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List of Quarries in Indiana & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles

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  • Bedford, Indiana - “The Bedford Stone Quarries” (in 1884), in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884. 
    "A View of the Bedford Stone Quarries" (in Indiana), "The Manufacturer and Builder," Dec. 1884

    “A View of the Bedford Stone Quarries” (in Indiana)

  • Bedford, Lawrence County, Indiana – Oölitic Limestone Quarries – “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” by George D. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana, in Mine and Quarry, Vol. V, No. 1, July 1910, pp. 410-419.

    The article begins:

    “The Indiana Oölitic limestone district extends from a point near Greencastle on the north, to the Ohio River, and ranges from two to 14 miles in width.  The deposits are from 25 to 100 feet thick.  The active quarries are confined to a comparatively small area called the Oölitic belt, embracing Romona, in Owen County, Stinesville, Ellettsville, Bloomington, Clear Creek and Saunders, in Monroe County; Oölitic, Dark Hollow and Bedford, in Lawrence County, Salem, Washington County, and Corydon, Harrison County.”

  • Photograph on cover, “Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910 “One of the great stone plants in the Indiana oölitic district.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) “Several ‘Y’ channelers on one track – a characteristic practice in the district.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)

    Photograph on cover, “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910

    “One of the great stone plants in the Indiana oölitic district.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)

    “Several ‘Y’ channelers on one track – a characteristic practice in the district.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)

    “Five Sullivan Channelers on the second lift.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) “A hydraulic stripper at work.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)  “Handling channelers outside derrick radius.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) 

    “Five Sullivan Channelers on the second lift.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) 

    “A hydraulic stripper at work.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) 

    “Handling channelers outside derrick radius.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) 

    “Sullivan Y-8 channelers cutting 20 feet deep; this view shows a quarry block turned over and being split with drill and wedges.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) “Ten Sullivan channelers in a well developed quarry.” (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910) Blocks of Indiana limestone on railroad cars (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone: Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910).

    “Sullivan Y-8 channelers cutting 20 feet deep; this view shows a quarry block turned over and being split with drill and wedges.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)

    “Ten Sullivan channelers in a well developed quarry.”  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910)

    Blocks of Indiana limestone on railroad cars  (“Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” Mine and Quarry, July 1910).

  • Bedford, Indiana - Architectural Stone Sales, Inc., Facilities and Sales (present-day company)
  • Bedford, Indiana – Bedford and Louisville Quarry
  • Bedford, Indiana – Stone Storage Yard – “Wall Street,” by Jack Hackney  (colorized postcard photograph, #2603; Mirrocolor Post Card; Nationwide Postcard Co., Arlington, Texas; in Bedford, Indiana.  See Geo. C. Vaughn; mid-1900s; unmailed)
    “Wall Street,” by Jack Hackney  (colorized postcard photograph, #2603; Mirrocolor Post Card; Nationwide Postcard Co., Arlington, Texas; in Bedford, Indiana.  See Geo. C. Vaughn; mid-1900s; unmailed) “Wall Street,” by Jack Hackney, Bedford, Indiana (postcard photograph)
    (Text from the back of the above postcard)  “Quarry Scene Located near Bedford, Indiana.  From these blocks come the finished products.  Indiana limestone is the nation’s building stone and is used for constructing skyscrapers, schools, churches, and private homes.”
  • Bedford, Indiana – the Bedford Foundry and Machine Company  (Advertisement from Stone, Vol. XLIX, No. 1, January 1928, pp. 54)

    Bedford Foundry and Machine Co., Bedford, Ind.
    Bedford Self-Contained Planer

    Bedford Self-Contained Planer: To plane 3 ft. 6 in. wide, 3 ft. 6 in. high, 12 ft., 14 ft., 16 ft. long. All operations direct gear driven. No chains, sturdy economical, built to last. Equip your plant with Bedford machinery.

  • Bedford Foundry and Machine Company advertisement from Stone, January 1928, pp. 54. Bedford Foundry and Machine Company advertisement from Stone, January 1928, pp. 54
  • Bedford, Indiana – The Bedford Quarries Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. i.)
    The Bedford Quarries Company Bedford, Indiana
    W. J. Craig, Manager Quarries: Hoosier, Oolitic, Buff Ridge. Chicago Office: 185 Dearborn Street, W. H. Hill, Sales Agent. New York Agent: Geo. W. White, 160 Fifth Ave.
    Prices Reduced – Beginning October 1, 1895, until further notice, THE BEDFORD QUARRIES COMPANY will sell stone from its quarries at the following prices, f.o.b. quarries
    No. 1 Mill Blocks, Buff or Blue Unscabbled – 13 cents per cubic foot. - Scabbled – 15 cents per cubic foot
    Mixed Mill Blocks
    Unscabbled – 8 cents per cubic foot. - Scabbled – 10 cents per cubic foot
    Sawed Stone, Buff or Blue
    No. 1. Sawed two sides, 28 cents per cubic foot. No. 1. Sawed four sides, 43 cents per cubic foot. Mixed. Sawed two sides, 23 cents per cubic foot. Mixed. Sawed four sides, 38 cents per cubic foot.
    Prices on Dimension Stone will be furnished on application.

    Terms. Net, 60 days. A discount of 5 per cent. will be allowed on all bills paid within 15 days from date of shipment. Subject to draft after 60 days.

  • Bedford, Indiana – The Bedford Indiana Stone Co., Quarrymen and Wholesale Dealers (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. ii.)

    The Bedford Indiana Stone Co. Main Office: No. 19 Baldwin Block, Indianapolis, Ind.
    Quarrymen and Wholesale Dealers in Rough and Sawed Bedford Oolitic Limestone,
    Quarries and Mills at Bedford, Ind.
    The only oolitic quarry in Indiana having competing railroads in the quarries. Direct shipments made via. the L., N.A. & C., E. & R., and the B. & O. S. W. Railways, thus insuring prompt service at all times.
    New York Agents, Messrs. G. P. Sherwood & Co., 150 Nassau Street. Philadelphia Agent,
    Frank Williamson, 2202 Chestnut Street. Chicago Agent, C. C. Witt, 3458 Wabash Avenue.
  • Bedford, Indiana - “Effect of the air hammer on the hands of stonecutters. The limestone quarries of Bedford, Indiana, revisited,” by W. Taylor, D. Wasserman, V. Behurens, D. Reynolds, and S. Samueloff, August 4, 1984, on the www.pubmed.gov web site.
  • Bedford, Indiana - Limestone Quarrying and Processing (circa 1967) (from Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 27.)
    “Anyone who has traveled extensively will certainly have seen famous buildings faced in large part with Indiana limestone.

    “Ind. 37. - Bloomington, Oolitic, and Bedford are centers of stone production (circa 1967). Many of the Nation’s most famous buildings are partially constructed of Indiana oolitic limestone from this area. Quarries are visible from Ind. 37 at Oolitic. Numerous quarries and finishing mills are in the area. Inquire locally for permission to visit finishing mills and quarries.”
  • Bedford, Indiana – Bedford Monumental Works  (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, July, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 7, p. 431)

    Bedford Monumental Works
    Wholesale Dealers in Statuary, Rustic and Rockfaced Monuments, Markers, Vases, Settees, Turned Work, Bases, Sawed and Dimension Stone Etc. Etc.
    We make specialty of Rustic Monuments which we guarantee to be superior in finish to anything produced in Bedford Stone.
    Fine Paris Panel Designs $2.00 per dozen.  Send your tracings for estimates. Lock Box 465.
    Bedford, Ind.
  • Bedford Monumental Works, Indiana, advertisement in The Monumental News, July 1895, pp. 431

    Bedford Monumental Works, Indiana, advertisement in The Monumental News, July 1895

    • Bedford, Indiana – Bedford Monumental Works (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 503. The image of the monument in the August 1895 advertisement, pp. 503, is the same image presented in the July 1894 advertisement above.)

      Bedford Monumental Works,
      Wholesale Dealers in Statuary, Rustic and Rockfaced Monuments, Markers, Vases, Settees, Turned Work, Bases, Sawed and Dimension stone Etc. Etc. We make a Specialty of Rustic Monuments which we guarantee to be superior in finish to anything produced in Bedford Stone. Fine Paris Panel Designs $2.00 per dozen. Send your tracings for estimates. Lock Box 465, Bedford Ind.
  • Bedford, Indiana – Bedford Steam Stone Works (Quarrymen and Stone Dealers) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. inside front cover.)

    Bedford Steam Stone Works

    Quarrymen and Wholesale Dealers in

    Bedford Limestone - Rough, Dimension and Sawed.

    Our Quarries are situated in the famous Dark Hollow Region.

    Our mills and yard are in Bedford, on the L., N. A. & O. E’y, and the E. & R. R’y.

    Mill Blocks Sawed. Flags, Sills, Caps, Coping and Posts.

    Base Stock to Trade Only.

Prices and Quality Guaranteed. We make a specialty of Turned Columns, Posts, Balusters, etc.

    Shipping facilities not equaled here, being the only mill having switches from competing railroads. Estimates given on Stone Fronts, Trimmings, Vaults, etc.

  • Bedford, Indiana – The Bedford Steam Stone Works, Quarrymen and Wholesale Dealers (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. ii.)

    The Bedford Steam Stone Works

    C. H. Thornton, Pres’t. – E. B. Thornton Sec’y

    Quarrymen and Wholesale Dealers in Buff and Blue Bedford Limestone.

    Rough, Dimension and Sawed.

    Quarries in Dark Hollow, Ind. - Mills and Yard at Bedford, Ind., on L. N. A. &: C. and E. & R. Railways.

    The only Stone Mill having switches from Competing Railroads.

    Bedford, Indiana

  • Bedford, Indiana – The Bedford Steam Stone Works (Stone Dealers) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 3.)

    The Bedford Steam Stone Works,

    Bedford, Ind.

    H. C. Thornton, Pres’t. – E. B. Thornton, Sec’y.

    Quarrymen and wholesale Dealers in Buff and Blue Bedford Limestone - Rough, Dimension and Sawed.

    Quarries in Buff Ridge, Ind. Mills and Yard at Bedford, Ind., on C., I. & L., and So. Ind. Railways.

    Planed Mouldings and Turned Balusters.

    The only Stone Mill here having switches from Competing Railroads.

  • Bedford, Indiana – C. D. Donato Cut Stone Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 140.)

    C. D. Donato Cut Stone Co.

    (Incorporated)

    Bedford, Indiana

    Indiana Limestone Cut, Ready To Set - F.O.B. or Delivered - Please Send Plans for Estimates

  • Bedford, Indiana C. S. Norton Bluestone Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. iv.)

    C. S. Norton Bluestone Co., Bedford, Ind.

    “Royal Blue.” – Dark Blue Stone.

  • Bedford, Indiana – C. S. Norton Bluestone Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No.1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 5.)

    C. S. Norton Bluestone Co., Bedford, Ind.

    “Royal Blue” – Dark Blue Stone.

    Howard L. Woody, 24 East 42d St., New York, Gen. Eastern Agent

  • Bedford, Indiana – Chicago & Bedford Stone Company’s Quarry (Oolitic Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    “Among the most valuable building stones of Indiana may be classed the so-called oolitic limestones.  They are of sub-carboniferous age, and chemically almost pure carbonate of lime.  The most noted building stone of this series is obtained from strata believed to be the equivalent of the rocks that outcrop at St. Louis, and that are called St. Louis limestone in the geological reports of Illinois.  The crop of this stone may be followed from Montgomery county on the north to Harrison county on the south.  The workable beds are from 10 to 100 feet in thickness.  The color ranges from grayish-white and bluish-gray to chalk-white.  The structure, as before said, is oolitic (so named from its resemblance to the roe of a fish).  The rounded segregated particles of which it is composed are sometimes so small as to be unrecognizable to the unaided eye, and again so large as to be quite conspicuous.  It may be quarried in blocks of any size and thickness that may be desired.  Prof. Cox reports that he has seen block of it cut out by the steam channeler 6 ½ by 9 ½ inches in thickness and 42 feet long, and, at one of the Bedford quarries, a block of similar thickness and 66 feet long.  At most of the localities where this stone is quarried, blocks of much greater length, thickness and width can be obtained if required; and, says Prof. Cox. ‘Cleopatra’s Needle might be duplicated, should a market be opened for monoliths of that character.’  Chemical analyses of this stone from widely separated localities yield from 96 to 98 per cent of carbonate of lime, showing it to be an almost chemically pure limestone, and of remarkably uniform composition.

    “The following record of tests of strength, etc., made on various specimens of this stone by Gen. Gillmore, will be useful for comparison:  Simpson & Archer’s stone, quarry located four miles east of Spencer, on the Indianapolis & Vincennes railroad; weight of a cubic foot, 140.03 pounds; crushing strength per cubic inch 7,500 pounds; ratio of absorption, 1 : 30.

    Chicago & Bedford Stone Co.’s stone, quarry at Bedford; weight per cubic foot, 146.56 pounds; crushing strength per cubic inch, 11,750 pounds; ratio of absorption, 1 : 28.”

    • Bedford, Indiana – The Chicago and Bedford Stone Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. ii.)

      The Chicago and Bedford Stone Co.

      Bedford, Ind.

      H. L. Thornton, Pres. – E. B. Thornton, Sec’.y

      Cornelius Vanderbilt, W. K. Vanderbilt,

      C. P. Huntington, Robert Goelet, and many other

      “Napoleons of Finance” live in palaces of

      The famous – Bedford Stone – Quarried only by

      The Chicago and Bedford Stone Co.

  • Bedford, Indiana – Consolidated Stone Quarry.
    (colorized postcard photograph #10799; the Acme Graph Co., Chicago; no postmark, early 1900s) Consolidated Stone Quarry
  • Bedford, Indiana – Consolidated Stone Company – the Dark Hollow Quarry (Limestone)  (from “Activity in the Indiana Limestone Field,” in Stone, Vol. XLI, No. 6, June 1920, pp. 280)

  • One Month’s Quarrying.  Stack at the Dark Hollow Quarry of the Consolidated Stone Company, Bedford.” (Indiana) Stack at the Dark Hollow Quarry of the Consolidated Stone Company, Bedford” Indiana
  • Bedford, Indiana – Consolidated Stone Company – Ira A. Correll, Head Carver for the Consolidated Stone Company. (The photograph of the statue below is from Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 5, May 1923, pp. 274.)
    Statue of Lincoln Carved by Ira A. Correll, Head Carver for The Consolidated Stone Company, in Consolidated Dark Hollow Gray Indiana Limestone.” “Statue of Lincoln Carved by Ira A. Correll, Head Carver for The Consolidated Stone Company, in Consolidated Dark Hollow Gray Indiana Limestone” Stone mag, 5-1923
  • Bedford, Indiana – Consolidated Stone Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York.)

    Practicability versus Pretense

    “Selecting stone for a building is much the same as planning a new suit of clothes. The owner desires it to have the appearance of “newness” and naturally his taste turns to bright colors. On further thought, however, his decision is governed by practicability rather than pretense.

    “If the cut stone contractor desires the lasting good-will of his client, he will explain to him the short-lived beauty of the Buff Indiana Limestone and the permanent beauty of the Gray stone.

    “Gray is a symbol of immortality and it is significant that architects have selected stone of this color for edifices that have endured for centuries.

    “From the Consolidated Dark Hollow Quarry at Bedford, Indiana, five thousand carloads of Indiana Limestone are shipped across the continent annually to be used in the erection of various types of buildings. An analysis of our records shows that Gray Indiana Limestone predominates in these shipments. Preference of architects, when natural stone is specified, is for Gray Indiana Limestone.

    “And this preference for Gray is not surprising to those who are experienced with the use of natural stone. The Gray is of firmer texture and finer in grain than the general run of Indiana Limestone. In any climate and under any conditions, Gray Indiana Limestone weathers beautifully.

    The Consolidated Stone Company, Bedford, Indiana

    Representatives:

    Michael Cohen & Co., 8 W. 40 th St., New York City

    J. W. Ward, 716 Marquette Bldg., Chicago, Ill.

    G. W. Muir, Fort Washington, Pa.

    George W. Houlsby, 716 Marquette Bldg., Chicago, Ill.

    Martin Brick Co., Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa.

    R. E. Farley, 421 Free Press Bldg., Detroit, Mich.

    J. Blackburn, 716 A. & R. Bldg., Kansas City, Mo.

    A. W. Steward, Builders’ Exchange, Toronto, Ont.

    E. E. Dickinson, Bedford, Ind.

  • Bedford, Indiana – Consolidated Stone Company – Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” (from Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 6, June 1926, pp. 359-361)

    “From all parts of the United States members of the Benevolent and Patriotic Order of Elks will assemble in Chicago next month for the annual national convention of the order and for the formal opening and dedication of the Elks National Memorial Headquarters.  This beautiful edifice is a memorial to the dead heroes of the World War and a shrine for the living, in addition it is a monument of stone and marble….”

    “…And so Indiana Limestone was selected for the entire exterior facing of the structure….”

    “…To obtain the color effects for the interior thirty different kinds of marble, including marbles from Belgium, Germany, France, Italy and Greece, were used in conjunction with many marbles from quarries in this country, including marbles for the walls from Tennessee and trim and columns and floor from Vermont, Alabama, and Missouri….”

    “For interior walls of the memorial something like 22,000 cubic feet of Eastman’s Cream Marble from Vermont was used.  For the columns marbles from France and Italy were used in conjunction with domestic marbles, among others being Breche Centella, Premier Breche Violet, Madre Veined Alabama, a domestic marble; Eastman’s Cippolino, also a domestic marble; Fantastico Vert and Fantastico Viola, Premier Vert Maurin, Premier Imported Verde Antique, Route Lumi, Rouge Rubo, Premier Languedor and Sonora….”

    “The memorial was designed by Edgerton Swartout, New York…The Indiana Limestone for the exterior facing for the exterior columns and decorative details was furnished by the Consolidated Stone Company and the cutting and carving was done in the plant of Matthews Brothers Company, Bloomington, Indiana….”

    Part 1 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361. Part 2 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361. Part 3 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361.

    Part 1 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361.

    Part 2 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361.

    Part 3 of 3 of the article, “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361.

    “The Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois). Erected to the memory of the hero members of the order who fell in the World War. Exterior of Grey Indiana Limestone from the quarries of the Consolidated Stone Company. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361) “Entrance detail of Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois), showing circular colonnade of main structure and smaller office building in left. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361) “Great Memorial Hall in Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois), a study in the Harmony of colors in marble. Thirty different varieties, both foreign and domestic being used in the walls, columns, trim and decorative objects. Architect: Edgerton Swartout. This and other interior view of this building loaned by the Tompkins Kiel Marble Company.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361)

    “The Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois). Erected to the memory of the hero members of the order who fell in the World War. Exterior of Grey Indiana Limestone from the quarries of the Consolidated Stone Company. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.”

    “Entrance detail of Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois), showing circular colonnade of main structure and smaller office building in left. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.”

    “Great Memorial Hall in Elks Memorial Headquarters building, Chicago (Illinois), a study in the Harmony of colors in marble. Thirty different varieties, both foreign and domestic being used in the walls, columns, trim and decorative objects. Architect: Edgerton Swartout. This and other interior view of this building loaned by the Tompkins Kiel Marble Company.”

    “An entrance arched doorway of Memorial Hall, Elks Memorial Headquarters building, showing columns of Breche Centella Marble in foreground. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361) “An interior stair well in Elks Memorial Headquarters building. Showing the circle on circle domed ceiling and walls. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361) “A niche in Memorial all of Elks Memorial Headquarters building, showing two of the columns of marble. The base and urn are of Black and Gold Marble.” (from “Elks National Memorial An Architectural Masterpiece in Stone and Marbles,” from “Stone” June 1926, pp. 359-361)

    “An entrance arched doorway of Memorial Hall, Elks Memorial Headquarters building, showing columns of Breche Centella Marble in foreground. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.”

    “An interior stair well in Elks Memorial Headquarters building. Showing the circle on circle domed ceiling and walls. Architect: Edgerton Swartout.”

    “A niche in Memorial all of Elks Memorial Headquarters building, showing two of the columns of marble. The base and urn are of Black and Gold Marble.”

  • Bedford, Indiana – Cross & Rowe (Monument Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 507.)

    Cross & Rowe.

    Bedford, Indiana.

    Wholesale Rustic Works.

    Manufacturers of Rustic Monuments, Vases, Settees, Chairs, Markers and Log Curbing. Estimates given on any work in Bedford Stone. Photo Gravure Designs. On sheets 11 x 14 inches, $2 per dozen.

  • Bedford, Indiana - Elliott Stone Co., Inc., Limestone Quarry (present-day company)
  • Bedford, Indiana - Evans Quarries (present-day company) 1201 Limestone Drive, Bedford; (812) 279-3697.

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