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List of Quarries in Vermont & Quarry
Links, Photographs and Articles

  • Hydeville, Vermont – R. Hanger's Slate Works (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxv.)

    R. Hanger's Slate Works, Hydeville, Vermont

    Celebrated Vermont Building Slate,
    Steps, Platforms, Urinals, Tubs,
    Cemetery Work, Vaults, Catacombs,
    Billiards, Mantel Stock.
    Estimates Given Quickly.

  • Isle La Motte, Vermont - Limestone Quarries. The main block's facades of the Grand Isle County Courthouse in North Hero, Vermont, and its foundation are constructed of random coursed Isle La Motte limestone. (The link from which the information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.freeverse.com/jo/courthouse/courthousehist.html>
  • Isle La Motte, Vermont - the Fisk Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Risk quarry, first opened (for lime burning) in 1664 and furnishing building stone in 1788, is on the west side of the south end of Isle la Motte, in Lake Champlain, 11 ½ miles south of the Canada line, in grand Isle County. The western edge of the quarry is only 100 feet from the shore. The quarry covers several acres and has a depth of 20 feet. Operator, N. W. Fisk, Fisk, Vt.

    “The series consists in natural order of the following beds which are Chazy age:

    Section of marble beds at Fisk quarry.

    Black unmetamorphic calcite marble - 20 feet

    Dark-gray crinoidal calcite marble - 4-6 feet

    Dark-gray and black alternating calcite marble - 12 feet

    (Total) - 36-38 feet

    “The marbles, “Fisk black” and “Fisk gray” (specimens D, XXXI, 1, a, black, fresh; g, polished; e, f, weathered; b, gray, crinoidal; d, gray with Maclurea), have already been described in detail on pages 47-48. (See also fig. 9.) They are slightly dolomitic carbonaceous fossiliferous calcite marbles of unmetamorphic origin and of very dark gray shade and are susceptible of high polish. The weathered surface of the black is dark bluish gray in places, with irregular brownish-gray dolomitic bands. The polished surface is almost black, with here and there sections of Maclureas in white calcite. The stone, except the dolomite bands, effervesces freely with acid and is very sonorous. Certain tests and analyses of these marbles made for the architect of the Bennington Monument and the Buffalo Pan-American Exposition, are in Mr. Fisk’s possession.

    “The beds dip 5° to 7° NE. and had a glaciated surface in places, with polished grooves protected by 2 to 4 feet of sand and clay, carrying a few bowlders. The black beds are subdivided into beds half an inch to 2 inches thick by dolomitic films or bands as thick as half an inch.

    “The polished product is supplied to the market by the Barney Marble Co., of Swanton. The black has long been used for tiling all over the United States. In the post office at Worcester, Mass., it has been combined with marble from Swanton in wainscoting. The waste of the quarry is sold as crushed stone.”

    Ibid., pg. 146 footnote: See Sixth Rept. Vermont State Geologist for 1907, 1908, Pl. VI, for photograph of one of the glacial grooves.

    • Isle La Motte - The Lake Champlain Area, Vermont - Fisk Marble Quarry (Black Marble) Contact the Champlain Islands Chamber of Commerce for directions to the quarry, which is a wetland and wildlife habitat today.
  • Isle La Motte, Vermont - North to the Reef (Black Limestone Quarries) (history and information). This article was written by William G. Scheller in the online magazine, Islands Magazine. The black limestone from Isle La Motte was used in the construction of U.S. Capitol, in New York's Radio City Music Hall, and on the floor of the Vermont State Capitol in Montpelier, according to this site. There were five quarries in operation during the 1800s, but today only one survives on the east side of the island. The Fisk Quarry was located on the western side of the island. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.islands.com/islmj99/logbook.html>
  • Isle la Motte, Vermont - Verde Antique Marble Quarry - The Vermont Marble Company. A large underground marble quarry in Danby is operated by the Vermont Marble Company. The marble is white in color. (From Industrial Minerals and Rocks, senior editor, Donald D. Carr; associate editors, A. Frank Alsobrook, (et al.) 6th ed., Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Littleton, Colorado, 1994, pg. 25.)
  • Jay, Vermont - Steatite/Soapstone Deposits (Excerpt from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, pp. 285-291. “Soap-Stones of the Various States and Territories,” pp. 359-360.)

    “Vermont. - Most of the steatite of this State is found on the east side of the Green Mountains and near the eastern line of the talcose slate formation, beds of it extending nearly the entire length of the State. The rock occurs usually associated with serpentine and hornblende. The beds are not continuous and have, as a rule, a great thickness in comparison with their length. It not infrequently happens that several isolated outcrops occur on the same line of strata, sometimes several miles apart, and in many cases alternating with beds of dolomitic lime stone that are scattered along with them.

    “At least sixty beds of this rock occur in the State in the towns of…Jay.…”

  • Johnson, Vermont - Steatite/Soapstone Deposits (Excerpt from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, pp. 285-291. “Soap-Stones of the Various States and Territories,” pp. 359-360.)

    “Vermont. - Most of the steatite of this State is found on the east side of the Green Mountains and near the eastern line of the talcose slate formation, beds of it extending nearly the entire length of the State. The rock occurs usually associated with serpentine and hornblende. The beds are not continuous and have, as a rule, a great thickness in comparison with their length. It not infrequently happens that several isolated outcrops occur on the same line of strata, sometimes several miles apart, and in many cases alternating with beds of dolomitic lime stone that are scattered along with them.

    “At least sixty beds of this rock occur in the State in the towns of…Johnson….”

  • Kirby, Caledonia County, Vermont - the Burke Granite Quarry (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, by T. Nelson Dale, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1923.)

    The Burke Quarry was located on the west foot of Kirby Mountain “about 1,000 feet N. 60° E. from the Kearney Hill Quarry and 2 1/8 miles roughly 50° W. from North Concord.” About 1923 the operator was the Kirby Granite company (W. J. Chapman) of East Burke, Vermont. The granite from this quarry is a light to medium gray color with a fine texture. In 1907 the quarry measured about 175 to 100 feet and had a depth from 10 to 20 feet. At the time of the 1923 report, the quarry had been idle since 1916.

    Accessory minerals: Very little magnetite, apatite, zircon, and rutile. Secondary minerals: Kaolin, a white mica, epidote, zolsite, carbonate, and chlorite.

    Transport of the granite from the quarry was by cart 5 ½ miles to the railway at Concord.

    The granite from the Burke Quarry was used for rough and cut monuments.

  • Kirby, Caledonia County, Vermont - the Grout Granite Quarry (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, by T. Nelson Dale, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, 1923.)

    The Grout Quarry was located on the south side of Kirby Mountain in the eastern part of the township about 9 miles northeast of St. Johnsbury, “2 ½ to 3 miles N. 20° W. of North Concord and about 450 feet above the station there.” About 1923 the operator was A. Rossi of North Concord. Granite from this quarry is a gray granite of a light to medium slightly bluish-gray color with a fine texture. Reportedly, the quarry was in operation in 1915 by was abandoned in 1916, according to the 1923 report.

    Accessory minerals: Zircon. Secondary minerals: Kaolin and white mica.

    The Grout Quarry opened about 1899. In 1906 the quarry had two openings. The northern opening (and the upper one) measured 40 by 25 feet and had a depth of 10 feet; the lower quarry measured 70 feet square and had a depth from 3 to 5 feet. Transport of the granite was by cart 5 to 6 miles to the railway at Concord.The granite from this quarry was used for monuments.

  • Leicester Township, Addison County, Vermont - the Humphrey Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Huntley quarry is about 800 feet west of Leicester Township, Addison County. (See Pl. I and map of Brandon quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.) Operator, Brandon Lime & Marble Co., Leicester Junction, Vt.

    “The stratigraphic position of the marble beds of this quarry can hardly be determined, owing to the scarcity of outcrops and the distance of the quarry from the basal dolomite on the east and the schist on the west, 2 miles in each case. Marble more than 20 feet thick is exposed in beds which are doubled over on themselves two or three times.

    “The marble (specimen D, XX, 217, a) is of translucent but dull aspect, light buff-pinkish color, and uneven parallel elongate texture, as shown in figure 25, with alternate irregular tiers of large and small grains. The larger grains, whose longer axes are parallel, have a diameter of 0.04, to 0.2, mostly 0.04, to 0.09 millimeter, and are thus of grade 1 (extra fine); the small grains are more roundish, with a tendency to rhombic form, and have a grain diameter of 0.009 to 0.03, averaging possibly about 0.02 millimeter, finer than grade 1. The larger grains show rhombic cleavage and twinning parallel to that cleavage, and are presumably calcite; the smaller ones, with neither cleavage nor twinning, may be dolomite, or else calcite crushed along its cleavage. (See p. 19.) The stone effervesces with acid more freely than dolomite. The marble of these quarries seems to be referred to by Hitchcock and Hager.

    “The strike of the beds is N. 15° E. Beginning on the east there are within a width of 60 feet three synclines, two anticlines, and part of a third, with their axial planes inclined 45° - 55° E. From the manner in which the rock breaks from the mass it is evidently still under compressive or tensional strain. It is also rather sonorous. Some of these folds are shown in Perkins’s last report.”

    Ibid., pg. 148 footnote: Geology of Vermont, vol. 2, 1861, p. 768.

  • Leicester Township (west of), Addison County, Vermont - the Huntley Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Huntley quarry is about 800 feet west of Leicester Township, Addison County. (See Pl. I and map of Brandon quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.) Operator, Brandon Lime & Marble Co., Leicester Junction, Vt.

    “The stratigraphic position of the marble beds of this quarry can hardly be determined, owing to the scarcity of outcrops and the distance of the quarry from the basal dolomite on the east and the schist on the west, 2 miles in each case. Marble more than 20 feet thick is exposed in beds which are doubled over on themselves two or three times.

    “The marble (specimen D, XX, 217, a) is of translucent but dull aspect, light buff-pinkish color, and uneven parallel elongate texture, as shown in figure 25, with alternate irregular tiers of large and small grains. The larger grains, whose longer axes are parallel, have a diameter of 0.04, to 0.2, mostly 0.04, to 0.09 millimeter, and are thus of grade 1 (extra fine); the small grains are more roundish, with a tendency to rhombic form, and have a grain diameter of 0.009 to 0.03, averaging possibly about 0.02 millimeter, finer than grade 1. The larger grains show rhombic cleavage and twinning parallel to that cleavage, and are presumably calcite; the smaller ones, with neither cleavage nor twinning, may be dolomite, or else calcite crushed along its cleavage. (See p. 19.) The stone effervesces with acid more freely than dolomite. The marble of these quarries seems to be referred to by Hitchcock and Hager.

    “The strike of the beds is N. 15° E. Beginning on the east there are within a width of 60 feet three synclines, two anticlines, and part of a third, with their axial planes inclined 45° - 55° E. From the manner in which the rock breaks from the mass it is evidently still under compressive or tensional strain. It is also rather sonorous. Some of these folds are shown in Perkins’s last report.”

    Ibid., pg. 148 footnote: Geology of Vermont, vol. 2, 1861, p. 768.

  • Leicester Township (west of), Addison County, Vermont - the Swimmington Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “About 0.7 mile southeast of the Huntley quarry is the Swimmington quarry of the Leicester Marble Lime Co., not visited by the writer but described by Perkins, in which a dark-gray (graphitic) marble forms a completely compressed (isoclinal) fold with an almost horizontal axial plane. The fold is about 7 ½ feet in diameter and 100 feet long.

    “The structure at both of these quarries indicates that Leicester Junction marks the location of a north-south zone or axis of intense crystal compression similar to that which passes near the Owls Head, in Dorset. (See p. 93.)”

    Ibid., pg. 148 footnote: Idem, pp. 349-351, Pls. LII, LXXL.

  • Lowell, Vermont - Steatite/Soapstone Deposits (Excerpt from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, pp. 285-291. “Soap-Stones of the Various States and Territories,” pp. 359-360.)

    Vermont. - Most of the steatite of this State is found on the east side of the Green Mountains and near the eastern line of the talcose slate formation, beds of it extending nearly the entire length of the State. The rock occurs usually associated with serpentine and hornblende. The beds are not continuous and have, as a rule, a great thickness in comparison with their length. It not infrequently happens that several isolated outcrops occur on the same line of strata, sometimes several miles apart, and in many cases alternating with beds of dolomitic lime stone that are scattered along with them.

    “At least sixty beds of this rock occur in the State in the towns of…Lowell….”

  • Ludlow, Vermont - Steatite/Soapstone Deposits (Excerpt from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, pp. 285-291. “Soap-Stones of the Various States and Territories,” pp. 359-360.)

    “Vermont. - Most of the steatite of this State is found on the east side of the Green Mountains and near the eastern line of the talcose slate formation, beds of it extending nearly the entire length of the State. The rock occurs usually associated with serpentine and hornblende. The beds are not continuous and have, as a rule, a great thickness in comparison with their length. It not infrequently happens that several isolated outcrops occur on the same line of strata, sometimes several miles apart, and in many cases alternating with beds of dolomitic lime stone that are scattered along with them.

    “At least sixty beds of this rock occur in the State in the towns of…Ludlow….”

  • Manchester, Vermont - the Continental Marble Co.’s Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Continental quarry is a mile west-northwest of the village. The marble is gray and white banded is overlain by dolomite. The beds, though nearly horizontal, show a minor fold striking clearly N. 55° E. One set of joints strikes N. 30° W.; another N. 65° W.”

  • Manchester, Vermont - the Dyer Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Dyer quarry is on the south foot of Equinox Mountain, on the D. H. Dyer farm about 250 feet south of the Dyer house (see map, Pl. I), a mile north-northwest of the Sunderland station in the town of Manchester. The quarry is not operated. The opening is small and only 30 feet deep.

    “The marble (specimens D, XVIII, 137, a, c, d, g, rough; D, XXXI, 81, a polished) is a breccia with bright brick-red cement and fragments of (1) pinkish to cream-colored and (2) bluish-gray calcite marble, and also of (3) a deep-reddish hematitic calcitic dolomite marble. The breccia is described more fully on page 48 and its general character is shown in Plate VIII, B, a. The pinkish marble belongs to grade 4, the bluish gray to grade 5, and the reddish to grade 2.

    “The beds undulate in small folds, striking N. 20° - 25° E. The brecciated bed is reported to have been core drilled to a vertical depth of 200 feet. It is bordered on both the east and the west by a light bluish-gray calcite marble like that of some of its fragments. At a point about 3,400 feet S. 25° W.- that is, along the strike - close to the Sunderland line, a much jointed gray marble has been prospected, which has dolomite east of and under it. West and south of this prospect, on the cross road, the dips are low to the west. These facts indicate that the breccia will probably be found to be underlain by the dolomitic series at no great depth. There may, however, be a fault along the brecciated bed.

    “Columns of the breccia 13 feet long have been obtained. The problem is to determine how much of the brecciated bed is free from fragments large enough to deprive it of ornamental quality. The weakness of the marble as a whole is no more of a detriment than that of the imported breccias.”

  • Manchester, Vermont – E. J. & C. H. Hawley (Sand Feed Pump) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 87.)

    E. J. & C. H. Hawley, Manchester, Vt.

    Hawley's Patent Sand Feed
    Is used by all the leading firms – saws faster and better than any other sandfeed.
    More gangs using our feed than any other. Easily kept in order.
    Also many gangs working satisfactorily, using crushed steel.
    Can give best of references. Orders solicited.

  • Marlborough, Vermont - Steatite/Soapstone Deposits (Excerpt from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, pp. 285-291. “Soap-Stones of the Various States and Territories,” pp. 359-360.)

    Vermont. - Most of the steatite of this State is found on the east side of the Green Mountains and near the eastern line of the talcose slate formation, beds of it extending nearly the entire length of the State. The rock occurs usually associated with serpentine and hornblende. The beds are not continuous and have, as a rule, a great thickness in comparison with their length. It not infrequently happens that several isolated outcrops occur on the same line of strata, sometimes several miles apart, and in many cases alternating with beds of dolomitic lime stone that are scattered along with them.

    “At least sixty beds of this rock occur in the State in the towns of…Marlborough….”

  • Middlebury, Vermont - the Marble Ledge Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The long disused Marble Ledge quarry is about 3 ¼ miles N. 25° E. of Middlebury and 1 ¾ miles east of Beldens. (See map of Middlebury quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.)

    “A body of white marble about 60 feet thick is exposed, striking north and dipping 50° E. Muddy Branch here flows through a small gorge along the strike and there seems to be a syncline between the stream and the quarry.”

  • Middlebury, Vermont - the Middlebury Marble Co.’s Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The abandoned quarry of the Middlebury Marble Co. is 2 miles east-southeast of Middlebury, a little west of the west limit of the basal dolomite and about 1,100 feet east of the road to East Middlebury in Middlebury Township. (See map of Middlebury quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.) This quarry has been idle for over 28 years. It measures about 100 feet east to west.

    “The following section is exposed, beginning on the west:

    Section of marble beds at Middlebury Marble Co.’s quarry.

    Calcite marble, bluish - 6 feet

    milk-white - 9 feet

    white, translucent - 14 feet

    fine grained, faintly pink - 17 feet

    white (like 14-foot bed) - 22 feet

    (Total) - 68 feet

    “The marble of the 9-foot bed (specimens D, XXII, 410, a and c, from a prospect 250 feet farther south) is a calcite marble of milk-white color and of regular texture, with grain diameter of 0.02 to 0.37, mostly 0.12 to 0.25 millimeter, and thus of grade 3 (fine). It contains rare quartz grains and spherules of pyrite. The texture of this rock is that of a normal marble and very different both in grade and in grain arrangement from the section obtained of Brandon Italian, as will be noticed by comparing figures 24 and 22. An estimate by the Rosiwal method shows its average grain diameter to be 0.11 millimeter.

    “The structural relations are not clear. The marble, however, probably belongs not far from either the dolomite series or the intermediate dolomite. The dip on the west side of the quarry is 40° –50° W. about 600 feet east of the quarry a whitish dolomite and very quartzose beds strike N. 10° W. and the dip about 72° E. At an old disused quarry a mile north marble about 40 feet thick strikes north and dips 45° E.; and at another opening a quarter of a mile west of this one white marble about 70 feet thick, with muscovitic streaks, strikes N. 10° E. and dips 90°.”

  • Monkton, Vermont - the Chapin Marble Prospect (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The same dolomite marbles crop out between the two quarries last described, on the farm of L. O. Chapin, of Bristol, Vt. ”

  • Monkton, Vermont - the Columbian Marble Co.’s Monkton Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Monkton quarry of the Columbian Marble Co. is 0.6 mile S. 32° W. of the Vermont Marble Co.’s quarry, on the south side of the east-west crossroads in the same township. The opening is about 20 feet square and 5 to 10 feet deep and has been long disused.

    “The marble is identical with that of the Vermont Marble Co.’s quarry. The weathered parts have a muddy gray color. The beds strike north, dip 45° E., and show many minor fractures along the bedding.”

  • Monkton, Vermont - the Jimmo Marble Prospect (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Jimmo prospect is in Bristol Township 1 ¼ miles west-southwest of the Bristol bench mark. (See map of Middlebury quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.) Owner, Harry Jimmo, Bristol, Vt.

    “The marble (specimen D, XXXI, 67, a) is a quartzose hematitic dolomite marble of deep-pink color, differing from that of the Monkton quarries and prospects by its less conspicuous mottling and deeper shade. It has films of sericite. The thickness exposed is 8 feet.”

  • Monkton, Vermont - the Vermont Marble Co.’s Monkton Marble Quarry (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The dolomite of Monkton has been described on page 45. It belongs apparently to the dolomite which underlies the calcite marbles. The only quarry operated in recent years was idle in 1910.

    “The dolomite of Monkton has been described on page 45. It belongs apparently to the dolomite which underlies the calcite marbles. The only quarry operated in recent years was idle in 1910.

    The Monkton quarry of the Vermont Marble Co. is at the west foot of the so-called Hogback Mountains, really the west flank of the Green Mountain range, about 1 ½ miles north-northeast of East Monkton and 6 miles N. 10° W. of Bristol, in Monkton Township, Addison County. (See map of Middlebury quadrangle, U. S. Geol. Survey.) The opening is 30 by 15 feet and 5 feet deep. The quarry is not now used, the company having withdrawn the marble from the market.

    “The beds exposed consist of about 270 feet of dolomite. The marble, “Ruvaro” (specimens D, XXXI, 63, a fresh; d, weathered), is a mottled pink and white quartzose hematitic dolomite marble. It contains thin beds of sericite and quartz (specimens D, XXXI, 63, b, c). Descriptions of these will be found on page 45.

    “The dolomite strikes N. 25° -30° W., dips 30° -40° W., and is crossed by slip cleavage dipping 40° E. and in places by close east-west joints dipping steeply to the north. About 315 feet east of the dolomite is an outcrop of quartzite, slightly calcareous in places, striking N. 15° W. and dipping at a steep angle to the west, crossed by cleavage dipping 60° E. A little farther south, at the head of a brook flowing southward, dolomite and quartzite are in contact, both rocks for the depth of a foot dipping steeply to the east, whether by faulting or minor overturned folding is not evident.

    “This marble was polished by the company and sold for decorative use.”

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