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List of Quarries in Indiana & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles

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  • Brazil (south-west of), Clay County, Indiana - the Henry Ashley Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 83.)

    Building-Stone. - The sandstone which overlies the main ‘Block’ coal I, is, in places an excellent building-stone, and is extensively used in Brazil (Indiana) for making foundations, lintels, steps, and other parts of buildings....”

    “The limestone that overlies the upper seam of ‘Block’ coal K, was quarried on Mr. Henry Ashley’s place, about a half mile south-west of Brazil, many years ago, for building abutments to bridges and culverts on the national road; It ranges from two to ten feet in thickness, and may be found at a number of places on the Ashley land, on Garlick & Collins’ land north of Brazil, and on the property of Mr. Grimes, in the neighborhood of the village of Ashboro. It cracks and falls to pieces after some years’ exposure to the action of the weather, and cannot be considered a durable building stone....”

  • Bremen, Indiana - Marble Shop of M. B. Grose & A. Kinzie The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “New Firms. M. B. Grose and A. Kinzie will open a marble shop in the room formerly occupied by Edward Geiselman, in Bremen, Ind. ”

  • Brookville (north of), Franklin County, Indiana - the Schrichte Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, “Building Materials” section, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick.

    “The Localities where this rock is found are so numerous, and so generally known that to point them out would be superfluous. North of Brookville, one mile and a half in a direct line, the rock of which we have been speaking disappears under a stratum of (probably) magnesian limestone, which varies from six to twenty inches in thickness. This stone is extensively used for heavy masonry, and range-work, of various kinds; its qualities have been mentioned in a former part of this report and need not be repeated here. It is extensively quarried by Mr. Schrichte, on the south-east quarter of section 17, town 9, range 2 west....”

  • Bulltown (near), Franklin County, Indiana - the Alfred Deter Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick...."

    “Alfred Deter has, adjoining the village of Bulltown, in Posey township, a good quarry in section 13, town 12, range 11 east. This is the most western quarry I have seen....”

  • Clay County, Indiana - the Building Stone in Clay County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 83.)

    Building-Stone. - The sandstone which overlies the main ‘Block’ coal I, is, in places an excellent building-stone, and is extensively used in Brazil (Indiana) for making foundations, lintels, steps, and other parts of buildings.

    “The principal quarry of this rock now opened, is owned by Mr. Simonson, on section 7, town 12, range 6, one and a half miles south of Brazil. It is a bluish-white, hard, micaceous, coarse-grained durable sandstone, and presents a handsome appearance in buildings. On Dr. Wright’s property, and at quite a number of localities on South Otter creek, thence are fine exposures of this sandstone, but as yet little attention has been paid to opening quarries for market.

    “The limestone that overlies the upper seam of ‘Block’ coal K, was quarried on Mr. Henry Ashley’s place, about a half mile south-west of Brazil, many years ago, for building abutments to bridges and culverts on the national road; It ranges from two to ten feet in thickness, and may be found at a number of places on the Ashley land, on Garlick & Collins’ land north of Brazil, and on the property of Mr. Grimes, in the neighborhood of the village of Ashboro. It cracks and falls to pieces after some years’ exposure to the action of the weather, and cannot be considered a durable building stone.

    “The subcarboniferous limestone exposed on Jordan creek, near Bowling Green, may, when opened up, furnish good stone for building purposes, and will serve to make a good article of quicklime.”

  • Clear Creek, Monroe County, Indiana – Oölitic Limestone Quarries – “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” by George D. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana, in Mine and Quarry, Vol. V, No. 1, July 1910, pp. 410-419.

    The article begins:

  • “The Indiana Oölitic limestone district extends from a point near Greencastle on the north, to the Ohio River, and ranges from two to 14 miles in width.  The deposits are from 25 to 100 feet thick.  The active quarries are confined to a comparatively small area called the Oölitic belt, embracing Romona, in Owen County, Stinesville, Ellettsville, Bloomington, Clear Creek and Saunders, in Monroe County; Oölitic, Dark Hollow and Bedford, in Lawrence County, Salem, Washington County, and Corydon, Harrison County.”

  • Clear Creek, Indiana - the Cedar Creek Monument Shop (from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, May 1930, Vol. 6, No. 11, pp. 27)

    The Cedar Creek Monument Shop was listed as one of the customers of the Mount Brothers of Memphis Missouri, who sold their Air Take-off Device used in carving cemetery stones.

  • Clear Creek (northeast of), Monroe County, Indiana – the Consolidated Stone Company / the Borland Farm Limestone Quarry (Limestone)  (from “New Quarry of Indiana Limestone, Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 684)

    The article beings:  “The Consolidated Stone Company has purchased a tract of 217 acres known as the Borland farm, two miles northeast of Clear Creek in Monroe County, Indiana and plans to begin stripping operations at once….The land has been core drilled and the cores show the stone to be of a high grade of what reports might be termed a ‘white buff.’  The Consolidated Stone Company is now operating a large mill in the Hunter Valley district, a quarry and mill at Dark Hollow near Bedford and two large cutting and finishing plants at Bedford.”

  • New Quarry of Indiana Limestone,” Stone, November 1925, pp. 684 “New Quarry of Indiana Limestone, Stone, November 1925, pp. 684
  • Clear Creek (near), Indiana – Mahan & Company – Indiana Limestone Quarries (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 174.)

    Mahan & Company

    Chicago Office, Mill and Storage Yard, 2120-2140 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago

    Indiana Limestone

    Quarries and Mills Near Clear Creek, Indiana

    Block, Sawed, Planed and Turned Stone

  • Clinton (near,) Vermillion County, Indiana - the Building Stone near Clinton (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 172-173.)

    Building Materials.

    “Of stone suitable for building purposes there is no lack. Some of the more heavily bedded, slightly ferruginous sandstone layers of the sandy shales between coals No. 7 and No. 6 have been quarried, on a small scale, along the hill between Clinton and the mouth of Brouillet’s creek. The heavy bedded sandstone, which commonly lies from ten to thirty feet above coal No. 4, has yielded more stone for building purposes than any other bed in the county. Along the Little Vermillion, just below White’s Mill, it generally varies from four to nine feet in thickness, and is a fine building stone, but some of the accompanying layers, though looking quite solid in the quarry, will not resist the disintegrating action of the weather, and must be rejected...Among the shaly sandstones just below the quarry rock we frequently meet with large, thin flagstones, often showing ripple-marks. At all the quarries we find the stone containing more or less plant remains, of the genera Lepidodendron, Sigillaria, Syringodendron, Calamites, Cordaites, etc.....”

  • Columbus, Indiana - Fulwider Bros. (formerly J. W. Fulwider) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. Fulwider Bros. succeed J. W. Fulwider, Columbus, Ind.”

  • Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana – Oölitic Limestone Quarries – “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” by George D. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana, in Mine and Quarry, Vol. V, No. 1, July 1910, pp. 410-419.

    The article begins:

  • “The Indiana Oölitic limestone district extends from a point near Greencastle on the north, to the Ohio River, and ranges from two to 14 miles in width.  The deposits are from 25 to 100 feet thick.  The active quarries are confined to a comparatively small area called the Oölitic belt, embracing Romona, in Owen County, Stinesville, Ellettsville, Bloomington, Clear Creek and Saunders, in Monroe County; Oölitic, Dark Hollow and Bedford, in Lawrence County, Salem, Washington County, and Corydon, Harrison County.”

  • Dana, Indiana - H. J. Godfrey & Co. (formerly Godfrey & Jones) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. H. J. Godfrey & Co. succeed Godfrey & Jones, Dana, Ind.”

  • Dark Hollow, Lawrence County, Indiana – Oölitic Limestone Quarries – “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” by George D. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana, in Mine and Quarry, Vol. V, No. 1, July 1910, pp. 410-419.

    The article begins:

  • “The Indiana Oölitic limestone district extends from a point near Greencastle on the north, to the Ohio River, and ranges from two to 14 miles in width.  The deposits are from 25 to 100 feet thick.  The active quarries are confined to a comparatively small area called the Oölitic belt, embracing Romona, in Owen County, Stinesville, Ellettsville, Bloomington, Clear Creek and Saunders, in Monroe County; Oölitic, Dark Hollow and Bedford, in Lawrence County, Salem, Washington County, and Corydon, Harrison County.”

  • Dearborn County, Indiana – Greenburg, or Flat Rock Stone Quarries  (Magnesian Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    Greenburg, or Flat Rock, Stone. – This is a light-colored, close-grained, magnesian limestone, belonging, geologically, to the Niagara group, which underlies the Hamilton.  It is extensively quarried at various localities in Dearborn county, but principally in the vicinity of Greenburg, on San Creek, and St. Paul, on Flat Rock Creek, in Decatur county.  The crop is from 20 to 30 feet thick, the layers varying in thickness from 4 inches to 2 feet.  Flagging may be obtained of this stone in flags 50 by 200 feet, and from 6 to 7 inches thick, without break or flaw, and which will not vary one inch in thickness over the entire surface.  Stone 22 inches thick may be had of equal superfices, if it were possible to handle such masses.  An analysis of samples from the Greensburg Stone Company’s quarries gave as its composition 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 10 per cent of carbonate of magnesia, 6 percent of insoluble silicates, 6 ½ per cent of oxide of iron and alumina, and about 2 percent of chlorides of the alkalies.  Gen. Gilmore gives the weight of a cubic foot as 169.98 pounds; the crushing strength of one cubic inch as 16,875 pounds; and ratio of absorption, 1 : 117.”

  • Deputy, Indiana – North Vernon Blue Stone Quarries  (Limestone) quarried at North Vernon and Deputy –  From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83. 

    North Vernon Blue Stone. – This stone is a bluish-gray limestone, moderately close-grained, with slightly conchoidal fracture, lying in seams from one to two feet thick.  The principal centers where it is quarried are at North Vernon and Deputy.  The total exposure of the North Vernon blue stone is about 30 feet thick, and the bed covers an extended area in Jennings and Jefferson counties.  Geologically, it belongs in the Hamilton division of the Devonian.  Of the entire exposure, two or three layers are considered of first quality.  This stone has long enjoyed a fine reputation for massive masonry, such as foundations for public buildings, bridge abutments, etc., where great strength and durability are essential requirements.  Chemical analysis shows the stone to contain about 90 per cent of carbonate of lime, with about 2 per cent each of carbonate of magnesia and of alumina and silicates.  Tests of crushing strength by Gen. Q. A. Gillmore gave 15,750 pounds to the square inch.  One cubic foot weights 165 ½ pounds, and the ratio of absorption is 1 : 156 – that is, a cubic foot will absorb less than a pint of water.”

  • Eckerty, Indiana - Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc. (present-day company)  (photographs and history) The Mulzer family business started in 1935, and the company opened their first limestone quarry at Eckerty, Indiana.
  • Elkhart, Indiana – the Elkhart Marble Works  (The text below was taken from one of the company’s bill Heads dated 1870.)

    Elkhart Marble Works
    Bought of D. M. & N. P. dealers in Foreign and American Marble and Manufactres of Tombstones, Monuments, Mantles, and Building Stone

  • Elkhart, Indiana – Miller Monuments, Inc. – Monuments .. For The Ages (pdf), Miller Monuments, Incorporated, Plymouth & Elkhart, Indiana, No date of publication.
    Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana

    Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages

    “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages

    One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages

  • Ellettsville, Monroe County, Indiana – Oölitic Limestone Quarries – “Indiana Oölitic Limestone:  Geology, Quarries, Methods,” by George D. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana, in Mine and Quarry, Vol. V, No. 1, July 1910, pp. 410-419.

    The article begins:

  • “The Indiana Oölitic limestone district extends from a point near Greencastle on the north, to the Ohio River, and ranges from two to 14 miles in width.  The deposits are from 25 to 100 feet thick.  The active quarries are confined to a comparatively small area called the Oölitic belt, embracing Romona, in Owen County, Stinesville, Ellettsville, Bloomington, Clear Creek and Saunders, in Monroe County; Oölitic, Dark Hollow and Bedford, in Lawrence County, Salem, Washington County, and Corydon, Harrison County.”

  • Ellettsville, Indiana – Matthews Bros. (Quarrier and Stone Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 510.)

    Mathews Bros., Ellettsville, Indiana

    Quarriers and Dealers in Oolitic Limestone.

    What Marble Dealers are Looking for - A firm making a specialty in their line. We furnish rough and sawed bases, cemetery curb and all other work connected with the marble and granite trade. Prices cheerfully furnished and work shipped promptly.

  • Ellettsville, Indiana – Perry Bros., Producers and Dealers (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. iv.)

    Perry Bros.

    Producers and Dealers in Oolitic Limestone

    First Quality Buff and Blue.

    Mill Blocks, Bases and Monumental Stone, Sawed Ashlar, Caps,

    Sills and Platforms.

    Estimates Given on Bridge Stone.

  • Ellettsville, Indiana – Perry Bros., Producers and Dealers (The following advertisement is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. iv.)

    Perry Bros., Producers and Dealers in

    Oolitic Limestone

    Quarries and Mills at Ellettsville, Ind.

    Established in 1866.

    Gilbert K. Perry Henry F. Perry.

    First Quality Buff and Blue

    Mill Blocks, Bases and Monumental Stone, Sawed Ashlar, Caps, Sills and Platforms. Estimates given on Bridge Stone.

  • Eugene (near), Vermillion County, Indiana - Sandstone Quarries near Eugene (Sandstone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 172-173.)

    Building Materials.

    “Of stone suitable for building purposes there is no lack...Along the Little Vermillion, just below White’s Mill, it generally varies from four to nine feet in thickness, and is a fine building stone, but some of the accompanying layers, though looking quite solid in the quarry, will not resist the disintegrating action of the weather, and must be rejected. From this layer considerable rock has been quarried, along the Big Vermillion, below Eugene; on Tipton branch, south of Eugene, along the Little Vermillion, as just stated; and in the bluffs east of Highland. At the latter place the face of the quarry, twenty feet thick, shows well as viewed from the river. Among the shaly sandstones just below the quarry rock we frequently meet with large, thin flagstones, often showing ripple-marks. At all the quarries we find the stone containing more or less plant remains, of the genera Lepidodendron, Sigillaria, Syringodendron, Calamites, Cordaites, etc.....”

  • Evansville, Indiana – Caden Stone Company Office & Yard  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, April 1906, pp. 307)

    Caden Stone Company quarries located in Hadley, Warren County, Kentucky.  The Caden Stone Company office and yard were located in Evansville, Indiana.

    (photo caption)  “Erected from Green River Stone in Calvary Cemetery, Chicago” (Illinois)

    • Evansville, Indiana – Caden Stone Company Office & Yard  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, April 1909, pp. 287)

      For Vaults, Monuments and General Cemetery Work Use Green River Stone.  The best stone on the market for Monumental and Building purposes, as it bleaches white upon exposure and then retains its whiteness; does not become dark and discolored.

      Caden Stone Company, Quarries:  Hadley, Warren Co., Kentucky
      Office and Yard:  411 to 425 E. Ohio St., Evansville, Indiana

  • Erected from Green River Stone in Calvary Cemetery, Chicago” (Illinois) (Caden Stone Company, Green River Stone Quarries, Hadley, Kentucky, & offices at Evansville, Indiana)  Advertisement from The Monumental News, April 1909, pp. 287) “Erected from Green River Stone in Calvary Cemetery, Chicago” (Illinois) (Caden Stone Company, Green River Stone Quarries, Hadley, Kentucky, & offices at Evansville, Indiana) Advertisement from The Monumental News, April 1909, pp. 287)
    • Evansville, Indiana – Caden Stone Company Office & Yard  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, Vol. XXI, No. 6, June 1909, pp. 501)
  • Hardin County, Kentucky - "Crusher and skip-truck at quarry and quarry access road in 1941, 1934-1942."  (photographs)  These photographs are in the Container List - Scrapbook/Hardin County of the Goodman-Paxton Collection (1934-1942) housed at the University of Kentucky Libraries, Special Collections and Archives, Kentuckiana Digital Library (Archival Finding Aids Collection). They can be viewed on the web site.  (No. 2211 - Item 2211, Box 13).
  • Evansville, Indiana – the Empire Stone Works & Quarries, Joseph Albaker & F. R. Caden, Proprietors (Business Card)

    Jos. Albaker - F. R. Caden
    Albaker & Caden, Proprietors of the Empire Stone Workers,
    Corner of Vine and Fourth Streets
    Letter Box 591 – Evansville, Ind.

    Contractors for all kinds of Stone Work.  Stone Fronts and other elaborate work executed according to Drawings and Specifications.  We use nothing but the celebrated White and Imperishable Green River Lime Stone, Out Of Our Own Quarries.

  • Evansville, Indiana – F. J. Scholz & Sons (Monument Dealer) (Excerpts from “Motor Truck in the Monument Business: What Retail Monument Dealers Think of the Efficiency of Motor Transportation for Memorial Work,” article in Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 32-33d.

    “A short time ago Granite Marble & Bronze sent out a questionnaire to thousands of retail monument dealers throughout the country for information regarding the part the motor truck plays in the retail monument business….”

    “Of course, the real interest in connection with this digest is in quoting what the dealers have to say about the subject, for the sayings are many and various….”

    F. J. Scholz & Son, Evansville, Ind.:

    “‘We have a one-ton Ford and a 3 ½-ton G. M. C. truck, and find them a great convenience, a time-saver and a splendid advertisement for our business. They are working from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., hauling shipments to depot, receiving stock coming in, hauling to local cemeteries, etc. Repairs have been below expectations. We use solid Firestone tires, for a 3 ½-ton truck is too heavy for pneumatic.’”

  • Evansville, Indiana – Scholz (F. J.) & Sons

    (See: Evansville, Indiana – F. J. Scholz & Sons (Monument Dealer) )

  • Flat Rock Creek, Decatur County, Indiana – Greenburg, or Flat Rock Stone Quarries  (Magnesian Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    Greenburg, or Flat Rock, Stone. – This is a light-colored, close-grained, magnesian limestone, belonging, geologically, to the Niagara group, which underlies the Hamilton.  It is extensively quarried at various localities in Dearborn county, but principally in the vicinity of Greenburg, on San Creek, and St. Paul, on Flat Rock Creek, in Decatur county.  The crop is from 20 to 30 feet thick, the layers varying in thickness from 4 inches to 2 feet.  Flagging may be obtained of this stone in flags 50 by 200 feet, and from 6 to 7 inches thick, without break or flaw, and which will not vary one inch in thickness over the entire surface.  Stone 22 inches thick may be had of equal superfices, if it were possible to handle such masses.  An analysis of samples from the Greensburg Stone Company’s quarries gave as its composition 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 10 per cent of carbonate of magnesia, 6 percent of insoluble silicates, 6 ½ per cent of oxide of iron and alumina, and about 2 percent of chlorides of the alkalies.  Gen. Gilmore gives the weight of a cubic foot as 169.98 pounds; the crushing strength of one cubic inch as 16,875 pounds; and ratio of absorption, 1 : 117.”

  • Fountain County, Indiana - the Building Stone in Fountain County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 129.)

    Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone in this county furnishes an abundance of good freestone for building purposes. In color it ranges from whitish-gray to a brownish-red.

    “Quarries of this stone have been opened near Attica, on the Toledo, Wabash and Western railroad, in Logan township, and afford a coarse-grained, grayish-brown, durable sandstone, that can be quarried in blocks from one to four feet or more in thickness, and of any required length and width. Other quarries have also been opened at Portland, on the Wabash and Erie Canal, where a stone similar to that from Attica is obtained.”

  • Franklin County, Indiana - the Building Stone in Franklin County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick.

    “The Localities where this rock is found are so numerous, and so generally known that to point them out would be superfluous. North of Brookville, one mile and a half in a direct line, the rock of which we have been speaking disappears under a stratum of (probably) magnesian limestone, which varies from six to twenty inches in thickness. This stone is extensively used for heavy masonry, and range-work, of various kinds; its qualities have been mentioned in a former part of this report and need not be repeated here. It is extensively quarried by Mr. Schrichte, on the south-east quarter of section 17, town 9, range 2 west; also an (sic) the lands of Jane McCarty, sections 8 and 9; and W. W. Butler’s, section 8; on the farm of W. J. Peck, sections 13 and 14; on Josiah Allen’s, and James Gavin’s section 15; on the lands of John Skinner, Wm. Brier, and Samuel Shepperd, section 7; William Frank’s, section 18; on lands of Z. B. Reed and J. P. Shiltz, sections 17 and 18 also on the lands of C. T. Gordon, section 32; and those of M. H. Gordon, section 30, town 12 north, range 13 east. It is also found on H. H. Seal’s farm, section 36, town 10, range 2 west. South of Brookville it is found on the lands of Hon. A. B. Line, J. H. Lanning and John Althero - all in section 28, town 11 north, range 13 east; also on lands of E. Krause and P. Conrad, section 17, town 10 north, range 13 east. It is found in and around the town of Oldenburg, in great abundance, section 4, town 10 north, range 12 east; also on H. Schwegmann’s farm, section 1, same town.

    “Besides the localities already mentioned, there are many others which might be named; but to enumerate them all would render this report tedious and unnecessarily long.

    “The most valuable building-stone in the county, or probably in the State, is found in Laurel and Posey townships. It is of the same character, and belongs to the same formation as the Dayton stone so extensively used in Cincinnati and other places, and the same as that found at Greensburg and St. Paul. This group has generally been referred to the Niagara series, and probably correctly so, but I am of opinion that the upper strata, at least, belong to the Devonian formation. The few fossils I have been able to find in them (the upper members) are referable, in my opinion, to that group. Let this be as it may, the rocks are without doubt of great value as a building material, and when they come to be generally known will be extensively used.

    “Two miles north-west of Laurel, D. H. Mook owns a valuable quarry, which has been extensively worked. The strata are generally blue, especially the lower series, are hard, easily worked to a fine edge, are durable, and may be obtained of any required size or thickness. It is situated on the south-east quarter of section 5, town 12 north, range 12 east. Immediately west, in the same section, there is a fine outcrop of the same rock upon the land of Wm. Depperman; this has not been worked to the same extent as Mook’s, but it contains a vast amount of valuable material.

    “On section 17, town 12 north, range 12 east, Messrs. Kemble & Payne own a quarry of very fine quality of stone. In this quarry the upper members are cream-colored cherty limestone. Stone of any desirable thickness may be obtained there.

    “John H. Faurot has a fine quarry on the southwest quarter of section 18, town 12, range 12; it has been but little worked. James Murphy also has a fine quarry in the same section. Thomas B. and William D. Adams, whose farm is on section 1, town 12, range 11 east, have a good quarry of the same character of stone. It is upon this farm where gold has been found in greater quantity than in any other locality in the neighborhood.

    “To these gentlemen, and especially to Thomas B. Adams, Esq., I am generally indebted for assistance in prosecuting my examinations in that section of the county; and to the Rev. Wm. B. Adams my acknowledgements are due for hospitable treatment and entertainment at his residence.

    “Martha Plow owns a quarry in section 6, town 12, range 12, which promises well, but has not been worked to any considerable extent. J. A. Derbyshire has a fine quarry on section 20, town 12, range 12, and G. W. Kimble another in section 19.

    “Alfred Deter has, adjoining the village of Bulltown, in Posey township, a good quarry in section 13, town 12, range 11 east. This is the most western quarry I have seen.

    “One of the finest quarries in this formation belongs to Jesse Cloud, and is situate in the south-west quarter of section 7, town 12, range 12 east. The strata vary in thickness from two inches to ten. The thin flags are yellow, very hard, and upon being struck with a hammer give out a clear sharp ring, similar to glass; they are very durable, notwithstanding their argillaceous character.

    “Flagging, or stone for any other purpose, may be obtained here, or at any of the neighboring quarries, of uniform thickness and of any dimensions.

    “Besides these quarries there are a number of others in the vicinity which might be mentioned, but I deem it unnecessary to name them all, as they may be found in a belt two and a half miles in width by five or six in length.”

  • Franklin Township, Indiana - the Barrett Paving Materials Stone Quarry (photograph), located at the corner of Inke Road and Hollansburg Road, presented by WayNet Inc.
  • Goshen, Indiana - the Yoder Monument Works (from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, May 1930, Vol. 6, No. 11, pp. 27)

    The Yoder Monument works was listed as one of the customers of the Mount Brothers of Memphis Missouri, who sold their Air Take-off Device used in carving cemetery stones.

  • Greenburg (near), Decatur County, Indiana – Greenburg, or Flat Rock Stone Quarries  (Magnesian Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    Greenburg, or Flat Rock, Stone. – This is a light-colored, close-grained, magnesian limestone, belonging, geologically, to the Niagara group, which underlies the Hamilton.  It is extensively quarried at various localities in Dearborn county, but principally in the vicinity of Greenburg, on San Creek, and St. Paul, on Flat Rock Creek, in Decatur county.  The crop is from 20 to 30 feet thick, the layers varying in thickness from 4 inches to 2 feet.  Flagging may be obtained of this stone in flags 50 by 200 feet, and from 6 to 7 inches thick, without break or flaw, and which will not vary one inch in thickness over the entire surface.  Stone 22 inches thick may be had of equal superfices, if it were possible to handle such masses.  An analysis of samples from the Greensburg Stone Company’s quarries gave as its composition 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 10 per cent of carbonate of magnesia, 6 percent of insoluble silicates, 6 ½ per cent of oxide of iron and alumina, and about 2 percent of chlorides of the alkalies.  Gen. Gilmore gives the weight of a cubic foot as 169.98 pounds; the crushing strength of one cubic inch as 16,875 pounds; and ratio of absorption, 1 : 117.”

  • Greencastle (near), Putnam County, Indiana - Abandoned Rock Quarries - the Deauw University Nature Park. (This information is from The Mineral Industry of Indiana, 2003, reports presented by the Indiana Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey [PDF])

    “Hanson (PLC) donated 182 hectares including abandoned rock quarries and wooded areas valued at $5 million to DePauw University near Greencastle in Putnam County. It will become the DePauw University Nature Park, and rock climbing may be allowed on the quarry walls.

  • Greene County, Indiana - the Building Stone & Quick Lime in Greene County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 107-108.)

    Building-Stone. - Excellent quarries of sandstone and limestone are now being opened and worked on Mr. Watson’s land, on the line of the Indianapolis & Vincennes railroad, on section 6, town 8, range 4, and on section 14, town 8, range 5.

    “At the time of my examination, about six feet of rock was exposed at the latter quarry, still leaving a considerable depth of good stone undeveloped. It is a fine-grained, brownish-gray sandstone, with small specks of protoxide of iron, and lies in strata that range from six to sixteen inches in thickness, and may be taken up in slabs of any required length and breadth.

    Sandstone quarries have also been opened by Mr. Hamlin, on section 25, town 7, range 4, and at Mrs. Faucett’s, on Plummer’s creek, on section 4, town 6 range 4.

    “The stone at the latter quarry is moderately fine-grained, has a cream color, can readily be split to any required thickness, and is mined on large slabs from six to thirty inches thick. Stone from Hamlin’s quarry is used in Bloomfield for foundations to buildings, door-steps, door and window lintels and sills, chimneys, copings, etc., etc. In quality and in color it is similar to the stone at Mrs. Faucett’s quarry.

    “Good sandstone for building purposes is also found on Mr. Lahr’s land, and at various other localities in Wright township, in the north-western part of the county. In fact there is no scarcity of good building-stone in Greene county.

    Quick Lime. - The subcarboniferous limestone along the I. & V. railroad, and in the ridge skirting Richland creek and Ore-branch, will furnish material for an abundance of good white lime. The limestone which overlies coal K, in the western part of the county, will at many places furnish a dark-colored but good strong lime, in every respect suitable for making mortar.”

  • Huntington, Indiana – Orton & Steinbrenner Co. (Locomotive Cranes) (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 35.)

    Orton & Steinbrenner Co.

    Maine Office – Chicago, Ill. – Factory – Huntington, Ind.

    O. S. Dependable Locomotives – Cranes

    Employment of Cranes by Contracts Insures Greater Production with Minimum Cost Greatly Increasing Profits. Will insure such results. Designed and built to give continuous service with least maintenance cost. Catalog No. 18 sent on application

  • Indiana Limestone Company Quarry  "All ready to turn over the 'Cut' in Quarry of Indiana Limestone Company."  (The Indiana Limestone Co. had quarries in both Lawrence and Monroe Counties.)
    (postcard photograph; postmark August 22, 1928)  Quarry of Indiana Limestone Company
  • Indiana Limestone by John R. Hill (history) - Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc.
  • Indiana Limestone - Victor Oolitic Stone Company (southwest of Bloomington) (southwest of Bloomington) (Present-day company.) This web site has some good photographs of quarries and buildings of stone.) This company has supplied Indiana Limestone to the United States, Canada, and overseas markets since 1898. The third and fourth generation of the founding Edgeworth family directs and manages the company.
    • According to the BloombergBusiness web site:  “Victor Oolitic Stone Company, Inc., doing business as Indiana Limestone Company, Inc., provides limestone building stones.  The company’s products include blocks and slabs, trim and accent products, building veneers, and landscape materials…As of May 2, 2014, Victor Oolitic Stone Company, Inc. operates as a subsidiary of Indiana Commercial Finance, LLC.”

    • About the Company.
    • About Indiana Limestone...
  • Indiana Limestone Company, Inc., Bedford – “Introducing Indiana – Past and Present” – an issue of The Indiana Historian, Commerce and Industry by the Indiana Historical Bureau (map and photograph)
  • Indiana (southern) – Personal Account and Photos of a Southern Indiana Quarry, presented on an AOL Journal. (These links are no longer available, although you can view the sites on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine at these links:  Indiana Quarry, February 27, 2004 & Indiana Quarry (part 2) February 28, 2004.)
    <http://journals.aol.com/mskatdabrat/FromEveryAngle/entries/164>
    <http://journals.aol.com/mskatdabrat/FromEveryAngle/entries/165>
  • Indiana Quarry - 1947 photograph, by Harry Engel.
  • Indiana – Star Stone Company, Quarrymen Indiana Oolitic Limestone (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 132.)

    In this advertisement, the Star Stone Company is listed as the Sales gent and Secretary for the company Franklin T. Brodix (successor to Brodix & Malone), Building Stone, 112 West Adams Street, Chicago, Ill.

  • Indianapolis, Indiana – Allen Bros. (Monumental Designs) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 525.)

    Allen Bros.

    Monumental Designs Made by Allen Bros.,

    Will secure you orders for Monumental work.

    Special designs a specialty on any material desired.

    49 Thorpe Blk, Indianapolis, Ind.

  • Indianapolis, Indiana – Dean Bros.’ Steam Pump Works (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxvii.)

    Dean Bros.’ Steam Pump Works

    Pumping Machinery For All Purposes. - Send For Catalogue – All Prices. - Duplex Pump – Single.

  • Dean Bros.’ Steam Pump Works advertisement in Stone, November 1895 Dean Bros.’ Steam Pump Works advertisement in Stone, November 1895
    • Indianapolis, Indiana – the Enterprise Foundry and Fence Company  (from The Monumental News, Vol. XXI, No. 2, February 1909, pp. 194)

      Enterprise Foundry and Fence Company, 450 South Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, Iron and Wire Fences

    Enterprise Foundry and Fence Company, Indianapolis, Indiana  (advertisement from The Monumental News, Vol. XXI, No. 2, February 1909, pp. 194) Enterprise Foundry and Fence Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (advertisement from The Monumental News, Vol. XXI, No. 2, February 1909, pp. 194)
    • Jeffersonville, Indiana - Atkins Quarry - Liter’s Inc. (open-pit limestone mine - aggregates) (present-day company) (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.litersquarry.com/atkins.htm>

      According to this web site, this quarry was originally operated by T. J. Atkins starting in 1939. In November, 1988, the quarry was purchased by Liter’s Inc. The dimensions of the quarry are given as “125 feet deep with an additional 50 feet remained to be mine.”

    • Liter’s Quarry of Indiana Inc: Atkins Plant can be viewed on the Wikimapia web site.
  • Laurel, Franklin County, Indiana - the Laurel Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick....”

    “The most valuable building-stone in the county, or probably in the State, is found in Laurel and Posey townships. It is of the same character, and belongs to the same formation as the Dayton stone so extensively used in Cincinnati and other places, and the same as that found at Greensburg and St. Pau. This group has generally been referred to the Niagara series, and probably correctly so, but I am of opinion that the upper strata, at least, belong to the Devonian formation. The few fossils I have been able to find in them (the upper members) are referable, in my opinion, to that group. Let this be as it may, the rocks are without doubt of great value as a building material, and when they come to be generally known will be extensively used....”

  • Laurel (northwest of), Franklin County, Indiana - the D. H. Mook Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick....”

    “The most valuable building-stone in the county, or probably in the State, is found in Laurel and Posey townships. It is of the same character, and belongs to the same formation as the Dayton stone so extensively used in Cincinnati and other places, and the same as that found at Greensburg and St. Paul. This group has generally been referred to the Niagara series, and probably correctly so, but I am of opinion that the upper strata, at least, belong to the Devonian formation. The few fossils I have been able to find in them (the upper members) are referable, in my opinion, to that group. Let this be as it may, the rocks are without doubt of great value as a building material, and when they come to be generally known will be extensively used.

    “Two miles north-west of Laurel, D. H. Mook owns a valuable quarry, which has been extensively worked. The strata are generally blue, especially the lower series, are hard, easily worked to a fine edge, are durable, and may be obtained of any required size or thickness. It is situated on the south-east quarter of section 5, town 12 north, range 12 east. Immediately west, in the same section, there is a fine outcrop of the same rock upon the land of Wm. Depperman; this has not been worked to the same extent as Mook’s, but it contains a vast amount of valuable material....”

  • Laurel (north-west of), Franklin County, Indiana - the William Depperman Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick....”

    “The most valuable building-stone in the county, or probably in the State, is found in Laurel and Posey townships. It is of the same character, and belongs to the same formation as the Dayton stone so extensively used in Cincinnati and other places, and the same as that found at Greensburg and St. Paul. This group has generally been referred to the Niagara series, and probably correctly so, but I am of opinion that the upper strata, at least, belong to the Devonian formation. The few fossils I have been able to find in them (the upper members) are referable, in my opinion, to that group. Let this be as it may, the rocks are without doubt of great value as a building material, and when they come to be generally known will be extensively used.

    “Two miles north-west of Laurel, D. H. Mook owns a valuable quarry, which has been extensively worked. The strata are generally blue, especially the lower series, are hard, easily worked to a fine edge, are durable, and may be obtained of any required size or thickness. It is situated on the south-east quarter of section 5, town 12 north, range 12 east. Immediately west, in the same section, there is a fine outcrop of the same rock upon the land of Wm. Depperman; this has not been worked to the same extent as Mook’s, but it contains a vast amount of valuable material....”

  • Laurel (three miles west of  Laurel), Indiana - an active limestone quarry circa 1900. Laurel Steam Stone Company records (1900-1904), Indiana Historical Society - Manuscripts & Archives
  • LawrenceCounty, Indiana - Elliott Special Products. Elliott Special Products is located on SR 158, 3-1/4 miles west of Highway 37.  Phone: 1-800-319-5920. Hours vary, call before you go.  This is a small, family-owned quarry.  In the showroom you can view a 15-minute video and an historical display.  A short walking path takes you to an abandoned quarry.  There are also limestone products for sale if you're interested.
    • Lawrence County, Indiana – the Elliott Stone Co., Inc. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Lawrence County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bedford, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, Mineral Industries Surveys - Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995, prepared in January 1997.)
  • Lawrence County, Indiana – the Evans Quarries Inc. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Lawrence County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bedford, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys - Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Lawrence County, Indiana – the Indiana Limestone Co., Inc. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bedford, Indiana. [In 1995 this company was one of the ten leading dimension stone operations in the United States with sales greater than $500,000. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys - Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)]
  • Lawrence County, Indiana - “Lawrence County: It’s All The Stone,” article presented by SouthernIN.comin the Archive section of the web site.

    The article discusses the Indiana limestone and limestone quarries in addition to other subjects in Lawrence County including tours, et al.

  • Lawrence County, Indiana - Lawrence County, presented by Lawrence County Tourism Commission. This web site includes photographs of some of the old Indiana limestone quarries and one of stone columns being transported on railroad cars in addition to photographs of many other Indiana locales.
  • Lawrence County, Indiana – “Limestone A Portfolio Depicting the labors of the Indiana Limestone Co. in Lawrence and Monroe counties, Indiana,” by Margaret Bourke-White, Fortune Magazine, 1931.
  • Lawrence County, Indiana – the Perry, Matthews and Buskirk Quarry (The following information is from the section “Limestone and Sandstone” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 64.)

    Perry, Matthews and Buskirk Quarry

    John Torphy, superintendent of the Perry, Matthews and Buskirk quarries, at Bedford, has secured options on 1,500 acres of stone land in Lawrence County, Ind. Mr. Torphy says that the stripping is not heavy and that the land is easy of access from railroad. He thinks the stone is fully equal to any in the Bedford region.

  • Logan Township, Fountain County, Indiana - Sandstone Quarries at Logan Township (Sandstone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 129.)

    Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone in this county furnishes an abundance of good freestone for building purposes. In color it ranges from whitish-gray to a brownish-red.

    “Quarries of this stone have been opened near Attica, on the Toledo, Wabash and Western railroad, in Logan township, and afford a coarse-grained, grayish-brown, durable sandstone, that can be quarried in blocks from one to four feet or more in thickness, and of any required length and width. Other quarries have also been opened at Portland, on the Wabash and Erie Canal, where a stone similar to that from Attica is obtained....”

  • Logansport, Cass County, IndianaFrance Park - Limestone Quarry. Among other historical sites in the park can be found the ".remains of the Wabash and Erie Canal; a waterfall, the old 'Kenith Stone Quarry' and topographical features were formed as the limestone was mined by the Casparis Stone Company (1892-1927) and the France Stone Company (1927-1967)."
  • Mansfield, Parke County, Indiana – the Building Stone at Mansfield (Sandstone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 116.)

    Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone, which forms high cliffs on Big Raccoon, Little Raccoon and Sugar creeks, may be quarried in blocks of any required dimensions, and will make a handsome and durable building stone. At Mansfield, on Big Raccoon creek, this rock is a beautiful reddish-brown color, closely resembling in appearance the brown sandstone of which the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, D.C., is built. It has been used in the construction of abutments to the bridge which crosses the creek at Mansfield, where it has been exposed to the weather for several years, and gives evidence of being a durable stone.

    “A similar colored sandstone, from the conglomerate bluff on the Little Racoon (sic) creek, was used in the foundation of the largest bank building in Rockville, and is very highly spoken of as a building stone.”

  • Mansfield, Indiana - Sandstone Quarries, presented by Sisters City Association of Mansfield, England.  (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.mansfield2000.org.uk/Mansfield-indiana.htm>

    Mansfield is known for its sandstone.  The first quarry was opened in 1869, and the covered bridge foundations and other buildings throughout Park County were constructed with this locally quarried stone.  The Chicago Brownstone Company owned the quarry during the 1880s.  The stone was shipped to Chicago as well as to the East coast to be used in the construction of brownstone houses.  A railroad spur was built to the quarry, and, reportedly, a rail car of stone was shipped each day.  Seventy-five men were employed by the quarry at its peak.  In recent years the quarry has been reopened and stone is again being cut.  The stone from the Mansfield quarry comes in a variety of colors and is very durable, and it is easily carved when the stone is first cut.  Due to this the stone is used for decorative work.  The stone becomes harder as it ages.  Stone from the quarry in present time is used for restoration of buildings constructed during the 1800s.  According to this web site, new structures are also being constructed with this sandstone such as the new Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis.

  • Marengo, Indiana - the Marengo Limestone Quarry AKA locally as the “Rock Quarry” today the Marengo Warehouse and Distribution Center.  
    • Information about Marengo Limestone Quarry, today the Marengo Warehouse, is available in the “Marengo warehouse” section of Wikipedia.
    • History of the Marengo Quarry/Marengo Warehouse and Distribution Center (This link is no longer available, although you can view the site on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.marengowarehouse.com/about-us/history>

    According to this history, casual quarrying began about 1886.

  • Marion, Indiana - Roof and Son (from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, May 1930, Vol. 6, No. 11, pp. 27)

    Roof and Son was listed as one of the customers of the Mount Brothers of Memphis Missouri, who sold their Air Take-off Device used in carving cemetery stones.

  • Milltown, Indiana – Abandoned Limestone Quarry  (postcard photograph, #79939; Published by Eddleman Publishing Company, Marengo, Indiana; Photography by Harold and Deloris Eddleman; unmailed)

  • Abandoned Limestone Quarry, Milltown, Indiana

    “These tunnels on Indiana Highway 64 are the remains of a pioneer limestone quarry that operated from 1885 until the 1950’s.  Stone from miles of tunnels was manufactured into crushed stone, lime, and cement products.  Recently, a poultry breeder used one of the tunnels to house chickens.”
    Abandoned limestone quarry on Indiana Hwy. 64, postcard photograph
  • Mitchell (near), Indiana – the American Quarries Co. Quarry (The following information is from the section “Limestone and Sandstone” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 64.)

    American Quarries Co. Quarry

    A contract has been given to J. A. Coleman for the erection of stone mills and 500 feet of elevated tramway for the American Quarries Co., on Fishing Creek, near Mitchell, Ind. When the quarry is fully developed it will be one of the largest in the entire Indiana limestone region.

  • Montpelier, Indiana - Limestone Quarries. Montpelier is well known for its limestone quarries. (This link is no longer available.) <http://www.montpelier-ind.com/>
  • Monroe County, Indiana – the B. G. Hoadley Quarries Inc. Limestone Quarries. In 1995 this company was operating two limestone quarries in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bloomington, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys - Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Monroe County - Crown Quarry of Indiana Limestone Company - This quarry was mentioned on the web site of the Indiana University Wells Scholars Fieldtrip in the "Geology Resources." The link is no longer available.
  • Monroe County, Indiana – the Independent Limestone Co. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Clear Creek, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys - Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Monroe County, Indiana – the Indiana Limestone Co., Inc. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bedford, Indiana. [In 1995 this company was one of the ten leading dimension stone operations in the United States with sales greater than $500,000. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys – Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)]
  • Monroe County, Indiana – “Limestone A Portfolio Depicting the labors of the Indiana Limestone Co. in Lawrence and Monroe counties, Indiana,” by Margaret Bourke-White, Fortune Magazine, 1931
  • Monroe County, Indiana – the Reed Quarries Inc. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bloomington, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys – Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Monroe County, Indiana – the Star Quarry Co., Inc., Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Clear Creek, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys – Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Monroe County, Indiana - the Victor Oolitic Stone Co. Limestone Quarry. In 1995 this company was operating a limestone quarry in Monroe County. At that time the company headquarters was in Bloomington, Indiana. (from United States Geological Survey, "Mineral Industries Surveys – Directory of Principal Dimension Stone Producers in the United States in 1995," prepared in January 1997.)
  • Muncie, Indiana - the Phillips Quarry (today a dive site - photograph), presented by Dive Training.

    According to this web site, the former Phillips quarry, which was active until 1917, is today a 2.5-acre lake that is used for diving.

  • New Albany, Indiana – The New Albany Manufacturing Co. – Stone Quarry and Mill Machinery (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxv.)

    The New Albany Manufacturing Co.

    Manufacturers of Stone Quarry and Mill Machinery. Including: Wardwell Double Gang Channelers, Heavy Derrick Irons and Hoists, Improved Screw Feed Gang Saws, Steam or Electric Traveling Cranes.Bids on Entire New Plants Furnished Free On Application, New Albany, Ind.

  • New Albany, Ind. – The New Albany Manufacturing Co. (Stone Machinery) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 85.)

    The New Albany Manufacturing Co., New Albany, Ind.

    Stone Machinery For Quarry Or Mill.

    Exclusive Manufacturers for the Central States of

    Gilmour Double Plate Stone Planers.

    Any Width and Length. Also Single Plate Machines.

    Wardwell Double-Gang Channelers, Knobel Wire Rip Saws. Headers, Saw-gangs, Derricks, Power Hoists, Rubbing Beds. Overhead Cranes (Steam or Electric.) Complete Plants Erected Ready to Run.

    • New Albany, Indiana – the New Albany Manufacturing Company  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, Vol. XXI, No. 6, June 1909, pp. 456)

      The New Albany Manufacturing Co., New Albany, Ind.

      We manufacture all kinds of Stone Working Machinery:  planers, headers, saw gangs, rubbing beds, traveling cranes, power hoists, derricks, derrick turners, etc.

  • New Albany Manufacturing Company, New Albany, Indiana  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, June 1909, pp. 456) New Albany Manufacturing Company, New Albany, Indiana (Advertisement from The Monumental News, June 1909, pp. 456)
    • New Albany, Indiana – New Albany Machine Mfg. Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 176.)

    New Albany Machine Mfg. Co., New Albany, Ind.

    New Albany Stone Working Machinery - 30 Years Experience

    Up to the Minute in Design and Quality - Latest Patent Stone Planer - Wire Gangs - Channelers - Rubbing Beds - Gang Saws - Hoists - Derricks - Made in Three Sizes,

    Send for catalogue and let us figure with you for your requirements.

  • North Vernon, Indiana – North Vernon Blue Stone Quarries  (Limestone) quarried at North Vernon and Deputy –  From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83. 

    North Vernon Blue Stone. – This stone is a bluish-gray limestone, moderately close-grained, with slightly conchoidal fracture, lying in seams from one to two feet thick.  The principal centers where it is quarried are at North Vernon and Deputy.  The total exposure of the North Vernon blue stone is about 30 feet thick, and the bed covers an extended area in Jennings and Jefferson counties.  Geologically, it belongs in the Hamilton division of the Devonian.  Of the entire exposure, two or three layers are considered of first quality.  This stone has long enjoyed a fine reputation for massive masonry, such as foundations for public buildings, bridge abutments, etc., where great strength and durability are essential requirements.  Chemical analysis shows the stone to contain about 90 per cent of carbonate of lime, with about 2 per cent each of carbonate of magnesia and of alumina and silicates.  Tests of crushing strength by Gen. Q. A. Gillmore gave 15,750 pounds to the square inch.  One cubic foot weights 165 ½ pounds, and the ratio of absorption is 1 : 156 – that is, a cubic foot will absorb less than a pint of water.”

  • Odon, Indiana – Correll & Burrell (Monument Dealers) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 517.)

    Correll & Burrell, West of Bedford, on E. & R. R. R., Odon, Ind.

    Wholesale Rustic Works,

    Manufacturers of Rustic Monuments, Vases, Settees, Chairs, Markers, and Log Curving. Statuary and Fine Carving in Bedford Stone. Send your tracings for estimates.

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