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Names and Origins of Stone - P

Name of Stone Origin Color Comments
Peach Blossom     “See Fior di Persica and Fleur de Pecher.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peach Blossom (Garessio) Cuneo, Italy (Piedmont Region)   (12)
Peachblow Sandstone Near Aspen, Pitkin County, Colorado Light red Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 9, September, 1923 ) (“Used for building.”)
"Peach-Bottom" Slate *York County, Pennsylvania *Maryland (Cardiff Area, Harford County) Pennsylvania/Maryland border Bluish-gray  
Peach Limestone Texas, USA Light peach TexaStone Quarries (4)
Peachblow Sandstone In the Frying Pan Valley above Basalt, Eagle County, Colorado, USA. Reddish Described as reddish quartz sandstone on the Molly Brown House Museum web site.
Peacock Green Granite China   (5)
Peacock Green Granite India   (5)
Peakmoor Sandstone Bolehill Quarry, Wingerworth, Derbyshire, UK Light brown to pink (2)
Pearl Aswan Granite Egypt   (5)
Pearl Chiampo Marble (Chiampo Perlato) Veneto, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pearl Breccia Avellino (Gesualdo) Campania Region, Italy   (12)
Pearl Flower Granite China   (5)
Pear Gray Benevento (Vitulano) Campania Region, Italy   (12)
Pearl Gray Marble Morocco   Interior (12)
Pearl Grey Fluery Marble USA   (5)
Pearl Red Granite China   (5)
Pearl Serpentine (Serpentino Perlato) Lombardy, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Pearl Tavernelle Vincenza, Italy    
Pech-Cardaillac (Serpentine) “Quarried near Pech-Cardaillac, Lott, France.” “Varied shades of dark green from olive to almost black. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro A Rosso Unknown location. “Bands of rosy transparent white, mixed with fleecy mottlings.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Carnino Unknown location. “Flesh color.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Dorato Unknown location. “Flushed pinkish-white, patched with lichen of dark red, slightly tinged with gold.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Listato Unknown location. “Disposition to parallel lines.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Minuto Unknown location. “Fleshy mottlings very fine and even.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Minuto Nuvolato Unknown location. Clouded fleece, small in texture.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Pallido Unknown location. “Pale fleecy markings.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastro Sanguigno Unknown location. “Flesh of blood red.” “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pecorella Alabastros Unknown location.   “Pullen gives...(a) list and description of Pecorella Alabastros but does not give the location of the quarries; all are presumably ancient Alabaster: Pecorella Alabastro A Rosso, Pecorella Alabastro Carnino, Pecorella Alabastro Dorato, Pecorella Alabastro Listato, Pecorella Alabastro Minuto, Pecorella Alabastro Minuto, Pecorella Alabastro Minuto Nuvolato, Pecorella Alabastro Pallido, Pecorella Alabastro Sanguigno.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pedra Furada Quarries     “See Encarnadao.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pedrara Onyx “This Onyx is quarried in Mexican territory, but on the peninsula of lower or Baja California, some ten to fifteen miles from the gulf coast and some 150 miles south of San Diego.” “Pearl white, delicate rose tints and light greens are the usual colors. All more or less veined with rose red.” “(Takes its name from the old La Pedrara Quarry in Mexico.)” ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peekskill Granite New York, USA   (See: “Mohegan”)
Peerless Gray Marble “Andres Quarry, Kizer, Blount County, Tennessee.” USA “Gray (not bluish steel gray) with crow-feet of average width.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pegmatite     “Pegmatite or Graphic Granite. According to Geo. P. Merrill, ‘This is a granite rock consisting mainly of quartz and orthoclase, but in which the constituents instead of crystallizing in the usual granular condition are in the form of long parallel and imperfect prisms.’” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pelitomorphic (definition)     “Having clay or mud form. Applied to a rock of clay-like texture.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peloponnesus     “See Doliana Black.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peliviere     “See Rose De La Peliviere.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pellegrino Onyx “From Mount Pellegrino, Corsica.” “White with yellow and red veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peloponnesus Marble     Doliana Black and Rosso Antico are sometimes known as Peloponnesus marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pembroke Marble “Carew Newton Quarries, Pembrokeshire, Wales.” UK “Blue gray, with white fossil markings; some varieties show white veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pen Argyl Slate Pen Argyl, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, USA    
Penarth Alabaster     “See Alabaster, Welsh.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penache     “Same as Gris Penache.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pendant (Breche) “Quarried near Pendant, Lot, France.” “Gray with red veins. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pengersick Quarries     “See Cornish Serpentine.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peninsula Onyx     “Same as Pedara Onyx.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penmon Marble “Penmon Quarries, Anglesey, Wales.” UK “Light brown, with veining and clouds of darker shade.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penn Green     “See Sylvan Green.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penna White Marble “West Grove Quarries, Chester County, Pennsylvania.” “Dull white, somewhat coarse texture.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penne St. Martine (Breche) “Quarried at St. Beat in the Upper Garonne, France.” “Combination of white, yellow and gray. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pennsylvania Green Marble “Quarried at Easton, Pa.” (Pennsylvania, USA) “Variegated green.” “Frozen Green - Pennsylvania Green.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pennsylvania Limestone Pennsylvania, USA   Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 12, Dec., 1923 (“Much of the limestone quarried in the state is used for road-building, flux and ballast, that being produced for structural puposes finding little beyond local use for foundations, walls and occasional small buildings. At an earlier period...its used for architectural and structural purposes was much more extensive. In color, texture and durability the stone can be classed as fine-grained, dark in color and of even texture, some varieties being capable of taking a polishing. They are classified under various names, usually from the locality or quarry from which they are taken, as for example, York, Chambersburg, Helderberg, Birdsboro, Conshocken, etc.”)
Pennsylvania Marble     “See Penna White and Sylvan Green.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Penteli Monastery Marble “Quarried near the Penteli Monastery, from which it takes its name.”   “See Pentelic White Statuary.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelic Marble “Quarried from Pentelikon Mountain, near Kakkinaras, about eight miles northeast of Athens, Attica, Greece. “According to Watson the upper portion of the mountain is composed of blue-gray marble known as Blue Pentelikon. Underlying this are layers of mica shale, and below this again are beds of white marble which is nearly pure carbonate of lime and is known to the sculptors of Greece as statuary marble. Occasionally a few barely visible veins of talc cause a faint tinge of green for which reason Belli calls this marble Cippolino.” “Pentlic Marble or Pentelican or Pentelikon, or Marmor Pentelicum.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelic Marble Mt. Pentelicus in Attica; the mountains of Penteli (ancient quarries) White Marble was extensively used by the ancient Greeks; the Parthenon and other famous buildings were constructed of white Pentelic marble from Mt. Pentelicus in Attica AKA Pentelikon
Pentelic White Statuary Marble “Quarried near the Monastery of Penteli on the south slope of Pentelikon.” Greece “White when quarried but turns to a mellow light golden tint when exposed to the atmosphere. “Known as Patina.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelic White Statuary “Quarried at Dionysos, on the northern side of Pentelikon.” Greece   “Pentelic White Statuary or Northern Pentelic, or Dionysos Pentelic. Is similar to the Monastery variety, somewhat coarser, more fully crystallized and perhaps a little transparent. (Watson.) See Blue Pentelic and White Pentelic.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelican Marble “Quarried from Pentelikon Mountain, near Kakkinaras, about eight miles northeast of Athens, Attica, Greece. “According to Watson the upper portion of the mountain is composed of blue-gray marble known as Blue Pentelikon. Underlying this are layers of mica shale, and below this again are beds of white marble which is nearly pure carbonate of lime and is known to the sculptors of Greece as statuary marble. Occasionally a few barely visible veins of talc cause a faint tinge of green for which reason Belli calls this marble Cippolino.” “Pentlic Marble or Pentelican or Pentelikon, or Marmor Pentelicum.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelicon Marble Greece White Interior and exterior (12)
Pentelikon Marble “Quarried from Pentelikon Mountain, near Kakkinaras, about eight miles northeast of Athens, Attica, Greece. “According to Watson the upper portion of the mountain is composed of blue-gray marble known as Blue Pentelikon. Underlying this are layers of mica shale, and below this again are beds of white marble which is nearly pure carbonate of lime and is known to the sculptors of Greece as statuary marble. Occasionally a few barely visible veins of talc cause a faint tinge of green for which reason Belli calls this marble Cippolino.” “Pentlic Marble or Pentelican or Pentelikon, or Marmor Pentelicum.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentelikon Blue     “Same as Blue Pentelic.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pentreath Beach (location) “The Holestrow Quarries.”   “The Holestrow Quarries (see Cornish Serpentine) are above Pentreath Beach.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peony White Granite China   (5)
Peperino “Quarries at Gabi and near the Gate of Albano Laziale and the Castle of Marino.” "Dark greenish-gray, studded with black fragments like peppercorns, whence its name, or grayish-brown with black spots.” “Peperino or Lapis Albanus...According to Pullen: ‘This stone is a confused mass of ashes, gravel, and volcanic stones, closely welded together, and is used for stairs and fountains, because it grows more consistent by being wetted. It suffers both from frost and heat and is only found in really good preservation underground.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peperino (Volcanic Rock) At Marino, near Lake Albanus, Italy

(Lapis Albanus) light gray (Lapis Galbinus) light brown

Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 10, Oct., 1924 (“The popular name for a volcanic stone in which are embedded bits of black lava, giving it a peppered appearance, whence its name. It was used from the earliest time for building purposes in Italy and many of the most famous structure of Ancient Rome were of this material. The Two classic varieties were Lapis Albanus, light gray, Lapis Gabinus, light brown, and harder than the former. Peperino is still quarried (circa 1924) at Marino, near Lake Albanus, and widely used.”
Peppertint Granite Brazil   (5)
Perger Granite Austria Salt and pepper  
Perak Veined Marble “Quarried near Ipoh, Perak, Malay States.” “Dull white with dark gray veins.” “Perak Veined or Veined Perak.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perak White Marble “Quarried near Ipoh, Perak, Mala States.” “Varies in color. Some are rather coarse, pure white, crystalline, while others are dull white with dark gray veins. (Watson.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perfido Nero (Porphyry) “Unknown quarries, probably Egypt.” “Black, slightly tending to green with little white crystals.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perfido Serpentin or Serpentino     “Perfido Serpentine or Serpentino. Same as Green Porphyry.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perfido Serpentino “Quarried between the towns of Sparta and Marathonisi, Laconia, Greece.” “Dark olive green, with an abundance of small light green crystals and occasional small bluish agates. (Watson)” “Green Porphyry, or Marmor Lacedaemonium Viride or Perfido Serpentino. No longer available. Do not confuse with Verde antico. For different varieties of this marble see Porfido Serpentines.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Péribonka Granite The Lac St. Jean area of Quebec, Canada    
Peridotite     “See Polyfant Stone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perigueux Marble “Quarried near Perigueux, Dordogne, France.” “Pale bluish-gray varied with shades of green and red. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peristerite Townships of Bathurst & Burleigh, Ontario, Canada “A variety of soda-feldspar with a pronounced bluish opalescence.” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 5, May, 1924
Perl Slate Egypt   (5)
Perla (definition)     “Light.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perlaceo Alabastro     “Same as Alabastro Perlaceo.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perlato     “See Bigio Antico Perlato.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perlato d'Italia Marble (aka Dolcetto Perlato Marble) Trapani, Sicily, Italy, about 50 miles southwest of Palermo    
Perlato Sicilia (Cream Perla) Limestone Trapani, Italy Beige (very pale orange) Interior and exterior (11)
Perlonjour     “See Petit Granit.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perm     “See Russian Malachite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Permian Sea Coral Limestone Texas, USA Blue/gray with some burgundy TexaStone Quarries (4)
Pero Pinheiro     “See Abancado Das Lameiras, Almiscado Amerello, Almiscado Escuro, Encanado, Lios, Vidraco.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Perola Bahia Marble Brazil (Brasil)   (5)
Perola Dawn Marble Brazil   Interior (12)
Perosa Stone (Perosa Argentina) Torino, Piedmont Region, Italy   (12)
Perricara Marble “Quarried at Perricara, Tournon, Lot-et-Garonne, France.” “Pale yellow with red and brown veins. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Persecchino Grande Marble “Unknown quarry.” “White with lilac and videt (sic) colored spots, some of which are a foot wide.” “One of the ancient marbles from an unknown quarry.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Persecchino Grando Marble     “An ancient marble known as Persecchino Grande.  Also called Violet Breccia.  At present this name is often applied to Breccia Violetto.”  (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Persecchino Piccolo Marble “Probably from same quarry as Persecchino Grande.” Unknown location. “Is the same as the above marble (Persecchino Grande) except that the spots are smaller and some rare varieties have rose colored spots. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Persian Red Travertine Iran   Interior (12)
Perthshire Serpentine     “Same as Killin Serpentine.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peschagnard Marble “Quarried in Isere, France.” “Mottled gray, black and white. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pescina     “See Parmazo.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peshawar District     “See Nowshera.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petali Liman (location) Pertali Liman, on the island Marmora.   “Pertali Liman is a small bay on the northwest coast of the Island Marmora, near which the Marmora statuary is quarried.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peterhead Granite “Quarried at Stirling Hill, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.” “Deep red with dark brown almost black markings.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peterhead Granite Scotland Deep rich red Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 12, Dec., 1924 (“One of the most famous granites of Great Britain.”)
Perth Stone Lenark County, Ontario, Canada “Yellowish-white color, with broad bands of purple” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 5, May, 1924 (“Used for building purposes.”)
Perthite Perth, Ontario, Canada (See column to right for color description.) Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 5, May, 1924 (“A highly ornamental stone, made up of flesh-red and reddish brown bands of orthoclase and albite, interlaminated. When cut in certain directions it shows beautiful golden reflections, like aventurine, and it is suscepticle (sic) to a high polish....”)
Petersburg Granite Virginia, USA Gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924 (building & monumental work)
Peterson Brownstone Northern New Jersey, USA Red or brown Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 9, Sept, 1923 (“The general name of the red or brown granite sandstone quarried in various sections of Northern New Jersey. The stone is of fine texture and has been used for building and monumental purposes.”)
Petit-Antique Marble Unknown quarry. “Blackish background with white and gray veins running nearly parallel. (Blagrove.)” “This ancient marble from an unknown quarry...” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petit Antique Marble “Quarried at Brabancon, Hainault, Belgium.” “Black with irregular gray and white spots and veins fairly distributed. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petit Antique     “Petit Antique or Petit-Antique d’Hechettes. Same as Hechettes.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petit Deuil Marble “Quarried at Moulis, Ariege, France.” “White with fine black veins. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petit Granit Marble “Quarries at Perlonjour and Mons, Hainault, Belgium.” “Dark gray, nearly black, spotted with small fossils...Many marbles containing small white fossils are called Petit Granite. ( from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petit Granite Limestone Belgium Black Stone Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 1, Jan., 1925 (“black compact carboniferous limestone...crinoidal”
Petitor Marbles “Quarried at Petitor, St. Mary’s Church, Devonshire, England.” UK “Petitor Clouded Fossil or Fossil Clouded Petitor is pink and red largely made up of fossils. Petitor Clouded Gray or Gray Clouded Petitor is gray with numerous small red veins at all angles. Petitor Clouded Yellow or Yellow Clouded Petitor, yellow with numerous small pink veins at all angles. Petitor Red or Red Petitor, mottled red and pink with numerous fossils.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petrified Wood     “Found in various places, the best known of which is the so-called Fossil Forest near Corriza, Apache County, Arizona. According to Merrill, wood is not infrequently fossilized by silica, the organic matter being replaced atom by atom by the siliceous matter until a more or less complete cast of the woody structure remains. This is often variously colored, mainly in red tints by iron oxides and when cut and polished is very beautiful. The great toughness of the material renders it very expensive to work.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Petworth and Bethersden “Gorlinger quarries, near East Grinstead, Sussex, England.” UK “One variety is light blue gray, containing fresh water shells.  Another is greenish gray with shells as above; while the third variety is reddish brown with shells. (Extract from Watson.)” “Sussex or Petworth and Bethersden.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peyrere     “See Le Peyrere.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Peysonnier Marble “Quarried at Isere, France.” “Mottled gray, black and white. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Pezenas (Breche) “Quarried near Pezenas, Herault, France.” “White, gray and green. (Blagrove.)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)

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