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Geology Resources - Louisiana


Research Resources - Louisiana


The Louisiana Stone Industry

  • 1882 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry in 1882 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, J. S. Powell, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.  Excerpts from the chapters on 1)  "Structural Materials" and 2)  "The Useful Minerals of the United States."
  • 1883 and 1884 - The Louisiana Stone Industry, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Years 1883 and 1884 (PDF images of sections), Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1885.
  • 1885 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry in 1885 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1885 (PDF images of sections), David T. Day, Geologist, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1887. Excerpt from the chapter on "Structural Materials," by H. S. Sproull.
  • 1886 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1886 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1886 (PDF images of sections), David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1887.  Excerpts from the chapters on 1)  Structural Materials, by William C. Day; 2) Abrasive Materials, by William A. Raborg, and 3) Novaculite, by George M. Turner.
  • 1887 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1887, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1887 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1888
  • 1888 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1888, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1888 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1890
  • 1889 and 1890 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1889, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1889 and 1890 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1892
  • 1891 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1891, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1891 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1893
  • 1892 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1892, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1892 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1893
  • 1893 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1893, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1893 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1894
  • 1894 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1894, Excerpts from Sixteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part IV. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1894, Nonmetallic Products, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1894.
  • 1895 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1895, Excerpts from Seventeenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part III. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1895, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1896.
  • 1896 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1896, Excerpts from Eighteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part V. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1896, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1897.
  • 1897 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1897, Excerpts from Nineteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part V. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1896, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1898.
  • 1898 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1898, Excerpts from Twentieth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part VI. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1898, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal and Coke. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899.
  • 1899 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1899, Excerpts from Twenty-first Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part VI. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1899, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal and Coke. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1901.
  • 1900 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1900, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1900 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining and Mineral Resources, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1901
  • 1901 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1901, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1901 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining and Mineral Resources, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1902
  • 1902 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1902, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1902 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1904.
  • 1903 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1903, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1903 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1904.
  • 1904 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1904, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1904 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1905.
  • 1905 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1905, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1905 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1906.
  • 1906 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1906, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1906 (PDF images of sections), George Otis Smith, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1907.
  • 1907 - The Louisiana Stone and Building Industry, 1907, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1907 (PDF images of sections), Part II.  Nonmetallic Products, George Otis Smith, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey,  Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1908.
  • 1908 - The Louisiana Stone Industry, 1908, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1908, Part II - Nonmetallic Products (PDF images of sections), Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1909. Excerpts from the book are from the chapter on "Stone," by A. T. Coons.

    Building Stone Distribution:  Distribution of the various kinds of building stone and the localities where the different varieties of stone are now being quarried or may be quarried in the future for Louisiana are:  Limestone and sandstone.

  • 1995 - The Mineral Industry ofLouisiana.  This chapter was prepared under a memorandum of Understanding between the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey for collection on all nonfuel minerals. [PDF]

    "Sandstone, anhydrite, and shell were three minor mineral commodities in production.  Two conventional surface mines produced 13,500 tons (14,900 short tons) of sandstone in Sabine and Vernon parishes.  Winn Rock Inc. produced 179,000 tons in Winn Parish.." According to Table 3, entitled, "Louisiana Crushed Stone Sold or Used, by Kind," there was 1 sandstone quarry in 1993 and 6 in 1994 in Louisiana.

  • 1996 - The Mineral Industry ofLouisiana.  This chapter was prepared under a memorandum of Understanding between the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey for collection on all nonfuel minerals. [PDF]

    According to Table 2 entitled, "Louisiana Crushed Stone Sold or Used, by Kind," there were 6 sandstone quarries (producing 707 metric tons) in 1994 and 16 sandstone quarries (producing 2,540 metric tons) in 1995 in Louisiana.

  • 1997 - The Mineral Industry ofLouisiana.  This chapter was prepared under a memorandum of Understanding between the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey for collection on all nonfuel minerals. [PDF]

    According to Table 2 entitled, "Louisiana Crushed Stone Sold or Used, by Kind," there were 16 sandstone quarries (producing 2,540 metric tons) in 1995 and 13 sandstone quarries (producing 2,290 metric tons) in 1996 in Louisiana.

  • 1998 - The Mineral Industry ofLouisiana.  This chapter was prepared under a memorandum of Understanding between the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey for collection on all nonfuel minerals.  [PDF]

    According to Table 2 entitled, "Louisiana Crushed Stone Sold or Used, by Kind," there were 13 sandstone quarries (producing 2,290 metric tons) and no limestone quarries in 1996 in Louisiana.  In 1997 there were 9 sandstone quarries (producing 1,570 metric tons) and 4 limestone quarries in Louisiana.

  • 1999 - The Mineral Industry ofLouisiana.  This chapter was prepared under a memorandum of Understanding between the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey for collection on all nonfuel minerals.  [PDF]

    According to Table 2 entitled, "Louisiana Crushed Stone Sold or Used, by Kind," there 3 limestone quarries, 9 sandstone quarries (producing 1,570 metric tons), and 1 miscellaneous stone quarry in 1997 in Louisiana.  In 1998 only 1 sandstone quarry is listed.

  • 2000 - Mining inLouisiana, National Mining Association, Washington, D. C.  [PDF]
  • 1994 - 2005 - The Mineral Industry of Louisiana - United States Geological Survey  (1994 through 2005)
  • Building Stones of America:  50 Years of the NIST Stone Test Wall, National Center for Preservaton Technology and Training, Natchitoches, Louisiana.
  • Generalized Geology of Louisiana, presented by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University. [PDF]

    Lime and stone are two of the important nonfuel minerals in Louisiana.  "...Gypsum and anhydrite are produced from a single quarry in a slat-dome caprock exposure in Winn Parish in north-central Louisiana. Limestone occurs as part of the caprock at this dome, and as Cretaceous limestone brought to the surface by two salt domes in Bienville Parish. Lime is produced principally from clam shells dredged in south Louisiana."

  • Louisiana's Lack of Stone Quarries in the 1820s - According to Frommer's New Orleans 2003 "Overview of Great River Road," there were no stone quarries in Louisiana in the 1820s.  Stone was not used very often in building construction in Louisiana.  Stone that was used was "...shipped by sea from New England and transported up the Mississippi from New Orleans." (The link from which the preceding information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.frommers.com/destinations/greatriverroad/0780010001.html>

Printed and Online Sources

Note:  Louisiana Geological Survey Publications:  Use this link to find ordering information for Louisiana Geological Survey Publications at the web site.  (The descriptions of theLouisianaGeological Survey publications below are from the "Louisiana Geological Survey Publications," 2001.)

Google Book Search: You can use Google Book Search to search for specific subjects in thousands of books available through the Google Book Search - both books under copyright and in the public domain. Hundreds of books are added regularly, so check back if you do not find books on the subject for which you are seeking information.

  • Addenda to theLouisianaGeological Survey Geological Bulletin No. 45, 93-03, by F. M. Swain and E. G. Anderson, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1993, 3 pp.  (Should be purchased in addition to Geological Bulletin No. 45.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • ArkansasandNorth Louisiana, 1953, 11 pp. 
  • The Baton Rouge Geologic Quadrangle, 2000, by Paul V. Heinrich and Whitney J. Autin, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000,multicolored,sheet size 28 x 48 in. (Describes and illustrates the surficial geology of the Baton Rouge quadrangles.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Bibliography and Index ofLouisianaGeology, 1961 to 1979, by Michael J. Nault and Ghassan N. Rassam. Publisher Baton Rouge, La.: Dept. of Natural Resources, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1981, 149 pp.  (Includes 2,269 titles and a serials list.  Each entry is indexed by subject, parish, and rock units.  Includes a  generalized geologic map, and a columnar section of Louisiana.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Bibliography and Index of Theses and Dissertations on the Geology of Louisiana, compiled by M. J. Nault, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1980, 36 pp. (Lists 334 theses and dissertations on Louisiana geology completed through December 1979.  Titles indexed by subject-geologic time, key word, parish, stratigraphy and salt dome, subsurface oil and gas field or area, and chronology.  Also includes a generalized geologic map, and a columnar section of Louisiana. Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Bread and Respect: The Italians ofLouisiana, by Jerome J. Salomone, Anthony V. Margavio New Orleans: Pelican Publishing Company, 2002, 320 pp.
  • Buildings ofLouisiana(part of the Buildings of the United States series), by Karen Kingsley, London: Oxford University Press, and New York: Oxford University Press, 2003, 512 pp.
  • Earth Stuff, Minerals and Rocks: A Primer, by Bradford C. Hanson,1999, 35 pp. plus appendices.  (Educational Series introduction.  Basic presentation of definitions of minerals, crystals, and rocks, with an emphasis and history on those found in Louisiana.  Groups information into grades K-2, 3 -6, and 7 -9.  Includes puzzles and a  glossary; suitable for transparencies (photocopy available) draft; Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Field Papers inSouth ArkansasandNorth Louisiana, 1961, 89 pp. 
  • Geologic Map ofLouisiana, 1984, compiled by J. I. Snead and R. P. McCulloh, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:500,000, multicolored, sheet size 44 x 42 in.  (Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geologic Mapping inLouisiana, March 1998,LouisianaGeological Survey, 2 pp.  Presents the background of geologic mapping in the state and summarizes geologic mapping activities since 1985, with special emphasis on cooperative agreements with the U. S. Geological Survey for compilations of surface geology at intermediate scales (1:250,000-and 1:100,000-scale quadrangle formats. Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geological Map ofLouisiana (Blue Line Print)  Scale 1 inch equals 8 miles, 1946.  (map)
  • Geologic Map of the Fort Polk Area, Vernon Parish, Louisiana 1998, GQ-1, by David J. Hinds, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:24,000, multicolored, digitally produced, sheet size 28 x 36 in.  (Includes one dip-oriented structure section at 10x vertical exaggeration.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geologic Map of the Slagle Area,VernonParish,Louisiana, 1998, GQ-2, by David J. Hinds, scale1:24,000, multicolored, digitally produced, sheet size 33x36 in.  (Includes one dip-oriented structure section at 10x vertical exaggeration.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology and Ground-Water Resources of Southwestern Louisiana, by P. H. Jones, A. N. Turcan, Jr., and H. E. Skibitzke, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1954, map pack, 285 pp.  (Discusses groundwater resources of Acadia, Allen, Beauregard, Calcasieu, Cameron, Evangeline, Iberia, Jefferson Davis, Lafayette, St. Landry, St. Martin, St. Mary, and Vermilion parishes; also, the late Tertiary and Quaternary geology of the area.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology and History of the Belle Isle Salt Mine, the Southernmost Five Islands Salt Dome, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, by Donald H. Kupfer, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1998, 31 pp. plus appendix.  (An in-depth discussion of the mine with a diagram of the mine structure and a detailed map of its workings, minerals, and structural and surface geology.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Acadia and Jefferson Davis Parishes, by W. R. Paine, Louisiana Geological Survey, 962, map pack, 277 pp.  (Deals primarily with subsurface Tertiary geology, with special emphasis on the Frio and Anahuac formations with a discussion of growth faulting, regional faulting, and sedimentation.  Discusses producing fields and lists wildcat wells.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Avoyelles and Rapides Parishes, by H. N. Fisk, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1940, 240 pp.  (Discusses ancient and present channels of the Mississippi and Red rivers; Pleistocene physiographic history; and stratigraphy and sedimentation of the Miocene formations.  Includes stratigraphy, structure, and production of the Cheneyville and Eola fields and detailed structure maps for these fields. Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Beauregard and Allen Parishes, by W. C. Holland, L. W. Hough, and G. E. Murray, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1952, map pack, 224 pp.  (Discusses subsurface stratigraphy, structure, and petroleum geology of the area. Includes two multicolored geologic maps (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Bossier Parish (unpublished).Printed map of parish is available through Parish Geologic Maps.(See Maps and Atlases, Geologic Maps section.)
  • Geology of Caldwell and Winn Parishes, by J. Huner, Jr., Louisiana Geological Survey, 1939, 356 pp.  (Discusses geography and physiography of the alluvial valleys of the Ouachita River and Saline Bayou, the upland terraces, and hill country; surface outcrops and stratigraphy; salt domes, petroleum geology, and other economic resources.  Includes two multicolored geologic maps (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Catahoula and Concordia Parishes, by W. D. Chawner, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1936, 232 pp.  (Discusses geography and physiography of the alluvial valley of the Mississippi River, the upland terraces, and hill country; surface outcrops and stratigraphy; and economic and petroleum geology.  Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500),list of maps, and annotated bibliography.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of De Soto and Red River Parishes, by G. E. Murray, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1948, map pack, 312 pp.  (Discusses physiography, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology of the area.  Includes two multicolored geologic maps (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Evangeline and St. Landry Parishes, by G. G. Varvaro, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1957, map pack, 295 pp.  (Discusses physiography, surface and subsurface geology, and petroleum geology of the parishes and surrounding area.  Lists all wells drilled in the two parishes.  Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Grant andLa SalleParishes, by H. N. Fisk, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1938, 246 pp.  (Discusses physiography, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology; distribution, correlation, and age of Pleistocene terrace deposits.  Briefly outlines archeology, early settlement, and development of the parishes.  Includes two multicolored geologic maps (scale 1:62,500)and annotated bibliography. Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Iberia Parish, by H. V. Howe and C. K. Moresi, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1931, 187 pp.  (Includes discussions of physiography, with special reference to Pleistocene terraces and to drainage; stratigraphy; origin of the salt domes and caprock; and mineral resources.  Includes annotated bibliography.)  (Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Lafayette and St. Martin Parishes, by H. V. Howe and C. K. Moresi, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1933, 238 pp.  (Discusses Pleistocene terraces, Mississippi River meanders, and drainage; also, stratigraphy, salt domes, and prospective domes.  Includes annotated bibliography.  Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology ofNatchitochesParish, by H. V. Andersen, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1992, 227 pp.  (Discusses physiography, surface and subsurface geology, and structure of the parish. Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Ouachita Parish, by K. K. Wang, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1952, map pack,126 pp.  (Discusses physiography and surface and subsurface geology of the parish and surrounding area.  Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Sabine Parish, by H. V. Andersen, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1960, map pack, 164 pp.  (Discusses stratigraphy and structure of the parish.  Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology ofVernonParish, by R. N. Welch, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1942, 90 pp.  (Discusses geology and physiography of the area.  Contains subsurface contour maps, cross sections, and well data.  Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of Webster Parish, by J. L. Martin and others, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1954, map pack, 252 pp.  (Discusses physiography, stratigraphy, and petroleum geology. Includes multicolored geologic map (scale 1:62,500).  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Geology of the Chestnut Salt Dome Area, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, by R. F. Dinnean, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1958, 9 pp. Geological Summary No.1. (Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Guide to Rocks and Minerals ofLouisiana, by Riley Milner, 2001 (draft) Black Gold Beneath the Bayous, developed by Bob Bradley and Bradford Hanson, 2000.  (A single CD-ROM, ver. 1, designed as a comprehensive electronic teaching product developed specifically for science teachers that target oil and gas topics on Louisiana and the Gulf of Mexico.  Contains professional development materials that teachers can utilize to develop lesson plans, and is divided into seven chapters that contain text accompanied by interactive color graphics, animation, audio and video clip-its, illustrated concepts and embedded definitions.  (Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • History of Louisiana From Its First Discovery and Settlement, To The Present Time, by  E. Bunner, Brookhaven Press 1842 (reprint), 273 pp. ISBN: 1403500290.
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • LouisianaBuildings, 1720-1940: The Historic American Buildings Survey, by Jessie Poesch (Editor), Barbara Sorelle Bacot (Editor), Louisiana State University Press, August 1997, 448 pp.
  • LouisianaGeofacts, February 2001, Louisiana Geological Survey, 8 pp.  (Provides summary information on not well known, but interesting geological facts of Louisiana.   Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Louisiana Geological Survey Reports (1899-1909)  Early Reports of the Louisiana Geological Survey:  The Louisiana Geological Survey's nine preliminary publications, from 1899 to 1909, are out of print but are available for in-person review at the publications office, with the exception of two issues: the First Annual Report of the Louisiana State Geological Survey,1869, and the Third Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Louisiana, 1872.
  • Louisiana, Yesterday and Today: A Historical Guide to the State, by John Wilds, Charles Dufour (Contributor), Walter Cowan (Contributor), Louisiana State University Press, June 1, 1996, 304 pp.
  • Lower Mississippi River Delta: Reports on the Geology of Plaquemines and St. Bernard Parishes, by R. J. Russell and others, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1936, 454 pp.  (Includes reports on physiography of lower Mississippi River delta and salt domes, annotated bibliography, list of maps, petrology of two Mississippi River subdeltas, pebbles of the Chandeleur Islands, recent mollusks, Indian mounds, and vegetation of marshes and mounds. Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana,” in The Monumental News, September 1894.
  • “An Avenue of Tombs, Metairie Cemetery” (1894) “Albert Sidney Johnston Statue, Metairie Cemetery” (1894)

    “An Avenue of Tombs, Metairie Cemetery”

    “Albert Sidney Johnston Statue, Metairie Cemetery”

  • Mineral Resources Map of Louisiana, 1999, compiled by Paul V. Heinrich and Richard P. McCulloh, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:500,000, multicolored, sheet size 40 x 44 in.  (Shows with a combination of polygons and iconic symbols the occurrences of industrial, and nonfuel minerals of potential economic significance.)
  • The Nature and Evolution of Salt Domes and Their Caprock, by J. D. Martinez, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1980, 16 pp.  (Briefly discusses salt structures, internal deformation patterns, cap rock, utilization of salt domes, and needed research and planning.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • New Orleans Cemeteries: Life in the Cities of the Dead, by Robert Florence, Mason Florence (Photographer), Ann Cahn (Editor), Batture Pr Inc., October 1997, 211 pp.
  • Origin of the Cap Rock ofLouisianaSalt Domes, by R. E. Taylor, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1938, 191 pp.  (Discusses origin and general geology of the salt and cap rock of Louisiana salt domes; chemical composition of salt; minerals in salt and cap rock; and the origin and occurrence of sulphur.  Includes map of Louisiana salt domes.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • “Peace at Last: Lone Oak Cemetery, St. Gabriel, Louisiana,” by Ryan M. Seidemann, in the AGS Quarterly, Bulletin of the Association for Gravestone Studies, Vol. 32, No. 1 & 2, Winter & Spring 2008, pp. 3-4.
  • A Preliminary Report on the Geology ofLouisiana, by G. D. Harris and A. C. Veatch, 1899.  (Contains three sections: historical review, general geology, and special papers.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Quaternary Geology of the Lower Mississippi Valley, 1989, compiled by R. T. Saucier and J. I. Snead, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:1,000,000,sheet size 31 x 35 in.  (Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Regional Cross Sections, Louisiana Gulf Coast, Eastern Part, by D.G. Bebout and D. R. Gutierrez, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1983, 10 pp.  (Covers an area extending from West Feliciana, Pointe Coupee, St. Martin, Iberia, and St. Mary parishes on the west to the Louisiana-Mississippi state line on the east.)
  • Regional Cross Sections, Louisiana Gulf Coast, Western Part, by D. G. Bebout and D. R. Gutierrez, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1982, 11 pp. (Covers an area extending from the Sabine River on the west to Pointe Coupee, St. Martin, and Iberia parishes on the east; to the north the sections extend above the deeply buried Lower Cretaceous shelf margin.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Regional Cross Sections, North Louisiana, by L. G. Eversull, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1984,10 pp.  (Covers an area extending from Caddo, De Soto, and Sabine parishes on the west to West Carroll, Franklin, Concordia, and Avoyelles parishes on the east and from the Arkansas-Louisiana boundary on the north to Township 1 on the south.)
  • A Report on the Geology of Louisiana, Containing Special Papers by Different Authors, by G. D. Harris, A. C. Veatch, and J. A. Pacheco, 1902.  (Contains eight divisions that cover geography, geology, cartography, oil, and hydrology.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Report of 1907, by G. D. Harris.  (Contains three bulletins on geology, cartography, and rock salt.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Report of 1909, by G. D. Harris, I. Perrine, and W. E. Hopper.  (Focuses on oil and gas in northwestern Louisiana with special reference to the Caddo field.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Reports of 1905, by G. D. Harris, A. C. Veatch, and others.  (Contains four bulletins on magnetism, hydrology, and tide gage work.  Available for review at the Louisiana  Geological Survey.)
  • Reports on the Geology of Cameron and Vermilion Parishes, by H. V. Howe and others, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1935, 242 pp.  (Discusses Pleistocene Mississippi River deltas, cheniers, Gulf Coast subsidence, and isostatic data of Mississippi sedimentation; also, salt domes and microfossils of the Potamides matsoni zone.  Includes list of maps and annotated bibliography.  Out of print; photocopy available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Reports on the Geology of Iberville and Ascension Parishes, by H. V. Howe and others, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1938, 223 pp.  (Includes reports on the geography and physiography of the central portion of the existing delta of the Mississippi River and adjacent terraces; salt domes; Indian mounds; and fossils.)
  • Roadside Geology ofLouisiana, by Darwin R. Spearing, Mountain Press Publishing Company, Incorporated, September 1995, 225 pp., ISBN: 0878423249.
  • Rural Southern Gravestones: Sacred Artifacts in the Upland South Folk Cemetery,” by Donald Gregory Jeane, Markers IV, pp. 55-84, Association for Gravestone Studies. (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, USA)
  • The Second Annual Report of the Geological Survey ofLouisianato the General Assembly, by F.V.Hopkins,1871.  (Discusses the first appearance of a preliminary map showing formations.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • South Louisiana Geopressured Tertiary Sandstones, 1984, by R. P. McCulloh, E. C. Kosters, and M. A. Pino, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:500,000, black and white, sheet size 21 x 42 in.  (Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • St. John'sBentonite Report,Claiborne Parish,Louisiana, by C. O. Durham, Jr., and others,1962, one 24 x 18 -in. folded sheet.  (Maps bentonite area and discusses geology, occurrence, and reserves.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Supplementary and Final Report of a Geological Reconnaissance of the State ofLouisiana, by E.W.Hilgard,1869.  (Contains an overview of mineral resources and general topographic, agricultural, and botanical features in specific regional areas.  Available for review at the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • Surface Geologic Mapping inLouisiana:  History, Present Status, and Future Prospects, 92-01, by R. P. McCulloh, Louisiana Geological Survey, 1992, 20 pp.  (Open-File Series; Reviews geologic mapping activity in Louisiana from 1934, comparing the decline in geologic mapping in Louisiana to the national decline.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • The Technology of Marble Quarrying, U. S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 106, by Oliver Bowles, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1916.
  • Tour of Salt Dome Caprock Features, Winn Rock Quarry, Winn Parish, LA, J. R. Kyle and M. R. Ulrich, 1993, 48 pp.  (Available from the Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, Austin)
  • The Value of Geologic Maps,LouisianaGeological Survey, June 2000, 4 pp.  (Discusses the myriad potential uses, applications, and benefits of surface geologic maps of the state, with a figure illustrating the cumulative map production by parish at scales of 1:62,500 and greater.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)
  • The Ville Platte Geologic Quadrangle, 1999 geology by John Snead, Paul Heinrich, and Richard P. McCulloh, Louisiana Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000, multicolored, sheet size 28 x 48 in.  (Describes and illustrates the surficial geology of the Ville Platte quadrangle.  Available from the Louisiana Geological Survey.)

Quarries & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles

(The following list ofLouisianaquarries is not a complete list of all of the historical quarries in the state, only the ones I have been able to locate.  If you know of more historical quarries inLouisiana, please contact me. Peggy B. Perazzo) 

  • Active Quarries in Louisiana (present-day), listed on Superyellowpages.com.
  • Lake Charles, Louisiana - Stephen Hess Marble Shop. The following information is from The Monumental News, “Trades Notes” section, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 502.

    “Stephen Hesse of Winfield, Kansas, operates a marble shop at Lake Charles, La., during the fall and winter.”

  • Pineville, Louisiana – the Pineville Marble and Granite Works (postcard photograph; Picto-Cards, Kaeser & Blair, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio; early 1900s; unmailed)
    (From the postcard) “Pineville Marble and Granite Works Owned and Operated by F. M. Smith, since 1919. The designs shown give you an idea of the many types of memorials we are able to offer you. Anything furnished in marble or granite. From smallest headstones to largest family memorials. Telephones 668-1227, Pineville, Louisiana.” “Associated with Smith’s Memorials, 1818 East Broad St., Lake Charles, La.” Pineville Marble and Granite Works, Pineville, Louisiana
  • Sabine Parish, located halfway between Shreveport and Lake Charles, Louisiana - Stone Quarry now the centerpiece of the Hodges Gardens, Park, and Wilderness Area.  According to Lowell G. McManus of Louisiana:  "...the area of (the) 225-acre lake and (the) formal gardens began as a quarry, and large outcrops are abundant.  The quarry was developed around the turn of the 20th century by or for either the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf Railroad or the Kansas City Southern Railway (which the former became on April 1, 1900).  The stone was used for construction of the railroad and/or its port facilities at Port Arthur, Texas.  Most might have been used as crushed stone, but note that the Hodges History page speaks of stonemasons.."  Click here to read about the history of the park and wilderness area.
  • Sabine Parish,Louisiana- Sandstone Mine.  According to the "The Mineral Industry of Louisiana," 1996, "Two conventional surface mines produced 13,500 tons (14,900 short tons) of sandstone in Sabine and Vernon parishes.   [PDF]
  • VernonParish,Louisiana- Sandstone Mine.  According to the "The Mineral Industry of Louisiana," 1996, "Two conventional surface mines produced 13,500 tons (14,900 short tons) of sandstone in Sabine and Vernon parishes."  [PDF]
  • Winfield, Louisiana - Winn Rock, Inc., Quarry  (10264 Hwy. 84, Winnfield, LA 71483; (318) 628-3523)  (present-day company)  According to Lowell G. McManus of Louisiana:  "The rock (at the Winn Rock, Inc., quarry) is a salt-dome caprock, but there are historic references that call it a 'marble quarry.'  Perhaps there was some structural stone to be found there in the past.  In any case, caprock has been quarried there since at least 1936.  There is an old post card picture at < http://www.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genInfo.php?locIndex=3645>.  This rock is crushed and used in road construction."
  • Winn Parish,Louisiana- Winn Rock, Inc., Anhydrite Quarry.  According to the "The Mineral Industry of Louisiana," 1996, The "Winn Rock Inc. company produced about $179,000 tons of anhydrite from a quarry in Winn Parish."  [PDF]

Structures and Monuments in Which Louisiana was Used

  • The Finished Products fromLouisiana Stone in Florida
    • St. Petersburg, Florida - the White Gardens and Mosaic Walk of the States on the grounds of the Science Center of Pinellas County (Scroll down to the “White Gardens and Mosaic Walk of The States” entry.)

      In the White Gardens there is a Walk of States in which stone from each state was contributed for inclusion in the walk.  Sandstone was included as Louisiana's representative stone in the Walk of States.

  • The Finished Products from Louisiana Stone in Louisiana
    • Hodges Gardens, Park, and Wilderness Area in Sabine Parish, located halfway between Shreveport and Lake Charles, Louisiana - the old stone quarry is now the centerpiece of the Hodges Gardens, Park, and Wilderness Area.  According to local historian, Lowell G. McManus of Leesville, Louisiana:  "...the area of (the) 225-acre lake and (the) formal gardens began as a quarry, and large outcrops are abundant.  The quarry was developed around the turn of the 20th century by or for either the Kansas City, Pittsburg and Gulf Railroad or the Kansas City Southern Railway (which the former became on April 1, 1900).  The stone was used for construction of the railroad and/or its port facilities at Port Arthur, Texas.  Most might have been used as crushed stone, but note that the Hodges History page speaks of stonemasons..."
  • The Finished Products from Louisiana Stone in Washington, D.C
    • Washington, D.C. - the Louisiana Memorial Stone contributed to the Washington Monument (photograph and history), presented by the National Park Service. The information below is from the National Park Service files and is presented with a photograph of the contributed Louisiana stone.

      The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones in placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Louisiana Memorial Stone entry can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

      The Louisiana Memorial Stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 2.

      The Washington Monument web site has recently been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument.

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

      The following information relating to the Louisiana Memorial Stone can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 2.

      Name: Louisiana

      Level: 40-ft.

      Donor: State of Louisiana

      Dates: 1850s/1887

      Original material: marble

      Dimensions: 2' x 3' 11"

      Sculptor/Carver: not known

      Original inscription: The State of Louisiana. Ever Faithful to the Constitution and the Union.

      Documented material history:

      • 1850s: “...A block of Penn. marble has been furnished as a substitute [for the original] and the inscription and device copied from the former, with a little variation at the monument.” [RW]

      • 1880: “White Marble in Lapidarium” [CG]

      • 1887: “The contract for the insertion of the Marble was awarded January 2, 1887 to Burns & Sons of Washington, D.C....This was mentioned in the Senate Miscellaneous Document No. 22, 50th Congress, January 4, 1888....June 20, 1884 Dr. D.S. Waddell in a letter gave notice that he will introduce in the Legislature a bill to substitute a block of Marble....” [MR]

      Documented information on original stone:

      • 1849: “A stone has been prepared in New Orleans for the National Monument at Washington. It is a slab of sand-stone from almost the only quarry in Louisiana, and, though it is said to be rather friable, is the best the State affords.” [Adams Sentinel (Gettysburg), December 3, 1849.]

      • 1850: “From Louisiana, a block of light-colored freestone...” [DNI, August 7, 1850.]

      • 1850s: “Louisiana presented a block of native free-stone which has proved to be very indifferent by its crumbling to pieces soon after its insertion in the monument....” [RW]

      • 1880: Gedney drawing

      • 1880: “Stone badly disintegrated - part of inscription obliterated. Stone apparently of Coral formation....” [CG]

      • 1885: “[Original stone] Entirely decayed” [Sched.]

      Images:

      • 1850s Wilcox drawing

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

      • 2000 NPS slides


Stone Carvers, Stone Cutters, etc., in Louisiana

(None available at this time.)

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