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Structures and Monuments in Which Indiana Stone was Used

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  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Alabama

    • Birmingham, Alabama – Cottage / Model Exhibition Home from plans by F. H. Anderson, architect  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 8, August 1925, pp. 492)

    • Cottage constructed of Indiana Limestone and Alabama Limestone with brick trim and tile roof at Birmingham, Alabama.  Erected as a Model Exhibition Home from plans by F. H. Anderson, architect.” Cottage constructed of Indiana Limestone and Alabama Limestone with brick trim and tile roof at Birmingham, Alabama, from from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 8, August 1925, pp. 492
    • Birmingham, Alabama – the U. S. Court House & Post Office (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Court House and Post Office in Birmingham, Alabama.

    • Montgomery, Alabama – Alabama Judicial Building (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.alalinc.net/library/tour_text/intro.cfm>

      “The building occupies a full city block flanked by Dexter Avenue (west), McDonough Street  (north), Washington Street (east), and Hull Street (south)…The exterior is faced with natural Indiana limestone…The interior public spaces are finished in Carrara marbles from Italy….”

    • Montgomery, Alabama – the Confederate Monument on Capitol Hill – the Column  (The following excerpt is from the Encyclopedia of Alabama.)

      “Immediately after laying the cornerstone, the tall, stepped base and integral pedestals for the four statues were built with Alabama limestone from T. L. Fossick’s Rockwood quarry near Russellville, Franklin County, but fundraising and construction progress on the shaft and statuary were slow.  The limestone for the colossal column proved problematic. Available historical documentation is incomplete, but it appears that the stone for the column delivered in 1888 was unsatisfactory, necessitating a second order, possibly at additional expense to the LMA. Recent scientific conservation analysis of the stone in the monument indicates that the limestone in the shaft came from Indiana and not Alabama. Throughout their lengthy memorial efforts, the LMA promoted the monument as being built of ‘native’ (i.e., Alabama) stone. It is unclear whether the LMA knew that the limestone for the column came from Bedford, Indiana, where Doyle’s father owned a quarry, but it is clear that the relationship between the patrons and the artist soured in the late 1880s….”

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Alaska

    • Juneau, Alaska - the Alaska State Capitol (The following information was presented on the Alaska.com web site, and the link from which the information was obtained is no longer available.
      <http://www.alaska.com/akcom/trivia/trivcom/symbols/story/3005293p-3029500c.html>
      )

      The building has brick-faced reinforced concrete. Indiana limestone was used for the lower façade, and the four columns at the portico and the interior trim are of marble quarried in southeastern Alaska. These marbles are light and dark Tokeen marbles quarried at Tokeen, Prince of Wales Island. The construction of the building began in September 1929 and was completed in February 1931.

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Arizona

    • Warren, Arizona - the Donald W. Reynolds YMCA Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the YMCA sign.

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in California

    • Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California - the Greystone Mansion and Park, 905 Loma Vista Dr, Beverly Hills, California. The following information is from Dark Side of Fortune: Triumph and Scandal in the Life of Oil Tycoon Edward L. Doheny, by Margaret Leslie Davis, University of California Press, 1998, Feb 16, 2001, 339 pp., ISBN: 0520229096, pp. 214 pp., from Google Book Search)

      According to an excerpt from this book, Indiana limestone was used in the construction façade of the mansion and the garden room walls.

    • Beverly Hills, Los Angeles County, California - the BOSS Hugo Boss Store (from Stores of the Year, by Martin M. Pegler, Watson-Guptill, Sept. 1, 2001, 160 pp., ISBN 1584710578, pp. 74-75, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used for the façade of the building.

    • Compton, California – the First National Bank of Compton  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 671)

    • New building for the First National Bank of Compton, California, a design in which beauty, simplicity and strength are embodied.  Architect:  Curlett & Beelman.  Indiana Limestone used for entire exterior facing and carved work.” “New building for the First National Bank of Compton, California, a design in which beauty, simplicity and strength are embodied. Architect: Curlett & Beelman. Indiana Limestone used for entire exterior facing and carved work.” from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 671
    • Davis (outside of), Yolo County, California - a Pavilion located in Village Homes (excerpt from Designing Sustainable Communities, by Michael Corbett and Judy Corbett, Island Press, Dece. 1, 1999, 256 pp., ISBN 1559636866 from Google Book Search)

      According to an excerpt from this book, a pavilion was completed in Village Homes in which Indiana limestone and wood were used in the construction.

    • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank  (from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 541-542)

    • “The new Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, Los Angeles, California.  Exterior and part of interior decorative work of Indiana Limestone.  Schultze & Weaver, architects.  Cut Stone Contractors:  The Imperial Stone Company.” Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, Los Angeles, California, from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 541
      Section of main banking room of the new Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, Los Angeles, California, showing interior walls of Indiana Limestone.  Schultze & Weaver, Architects.” Section of main banking room of the new Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank, Los Angeles, California, from from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 542
      Main entrance doorway of Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank building, Los Angeles, California, the carved stonework for which was executed in the Bedford, Indiana plant of the Imperial Stone Company.  Schultze & Weaver, architects.” Main entrance doorway of Hellman Commercial Trust & Savings Bank building, Los Angeles, California, from from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 542
    • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation building  (from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 541.)

    • Main entrance of the new Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation building, showing arched doorways of carved Indiana Limestone, furnished by the Imperial Stone Company, J. B. and Donald Parkinson, architects.” Main entrance of the new Los Angeles Gas and Electric Corporation building in Los Angeles, California, from “Stone in Pacific Coast Buildings,” in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 541
    • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California - the St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church, northwest corner of South Figueroa and West Adams Boulevard, from An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles, by David Gebhard and Robert Winter, Gibbs Smith, Sept. 24, 2003, 512 pp., ISBN 1586853082, pp. 282, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the church was designed in the Spanish Revival style, and Indiana limestone was used for the screen which dominates the entrance.

      • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church  (“Stone in California Church,” Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, October 1925, pp. 605, 618)

        Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the St. Vincent Roman Catholic Church in Los Angeles, according to the above article.

    • Church of St. Vincent, Los Angeles, California, of Outstanding Architectural Beauty Ornamented With Intricately Carved Indiana Limestone from the Mills of The Imperial Stone Company.  General Contractors:  The McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company.  Architect:  Albert C. Martin.” Church of St. Vincent, Los Angeles, California, 1925, pp. 605
      Interior of the Church of St. Vincent, Los Angeles. Indiana limestone furnished by the Imperial Stone Company. General contractors: The McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company. Architect: Albert C. Martin. “Interior of the Church of St. Vincent, Los Angeles. Indiana limestone furnished by the Imperial Stone Company. General contractors: The McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company. Architect: Albert C. Martin.” “Stone in California Church,” "Stone, An Illustrated Magazine," Oct. 1925, pp. 618
    • San Francisco, San Francisco County, California - the San Francisco City Hall –“San Francisco City Hall Dome Statistics,” web site was presented on the Ceitronics web site, which is no longer available .
      <http://www.ceitronics.com/New_Pages/memorablefacts.html>.

      You can read about the San Francisco City Hall facts on the Sam Spade’s San Francisco web site and visit the San Francisco City Hall Virtual Tour, although this virtual tour indicates that the limestone used in the city hall was quarried in the state of Colorado rather than Indiana. (The Sam Spade’s San Francisco web site link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.samspadesf.com/2008/03/san-franciscos-city-hall-architectural.html>

      According to this web site, the San Francisco City Hall was designed in the Beaux Arts style, and it opened in 1916. The following stones are used in the interior of the City Hall according to this account: California marble and Indiana sandstone. The exterior of the City Hall building of Raymond Granite (quarried at Raymond, Madera County, California). “There are three acres of marble tile floors.”

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Colorado

    • Boulder, Colorado - the Boulder Museum of History previously the Victorian Harbeck-Bergheim House on University Hill, 1206 Euclid Avenue, information from the wcities.com web site. (photograph and history)

      According to the wcities.com web site, Indiana sandstone was used in the construction of the exterior of manor. (The wcities.com web site from which the information was obtained, is no longer available.)
      <http://www.wcities.com/en/record/,114058/274/record.html>

    • Colorado Springs, Colorado – the Colorado College Historic Walking Tour – Shove Memorial Chapel (photographs and history) 

      Originally Colorado red sandstone was considered for use in the construction, but there was a lack of modern stonecutting plants in Colorado, so Bedford limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was shaped into 1,000,000 bricks for the Shove Memorial Chapel.

    • Denver, Colorado - 1999 Broadway Building (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 77)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the building located at 1999 Broadway.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - the Exterior (The following information was obtained from a link on the Molly Brown House Museum web site, although the link is no longer available.)
      <http://mollybrown.org/immaculateconception.asp>

      According to the Molly Brown House Museum web site, Indiana limestone was used on the exterior of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. Italian Carrara marble was used for the carved altars, and “Colorado Yule marble makes up the vestibules, pillar bass, balustrades, baseboards, and confessionals.” Construction was completed in 1912.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral Exterior (The following information was obtained from a link on the Molly Brown House Museum web site, although the link is no longer available.)
      <http://mollybrown.org/immaculateconception.asp>

      According to the Molly Brown House Museum web site, Indiana limestone was used on the exterior of St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral.

    • Greeley, Colorado – the Weld County Court House (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 130.)

      The Weld County Court House was built with Indiana Limestone furnished by Shea & Donnelly Company (established in 1889), whose quarries, mills, and offices were in Bedford, Indiana.

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Connecticut

    • Willimantic, Connecticut– the Willimantic Post Office which today houses the Willimantic Brewery Company and restaurant This site, Historic Willimantic Connecticut, Picture Gallery #2, Windham/Willimantic Scenes, is presented by threadcity.com.  (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.threadcity.com/gallery/gallery02.shtml>

      The building was constructed of Indiana Limestone. 

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Delaware

    • Wilmington, Delaware - Nemours Mansion owned by Alfred I. duPont (from Millionaires, Mansions, and Motor Yachts: An Era of Opulence, by Ross MacTaggart, W. W. Norton & Company, Oct. 1, 2004, 256 pp., ISBN 0393057623, from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Nemours Mansion was designed by Carrère and Hastings, a New York firm, for Alfred I. duPont. It was constructed in 1909-1910. Granite quarried on the estate was used in the construction of the mansion in addition to Indiana limestone for trim. (Photographs of the mansion are included.)

    • Wilmington, Delaware – St. John Church Interior  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 10, October, 1925, pp. 609)

  • Interior St. John Church, Wilmington, Delaware, showing treatment of Indiana Limestone for decorative work.  Architects:  Zautzinger, Borie & Medary.” “Interior St. John Church, Wilmington, Delaware, showing treatment of Indiana Limestone for decorative work. Architects: Zautzinger, Borie & Medary.” From Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 10, October, 1925, pp. 609
  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Florida

    • Navarre, Florida - the Navarre Beach Campground Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Navarre Beach Campground sign.

    • Tallahassee, Florida – the U. S. Court House & Post Office (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Courthouse and Post Office in Tallahassee, Florida.

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Georgia

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Idaho

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Illinois

    • Alton, Illinois – the C. B. & Q. Railroad Bridge Across the Mississippi River at Alton (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the C.B. & Q. Railroad Bridge across the Mississippi River at Alton, Illinois.

    • Bloomington, Illinois – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House at Bloomington, Illinois.

    • Bloomington, Illinois - the Ft. Jesse Medical Center (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      < http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Ft. Jesse Medical Center.

    • Carthage, Hancock County, Illinois – the Hancock County Courthouse (photograph)

      The Courthouse was build in 1908.  White limestone from Bedford, Indiana, was used on the exterior.  Tennessee marble was used on the interior walls.

    • Champaign, Illinois - St. John’s Church (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      < http://www.indystone.com/photogallery3.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building St. John’s Church.

    • Champaign, Illinois - Volition Building - One Main (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      < http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Volition building at One Main Plaza.

    • Charleston, Illinois - the Blair Hall Renovation Eastern Illinois University (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building Blair Hall.

    • Chicago, Illinois 333 North Michigan Avenue.

      On this web site it is theorized that the bottom four stories of the Art Deco building are faced with what could be Cold Spring, Minnesota, “granite.”  The same stone was used on the Adler Planetarium.  The stories above the fourth story are faced with Bedford Limestone.  (Scroll down to “Chicago Caves and Canyons,” then “333 North Michigan Avenue” for more information.)

    • Chicago, Illinois – the A. H. Revell & Co. Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the A.H. Revell & Company building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the A. V Armour Residence on Lake Shore Drive (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of A. V. Armour on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Art Museum (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Art Museum built prior to 1900.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Auditorium Hotel (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Auditorium Hotel.

      • Auditorium Hotel Building, 430 S. Michigan Avenue, from Louis Sullivan: Prophet of Modern Architecture, by Hugh Morrison, W. W. Norton & Company, July 7, 2001, 400 pp., ISBN 0393321614, pp. 68, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, the walls of the building are of solid masonry - brick covered with stone. The lower 3 floors were faced with granite, and the remaining floors ashlar facing was of gray-buff Indiana limestone.

      • Auditorium Building (photographs and history), presented by Chicago Landmarks.

        According to this web site, the Auditorium Hotel was designed by Louis H. Sullivan and engineered by Dankmar Adler. The hotel was built 1886-90.

      • Chicago, Illinois – Auditorium Hotel Annex (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

        Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Auditorium Hotel Annex.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Breakwater along the lake (from The long Loneliness: The Autobiography of the Legendary Catholic School Activist Dorothy Day, by Dorothy Day, Harper Collins, Jan. 15, 1997, 304 pp., ISBN 0060617519, pp. 22 from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, the breakwater along the lake was built with slabs of yellow Indiana limestone.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Chicago Racquet Club (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, “Old Styles in Stone,” Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 156.)

      Chicago Racquet Club, Chicago, Awarded Medal by the Architect’s Association of Chicago for the Best or Most Interesting Design from an Architectural Viewpoint Erected During 1924. Exterior of Brick in Combination with Indiana Limestone. Architects: Rebori, Wentworth, Dewey & McCormick.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the William Borden Residence on Lake Shore Drive (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of William Borden located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, Illinois.

    • Cairo, Illinois – the Cairo Bridge, Ohio River (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)
      • Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Cairo Bridge on the Ohio River
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Fred Calgren Residence  (from Stone, October 1925, pp. 608)

    • Residence of Fred Calgren, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Illinois.  Exterior of Random Ashlar Indiana Limestone and cut and curved trim of the same stone.  Cut Stone Contractors:  A. F. Calgren & Company.  Architect:  Sidney Lovell.” “Residence of Fred Calgren, Beverly Hills, Chicago, Illinois. Exterior of Random Ashlar Indiana Limestone and cut and curved trim of the same stone. Cut Stone Contractors: A. F. Calgren & Company. Architect: Sidney Lovell.” From Stone, October 1925, pp. 608
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Chicago & Erie Bridges, all Piers at the Street Crossings under the Elevated Tracks of the Illinois Central Railroad (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Chicago & Erie bridges and all of the piers at the street crossings under the elevated tracks of the Illinois Central Railroad.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Chicago University Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Chicago University building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – City Hall (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Chicago City Hall.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Commonwealth-Edison Company Switching Station (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 86)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Commonwealth-Edison Company Switching Station.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Court House constructed prior to 1884 – “The Bedford Stone Quarries,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884.

      “Within the past decade, however, the industry has been powerfully revived, and the reputation of the Bedford stone has been fully established.  Within this period it has been employed in some of the most costly and imposing structures in America, in the Court House at Chicago, the State House at Indianapolis, the government buildings at Frankfort, Ky., and at New Orleans, the Olympic theater at St. Louis, the Nevada flats in New York, in the piers of the bridges across the Ohio at Henderson and New Albany, and elsewhere.  The Wm. K. Vanderbilt mansion in this city is also built of this stone….”

    • Chicago, Illinois - County Jail (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the County Jail in Chicago, Illinois.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Fourth Presbyterian Church  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials, Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 12.
      Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago; Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson, Architects; Howard Shaw, Associate Architect.  Variegated Indiana Limestone throughout.  Note the delicate and interesting variety of tone in the walls are due to the rare beauty of the Variegated stone.” Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Illinois, ca. 1920
      • Chicago, Illinois – Fourth Presbyterian Church and Parish House

        Fourth Presbyterian Church and Parish House (1912, 1925) “…Gothic Revival buildings which were built from grey Indiana limestone….” (Scroll down to “Chicago Caves and Canyons,” then “Fourth Presbyterian Church and Parish House” for more information.)

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Residence of Mrs. Fuller on Michigan Avenue (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Mrs. Fuller on Michigan Avenue in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the George Cleveland Hall Library, located 48 th Street and South Michigan Avenue. (from Richard Wright: The Life and Times, by Hazel Rowley, Owl Books, Aug. 1, 2002, 640 pp., ISBN 0805070885, pp. 70, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the library building, which was designed in the Italianate Renaissance style.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the William J. Goudy Residence on Astor Street (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of William J. Goudy on Astor Street in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Illinois Central Railroad Co. Depot (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Illinois Central Railroad Company depot.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Intercontinental Hotel (505 N. Michigan) 

      The Intercontinental Hotel was originally the Medinah Athletic Club.  In the 1980s the building was converted to a hotel.  Indiana limestone was used as facing in the construction of the upper part of the building.  (Scroll down to “Chicago Caves and Canyons,” then “Intercontinental Hotel” for more information.)

    • Chicago, Illinois – the James H. Walker Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the James H. Walker building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Jewish Synagogue at Fiftieth Street and Drexel Boulevard (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 166.)

      New Jewish Synagogue, Fiftieth St. and Drexel Boulevard, Chicago. Exterior of Variegated Indiana Limestone. Architects: Newhouse & Bernham.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the W. W. Kimball Residence at Prairie Avenue & 18th St. (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of W. W. Kimball located at Prairie Avenue and 18th Street.

    • Chicago, Illinois - Lakeshore Drive Wall from Geology and the Environment With Infotrac, by Bernard W. Pipkin, Dee D. Trent, and Richard Hazlett, Thomson Brooks/Cole, March 30, 2004, 496 pp., ISBN 0534490514, pp. 152, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the rock wall that protects Chicago’s Lakeshore Drive was constructed of Indiana limestone.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Lakeside Club (Grand Boulevard) (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Lakeside Club located on Grand Boulevard in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Lincoln Museum (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Lincoln Museum.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the London Guarantee and Accident Building, 360 North Michigan Avenue, from Pocket Guide to Chicago Architecture, by Judith Paine McBrien, W. W. Norton & Company, Oct. 1, 2004, 176 pp., ISBN 0393731553, pp. 32, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Alfred Alschuler designed the 22-story London Guarantee and Accident building. Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the building. (A sketch of the building is included.)

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Malabry Court Buildings, North Michigan Avenue (excerpt from Chicago’s North Michigan Avenue: Planning and Development, 1900-1930, by John W. Stamper, University of Chicago Press, Aug. 27, 1991, 344 pp., ISBN 0226770850, from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this above, Indiana limestone was used for the façade of the building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Marquette State Bank  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 545)

    • New offices and banking quarters of the Marquette State Bank, Chicago.  An interesting design of columned entrance in Indiana Limestone, K. M. Vitzhum & Co., Inc., Architects. New offices and banking quarters of the Marquette State Bank, Chicago, Illinois, from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 545
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Jonathan Mason Loomis Residence on Lake Shore Drive (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Jonathan Mason Loomis located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Michigan Avenue Bridge. This web site is presented by Ellen Beltz.  (photograph and more information) 

      Built between 1918 and 1920, the Michigan Avenue Bridge is a “double-leaf trunion bascule bridge.”  There are sculptured pieces and plaques on the bridge towers commemorating events in Chicago history.  Bedford limestone was used in the construction of the bridge piers, and the limestone contains “silicified sponges, bryozoa, gastropods, ammonoids and other fossils.”  (Scroll down to “Chicago Caves and Canyons,” then “Michigan Avenue Bridge” for more information.)

      Visit the Chicago Landmarks web site to view two photographs of the Michigan Avenue Bridge and Esplanade: Photo 1 and Photo 2.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Museum of Science and Industry  Building, presented on A View On Cities web site.

      The Museum of Science and Industry is now located in the restored Palace of Fine Arts Building. This building was reconstructed of limestone and marble.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Odd Fellows’ Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Odd Fellows' building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Potter Palmer Residence on Lake Shore Drive (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)
      • Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Potter Palmer located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago.
    • Chicago, Illinois - the Playboy Building (formerly the Palmolive Building) (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Palmolive building, in 1985 known as the Playboy building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Powhatan Building, 4950 South Chicago Beach Drive (from A Guide to Chicago’s Murals, by Mary Lackritz Gray, University of Chicago Press, April 1, 2001, 520 pp., ISBN 226305996, pp. 172, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt from this book, the twenty-two story Powhatan Building built in 1927-1929 is clad in Indiana limestone and terra cotta.

    • Chicago, Illinois – Prudential Buildings, I & II

      The original Bedford, Indiana, limestone facade is being replaced with granite due to weathering and potential for failure due to weathering. (Scroll down to “Chicago Caves and Canyons,” then “Prudential Buildings” for more information.) 

    • Chicago, Illinois – Public Library Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Public Library building in Chicago built prior to 1900.

      • Chicago, Illinois - the Chicago Public Library (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

        According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Public Library in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Ryerson Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Ryerson building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the S. W. Straus Building  (Article about the S. W. Straus Building & the Chicago Tribune building in Chicago, Illinois, entitled, “Selecting Stone for Monumental Buildings,” Stone, July 1925, pp. 413-414)

      (Excerpt from the article)  “Rising to a height of 475 feet, or 215 feet above the Chicago building height limit of 264 pierces the sky-line as a monument of a new architecture.  This massive structure takes the form of a hollow square, built around the site, with an inside light and air court entirely surrounded by offices.  This main shaft of building is twenty-two stores high and carries a ten-story tower on the Michigan Avenue side…The first five stories are faced in Select Buff Indiana Oolitic Limestone and the balance, including the tower in Variegated Indiana Limestone.  All of this stone was quarried and furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company of Bedford, Indiana….”

    • S. W. Straus Building, Chicago, as seen from Grant Park.  Architects:  Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, exterior of Select Buff and Variegated Indiana Limestone furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company.  Cut Stone Contractors:  The Central Oolitic Stone Company.” S. W. Straus Building, Chicago, as seen from Grant Park, from “Selecting Stone for Monumental Buildings,” Stone, July 1917, pp. 411.
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Saint Joseph Hotel (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Saint Joseph Hotel.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Security Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Security building in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Simmons-Gill House (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 75)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Simmons-Gill House.

    • Chicago, Illinois – St. Thomas Aquinas Church – Exterior  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 7, July 1925, pp. 416)

    • St. Thomas Aquinas Church, Chicago, Illinois.  Exterior of Indiana Limestone.  Architects:  Witzthum & Burns.” St. Thomas Aquinas Church, Chicago, Illinois, from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 7, July 1925, pp. 416
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Standard Club (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Standard Club.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Studebaker Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Studebaker building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Temple (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Temple in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Title Guarantee & Trust Co. Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Title Guarantee & Trust Company building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Joseph Torrence Residence on Lake Shore Drive (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Joseph Torrence located on Lake Shore Drive in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Tribune Tower (photograph)
      • Chicago, Illinois – the Chicago Tribune Tower  (Article about the S. W. Straus Building & the Chicago Tribune building in Chicago, Illinois, entitled, “Selecting Stone for Monumental Buildings,” Stone, July 1925, pp. 413-414)

        (Excerpt from the article)  “Rising to a height of 475 feet, or 215 feet above the Chicago building height limit of 264 pierces the sky-line as a monument of a new architecture.  This massive structure takes the form of a hollow square, built around the site, with an inside light and air court entirely surrounded by offices.  This main shaft of building is twenty-two stores high and carries a ten-story tower on the Michigan Avenue side…The first five stories are faced in Select Buff Indiana Oolitic Limestone and the balance, including the tower in Variegated Indiana Limestone.  All of this stone was quarried and furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company of Bedford, Indiana….”

      • Tower of the Chicago Tribune Building, showing beautiful effects of carved and ornamented ‘Old Gothic’ Indiana Limestone.  J. Hoadley & Sons Co., Cut Stone Contractors.  Howell & Hood, Architects.” Tower of the Chicago Tribune Building, from “Selecting Stone for Monumental Buildings,” Stone, July 1925, pp. 413
      • The Tribune Tower is a Gothic revival building “with great flying buttresses.”  It is faced with Indiana limestone.  The tower “has a base inset with stones from famous structures throughout the world, such as Westminster Abbey, the Taj Mahal, and the Great Wall of China.” (The link from which the above information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.metromix.com/top/1,1419,M-Metromix-Home-freepagesquarry!ArticleDetail-4444,00.html>
      • Tales of the Stones (in the Tribune Tower). This site lists the origin of the 136 stones placed in the exterior of the Tribune Tower from all around the world. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.metromix.com/top/1,1419,M-Metromix-Community-redirect!ArticleDetail-4444,00.html>
      • The Chicago Tribune Tower Competition, by Katherine Solomonson, University of Chicago Press, Nov 1, 2003, 384 pp., ISBN0226768007, from Google Book Search)

        According to an excerpt from this book, Howell’s and Hood specified Indiana limestone be used for the exterior of the Chicago Tribune Tower “in shades of gray.” The limestone was supplied by J. Hoadley and Sons Company of Bloomington, Indiana, and Archer Stone Setting Company cut the stone.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the L. Wolf Residence on Washington Boulevard (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.) 

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of L. Wolf located on Washington Boulevard in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Indiana - the Union Station - Colonnade (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the colonnade at Union Station in Chicago.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the University Club – Fireplace  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials, Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 30.
      Top:  Door lintel.  Fourteen feet long, four feet high:  Crest View School Building, Columbus, Ohio, D. Riebel Architect.  Center:  Fireplace in the University Club, Chicago; Holabird and Roche Architects.  Sides:  Life size statues for a church. Crest View School Building, Columbus, Ohio; & University Club Fireplace, Chicago, Illinoios, ca. 1920
    • Chicago, Illinois - the University of Chicago - Original College Buildings, from “Fall Foliage, in Chicago, University of Chicago, October 30, 2004. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://phoenix.uchicago.edu/campusfeature/index.aspx?featureid=30>

      According to this article, the buildings constructed for the university, founded in 1892, were constructed from Indiana limestone. They were designed in the neo-gothic style.

      • Chicago, Illinois - the University of Chicago - Crerar Science Library (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 83)

        Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Crerar Science Library at the University of Chicago.

      • Chicago, Illinois – the University of Chicago – the Theology Building  (from “Stone the Inspiring Influence in Collegiate Architecture” (Article about the University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana, & the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois), Stone, Stone Publishing Company, Vol. XLVII, No. 7, July 1926, pp. 421-422)

        New Theology Building, University of Chicago.  Collegiate Architecture at its best is shown in this building in which rough sawed Indiana limestone in random ashlar field work is relieved by cut trim of the same material.  Architecs.  Coolidge & Hodgden.” Theology Building, University of Chicago, from “Stone,” July 1926, pp. 421-422
        Entrance detail Theology Building, University of Chicago.  Cut and carved Indiana limestone used exclusively in combination with rough sawed random ashlar field of the same material.  Architects:  Coolidge & Hodgden.” Entrance detail Theology Building, University of Chicago, from “Stone,” July 1926, pp. 421-422
    • Decatur, Illinois – the Washington School – Main Entrance Trim  (from “The Entrance Beautiful Assured by Use of Natural Stone,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVII, No. 10, October 1926, pp. 604.)
      Main Entrance of Washington School, Decatur, Illinois, Showing a Generous Use of Indiana Limestone as Trim for a Brick Structure.  Architects:  Brooks, Bramhall & Dague.” Main Entrance of Washington School, Decatur, Illinois
    • Evanston, Illinois – the State Bank and Trust Company Building  (from “The Art of Stone Carving,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 30)

    • The Art of Stone Carving,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 30. “The Art of Stone Carving,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 30. (from “The Art of Stone Carving,” in “Stone,” Jan. 1926, pp. 30)
      Plaster capital, one of several decorative features of exterior of new State Bank & Trust Company building, Evanston, Illinois. (from “The Art of Stone Carving,” in “Stone,” Jan. 1926, pp. 30) Plaster capital in Buff Indiana Limestone, one of exterior decorative features of the new State Bank & Trust Company Building, Evanston, Illinois. (from “The Art of Stone Carving,” in “Stone,” Jan. 1926, pp. 30) Keystone of main entrance arch of new State Bank & Trust Company building, Evanston, Illinois. (from “The Art of Stone Carving,” in “Stone,” Jan. 1926, pp. 30)

      “Plaster capital, one of several decorative features of exterior of new State Bank & Trust Company building, Evanston, Illinois.  Executed in Buff Indiana Limestone by the Andres Stone & Marble Company.  Architects:  Childs and Smith.”

      “Plaster capital in Buff Indiana Limestone, one of exterior decorative features of the new State Bank & Trust Company Building, Evanston, Illinois.  Carved from designs by the Architects, Childs & Smith.”

      “Keystone of main entrance arch of new State Bank & Trust Company building, Evanston, Illinois, carved in Buff Indiana Limestone.  Architects:  Childs & Smith.”

    • Galesburg, Illinois – Knox College – Old Main – the Limestone Foundation, Trim, Stairs, & Porches

      At 150, Old Main Old Main Rocks,” by R. Lance Factor, George Appleton Lawrence Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy. (This link is no longer available, although you can read the article on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.knox.edu/Alumni-and-Friends/Knox-Magazine-and-More/Knox-Magazine-Archives/Fall-2007/At-150-Old-Main-Rocks.html?ss=print>

      According to this article, “Old Main and Whiting had cherry red brick, lead white windows and doors, and blue limestone foundations, porches, and entrances. Charles Ulricson, the Swedish born immigrant architect and builder of both Old Main and Whiting Hall, made a special effort to explore Illinois quarries searching for the bluest limestone available. He sought and received extra money from the Trustees to purchase 13 carloads of Aurora Blue Cloud….” The original Blue Cloud limestone porches and stairs at Old main “flaked and crumbled almost as quickly as the stone turned from blue tint to buttery brown.” Due to the deterioration of the building, by 1927 it was decided that Old Main must be either renovated or destroyed. Janet Greig Post, Knox’s first woman trustee and a graduate of the Class of 1894, was responsible for raising the money to restore the building. “Restoration meant removing paint and replacing brick. New foundations, porches, and trim required five carloads of Indiana’s hardest Bedford limestone. Only the ashlar blocks at the entrances are the original Blue Cloud.”

      Historical information and photographs about the Old Main building are available in the article above and R. Lance Factor’s book published in December 2009:

      Chapel in The Sky: Knox College’s Old Main And Its Masonic Architect, by R Lance Factor, Northern Illinois University Press, December 15, 2009, ISBN-10: 0875804152, ISBN-13: 978-0875804156. (“Factor uncovers the architectural mysteries of Knox College ’s beloved Old Main. Knox College ’s Old Main – a national landmark and the only extant building that was a site of the Lincoln-Douglas debates – is a campus treasure with a secret. Built in 1857, Old Main was designed by Charles Ulricson, a Swedish-born immigrant who was trained by Freemasons. In ‘Chapel in the Sky,’ Knox faculty member Lance Factor decodes the symbols of this beloved building and explores how an ardently anti-Mason administration came to hire Ulricson.”)

    • Havana, Illinois – the Jackson & Southeastern Bridge (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Jackson & Southeastern Bridge.

    • Illinois - the Batchen Hotel, opposite Wisconsin Central Depot, Illinois (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Batchen Hotel located opposite the Wisconsin Central Depot in Illinois.

    • Joliet, Illinois – the Ottawa Street Methodist Church  This site is presented by the Joliet Historic Preservation Commission.  (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.joliethpc.org/ottawa.htm>

      The Ottawa Street Methodist Church was built in 1909.  It is constructed of brick and trimmed with Bedford, Indiana, limestone.

    • Morton, Illinois - the Otto Baum Company Office Building (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Otto Baum Company office building.

    • Normal, Illinois - Illinois State University (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      < http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >
    • Paxton, Illinois - Sidewalk of Bedford Flagstone. The following information is from The Monumental News, “Trades Notes” section, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 502.

      “The corn crop in the vicinity of Paxton, Ill., never was more promising than at the present time, said Mr. N. Groetzinger, of Groetzinger & Fitzsimmons of that place, while in Chicago last month. Mr. Groetzinger embarked in the monumental business at Paxton less than two years ago and is establishing a very successful trade in monumental and building work. The firm has just completed a contract for about 5000 feet of stone flagging in the business part of the town. The sidewalk is sixteen feet wide and is laid in Bedford flags 8-ox5-oxo-4 sawed on two sides. The walks are a credit to the town and to the contractors and are proving to be of mutual benefit to all concerned.”

    • Peoria, Illinois - the Caterpillar Headquarters Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Caterpillar Headquarters sign.

    • Peoria, Illinois – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House constructed prior to 1900 in Peoria, Illinois.

    • Quincy, Illinois – Public Buildings (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the some of the public buildings in Quincy, Illinois.

    • Rock Island, Illinois – Two School Houses (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of two school houses prior to 1900 in Rock Island, Illinois.

    • Rockford, Illinois – Second Congregational Church (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Second Congregational Church.

    • Urbana, Illinois - the Cunningham Children’s Home (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Cunningham Children’s Home.

    • Urbana-Champaign, Illinois – University of Illinois – the Natural Resources Building (photographs and history). (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/nrb.html>

      The Salem Limestone used in the construction of the building came from a Bloomington Limestone Company quarry near Bloomington in south-central Indiana.  The limestone is marketed under the trade names of “Indiana Limestone” and Bedford Limestone.  The limestone has been quarried in Indiana since “at least 1827, and was quarried between Bloomington and Bedford, Indiana.  While the limestone is used extensively in construction of American buildings, it is used “particularly in the Midwest.”

      • By visiting the links below, you will find a great deal of information about the stone used in the construction of the Natural Resources Buildings in addition to many photographs. Below are short summaries of some of the information available about the building stone used in the Natural Resources building.
      • Natural Resources Building Architecture (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
        <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/arch.html>
      • Natural Resources Building Stone (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
        <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/stone.html>
        • According to this web site, the greenish gray slate that covers the roof was "..quarried from the Maine and western Vermont slate belt by the Rising and Nelson Slate Company of West Pawlett, Vermont…"
      • Natural Resources Building East Entrance Exterior (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
        <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/east-ext.html>

        The stairs at the east exterior entrance are constructed of granite "…(s)upplied by the Cold Springs Granite Company of Cold Springs, Minnesota, the rock is probably from the Warman area, Kanabec County, in east-central Minnesota…."

        The pair of large balls on the platform in front of the building and the building trim are constructed of limestone quarried near Bloomington in south-central Indiana. The Bedford Limestone "…it is marketed under the trade names Indiana Limestone and Bedford Limestone. An excellent building stone due to its durability, attractiveness, and economy, the Salem Limestone has been quarried in Indiana since at least 1827. It is standard construction material in American buildings, particularly in the Midwest."

      • The exterior door trim at the east exterior entrance is another limestone called the Ozark Tavernelle Marble. This limestone was "…supplied by the Carthage Marble Corporation of Carthage, southwestern Missouri. The stone industry gives the name Ozark Tavernelle Marble to limestones that take a high polish and to marbles - the white and varicolored metamorphic carbonate rocks used to make gravestones, statues, and buildings. Tavernelle is an old building stone term that means spotted or mottled." "Ozark Tavernelle, cut from a 2- to 3-foot thick bed in Carthage Quarry, is the lowest of the three beds that supplied cut stone for the Natural Resources Building. All three beds are part of the Warsaw Formation of Mississippian age."

      • Natural Resources Building East Entrance Interior (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
        <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/east-int.html>

        The (f)loor and stairs at the east interior entrance are constructed of "…brown to dark brown limestone that contains very light brown speckles is Nerobi Marble. It came from a bed in the Warsaw Formation at Carthage quarry. Nerobi Marble occurs above the Ozark Tavernelle and Ozark Veined beds…."

        The lower wall veneer, pillar, and baseboard are constructed that appears as "…light grayish brown mottles is Dark Plattin Marble. This Ordovician-age stone, supplied by Carthage Marble Company, was probably extracted from a quarry near Batesville in north-central Arkansas. The geologic name of the stone is the Plattin Limestone…."

        The hall, walls, door frames are constructed of "…blocks of mottled, light yellowish gray stone are cut from dolomite, a rock native to Illinois. It was quarried and finished in Joliet by the Adam Groth Stone Company. In that area the dolomite was called Joliet Marble. A few miles north, near Lemont, which was once known as Athens, the same dolomite was called Athens Marble. The stone comes from the Sugar Run Formation of Silurian age (438 to 408 million years old)."

      • The rest room partitions and wall veneer are constructed of "…polished limestone panels are Ozark Veined Marble from the Carthage Marble Corporation Quarry in Missouri. The light gray and light olive gray limestone contains wispy, dark gray figures. It comes from the same quarry ledge as the Ozark Tavernelle stone. The veined rock comprises about the upper three-fourths of the ledge and the Tavernelle the lower one-fourth…."

      • Sources (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
        <http://www.isgs.uiuc.edu/build/sources.html>
      • NCSA Building
      • According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the NCSA building. (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html>

    • Winetka, Illinois – Village Hall  (from Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 12, November 1926, pp. 677)
  • Village Hall, Winnetka, Illinois, showing an exterior of Indiana Limestone in a smaller type public building.” (from Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 12, November 1926, pp. 677) “Village Hall, Winnetka, Illinois, showing an exterior of Indiana Limestone in a smaller type public building.” – from “Stone,” Nov. 1926, pp. 677.
  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Indiana

    • Indiana & Elsewhere - Tombstones created from Whetstone quarried in Orange County, Indiana, article by the Indiana Geological Survey on the Indiana University web site. (The following quotation is used with permission of the Indiana Geological Survey. The article can be read in its entirety at the link below.) (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://newsinfo.iu.edu/OCM/releases/gravesto.htm>

      The following is from a news release by Hal S. Kibbey, Indiana University News Bureau, updated by Richard L. Powell, Indiana Geological Survey, a research affiliate and retired geologist.

      Indiana Geological Survey Asks For Helpfrom Hoosier Residents in Locating Tombstones

      “BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – The Indiana Geological Survey (IGS) is asking for help from Hoosier residents in a statewide project to locate gravestones made of whetstone. In the pre-Civil War era, Indiana’s whetstone-quarrying district in Orange County produced commercial-grade gravestones. These whetstones were one of Indiana's first commercial products, but the tombstone industry was largely unknown until IGS geologists were requested by an archaeologist to identify the rock which was used to make tombstones found in Albion, Ill.

      “In the 1800s, Indiana was a major producer of whetstones, which were stones used to sharpen a variety of implements. This mining industry was centered in Orange County, where well-sorted, uniformly cemented siltstone is common. At the peak of the industry in the late 1800s, annual production was about 300,000 pounds, and it was once stated that ‘a Hoosier household without an Indiana whetstone was no Hoosier Household at all.’

      “Most commercial whetstones produced were transported from the quarries in ox-drawn wagons to White River or Lost River. Flatboats, keelboats or barges then floated the stones down these rivers and eventually to the Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi rivers. In some cases they were shipped on to New Orleans and overseas from there. Production persisted into the late 1980s, when the last quarry closed.

      “‘The stones are characterized by a distinctive layering, which allows for easy identification of their origin in Orange County, unlike most other stones used during this period,’ said former IGS geologist Erik Kvale.

      “‘Geological investigations have shown that these whetstone beds were deposited on an ancient silty tidal flat and that the thickness of each siltstone layer can be directly equated to the daily, and sometimes semi-daily, rise and fall of ancient tides on that tidal flat,’ Kvale said. ‘These ancient recordings are so exact that it is possible to determine, among other things, the phase of the moon during the time the layers were deposited. So significant is this discovery that these Indiana deposits are now known internationally in the geological community.’

      “Strata seen in the Orange County whetstone quarries are the same as the whetstone headstones found in many cemeteries in the region. They are composed of finely layered siltstone, with the thickness of each layer measured in millimeters. What is unique about these deposits is the organization of the layers into couplets consisting of a thick layer and a thinner layer. These couplets show a cycle of progressive thickening and thinning.

      “‘This pattern of progressive thickening and thinning of the layers is absolutely diagnostic of the whetstone beds and allows us to positively identify this stone when we find it in cemeteries,’ Kvale said.

      “Erik Kvale, Richard Powell, geologist and IGS research affiliate, and Michael McNerney, an archaeologist from Illinois, attempted to map the distribution of these gravestones. They were initially assisted by a grant from the Indiana Historical Society.

      “Whetstone gravestones are among the oldest preserved in the southern part of the state, and the graves of several historically important Hoosiers from the early 1800s, such as Col. Francis Vigo and Robert Buntin, are marked with these monuments.

      “‘Despite the age of these stones, most of the whetstone gravestones are so durable that the lettering and scroll work look as though they were carved yesterday rather than 150 to 180 years ago,’ Kvale said.

      “More than 1800 whetstone grave markers have been found in just over 200 pioneer cemeteries in southwestern Indiana and southeastern Illinois along the Wabash River. About 1,000 cemeteries have been examined to date. The distribution of these gravestones is not completely known, but they may be present along the lower Ohio and Mississippi rivers and parallel the other commercial trade routes of early Indiana, such as the Wabash-Erie Canal network and the National and Michigan roads.

      “More than 90 of the grave markers were signed by the engraver or dealer. About 70 other markers have been attributed to a few engravers owing to their particular lettering styles. The lettering is similar to fonts used by newspapers, books and handbills prior to the pre-Civil War era.”

    • Bedford, Lawrence County, Indiana – the Furst-Kerber Cut Stone Company Office Building (from “Bedford’s Latest Stone Office Building,” in Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIII, No. 7, July 1922, pp. 363)

      “…This is the office building of the Fürst-Kerber Cut Stone Company, at Bedford.  The company is moving its general offices from Chicago to Bedford as rapidly as circumstances permit, and it is expected by the first of the year to have all the general office activities under way at the latter place....”

      “The office structure, which is 35 by 100 feet, two stories and basement, stands about 100 feet south of the company’s No. 1 mill.  It is built entirely of buff Bedford Indiana limestone, after plans and specifications by Architect Charles H. Prindiville, of Chicago.  All partitions are of solid masonry, and the roof is of red tile….” 

      “New Office Building for a Stone Company. General Offices for the Fürst-Kerber Cut Stone Company, just completed at Bedford, Ind. ”  ( pp. 363) General Offices for the Fürst-Kerber Cut Stone Company, Bedford, Ind.
    • Bedford, Indiana - the Indiana Limestone Company, Inc. - Home Office Building (information from colorized postcard photograph; Curteich; early-mid-1900s; unmailed)

      The Indiana Limestone Company, Inc., home office building is constructed of Indiana limestone.

      • Bedford, Indiana - the Indiana Limestone Company, Inc. - Home Office Building (information from colorized postcard; Curteich; early-mid-1900s)

        The Indiana Limestone Company, Inc., home office building is constructed of Indiana limestone.

      • Bedford, Indiana - the Indiana Limestone Company Building, 405 I Street, from National Register of Historic Places 1966 to 1994, by the National Park Service, National Trust for Historic Preservation The Preservation Press, Historic Preservation Officers National Conference of State, John Wiley and Sons, June 29, 1995, 926 pp., ISBN 0471144037, pp. 207, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this book, the Indiana Limestone Company Building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places December 21, 1993.

    • Bedford, Indiana - the Indiana Cut Stone, Inc. – the Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Indiana Monument and Cut Stone sign.

    • Bedford, Indiana – the Lawrence County Court House, etc. (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Bedford, Indiana.

      • Bedford, Lawrence County, Indiana – Lawrence County Courthouse Square – the  Soldiers, Sailors, and Pioneers Monument  (The following information is from the article entitled, “County’s Miss Indiana may get a facelift,” BRI, county will work to restore monument, by Terri Jo Cooper, Times-Mail Staff Writer

        This 1999 article indicates that the Bedford Revitalization Inc.  and others planned to apply for a grant to clean and restore the Soldiers, Sailors, and Pioneers monument, which is located on the Lawrence County courthouse square.  Charles Dodd used limestone in 1922 from the Furst-Kerbert and Imperial Stone and Consolidated companies.  The Miss Indiana sculpture, positioned on the top of the monument, also of limestone, and was formally dedicated in January 1924.     

        More information about the monument is available in this article at the web address above and also on the “Lawrence County Soldiers Sailors and Pioneers” entry, which includes several photographs of the monument, on the hmdb.org Historical Marker Database.

    • Bedford, Indiana – the Madden School Building (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 159.)

      New Madden School, Bedford, Indiana, of Variegated Indiana Limestone furnished by W. McMillan & Son. Bedford Cut Stone Company, cut stone contractors. Architects: Elmer E. Dunlap Company.

    • Bedford, Indiana - the Network America Limestone Sign

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Network America sign.

    • Bedford, Indiana – the John A. Rowe Residence  (from “Stone For Residential Work,” Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 544)

       
    • New residence for Mr. John A. Rowe at Bedford, Indiana, in which the mixture of split face rough sawed and tooled finish Indiana Limestone furnishes an excellent example of the random ashlar style of masonry in home construction work.” “Stone For Residential Work,” Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, September 1925, pp. 544 - residence for Mr. John A. Rowe at Bedford, Indiana
    • Bloomfield, Greene County, Indiana - Foundations, Door-steps, Lintels, Sills, Chimneys, & Coping (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 107-108.) (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

      “Sandstone quarries have also been opened by Mr. Hamlin, on section 25, town 7, range 4, and at Mrs. Faucett’s, on Plummer’s creek, on section 4, town 6 range 4.

      “The stone at the latter quarry is moderately fine-grained, has a cream color, can readily be split to any required thickness, and is mined on large slabs from six to thirty inches thick. Stone from Hamlin’s quarry is used in Bloomfield for foundations to buildings, door-steps, door and window lintels and sills, chimneys, copings, etc., etc. In quality and in color it is similar to the stone at Mrs. Faucett’s quarry.”*

      (* The color noted for the stone quarried from Mrs. Faucett’s quarry was described as, “...a fine-grained, brownish-gray sandstone, with small specks of protoxide of iron...”)

    • Bloomington, Indiana – the Bowman Residence (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, “Old Styles in Stone,” Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 154.)

      Bowman Residence, Bloomington, Ind. A two-family, or Duplex House, showing the Adaptability of Short-length Indiana Limestone for residential and small apartment exterior ashlar.

    • Bloomington, Indiana - the Old City Hall (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the old city hall in Bloomington, Indiana.

    • Bloomington, Indiana - Indiana University
      • The Indiana University Gate - from Ritual, Ceremonies, and Cultural Meaning in Higher Education, by Kathleen manning, Bergin Garvey/Greenwood, May 30, 2000, 184 pp., ISBN 0897895045, pp. 7, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used for the Indiana University Gate.

      • Indiana University Parking Garage (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery3.html >

        According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Indiana University parking garage.

      • Follow the Limestone: A Walking Tour of Indiana University (brochure), by IGS senior scientist Brian Keith and produced by the Bloomington / Monroe County Convention and Visitors Bureau, circa 2009/2010.

        (From the Indiana Geological Survey web site) “‘The heart of the Indiana University Bloomington campus is meant for casual walking and exploration. The unique combination of green space and architecturally distinctive limestone buildings that span across three centuries continually provides me with interesting and enjoyable things to see, even after being here for many years,’ said Keith.

        “The brochure celebrates and commemorates the area’s limestone heritage as evidenced by the prolific limestone architecture on the campus of Indiana University, and is full of interesting facts about the architectural styles of the buildings and the stone that was used to construct them.

        “Brochures are available at the Bloomington Visitors Center on North Walnut Street, the Indiana Geological Survey at the corner of 10th Street and Walnut Grove Avenue and at the Indiana University (IU) Visitor Information Center on Indiana Avenue.”

    • Bloomington, Indiana – the University of Indiana Stadium  (from “University Stadium in Stone, in Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 666)

      (The article begins)  “The popularity of American college sports and especially football has resulted in the erection within the past decade of a large number of arenas or amphitheaters in which contests are staged…At the University of Indiana at Bloomington…(the) ends (of the stadium) are faced with Indiana Limestone in panel effects and surmounted with tower-like corner pillar supporting a flag staff….”

    • “University Stadium in Stone, in Stone, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 666. “University Stadium in Stone, in Stone, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 666
      “New stadium at the University of Indiana, Bloomington, in which beauty has not been sacrificed.  Indiana Limestone has served to make the structure attractive.” “New stadium at the University of Indiana, Bloomington, in which beauty has not been sacrificed. Indiana Limestone has served to make the structure attractive.” From “University Stadium in Stone, in Stone, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 666
      • Bloomington, Indiana – the University of Indiana – Women’s Dormitory  (from “Stone the Inspiring Influence in Collegiate Architecture” (Article about the University of Indiana, Bloomington, Indiana, & the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois), Stone, Stone Publishing Company, Vol. XLVII, No. 7, July 1926, pp. 421-422)

        Women’s Dormitory, University of Indiana, Bloomington, showing a random ashlar field work in connection with cut trim, both of Indiana limestone.  Architects:  Granger, Lowe  Bollenbacher.” Women’s Dormitory, University of Indiana, Bloomington, from “Stone,” July 1926, pp. 421
        Main entrance of Women’s Dormitory, University of Indiana, Bloomington, a beautiful example of the combined use of rough sawed and cut Indiana limestone.  Architects:  Granger, Lowe  Bolenbacher.” Main entrance of Women’s Dormitory, University of Indiana, Bloomington, from “Stone,” July 1926, pp. 422
    • Brazil Area in Clay County, Indiana - Use of Building Stone in the Brazil Area (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 83.) (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)
    • Building-Stone. - The sandstone which overlies the main ‘Block’ coal I, is, in places an excellent building-stone, and is extensively used in Brazil (Indiana) for making foundations, lintels, steps, and other parts of buildings.

      “The principal quarry of this rock now opened, is owned by Mr. Simonson, on section 7, town 12, range 6, one and a half miles south of Brazil. It is a bluish-white, hard, micaceous, coarse-grained durable sandstone, and presents a handsome appearance in buildings. On Dr. Wright’s property, and at quite a number of localities on South Otter creek, thence are fine exposures of this sandstone, but as yet little attention has been paid to opening quarries for market.

      “The limestone that overlies the upper seam of ‘Block’ coal K, was quarried on Mr. Henry Ashley’s place, about a half mile south-west of Brazil, many years ago, for building abutments to bridges and culverts on the national road; It ranges from two to ten feet in thickness, and may be found at a number of places on the Ashley land, on Garlick & Collins’ land north of Brazil, and on the property of Mr. Grimes, in the neighborhood of the village of Ashboro....”

    • Cannelton, Indiana – the Canelton Historic District – Native Sandstone Buildings
    • According to the “Cannelton Historic District” section of Wikipedia:  “…The district encompasses 178 contributing buildings, 42 contributing structures, and 2 contributing objects in the central business district and surrounding residential and industrial areas of Cannelton. The area developed between 1837 and 1936, and includes notable examples of Gothic Revival, Late Victorian, and Bungalow / American Craftsman style architecture. A number of the buildings are constructed of native sandstone. Notable buildings include the Indiana Cotton Mill (1849-1850), St. Michael's Church (1859), F. H. Clemens Store, Cannelton Sewer Pipe Company, Josie Nicolay House, Myers Grade School / The Free School (1868), Jacob Heck Building (1882), Perry County Courthouse (1896-1897), and the separately listed St. Luke's Episcopal Church.

    • Cannelton, Indiana – the Cannelton Historic District Walking Tour, presented by Perry County, Indiana.  (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.perrycountyindiana.org/tours/walkingtour.cfm>
    • Cannelton, Indiana – the Henry Helm House today known as the Charles Haury House, 109 E. 7th Street. (The tour from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.perrycountyindiana.org/tours/walkingtour.cfm>
    • According to this web site, stone carver and mason Martin Heim worked on the Henry Heim House using stone leftover from the construction of St. Michael’s Church. Martin Heim lived in the house until he died in 1880.

    • Cannelton, Indiana – the Indiana Cotton Mill  (history) Construction of the Indiana Cotton Mill began in 1849. 

    This National Historical Monument is built of Indiana sandstone and has been vacant for decades.

    Also see:  “Scenic and Historic Tours,” presented by Perry County, Indiana, for more information on the Indiana Cotton Mill.

    • Cannelton,Indiana - the Perry County Courthouse Museum (The tour from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.perrycountyindiana.org/tours/walkingtour.cfm>

      This is the second courthouse for Cannelton. The building was constructed of Bedford, Indiana, limestone trim on Yellow pressed brick.

    • Cannelton, Indiana - St. Michael Church (The tour from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.perrycountyindiana.org/tours/walkingtour.cfm>

      Sandstone quarried from nearby hills was used in the construction of the exterior and interior walls of St. Michael Church, which was completed in 1858. the tower was completed in late 1860. The church was later remodeled 3 times. (This entry also indicates that the book, St. Michaels on the Hill, by Michael Rutherford provides more information on the church.)

    • Clay County, Indiana - Buildings, Abutments To Bridges, & Culverts on The National Road in Clay County (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 83.) (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

      Building-Stone. - The sandstone which overlies the main ‘Block’ coal I, is, in places an excellent building-stone, and is extensively used in Brazil ( Indiana ) for making foundations, lintels, steps, and other parts of buildings.

      “The principal quarry of this rock now opened, is owned by Mr. Simonson, on section 7, town 12, range 6, one and a half miles south of Brazil. It is a bluish-white, hard, micaceous, coarse-grained durable sandstone, and presents a handsome appearance in buildings. On Dr. Wright’s property, and at quite a number of localities on South Otter creek, thence are fine exposures of this sandstone, but as yet little attention has been paid to opening quarries for market.

      “The limestone that overlies the upper seam of ‘Block’ coal K, was quarried on Mr. Henry Ashley’s place, about a half mile south-west of Brazil, many years ago, for buildings abutments to bridges and culverts on the national road; It ranges from two to ten feet in thickness, and may be found at a number of places on the Ashley land, on Garlick & Collins’ land north of Brazil, and on the property of Mr. Grimes, in the neighborhood of the village of Ashboro....”

    • Columbia City, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Columbia City, Indiana, built prior to 1900.

    • Columbus, Indiana - the original Columbus Public Library, 5th and Mechanics (Lafayette) Streets, from Columbus, Indiana, by Patricia M. Mote, Arcadia Publishing, June 15, 2005, 128 pp., ISBN 0738533637, pp. 86, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the original Columbus Public Library was constructed in 1903 of Indiana limestone.

    • Corydon, Indiana – Corydon Capitol State Historic Site, presented by the Indiana State Museum (photograph and history) 

      The building was constructed with limestone quarried nearby.

    • Elkhart, Indiana - the first Elkhart High School, located at the intersection of Vistula and Pigeon Street (now Lexington Avenue), from Elkhart (Indiana), by Amy Wenger, Arcadia Publishing, Aug. 1, 2002, 128 pp., ISBN 0738519790, pp. 25, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the first high school in Elkhart was constructed of Indiana limestone. In the early 1910s, this building was demolished to be replaced by Samuel Strong Elementary. (A photograph of the high school is included in this book.)

    • Ellettsville, Indiana - St. John’s Catholic Church (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building St. John’s Catholic Church.

    • Elwood, Indiana - the St. Vincent Mercy Hospital Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the St. Vincent Mercy Hospital sign.

    • Evansville, Indiana – the County Jail (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the County Jail built prior to 1900 in Evansville, Indiana.

    • Evansville, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House constructed prior to 1900 in Evansville, Indiana.

    • Evansville, Indiana – the U. S. Custom House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Custom House.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the B. L. Auger’s Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the B. L. Auger's building.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the Baltas Block (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Baltas Block.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana - the Fort Wayne Newspapers Building (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery3.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Fort Wayne Newspaper building.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the L. Mohr’s Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the L. Mohr building.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the Louis Fox’s Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Louis Fox building.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the M. S. Maharius Residence (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of M. S. Maharius.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – Rich & Baker’s Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Rich & Baker building.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the Schmitz Block (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Schmitz Block.

    • Fort Wayne, Indiana – the U. S. Government Buildings (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. government buildings in Fort Wayne.

    • Franklin, Indiana - the Franklin Community High School (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery3.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Franklin Community High School.

    • French Lick, Indiana – the French Lick Resort Casino & Hotels. The following information is from “French-style resort built with Indiana limestone,” by Michelle Stinnard, October 1, 2007, in Stone World online edition.

      This article is about the extensive renovation and stone restoration of the French Lick Resort Casino that focused on the preserving the property’s historic features. According to the author, the property dates from the turn of the last century. Bedford limestone, quarried at Bedford, Indiana, about 20 miles away, was used in the construction of new entry points for the exterior of the buildings. One goal of the project was to use native material and local craftsmen. According to one of the masons working on the project, he “thinks that they quarried the new stone at the quarry that the original stone came from.” Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., of Bedford , Indiana, and Whaley Construction of Bloomington, Indiana, fabricated the material for the project.

    • Garrett City, Indiana – the Lackey & Thompson’s Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Lackey & Thompson building.

    • Greencastle (near), Putnam County, Indiana - Abandoned Rock Quarries - the Deauw University Nature Park. (This information is from The Mineral Industry of Indiana, 2003, reports presented by the Indiana Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey)

      “Hanson (PLC) donated 182 hectares including abandoned rock quarries and wooded areas valued at $5 million to DePauw University near Greencastle in Putnam County. It will become the DePauw University Nature Park, and rock climbing may be allowed on the quarry walls.

    • Greencastle, Indiana - the Robert R. Roberts Memorial (Cemetery stone) (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Robert R. Roberts Memorial.

    • Greene County, Indiana - Building Foundations, Door-Steps, Lintels, Sills, Chimneys, & Coping in Greene County (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 107-108.) (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

      Building-Stone. - Excellent quarries of sandstone and limestone are now being opened and worked on Mr. Watson’s land, on the line of the Indianapolis & Vincennes railroad, on section 6, town 8, range 4, and on section 14, town 8, range 5.

      “...It is a fine-grained, brownish-gray sandstone, with small specks of protoxide of iron, and lies in strata that range from six to sixteen inches in thickness, and may be taken up in slabs of any required length and breadth.

      “Sandstone quarries have also been opened by Mr. Hamlin, on section 25, town 7, range 4, and at Mrs. Faucett’s, on Plummer’s creek, on section 4, town 6 range 4.

      “The stone at the latter quarry is moderately fine-grained, has a cream color, can readily be split to any required thickness, and is mined on large slabs from six to thirty inches thick. Stone from Hamlin’s quarry is used in Bloomfield for foundations to buildings, door-steps, door and window lintels and sills, chimneys, copings, etc., etc. In quality and in color it is similar to the stone at Mrs. Faucett’s quarry.”

    • Huntingburg, Indiana – Patoka Marble Works (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, “Notes from Quarry and Shop” section, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 88.)

      “The firm of Sorenson & Thormann, Huntingburg, Ind., doing business under the name of Patoka Marble Works, has been dissolved by mutual consent, Chas. Sorenson having been compelled to retire on account of ill health. Fred Thormann will conduct the business on his own account.”

    • Huntington, Indiana – the I.O.O.F. Building  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the I.O.O.F. building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the American United Life (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985) According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the American United Life building.
      • Indianapolis, Indiana - the American United Life Insurance Building (photograph and diagrams) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 92)

        Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the American United Life Insurance building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Blue Cross/Blue Shield Building (1969) (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.nlcs.k12.in.us/oljrhi/history.htm>

      Oolitic Limestone from Oolitic, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Blue Cross/Blue Shield building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Central Business College (Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Central Business College.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Channel 13 WTHR Building (photograph and diagrams) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 91)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Channel 13 WTHR Building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Columbia Club – the Façade  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 10, October 1925, pp. 615)

    • New home of the Columbia Club, Indianapolis, Indiana.  Showing a façade of dignified simplicity made possible through the use of Indiana limestone for ashlar and carved decorative work.  Rubush & Hunter, Architects.” “New home of the Columbia Club, Indianapolis, Indiana. Showing a façade of dignified simplicity made possible through the use of Indiana limestone for ashlar and carved decorative work. Rubush & Hunter, Architects.”  from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 10, October 1925, pp. 615
    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Columbia Club (from Through the Ages, Vol. 5, No. 8, December 1927, pp. 44)

      F. E. Gates Marble & Tile Co., Indianapolis, Indiana

      “Columbia Club, Indianapolis, Indiana.  Rubush & Hunter, Architects.  A beautiful entrance executed in Pink Georgia Marble.”

    • Columbia Club, Indianapolis, Indiana.  Rubush & Hunter, Architects.  A beautiful entrance executed in Pink Georgia Marble.” (from Through the Ages, December 1927, pp. 44) “Columbia Club, Indianapolis, Indiana. Rubush & Hunter, Architects. A beautiful entrance executed in Pink Georgia Marble.” (from Through the Ages, December 1927, pp. 44)
    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Commercial Club  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Commercial Club.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the County Jail  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the County Jail constructed prior to 1900 in Indianapolis.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Court House  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House constructed prior to 1900 in Indianapolis.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – Crown Hill Cemetery – the Chapel & Vaults (from “Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana,” in The Monumental News, Sept. 1893, pp. 414)
    • “…Within the entrance and close to the ground set apart for a national cemetery, are the chapel and vaults.  The vault and chapel combined in a handsome Gothic structure built entirely of Indiana stone.  The chapel is in the center of the building, a large room with stained glass windows, tiled floor and walls and groined arched….” 

      (Page 414 – and the end of this article – are missing. If you have a copy of page 415, I would appreciate it if you would contact me so I can add that portion to the above article.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      • Indianapolis, Indiana – Crown Hill Cemetery – the Gustav Bohn Columbarium  (“A Columbarium, Indianapolis, Indiana,” The Monumental News, Vol. 8, No. 2, February 1897, pp. 130)
      The Gustav Bohn Columbarium, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana, in The Monumental News, February 1897.  (“The monument is built of Indiana stone, in the classic renaissance style.  The small iron door in front, of Grecian design, is gilded over with leaf gold….”) The Gustav Bohn Columbarium, Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana, in The Monumental News, February 1897. (“The monument is built of Indiana stone, in the classic renaissance style. The small iron door in front, of Grecian design, is gilded over with leaf gold….”)
    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Fall Creek Place Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>
    • According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Fall Creek Place sign.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Federal Building, 225 N. Pennsylvania Street, from Masterpieces of American Architecture: Museums, Libraries, Churches and Other Public Buildings, by Edward Warren Hoak and Willis Humphrey Church, Courier Dover Publications, Aug. 6, 2002, 233 pp., ISBN 0486422313, pp. 69, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the Federal Building was constructed of Indiana limestone.

      • The Old Federal Building, presented by the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.insd.uscourts.gov/History/ct_hist_OldFedBldg.htm>

        The Federal Building was three stories high and constructed of solid limestone walls in the Neoclassical style. The building contained the Post Office, Courts, and various offices. The building was completed in 1860. In the early 1900s the building was refurbished and used as a bank. then in 1962 the old Federal Building was demolished and replaced by the Union Federal Building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana– the Indiana Historical Society (IHS) Building.  The Historical Society building is downtown Indianapolis.  (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.imiweb.org/stonemagazine/stone_mag10-15-99.htm>

      The exterior is constructed with Indiana Bedford limestone, Cold Spring, Minnesota, granite and Fletcher granite.  On the interior in the Great Hall Botticino and Rosa Verona marble, along with granite, was used on the floors.  Cold Spring granite was used on the staircase.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - Indiana State Museum (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Indiana State Museum.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - Indiana State Office Building (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Indiana state office building.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Indiana University/Purdue University (IUPUI) Library (from Building Libraries for the 21 st Century: The Shape of Information,, by T. D. Webb, McFarland & Company, Sept. 1, 2004, 286 pp., ISBN 0786420340, pp. 138, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the library.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the K. of P. Building (from Stone Magazine, October 1926, Vol. XLVII, No. 10, pp. 613)

      Marble in Lodge Building

      “Imported marble, for the most part, were selected for the interior decorative work in the new K. of P. Building, Indianapolis. The lobby and vestibule floors are in fleur de peche, in combination of red Levanto and verde antique. Walls of the vestibule are in yellow Verona marble with bases of Alpine green. Corridors of the second, third floors are in Alabama white marble with York Fossil marble for the bases. Colonial Gray Marble partitions are used in the toilet rooms.”

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Park Tudor School - 6 Academic Buildings (from Peterson’s Private Secondary Schools 2005, by Petersons Publishing, Tomson Peterson’s, April 1, 2004, 1530 pp., ISBN 0768913640, pp. 1042, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt from this book, 6 major buildings of the school were constructed of Indiana limestone.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Public Library  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Public Library in Indianapolis constructed prior to 1900.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument. The monument is a tribute to Indiana patriots who served in the Civil War and the Spanish American War. The monument is 284 feet, 6 inches tall, and the gray oolitic limestone used for the monument was from the Romona Quarries in Owen County, Indiana. (This information was from a postcard.)

      Limestone used for the monument is gray oolitic limestone from the Romona quarries of Owen County. It stands 284 feet, 6 inches high.)

    • Indianapolis, Indiana– the State Capitol  (pre-1900) (photograph and history) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the State Capitol in Indianapolis.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the State House constructed prior to 1884 – “The Bedford Stone Quarries,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884.

      “Within the past decade, however, the industry has been powerfully revived, and the reputation of the Bedford stone has been fully established.  Within this period it has been employed in some of the most costly and imposing structures in America, in the Court House at Chicago, the State House at Indianapolis, the government buildings at Frankfort, Ky., and at New Orleans, the Olympic theater at St. Louis, the Nevada flats in New York, in the piers of the bridges across the Ohio at Henderson and New Albany, and elsewhere.  The Wm. K. Vanderbilt mansion in this city is also built of this stone….”

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the State Soldiers’ Monument  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the State Soldier’s monument.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the U. S. Custom House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Custom House in Indianapolis.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the War Memorial (photograph of the War Memorial in Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the War Memorial in Indianapolis.

    • Indianapolis, Indiana - the Willowbrook Park Office Building #6 - Textured Panels (photograph and diagrams) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 90)

      Indiana limestone was used for the textured panels on the Willowbrook Park Office Building #6.

    • Judah, Indiana - the Judah Community Limestone Signs (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Judah community sign.

    • Lafayette, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Lafayette constructed prior to 1900.

    • LaGrange, Indiana - the University Park Veteran Hospital Limestone Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the University Park Veteran Hospital sign.

    • Lawrence County, Indiana Lawrence County Map
    • Leopold (near), Indiana – St. Augustine’s Church  (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.perrycountyindiana.org/attractions/leopold.cfm> 

      Peter and Margaret (Devillez) Gorges arrived in the area.  They were natives of Hachy and Nobressart, Belgium.  The Georges were employed as stonemasons on the first phase of the building of St. Augustine Church.  Construction of the present church began in 1866.  Sandstone quarried near Leopold was used to build the church.  The sandstone was hauled up the hill by teams of oxen.  The walls of the church were built from 1867 to 1869.  In 1903, 30 years later, the tower, spire, chimes and bells were completed.

      Also see:  “Scenic and Historic Tours,” presented by Perry County, Indiana, for more information on St. Augustine’s Church.

    • Logansport, Indiana - the Little Turtle Waterway Plaza (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Little Turtle Waterway Plaza.

    • Logansport, Indiana – the Soldiers’ Monument (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Soldiers’.

    • Mansfield, Parke County, Indiana - Bridge Abutments of Bridge that Crosses the Creek at Mansfield (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 116.) (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

      Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone, which forms high cliffs on Big Raccoon, Little Raccoon and Sugar creeks, may be quarried in blocks of any required dimensions, and will make a handsome and durable building stone. At Mansfield, on Big Raccoon creek, this rock is a beautiful reddish-brown color, closely resembling in appearance the brown sandstone of which the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, D.C., is built. It has been used in the construction of abutments to the bridge which crosses the creek at Mansfield, where it has been exposed to the weather for several years, and gives evidence of being a durable stone.”

    • Manchester, Indiana - Peabody Retirement Community (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Peabody Retirement Community building.

    • Marion, Indiana – the Grant County Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Grant County Court House.

      • Marion, Indiana - the Grant County Courthouse from A Lynching in the Heartland, by James H. Madison, Palgrave, Jan. 4, 2003, 240 pp., ISBN 1403961212, pp. 32, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, the Grant County Courthouse was constructed in 1880 of Indiana limestone.

    • Montpelier, Indiana – the Columbia Hotel (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Columbia Hotel.

    • Mt. Vernon, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Mt. Vernon, Indiana.

      • Muncie, Indiana - the Ball State University
        • The Music Building at Ball State University (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
          <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

          According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the music building at Ball State University.

      • The Art & Journalism building at Ball State University (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

        According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Art and Journalism building at Ball State University.

    • Muncie, Indiana – Wysor’s Grand Opera House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of Wysor’s Grand Opera House.

    • New Albany, Indiana – the Floyd County Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Floyd County Court House in New Albany, Indiana.

      • New Albany, Indiana - the Floyd County Courthouse (the 3rd courthouse), located at the southeast corner of Spring and State Streets, from New Albany in Vintage Postcards, Indiana, by David C. Barksdale and Robyn Davis Sekula, Arcadia Publishing, May 1, 2005, 128 pp., ISBN 0738533866, pp. 27, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, the Greek Revival style courthouse was constructed in 1866. Limestone from Bedford, Indiana, quarries was used in the construction of the courthouse. It was demolished in 1963 and replaced with a bank building. (A postcard photograph of the Floyd County Courthouse is included.)

    • New Albany, Indiana – Vincennes St. School  (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Vincennes Street School.

    • Noblesville, Indiana - the Noblesville City Hall Building & Sign (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery3.html> & < http://www.indystone.com/customsignwork.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Noblesville city hall building and sign.

    • Princeton, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Princeton, Indiana.

    • Richmond, Indiana – the Court House (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House in Richmond, Indiana.

    • Richmond, Indiana – the Garr Block (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Garr Block.

    • Rockville, Parke County, Indiana - “Largest Bank Building in Rockville” circa 1869 (from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 116.) (This book is available on Google Book Search for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

      Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone, which forms high cliffs on Big Raccoon, Little Raccoon and Sugar creeks, may be quarried in blocks of any required dimensions, and will make a handsome and durable building stone....”

      “A similar colored sandstone, from the conglomerate bluff on the Little Racoon (sic) creek, was used in the foundation of the largest bank building in Rockville, and is very highly spoken of as a building stone.”

    • Spring Mill, Indiana - the Spring Mill Inn in the Spring Mill State Park, Indiana, presented by Indiana’s State Parks and Reservoirs.
      • A Brief History of Spring Mill Inn. In 1936 the building site for the Spring Mill was cleared and construction began.  The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCCs) brought in native Indiana limestone from quarries in nearby Stonington in 1937.  The limestone was used as building stone for walls and foundation work.  The Indiana Conservation Department Engineers were Henry H. Morgan and Henry Prange.  Another sight at the park include the remains of a lime kiln.  There is a trail which leads to a limestone quarry in the park.  The limestone was used in the construction of the Park Inn, a dam, and other structures during the 1930s.
    • Terre Haute, Indiana - Indiana State University - the First Library Building, presented on the Cunningham Memorial Library web site in the ISU Library Facilities section.

      Arthur Cunningham, the first librarian, was involved in the construction of the first library building, which was located across the street from the main complex. The library, which opened in 1910, was named after him. Italian artisans were used in the construction of the Renaissance style building, and Indiana limestone was used on the exterior of the building.

    • Terre Haute, Indiana – the U. S. Government Buildings (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. government buildings in Terre Haute, Indiana, constructed prior to 1900.

    • Urbana, Illinois - the Urbana Free Library, information from “Urbana Free Library's grand opening Sunday,” By Mike Monson, The News-Gazette Online, April 29, 2005.

      The original library building was constructed in 1918 in the classical revival style using white Indiana limestone on the exterior. The library has since been enlarged.

    • Wabash, Indiana - the Wabash County Government Center (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Wabash County government center.

    • Warsaw, Indiana - the Kosciusko County Justice Building (The link on the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.indystone.com/photogallery1.html>

      According to the Indiana Monument & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Kosciusko County Justice building.

    • Wayne County, Indiana – the Wayne County Courthouse  (photograph and history)

      Completed in 1893, the Courthouse was constructed of several types of material, two of which were gray granite from Concord, New Hampshire, and lighter gray oolitic limestone from Lawrence County, Indiana.

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