding, Salem, Indiana

    Indiana Stonecarver: The Story of Thomas R. Reding, by Ann Nolan and Keith A. Buckley, Indiana Historical Society, 1984, 106 pp., ISBN-10: 999945447X, ISBN-13: 978-9999454476. (This book chronicles the life of Thomas R. Reding from Salem, Indiana. Details his work are included along with many black-and-white photographs of his carvings and tombstones that can be found throughout Indiana. Most of these older markers are carved from a fine-grained, light-colored sandstone. The engraving on these stones appears to be of consistently higher quality than that of the marble ones. Although the sandstone slabs date from 1830 to 1850, they have retained their sharpness and detail.)

  • David Rodgers - Indiana Carver - interview in Stone Country, in the “Three Carvers” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)
  • C. R. Schiefer, Sculptor – 10-acre Sculpture Garden in Martinsville, Indiana, which includes over 150 garden and monumental works. (The following quotation is used with the permission.)

    "Schiefer is a self-taught stone sculptor. After 25 years as a speech pathologist specializing in brain injury, he discovered sculpting and found he could not only carve things from limestone, marble, alabaster, and soapstone – people would actually buy them. So – since 1974, Schiefer has worked in, and loved his new field, making for years, small saleable items and taking them to major art fairs all over the East Coast from Central Park in New York City – to Chicago – to Miami and all over Florida.

    "Schiefer's private art collection is Ethnographic Art beginning with American Indian artifacts and growing into pre-Columbian art from all over Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatamala and Peru…."

  • Stonecarvers of Monroe County, Indiana, 1828-1890,” by Jennifer Lucas, in Markers VII, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1990.
  • Casey Winningham, Bloomington, Indiana – “Craftsman turns carved headstones into business,” by Associated Press, May 3, 2014.

    (excerpt from the article)  “He works from his home to the west of Bloomington...He started lettering three years ago and has now created headstones for graves in Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, Kansas and Tennessee.

    “Winningham, a 59-year-old who spent much of his life as an artist-blacksmith, is fascinated by old graveyards. He’s done work documenting aged headstones that are in danger of being lost. When he started seeing orphaned graves without headstones, he started to create markers for them.”

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