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Names and Origins of Stone - P

Name of Stone Origin Color Comments
Pfeiffer Buff Stone Pfeiffer Quarry, near Batesville, Arkansas, USA “Light grayish buff” (or Batesville Buff Marble) “Size of blocks or slabs of even color limited.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., 1907; 1994 the MIA)
Pfeiffer Stone Gray Marble Pfeiffer Quarry, near Batesville, Arkansas, USA “Gray fairly uniform” (or Batesville Gray) “Size of blocks or slabs or even color limited.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., 1907; 1994 the MIA)
Pfinztal Sandstone Germany   (5)
Phenix “Village on the S.L.&S.F. Company’s Railroad, 23 miles from Springfield, Missouri, where Napoleon Gray is quarried.”   (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
"Phenix Cut Stone" (limestone); "Phenix White Lime" Limestone; & "Napoleon Gray" Marble Phenix, Missouri, USA White with grayish tint  
Phenix Limestone Missouri, USA Slight grayish tint Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 12, Dec., 1923 (“Napoleon Gray Marble - A hard and highly crystalline limestone of a close, even texture, with a slight grayish tint. The presence of the remains of crinoids gives the stone fine pencil markings and reveals attractive patterns when sawn across the bed. Takes an excellent polish.”)
Phenix Stone “West Quarry” of the Phenix Marble Co., Greene County, Missouri, USA   (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Rpt. of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geo. Survey & Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946.)
Phigaleian Marbles     “According to Hull this refers to a collection of marbles now in the British Museum, which are evidently modeled after the sculptures of the Parthenon.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Philadelphia Granite Pennsylvania, USA Warm gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924 (granite gneiss)
Philippeville Marble (Ancient) “Quarried near Philippeville, Algiers, Africa.”   “Some writers claim that this marble is the same as the Ancient Numidian, while others claim the Ancient Numidian was quarried at Simittu Colonia (Modern Chemtou) in the Valley of Medjerda. However, this marble is almost, if not identically, the same as Numidian Yellow.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Philippeville (Light) “Quarried at Philippeville, Belgium.” “Gray with Iregular spots of varying shades of gray.” “Philippeville (Light) or Florence.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Philippeville (Reddish) “Quarried at Philippeville, Belgium.” “Reddish-gray with spots of dark gray and black.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Philippine Islands     “See Romblon.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Phillipsburg     “See Missouri marbles.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Phoenix Green Marble USA Green (5)
Phoenix Napoleon Marble Missouri, USA    
Phonolite     “Phoolite or clinkstone. Defined by Hull as, ‘A compact base, in its fresh state dark greenish-gray, showing here and there single cleavage surfaces of vitreous feldspar.’” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Phrygian     “Phrygian or Phrygio, or Phrygium. Same as Synnadic.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Phrygian, called Pavonazetto ? Darker purple markings with veins of white  
Phrygio / Phrygium     “Phrygian or Phrygio, or Phrygium. Same as Synnadic.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piasco Green Cuneo, Piedmont Region, Italy   (12)
Piasentina Stone (Piestra Piasentina) Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Piastraccia Marble “Quarried at Piestrasanta, Italy.” “White statuary with broken gray veins or greenish-gray.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piastraccia Marble Lucca, Italy   Interior and exterior marble (11)
Picasso Marble Utah, Minnesota, USA    
Picchiettato     “Same as Giallo Antico Picchienttato.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pichens (sic) County     “See Georgia marbles.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pickens County Marble Pickens County, Georgia, USA White, blotched with black and gray  
Picton Island Granite New York, USA Red “Two varieties are found - one fine grained with uniform pink tint used especially for monuments; the second, medium-grained with bright red body flecked with black.” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 2, Feb., 1924 (building & monumental work)
Picton Island Red Granite Picton Island Area, New York, USA    
Pictou Freestone Pictou County, Nova Scotia, Canada “Gray with a slight cast of brown, but weathering to a soft buff color” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 5, May, 1924 (“Widely used for public buildings, churches, and structural work generally.”)
Pidichiasa Marble “Quarried near Trapani, Sicily.” “Red with spots of golden yellow. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piedmont (location)     “This Italian province produces Candoglio Veine Dore, and other marbles and onyx.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piedmont Black (Caressio) Cuneo, Italy (Piedmont Region)   (12)
Piedmont Diorite – Granite (Diorite Del Piedmonte) Piedmont, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Piedmont Onix (Caraglio) Cuneo, Italy (Piedmont Region)   (12)
Piedmont Purple Violet (Monastero) Cuneo, Italy (Piedmont Region)   (12)
Piedra de Ijada (Colic Stone)     “Piedra de Ijada (Colic Stone) or Lapis Nephriticus, Fan-yu, Han-yu, Tseng-yu, which are names given to Jade or products from Jade.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pieds de Souris (Mouse’s Feet) Marble “Quarried at Montigny-Saint-Christophe, Hainaut, Belgium.” “Gray, spotted with paler gray and with little white marks. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierg Black Granite Minnesota, USA Black Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 2, Feb., 1924 (monumental purposes)
Pierre Bleu Belgian Limestone Belgian Charcoal to black with tiny white Fossils  
Pierra Chaline     “Same as Lumachelle des Argonne.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierra de Paragone Marble “According to Pullen: ‘This is said to come from Lydia....’” “Jet ebony black with faint streaks of mottled white.” “According to Pullen: ‘This is said to come from Lydia and to be the touchstone of metallurgists....” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre Champville     “Same as Champville.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre D’Ancy Le France     “See Ancy Le Franc.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Caen     “See Caen Stone, French.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Chassis     “See Marbre De Cassis.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Chiampo     “See Chiampo (Tavernelle).” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Comblachien     “Same as Comblanchien.” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Hauteville     “See Hauteville.” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Jaumont Banc Lacour Sandstone France   (5)
Pierre de Lens (Limestone) France White Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 10, Oct., 1924 (“Worked since the time of the Romans. Building and monumental.”)
Pierre De Normandoux Limestone “Quarried in France.” “White limestone very densely grained.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Tavernelle     “See Chiampo.” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre d’Etoile     “Same as Pietra Stellaria.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra (definition)     “Stone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Arenaria     “Sandstone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Calcarea     “Limestone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra di Labradore “Found on the small Island of St. Paul, off the coast of Labrador.”   “Found on the small island of St. Paul, off the coast of Labrador. Stone by this name from above source has been classed as an agate by some writers, notwithstanding that it is chiefly composed of feldspar. See Labradorite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pierre De Ruoms Limestone France   (5)
Pierre Marbree de’Ancy-le-France France Almost white Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 10, Oct., 1924 (“Has been widely used for fine structural work and decoration. It has been employed in notable buildings in NewYork. The stone is a compact fine and even-grained oolite, almost white in color, and carves well. The decorative stone from the lower beds is known as Pierre Marbree de’Ancy-le-France.” AKA Chassignelles Limestone)
Pietra Basaltina (Basalt) Latium (?), Italy Deep gray with small black and white flecks.  
Pietra Basaltina o Grigio Aniciano Marble Viterbo, Italy   Interior and exterior floorings and stairs (11)
Pietra Di Vicenza S. Gottardo Vicenza, Italy   Exterior and interior (11)
Pietra Lavezzaria     “Pietra Lavezzaria or Pietra Lavezzaria Serpentine - See Genova Green.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Lavezzaria Serpentine     “Pietra Lavezzaria or Pietra Lavezzaria Serpentine - See Genova Green.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petra Nefritica Bronzina Marble   “Dark metallic brown with suspicion of dusty gray.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Nefritica Bruna Marble   “Dusky brown, metallic spots barely visible.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Nefritica Nera Marble   “Jet Black” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Nefritica Serpentine Unknown location. “Color is jet black, minutely dusted with gray, metallic texture.” “This ancient serpentine from unknown source, according to Pullen, is usually found in the form of a flattened sphere or a kidney shaped bean ( hence the name). Not used to any extent as a building stone, but was used by the Romans as a standard of weights. ‘They were also used to tie around the necks of Christians condemned to be thrown into wells, or waterways, hence, by some they are known as Martyr Stone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Jefritica Verde Marble   “Dark green, with tiny spots of lighter hue.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Paisina     “See Landscape marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietra Persichina Di Prun Verona, Italy   Exterior and interior floorings and veneers (11)
Pietra Stellaria (Madrepore) Marble “Quarried near Verona, Italy.” “Gray and white fossils and fragments compose the entire mass. Takes good polish. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pietrasanta     “See Piastraccia.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pieva     “See Brocatello Della Pieva.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piggs Peak Mines     “See Verdite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piighes White Marble Greece   (5)
Pike River Granite Amberg, Wisconsin, USA “Gray and marinette red” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924
Pike River Gray Granite Wisconsin, USA “...dark gray granite, medium...with a ground mass of white feldspar crystals....” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924 (crystals and considerable hornblende)
Pikes Peak Quarries     “See Amazonite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pillora del Fiume Marble “Quarry located near the banks of the Arno, Italy.” “Yellow with black veins. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pillora di Arno Marble “Quarry located near the banks of the Arno, Italy.” “Greenish-yellow with pinkish veins and black specks. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pine Green Granite Canada   (5)
Pingshan Red 1, 2, & 3 Granite China   (5)
Pinheiro     “See Pero Pinheiro.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Alabaster     “See Alabaster, Welsh, which is known as Pink Alabaster or Pink Welsh Alabaster.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Alabaster “Quarried at Sea Cliffs, Glamorganshire, Wales.” “Delicate pink, containing some nodules of a darker color, a few thin, brown thread-like veins.  (Extract from Watson.)” Welsh Alabaster or Pink Alabaster.  (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Beltor     “Pink Beltor or Pink Little Beltor - See Little Beltor (Pink).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Brazil Sandstone Brazil (Bahia)   (5)
Pink Chiampo Marble (Chiampo Rosato) Veneto, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pink Chiampo Marble (Chiampo Rosato) Veneto, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pink Clouded Marble “Bancroft Quarries, South Ontario, Canada.” “Light pink with numerous white veins and a few little green patches.” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Clouded Marble South Ontario, Canada “...A light pink groundmass and a few small light green patcheson the surface.” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 4, April, 1924 (One of the variegated marbles of South Ontario....”)
Pink Crystal Marble Australia   (5)
Pink Kershaw Kershaw, South Carolina, USA Pink Quarried by North Carolina Corp. (1)
Pink Lepanto     “See Lepanto.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Listavena Marble “Quarried at West Rutland, Vermont.” “White shading to pink faintly veined with green parallel bands, limited supply.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Listavena Marble West Rutland, Vermont, USA Pink ground with veins of green and white shades. Quarried in Western Vermont ca 1932. (10)
Pink Little Beltor     “Pink Beltor or Pink Little Beltor - See Little Beltor (Pink).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Makrana Marble “Makrana Quarries, Parbatsar district, Jodhpur, Rajputana, India.” “Pink with few black and white spots.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Mara Granite Argentina   (5)
Pink Marquise Marble “Quarried near Marquise or Marquese, close to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France.” “Brownish-gray or creamed coffee color with veins which vary from white to auburn. Another variety, called Pink Marquise, is pink with veins as above. And the third variety, known as Maruise Fleurie, is a pinkish-purple with veins. (Blagrove.)” Marquise or Marquese. (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Nembro Marble (Nembro Rosato) Veneto, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pink Numidian     “See Numidian Pink.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink of Arta Limestone Greece   (5)
Pink of Salto Granite Argentina   (5)
Pink Peperino (Peperino Rosa) Latium, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pink Perlino Marble (Perlino Rosato) Veneto, Italy   Interior (12)
Pink Quartzite (Quartzite Rosa ) Piedmont, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pink Quartzite Carolina Sandstone Brazil (Bahia)   (5)
Pink Rubio Marble “Quarried at West Rutland, Vermont.” “Pinkish-white, slightly variegated.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Skye     “Same as Skye (Pink).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Sudanese     “See Sudnese Marbles.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Tennessee     “See Tennessee Pinks: Gray Eagle Pink, Gray Knox Pink, Bond Pink, Craig Pink, Cedar Pink, Knox Pink, Ross Pink, Asbury Pink.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pipestone     “See Catalinite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pink Veined Bari (Trani) Apulia Region, Italy   (12)
Pink Yaye Granite Argentina   (5)
Pink Westerly Granite Rhode Island, USA Pinkish buff medium gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924
Pipestone Pipestone County, Minnesota, USA Red Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 12, Dec., 1923 (“A hard, dense red clay-like rock found within the massive quartzite deposits in Pipestone County. Used for ornamental trimming.”)
Pinta Verde Marble Brazil (Brasil)   (5)
Piqua Limestone Ohio, USA   Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 12, Dec., 1923 (“A calcareous limestone. Soft and easily worked. Uneven beds. Used principally for fluxing and marble dust.”)
Piqua Sandstone Piqua, Ohio, USA    
Piracema Granite Brazil   (5)
Piracema White Granite Brazil   (5)
Pisa     “See Fiorito di Pisa.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pisogne Onxy     “See Italian Onyx.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pisolite (Limestone) England   Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 10, Oct., 1924 (“From the Greek word meaning pea, it is a limestone of oolitic structure, in which the individual grains are the size of peas. It is rather common in some of the oolitic beds of England, where the stone is given the popular name of Peastone or Peagrit.”)
Pistoja     “See Verde de Pistoja.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Piszko Sutto Rot Marble “Sutto Quarries, on the south bank of the Danube, about twenty miles from Budapest, Hungary.” “Light red with scattered dots and spots of dark red.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Italian Marble “Turner Quarry, near Fowler Station, Pittsford Township, Vermont. “There are several varieties of the Pittsford Italian, though only two are recognized in trade. In the D layer the ground is hsaded, white in some parts, yellow in the very light shades elsewhere and one charm of the marble is in the manner in which the white and yellow are intermingled. Running through the ground are distinct veins of yellowish-brown and olive, or in another part of the stone there may be dark gray or even black. These veins are all narrow, much crumpled and irregularly distributed. In the Layer Y we have more intricate entanglemen of veins and bands of a dark bluish tint. These veins and bands of a dark bluish tint. These veins never seem to coalesce as in many marbles, but although constantly changing their direction they do not mingle. Although there are the dark veins mentioned, they are not sufficiently abundant to essentially darken the marble which is always very light in general tone. - Report of the Vermont State Geologist.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Italian Marble Pittsford, Vermont, USA A calcite marble, slightly bluish-white color with finely plicated beds and irregular mottlings of medium gray Quarried by the Vermont Marble Co., 1932. (exterior and monumental marbles) (10)
Pittsford Valley Marble or Light Florence “Florence No. 2 Quarries, near Fowler, Vermont.” USA “Bluish-white with veins or lines of darker shade.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Valley Marble Pittsford, Vermont, USA A calcite marble of light bluish-gray color with little medium to dark gray Quarried by the Vermont Marble Co., 1932. (exterior and monumental marbles) (10)
Pittsford Valley Marble (H Layer) “Florence Quarry No. 2, near Fowler Station, 1,000 feet southwest of the old Turner Quarry, and one and one-quarter miles almost due west of Pittsford Station, Pittsford township, Vermont.” “Bluish-white, abundantly blotched and clouded by dark spots usually elongated, and there may be distinct dark lines. (Vermont State Geological Survey.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Valley Marble (M Layer) “Quarried also from the Florence No. 2 Quarry.” “Bluish-white with light green bands which in some portions almost completely cover the surface.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Valley Marble (X Layer) “From the Florence No. 2 Quarry.” “Bluish-white with numerous greenish veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pittsford Valley Marble (W Layer) “From the Florence No. 2 Quarry.” “Practically the same as Pittsford Valley, M Layer.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)

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