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Maine Granite Quarries
List and Location of Individual Quarries
(Page 2)

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Kennebec County

Hallowell, Kennebec County

  • Stinchfield Quarry [44]

    Panel at entrance of New York Bank of Commerce.  Carved of fine biotite-muscovite granite from the Stinchfield Quarry, Hallowell, Maine. (from The Commercial Granites of New England)

    This quarry was located "in the town of Hallowell, 2 miles northwest of the city of Hallowell, on the southern part of Lithgow Hill."  The operator was the Hallowell Granite works, C. B. Paine, receiver, of Hallowell, Maine.  Granite from the quarry, "Hallowell," was reportedly a light-gray color with a fine texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 2 miles to the railroad or to the wharf on Kennebec River at Hallowell, which was accessible to schooners of 12-foot draft.  George A. Fuller Co. leased the quarry in 1922 and supplied part of the stone for the courthouse in New York.

    The Stinchfield Quarry was opened about 1826 at the same time as the Longfellow Quarry, which was southwest of the Stinchfield quarry "and communicating with it.".  In 1905 the quarry was measured and it was 600 feet from northeast to southwest by 400 feet across and had a depth from 30 to 60 feet. 

    The granite from the Stinchfield Quarry was used for buildings and sculpture.  "It lends itself remarkably well to delicate ornamental work and statuary."  About seven-eighths of the granite went into building and one-eight into carved works in 1905.  Granite from this quarry was used in the following examples:  the Capitol in Albany, New York; the Marine National Bank in Buffalo, New York; the Hall of Records (including the statuary), the Brooklyn Savings Bank, in New York; the Masonic Temple in Boston, Massachusetts, the academic and library buildings at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland; the vestibule of the Terminal Station in Chicago, Illinois; the Northwestern Insurance Co.'s building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and the Savings Bank in Bangor, Maine.  The granite was also used in the following monuments and statuary:  the Statue on Pilgrim monument in Plymouth, Massachusetts; the National Monument in Yorktown, Virginia; the New York State monument in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; the Soldiers' Monument in New Haven Connecticut; the Richard M. Hunt monument in Central Park in New York; and the Battlefield Monument in Trenton, New Jersey.

  • Longfellow Quarry [45]

    The Longfellow Quarry was discussed in the section pertaining to the Stinchfield Quarry.  The Longfellow Quarry opened about 1826.  In 1905 the Longfellow was not in operation, and it was filled "up to 20 feet with water."  This quarry was "southwest of the Stinchfield and communicat(ed) with it."  The Longfellow Quarry measured 400 by 200 feet with a depth from 50 to 70 feet.

  • The Tayntor Quarry (Melvin Quarry) [46]

    This quarry was "in the town of Hallowell, 2 miles north-northwest of the city of Hallowell."  It was owned by the Hallowell Granite Works.  At the time of the report, the quarry had not been worked for many years.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with a fine texture. 

    The Tayntor Quarry opened before 1840.  In 1905 the quarry measured "520 feet N. 30 W. to S. 20 E. by 275 feet across and from 10 to 40 feet in depth.  The deeper part of it is 275 by 150 feet and 40 feet deep."  Transport of the granite was by rail 2 miles to the cutting shed at the dock.

    The granite from the Tayntor Quarry was used for monumental work.  Examples can be seen at:  the General Slocum monument in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; the State of Maine Monument in Andersonville, Georgia; the New York State Monument on Lookout Mountain (Craven House), in Tennessee; the Soldiers' Monument at Pittsfield, Maine; the Dunlap mausoleum (Corinthian style, 16 by 28 feet) and the Ziegler mausoleum (Grecian Doric style, 25 by 34 feet, after the temple at Paestum) in the Woodlawn Cemetery in New York; and the General Miles mausoleum in Arlington, Virginia.


Knox County

Muscle Ridge Plantation, Knox County, Maine

  • The High Isle Quarry [47]

    This quarry was "in Muscle Ridge Plantation, 9 miles south-southeast of Rockland."  In 1905 the operator was William Gray & Son of Philadelphia Pennsylvania.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a slightly pinkish medium-gray color with conspicuous black mica and had a medium to coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by gravity and track 650 feet to the wharf.

    The High Isle Quarry opened about 1894 and had five openings.  Each of the openings were about 100 feet square and had maximum depths of 50 feet with an average depth of about 17 feet.

    Granite from the High Isle Quarry was used for buildings.  The bridge seats for the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Wanamaker store in Philadelphia were made from granite from this quarry.

  • The Dix Island Quarries [48]

    These quarries were "in Muscle Ridge Plantation, half a mile southwest of High Isle."  The owner was Thomas Dwyer, 216th Street and Broadway, New York.  There were six openings to the quarries, which were operated extensively in 1880 by the Dix Island Granite Company, which employed 1,400 men.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a dark-gray color with a medium texture.  At the time of the report there was a wharf with 12 feet of water at low tide, although the quarries had been abandoned.

    The Dix Island quarries furnished granite for the United States Treasury Department extension at Washington, the basement of the Charleston customhouse, the New York and Philadelphia post offices, and the trimmings for the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art.

South Thomaston

  • The Sprucehead Quarry (Sprucehead Island) [49]

    This quarry was located "on Sprucehead Island, in the town of South Thomaston, about 10 miles south of Rockland."  The owner was the Bodwell Granite Co. of Rockland, Maine. When the quarry was measured in 1905 it was about 275 feet by 250 feet.  It had a maximum depth of 55 feet and an average depth of about 27 feet.  The rock from the quarry, "Sprucehead," was reportedly "conspicuous black, white, and gray particles" with a medium to course texture. Transport of the rock was by cart 300 feet to the wharf.  The quarry had not been used since 1910 at the time of the report. 

    The rock from the Sprucehead Quarry was used in the following examples:  the Carnegie Library in Allegheny, Pennsylvania; the post office and customhouse in Atlanta, Georgia; the columns of the Auditorium Building in Chicago, Illinois, the Mutual Life Insurance Co.'s building and the National City Bank in New York; and the exterior of the post office in Bar Harbor, Maine.

  • The Weskeag Quarry [50]

    This quarry was "in the town of South Thomaston, 1 mile west of Pleasant Beach and 7 miles south of Rockland."  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a slightly bluish medium gray color with a medium to coarse texture.  In 1905 the quarry measured about an acre of ground and had an average depth of 20 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cars and horsepower on a track half a mile to the wharf near Birch Point.  At the time of the report, the quarry had not been used since 1914.

St. George, Maine

  • The Clark Island Quarry (Clark Island) [51]

    This quarry was "on Clark Island, in the town of St. George, about 12 miles south-southwest of Rockland."  The owner was the Rodgers Granite Corporation, 271 West 125th Street in New York.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a bluish-medium gray with a fine to medium texture.

    The Clark Island Quarry opened about 1870.  In 1905 the quarry measured 500 by 300 feet and had a maximum depth of 50 feet and an average depth of 25 feet.  Transport of the granite was by horse power on a track 900 to 1,200 feet to the wharf.

    Granite from the Clark Island Quarry was used in the following examples:  the post offices in Hartford, Connecticut, and Buffalo, New York; and the Standard Oil Building in New York.

  • The McConchie Quarry [52]

    This quarry was "in the town of St. George, about three-fourths mile north of Long Cove quarry."  The granite from the quarry, "Crown Black Granite," was reportedly a very dark gray shade with a fine to medium texture.  The granite was "carried 10 miles to the cutting works at South Thomaston, although the quarry itself is within one-fourth mile of seaboard."

    The McConchie Quarry opened in 1888.  In 196 the quarry measured about 50 feet square and had a depth from 10 to 15 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry was idle.

    Granite from the McConchie Quarry was used in the Soldiers' monuments at Warren and Union, Maine.

  • The Long Cove Quarry [53]

    This quarry was located "near both Tenants Harbor and Long Cove, in the township of St. George, about 13 miles southwest of Rockland."  The operator was Booth Bros. & Hurricane Isle Granite co., 208 Broadway, New York.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine to medium texture similar to the granite found at the Clark Island Quarry.  Transport of the granite was by inclined track 900 feet to the wharf.

    The Long Cove Quarry was opened about 1873.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 1,000 feet north to south by 500 feet east to west and had a depth from 20 to 75 feet, averaging about 40 feet in depth.  "This is the only quarry in New England in which tunneling is resorted to in the use of explosives."

    Granite from the Long Cove Quarry was used mainly for monuments and was sent mainly to Greenwood and other cemeteries near Brooklyn, New York.  Paving blocks were also made.  Granite was from this quarry was used in the following examples:  the post office in Albany, New York; the Bates Building in Philadelphia; and part of the Saratoga monument.

    The Willards Point or Wildcat Quarry [54]

    This quarry was "on Tenants Harbor, in the township of St. George, about a mile south of the Long Cove quarry."  The operator was the St. George Granite Co., 90 West Street, New York.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly similar to that found in Long Cove and Clark Island Quarries, which was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  The quarry was 30 feet from the dock.

    The Rockland post office was made from granite from the Willards Point or Wildcat Quarry, although at the time of the report, the granite was used entirely for paving.

Vinalhaven and Hurricane Islands - Known as the "Fox Islands" [55]

Vinalhaven and the adjacent islands have been known collectively as the Fox Islands, and their granite as "Fox Island Granite."  The granite industry of these islands is distributed over an area about 5 miles from east to west by 4 miles from north to south..Some of them are near the center of Vinalhaven Island.  The Palmer quarry is on the west shore; the Black and Webster quarries are on the east shore; the Sands, Harbor, and Armbrust quarries are on the south shore, near Vinalhaven village; and the Pequoit and Duschane Hill quarries lie east of the village near the east shore.  There are some minor quarries ('motions') on Barton, Cundell, and Green Islands, and a large quarry on Hurricane Island."

  • The Sands Quarry [56]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, at the northeast side of the head of Sand Cove."  The operator was Bodwell Granite Co. of Rockland, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a pinkish-buff color with a coarse texture. 

    The Sands Quarry opened before 1860.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 500 feet northeast to southwest and about the same northwest to southeast and had a depth from 20 to 75 feet, averaging about 40 feet.  The quarry was idle in 1922.  Transport of the granite was by railroad 500 feet to the wharf, "which admits schooners and barges of 1,500 gross tons capacity."

    Granite from the Sands Quarry was used for docks, bridges, piers, buildings, and monuments.  Examples are:  the Post Office Department building in Washington; the Masonic temple in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the savings bank in Wilmington, Delaware; the Board of Trade building in Chicago, Illinois; the post office and customhouse in Brooklyn, New York; the General Wool monument in Troy, New York; the Manhattan Bank in New York.  The Sands Quarry and the Palmer Quarry together furnished all the granite for the customhouse in New York.

  • The Palmer or Wharff Quarry [57]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, on the west side, opposite Leadbetter Island."  The operator was Bodwell Granite co. of Rockland, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly identical with that of the Sands Quarry, except it was a little more of a pinkish buff with a slightly greenish tinge. Transport of the granite was by rail 700 feet to the wharf, "where the blocks (were) taken on schooners either to the cutting sheds at the Sands quarry or directly to market."

    The Palmer or Wharff Quarry opened in 1896.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 500 feet square and had an average depth of 25 feet.  "The quarry (was) on the west side of a ridge 100 feet high."  The quarry was idle in 1922.

    Granite from this quarry was used mainly for bridges and buildings.  The waste was made into paving blocks.  This quarry, in addition to the Sands Quarry, provided granite for the New York customhouse. 

    Granite from this quarry was used the following examples:  the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad station in Chicago, Illinois; the State Savings Bank in Lansing, Michigan; the West Street Building (two stories polished), the United Realty Building, 115 Broadway, and 97 percent of the main piers (above foundation) of the Hell Gate Bridge in New York.

    The quarry also supplied eight columns (51 to 54 feet long by 6 feet in diameter) for the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York.  The columns were each made in two sections.

  • The Webster Quarry [58]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Vinalhaven, on the north shore of 'Pleasant River' at the end of Winter Harbor, in the northern part of Vinalhaven Island."  The operator was the A. M. Webster & Co. of Vinalhaven in 1905.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly identical to the granite found at the Palmer Quarry.  Transport of the granite was by "a graded track 200 feet to wharf admitting schooners of 300 to 350 long tons."

    The quarry was abandoned at the time of the report.  The granite had been shipped in the rough to be used for buildings in New York and Boston.

  • The Black (Pleasant River) Quarry [59]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Vinalhaven, on the south shore of Pleasant River, at the end of Winter Harbor, in the northern part of Vinalhaven Island."  The operator was Joseph S. Black of Vinalhaven, Maine.  The granite from the quarry reportedly was identical to the granite found at the Palmer Quarry.  Transport of the granite was by a 350-foot track, with a grade of 10 feet, to the wharf.

    The Black Quarry opened in 1896.  In 1905 the quarry measured 300 feet in a "N. 40O W. direction by 200 across with a working face 45 feet high."  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1912.

    Granite from the Black Quarry was used for buildings and the waste for rip rap.  Granite from this quarry was used in building the dry dock at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and the Rain Island Lighthouse.

  • The Pequoit Quarry [60]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, 1 1/24 miles east-northeast of Vinalhaven village, on Vinalhaven Island."  The owner was Booth Bros. & Hurricane Isle Granite Co., 208 Broadway, New York.  Granite from this quarry was reportedly a medium-gray shade with a fine texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart one-third mile to the narrows and shipped from there.

    The Pequoit Quarry opened in 1887.  In 1905 there were two openings.  Each of the openings were about 250 feet square with a depth of 10 feet.  The quarry only produced granite paving blocks in the sizes 10 to 14 by 4 to 5 by 6 to 7 inches.

  • The Duschane Hill Quarry [61]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, 1 miles east of Vinalhaven village, on Roberts Harbor."  The operator was Roberts Harbor Granite co. of Vinalhaven, Maine.  The granite was reportedly a medium buff-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  The granite from the quarry was used exclusively to produce paving blocks.

  • Bodwell Openings [62]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, in the diabase area west of Sand Cove."  The operator was the Bodwell Granite co. of Rockland, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reported to be an "olivine norite of almost black shade and fine texture."  Very large blocks are not obtainable.  The quarry was idle in 1922.

  • The Indian Creek Quarry [63]

    This quarry was "on Indian Creek in the township of Vinalhaven, about half a mile from Vinalhaven village."  The operator was J. Leopold & Co., 233 Broadway, New York.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray with a medium grain.  The quarry opened in 1909.  The granite from the quarry was used exclusively for curbing and paving.

  • The Armbrust Quarry [64]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, between Carvers Harbor and Indian Creek, south of Vinalhaven village."  The operator was the Crown Hill Granite Works in Vinalhaven, Maine.  The quarry had "numerous openings on several sides of a hillock 100 feet high.  Transport of the granite was by cart of 7 to 10 ton loads one-fourth to one-half mile to a wharf on Carvers Harbor.  The granite from the quarry was used exclusively to make paving blocks.

    At the time of the report, the quarry had not been operated since 1907.

  • The Hurricane Island Quarry [65]

    This quarry was "in the town of Vinalhaven, in the southeastern part of Hurricane Island."  The operator was the Hurricane Isle Quarries Co. of Rockland, Maine.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a pinkish-buff medium-gray color with a coarse texture. 

    The Hurricane Island Quarry was opened about 1876.  In 1905 the quarry measured "500 feet along the rift and had an average width of 150 feet.  The quarry was on the south side of a ridge 100 feet high with a west-northwest axis.  The greatest depth of working face was 105 feet and its average about 50 feet."  Transport of the granite was by track 400 feet to the dock. At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.

    The granite from the Hurricane Island Quarry was used for both buildings and monuments.  Waste goes into paving blocks.  The following are examples built from the granite from this quarry:  the Suffolk County courthouse, Boston, Massachusetts; St. Louis post office and customhouse; two buildings for the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland.


Lincoln County

Bristol, Lincoln County, Maine

  • The Round Pond Quarry [66]

    This quarry was "in the town of Bristol, one-fourth mile east of Round Pond village, and west of Muscongus Island."  The operator was Peter Svensen & Co., Round Pond.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly of very dark-gray and medium-gray colors with a fine texture.  ("black granite")  Transport of the granite was by cart about 300 feet from the lower quarry and 800 to 1,000 feet from the upper quarry to the wharf in Muscongus Bay.

    The Round Pond Quarry was opened in 1885.  There were two adjacent openings along a northwest-southeast line.  The upper quarry (the northwestern) measured 100 feet square in 1905; the lower quarry measured 400 feet northwest-southwest by 100 feet across, "but with a central part 37 feet wide on each side-that is, 175 feet wide."  The depth for these openings ranged from 10 to 65 feet.  It was difficult to obtain many large blocks.  The quarry was idle in 1916.

    The granite from the quarry was used mainly for small monuments which were shipped to New York without the lettering.  Waste was used to make paving blocks.  The granite from the quarry was used in the following examples:  the Die of the Maine monument at Andersonville, Georgia; the base and die of the General Sheridan monument in National Cemetery at Arlington, Virginia.

Waldoboro, Lincoln County

  • The Waldoboro Quarry [67]

    This quarry was "in the town of Waldoboro, 1 miles north of Waldoboro village, on the Boston & Maine Railroad."  The operator was the Booth Bros. & Hurricane Isle Granite Co., 208 Broadway, New York.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray shade, "a trifle darker than 'Hallowell granite" and still darker than "North Jay granite."  It had a fine to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1,300 feet (and 120 feet down) from the quarry to the mill, and then by cars 19 miles to the wharf at Rockland.  "The distance from the quarry to tidewater at Waldoboro is only 1 miles, but the water there is only 11 feet deep at high tide." 

    The Waldoboro Quarry was opened in 1860.  In 1905 the quarry measured "400 feet N. 59 E. to S. 52O w, by 140 feet across, and was 60 to 85 feet deep."  The quarry was not operated in 1916, and it was abandoned at the time of the report.

    Granite from the Waldoboro Quarry was used for buildings and monuments but not polished work.  Waste was used for paving and road ballast.  "About 250,000 paving blocks were shipped annually, mostly to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania." 

    Granite from the Waldoboro Quarry was used in the following examples:  the Buffalo Savings Bank in Buffalo, New York; the Armory, boat house, and cadets' quarters at the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland; the Crockett monument in the Acorn Cemetery in Rockland, Maine; Chemical National Bank, "platforms" for sidewalk around Schwab Building, and Riverside Drive, New York.

Whitefield, Lincoln County

  • Jewett's Quarry [68]

    This quarry was "in the town of Whitefield, 1 miles southeast of Whitefield village (Kings Mills).  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a very dark gray color with a bluish tinge and a fine to medium texture.  The quarry had two adjacent openings.  One of the openings was t0 by 25 feet and the other was 60 by 30 feet.  When they were measured in 1905 these openings were 6 and 8 feet deep, respectively.  The quarry was only worked at intervals, and the stone was used for monuments locally.  At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.


Oxford County

Fryeburg, Oxford County, Maine

  • The Eagle Gray Quarry [69]

    This quarry was "in the town of Fryeburg, at the northeast foot of Starks Hill, about 1 miles south of Fryeburg Village."  The operator was the Eagle Gray Granite Co. of Fryeburg, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium gray color with a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart two-fifths mile to the Maine Central Railroad.

    The Eagle Gray Quarry was opened in 1903.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 150 feet square by 3 to 12 feet deep. 

    Granite from the Eagle Gray Quarry was used for buildings and bases to monuments and can be seen in the granite part of the public library at Conway, New Hampshire.

Oxford, Oxford County, Maine

  • The Roy Quarry [70]

    This quarry was "in the town of Oxford, three-fourths mile from Oxford village."  The granite from this quarry was reportedly a medium cream-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.

    The Roy Quarry was opened in 1898 and covered about 5 acres with a working face 40 feet deep.  It was only occasionally worked, and the granite was used for rough foundations and trimmings.  Granite from this quarry can be seen in the trimmings on the Catholic Church at Berlin, Maine, and the McGillicuddy Block at Lewiston.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1906.

Woodstock, Oxford County, Maine

  • The Bryant Pond Quarry [71]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Woodstock, half a mile south of Bryant Pond station, on the east side of the Grand Trunk Railway."  The operator was the Grand Trunk Railway, Master of Bridges and Buildings, Grand Trunk Railway, Montreal, Canada.  Rock from this quarry was "a quartz diorite with conspicuous black particles on a bluish-white rather than a yellow-white ground" and had a medium texture. 

    The Bryant Pond Quarry opened about 1864.  When measured at a later date it was 150 feet north to south by 250 feet east to west with a depth from 10 to 50 feet.  The quarry was located on the west side of a north-south ridge.

    The granite from the Bryant Pond Quarry was used exclusively for bridges and stations on the Grand Trunk Railway.  This granite can be seen in the following examples:  the vestibule, first story, and trimmings of the station at Portland, Maine, and the station at Battle Creek, Michigan.


Penobscot County

Hermon, Penobscot County, Maine

  • The Hermon Hill Quarry [72]

    This quarry was "on Hermon Hill, 5 miles northwest of Bangor."  The owner was Dr. H. F. Hanson of Bangor, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a dark-green ("black granite") color with a fine texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the Maine Northern Seaport Railroad or 5 miles to Bangor.  The quarry was only occasional worked.

    The granite from the Hermon Hill Quarry was used for dies, memorial tablets, and wainscoting.  Examples can be seen in the following:  about 20 dies in Mount Hope and in the Mount Pleasant cemeteries at Bangor, Maine; the dies at the cemetery at Springfield, Illinois; the cornerstone of the Catholic Church at Orono, Maine; the keystone, etc., at the Lord Hall at the University of Maine.

Guilford, Penobscot County, Maine

  • The Queen City Quarry [73]

    This quarry was "3 miles from Foxcroft, in Guilford township."  The operator was the Queen City Granite Co. of Bangor, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-bray color with a medium to coarse texture.  The quarry was idle in 1918.

    Granite from the Queen City Quarry was used for building and can be seen in the following examples:  the trimmings of a brick building erected in 1899 for the Bangor Theological Seminary and those of the Stetson Block at Bangor, Maine.


Somerset County

Hartland, Somerset County, Maine

  • The Hartland Quarry [74]

    This quarry was "in the town of Hartland, near Hartland village, on the Sebasticook & Moosehead Railroad."  Prior to 1905 the operator was Joseph H. Baker, and the property was reportedly owned by the Linn estate.  Rock from the quarry was "a quartz diorite with conspicuous black particles on a more bluish than yellowish-white ground" and had a medium to coarse texture.

Norridgewock, Somerset County

  • The Dodlin Quarry [75]

    This quarry was "in the town of Norridgewock, on the northeast side of Dodlin Hill, 2 miles south of Norridgewock village, and has a north-northeasterly axis and a height of 350 feet above the general level and of 650 feet above the sea.  Although this quarry is now disused, it is described because of its geologic interest."  The granite from the quarry came in two shades.  One shade is a general medium gray with black particles on a white ground.  The other shade is a general light gray with much finer black particles on a ground of mixed white and gray.  Both have a medium to fine texture. 

    The Dodlin Quarry opened about 1885.  In 1905 the quarry measured 400 feet from north-northwest to south-southeast by 250 feet across, with an average depth of 30 feet.

    The granite from the Dodlin Quarry was used mainly for buildings.  Granite from this quarry can be seen in the following examples:  the post office at Muskegon, Michigan; the Merrill Library in Norwood, Massachusetts; the Catholic Church in Lewiston, Maine; the annex of the insane asylum at Augusta, Maine.

  • The Lawton Quarry [76]

    This quarry was "in the town of Norridgewock, on the northwest side of Dodlin Hill, 2 miles south-southwest of Norridgewock."  The operator was F. S. Lawton, Norridgewock.  Rock from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray and light-gray color with medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 3 miles to the railroad at Norridgewock.

    The Lawton Quarry opened before 1845.  In 1905 the quarry had two openings that measured 200 by 100 and 300 by 200 feet with depths from 5 to 10 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1917.

    Granite from the Lawton Quarry was used for buildings, bridges, and monuments for local supply.  Granite from this quarry can be seen in the town bridge at Bingham, Maine.

  • The Taylor Quarry [77]

    This quarry was "in the town of Norridgewock, on Dodlin Hill, about one-fourth mile north of the Lawton Quarry."  The operator was D. E. Taylor & Son of Norridgewock, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray shade with a very fine texture.  The quarry was a small opening and was only occasionally quarried for monumental purposes.  The quarry was idle in 1916.


Waldo County

Frankfort, Waldo County, Maine

  • The Mosquito Mountain Quarry [78]

    This quarry was "in the town of Frankfort, on top of Mosquito Mountain, 2 miles S. 10 E. of Frankfort village.  This mountain is a granite dome rising 545 feet above tidewater, close by, with a steep east face.."  The operator was Hayward Pierce of Frankford in 1905.  The granite in the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with milk-white feldspar crystals.  It had a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by "about 7,000 feet of track and gravity cars from quarry to the cutting shed and wharf on Marsh River (South Branch Stream), which admits schooners of 14-foot draft."

    The Mosquito Mountain Quarry was opened before 1837 and was located on the east side of the mountain.  A later opening was located on the top and in 1905 this quarry measured 1,000 by 500 feet and had a maximum depth of 25 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry had not been operated since 1912 and was then abandoned.

    The granite from the quarry was used for bridges, buildings, and the small sheets and waste for paving.  Granite from this quarry was used in the following examples:  the post office at Lynn, Massachusetts, and part of that at Chicago, Illinois; and the New York Central Railroad bridge across Harlem River.

  • The Mount Waldo Quarry [79]

    This quarry was "in the town of Frankfort, on the north spur of Mount Waldo, 660 feet above sea level, one-third mile southwest of Frankfort village."  The operator of the quarry was the Mount Waldo Granite Works of Frankford, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium gray color.  Transport of the granite was by "two graded tracks, each 1,200 feet long, operated by gravity from the quarry part way down the hill to the power house, thence by a cable road (Roebling engine) 1 miles to the wharf, which is accessible to schooners at 15-feet draft."

    At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1914.

    Granite from the quarry was used for buildings and the small sheets and waste for paving blocks.  Granite from this quarry can be seen in these examples:  the Milwaukee, Cleveland, Indianapolis and Jersey City post offices; the Philadelphia Mint; the Municipal Building in New York; the public library in St. Louis, Missouri, and the post office in Bangor, Maine.

Lincoln, Waldo County, Maine

  • The Lincolnville Quarry [80]

    This quarry was "in the town of Lincoln, near the north end of Lake Megunticook."  The operator was W. E. Dornan of East Union, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 5 miles to the electric railroad, and then 8 miles to Maine Central Railroad.

    The Lincolnville Quarry opened about 1875.  In 1905 the quarry measured 100 by 50 feet and was 28 feet deep. 

    Granite from the quarry was used locally almost entirely for monuments.  An example can be seen in the trimmings to the Carlton Block in Rockport, Maine.

  • The Heal Quarry [81]

    This quarry was "in the town of Lincoln, about 2 miles from the bridge over the outlet to Tilden Pond and about 3 miles from the shore of Penobscot Bay."  The operator was A. S. heal of Belfast, Maine.

  • The Bog Hill Quarry [82]

    This quarry was "in the town of Searsport, on Mount Ephraim (Bog Hill), about 5 miles north-northwest of Searsport village and 2 miles east of Swanville."  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with a medium texture. 

    At the time of the report, the quarry measured 200 feet north to south by 50 feet east to west and had an average depth of 5 feet. 

    Granite from the Bog Hill Quarry was used for monuments and buildings in Belfast and for paving blocks.  The granite was carted 5 miles to Searsport.  At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.

Swanville, Waldo County, Maine

  • The Oak Hill Quarry [83]

    This quarry was "in the town of Swanville, on Oak Hill, about 6 miles north-northwest of Belfast."  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a slightly bluish dark-gray color and had a fine texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart one-fourth mile to the siding from Sargents Crossing on the Maine Central Railroad.  Formerly the quarry was leased to the New England Granite Co. of Westerly.

    The Oak Hill Quarry opened about 1872 and consisted of several openings.  The largest opening measured 175 by 100 feet, and had a working face 60 feet high at the time of the report.

    The granite from the quarry was used for monumental uses.  "The stone is the darkest of the fine-textured granites of the State.and is finer textured than the blue granite of Westerly, R. I."


Washington County

Addison, Washington County, Maine

  • The Pleasant River Quarry [84]

    This quarry was "in the town of Addison at Dalotville, on the east side of Pleasant River Bay."  The operator was the Pleasant River Granite Co. of Addison.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly "an hypersthene-olivine gabbro of almost black shade and of medium phitic texture, with black particles up to half an inch and slender whitish crystals.  The polished surface is jet-black mottled with a little white."  Transport of the granite was by cart on a track 300 feet from quarry to mill and 300 feet then on to the wharf on Pleasant River Bay.

    The Pleasant River Quarry opened about 1885.  In 1905 the quarry measured 75 by 50 feet and had a working face about 50 feet high.  "It is on the south side of an east-west ridge 70 feet high, the upper 5 to 10 feet of which consists of morainal sand and boulders." The quarry was idle in 1921 and 1922.

    Granite from this quarry was "used for monuments and interior decorations.  The dimensions of the blocks are limited by the spacing of the joints and sheets.  The usual sizes shipped measure 2 feet 6 inches b 2 feet 6 inches b 1 foot and also 3 to 6 feet by 1 foot by 1 foot.  The largest block shipped measured 6 feet by 4 feet 6 inches by 4 feet 6 inches."

    The granite from this quarry can be seen in the following examples:  base of wainscoting in the city hall at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the tablet with Welsh inscription in the Washington Monument, Washington, D.C; the Danforth monument in Morristown, New Jersey; the Zeller monument in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania; the Center monument in the Gree(n)wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York; the mantle piece in the public library at Machias, Maine; and the memorial to Architect French in New York.

  • The Thornberg Quarry [85]

    This quarry was "in the town of Addison, 3 miles south of Addison village.  In 1905 the operator was A. M. Thornberg of Addison, Maine.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly a "hypersthene gabbro of almost black shade and medium ophitic texture.  There are two varieties-a dark one, which is externally identical with that from the Pleasant River quarry, and a lighter one, in which the white mottling due to the feldspar is a little more abundant.The stone takes a very fine polish, and the hammered or cut surfaces are almost white."  The quarry was not operated in 1916.

  • The Black Diamond Quarry [86]

    This quarry was "in the town of Addison, on Yoho Bay."  The operator was the Maine, Black Diamond Granite Co.  Rock from the quarry, known as "Indian Black Diamond Granite," is a hypersthene gabbro of very dark gray shade, with slight brownish tinge, and of fine to medium ophitic texture.A polished block, reported as from this quarry and shown to the writer in a stonecutter's yard at Quincy, Mass., had become pitted from exposure, but monuments erected 20 years or more ago in New York City are reported to be in good condition. There was a track 600 feet long to the wharf which admitted schooners of 11 feet draft.

    The Black Diamond Quarry opened in 1902.  When measured the quarry was 200 feet square and had a depth from 10 to 20 feet.  The oldest part of the quarry had been worked down to sea level.

Baileyville, Washington County, Maine

  • The Hall Quarry [87]

    This quarry was "in the town of Baileyville, at the north edge of Meddybemps Lake, 5 miles southwest of Baring, on the Washington County Railroad, about 7 miles southwest of Calais."  The operator was F. H. Hall of Calais, in 1905.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly a "norite of brilliant luster, very dark gray shade without any yellowish tinge and a coarse texture and marked rift, with jet-black particles up to 0.5 inch in diameter in a network of translucent whitish feldspar."  Transport of the rock was by cart 5 miles to Baring on the Washington County Railroad.

    The Hall Quarry opened in 1902 and had "two adjacent openings in the northeast side of a northwest-southeast ridge over one-fourth mile long and about 50 feet high.  These openings measure 60 by 25 feet and 35 feet in depth and 50 by 20 feet and 20 feet in depth, respectively."  At the time of the report, the quarry was no longer in operation.

    Granite from the Hall Quarry can be seen in the monument erected by Stephen A. Lovejoy at the Melrose Cemetery in Melrose, Massachusetts.

  • The Tarbox Quarry [88]

    This quarry was "in the town of Baileyville, about 900 feet northeast of the Hall quarry.at the north edge of Meddybemps Lake, 5 miles southwest of Baring, on the Washington County Railroad, and about 7 miles southwest of Calais."  The operator was Redbeach Granite Co. of Redbeach, Maine.  The rock in the quarry was identical to that in the Hall Quarry: ("black granite") was reportedly a "norite of brilliant luster, very dark gray shade without any yellowish tinge and a coarse texture and marked rift, with jet-black particles up to 0.5 inch in diameter in a network of translucent whitish feldspar." 

Calais, Washington County, Maine

  • Gardner's Prospect [89]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, on St. Croix River, 6 miles south of Calais, north of road to Redbeach."  The owner was Lorenzo Gardner of Calais, Maine.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was "a quartz diorite of very dark gray (not bluish) shade and fine, even-grained texture.It takes a high polish, and the hammered and cut surfaces are very light.  The stone is suitable for monumental work.  Dr. George Otis Smith, who visited the Gardner prospects in 1903, states that 'pink granite occurs intrusive in the dioritic rock in such a manner that both kinds of stone can be quarried from the same opening.'"

  • The Mingo-Bailey Quarry (1) [90]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, about 6 miles south of Calais, on the southwest side of the road to Redbeach, on the north side of an east-west ridge, near top."  The operator was Mingo, Bailey & Co of Redbeach, Maine.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly "almost black with a slight greenish tinge and of fine to medium even-grained ophitic texture."  When the quarry was measured in 1905, the quarry was 50 by 15 feet and had a depth up to 20 feet.  The sheets are about 10 feet thick.  The stones were carted to the company's cutting shed near Redbeach on the St. Croix River.  The Mingo-Bailey Quarry was only occasionally worked.

  • The Beaver Lake Quarry [91]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, near the north end of Beaver Lake, 4 miles west of Red Beach village."  The operator was the Maine Red Granite Co. of Red Beach.  Rock from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly "a mica-quartz diorite of general dark-gray shade (black mottled with white and gray) and of coarse to medium porphyritic texture."

    The Beaver Lake Quarry opened in 1885.  In 1905 the quarry measured 250 feet north-northeast to south-southwest by 75 feet across and had a working face on the east of 30 feet in height.  Transport of the stone was by cartage of 4 miles to the company's cutting mill at Red Beach and then further cartage of one-fourth mile to the wharf on St. Croix River.  At the time of the report, the quarry was idle.

    The product from the quarry was used entirely for monuments, and the Soldiers' Monument at Calais is an example.

  • The Shattuck Mountain Quarry [92]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, 3 miles west-southwest of Red Beach village, on Shattuck Mountain."  The operator was the Maine Red Granite co. of Red Beach, Maine.  The granite, "Shattuck Mountain," was reportedly a dark reddish to greenish-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 3 miles to Red Beach on the St. Croix River.

    The Shattuck Mountain Quarry opened in 1890.  When the quarry was measured in 1905, it had three openings on the south side of an east-west ridge.  "The principal opening measured 50 by 25 feet and from 10 to 20 feet in depth."  At the time of the report, the quarry was idle.

    Granite from the quarry was used for ornamental and monumental work.  An example of the granite from this quarry can be seen in the four fluted columns (22 by 3 feet) in the courthouse at Marquette, Michigan.

  • The Mingo-Bailey Quarry (2) [93]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, 1 miles north-northwest of Red Beach."  The operator was the Mingo, Bailey & Co. of Red Beach, Maine.  Granite from this quarry was reportedly a dark-reddish color speckled with pale greenish and had a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 miles to the wharf at Red Beach.

    The quarry measured 25 feet square by 8 feet deep at the time of the report and was abandoned.  The granite from this quarry was used entirely for monuments.

  • The Maine Red Granite Co.'s Quarry [94]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Calais, three-fourths mile west of Red Beach."  The operator was the Maine Red Granite Co. of Red Beach, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a bright-pinkish-gray color with a medium texture.  "This type of 'red granite' is the brightest of those occurring in Maine."  Transport of the granite was by cart over half a mile to the wharf on St. Croix River at Red Beach.  The company had a cutting and polishing works about one-fourth mile west of Red Beach..

    The quarry had two openings.  One was known as the "old quarry, and it was opened in 1876.  The new opening was made in 1905 and measured about 150 feet square and had a depth from 20 to 50 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry was idle.

    All of the granite from the Maine Red Granite Co. was used for monumental and ornamental work

  • The Red Beach Granite Co.'s Quarry [95]

    This quarry was "in the town of Calais, on Cooks Mountain, 8 miles southeast of Calais, about 1,000 feet southwest of road to Red Beach."  The operator was the Red Beach Granite Co. of Red Beach, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a bright pinkish-gray color and had a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart over half a mile to the wharf on St. Croix River at Red Beach.

    The Red Beach Granite Co.'s Quarry opened in 1895.  At the time of the report, the quarry measured 50 by 25 feet and had a depth of 5 to 20 feet. 

    Granite from this quarry was used for buildings and monuments, and examples of the granite can be seen in the red granite in two corner wings of the American Museum of Natural History in New York; and the pedestal to General Grant's monument at Galena, Illinois.

Jonesboro, Washington County, Maine

  • The Fish Quarry [96]

    This quarry was "in the town of Jonesboro, 1 mile northwest of Jonesboro village."  The operator was N. W. Fish of Jonesboro, Maine.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a lavender medium-gray color with a medium texture.

    The quarry was a small opening about 300 feet northwest of Mr. Fish's house, and was only worked occasionally.  Sheets were cut up to 5 feet thick.

  • The Bodwell-Jonesboro Quarry [97]

    This quarry was "in the town of Jonesboro, 2 miles east of Jonesboro village.  The operator was the Bodwell Granite Co. of Rockland, Maine.  Granite from the quarry, "Jonesboro Red," was reportedly a medium pinkish-gray color with a coarse to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the wharf on Englishmans Bay.  The granite was shipped to Vinalhaven for finishing.

    The Bodwell-Jonesboro Quarry opened about 1875.  At the time of the report the quarry measured "about 700 feet N. 80 E.-S. 80 W. by 200 feet from north to south, and has a depth of 10 to 33 feet."  At the time of the report, the quarry was "not in operation for want of demand for granite of this color."

    Granite from this quarry can be seen in the following examples:  the Customhouse and post office in Buffalo, New York; the Methodist Book Concern Building; the Havenmeyer residence at Fifth Avenue and 66th Street in New York; the customhouse and post office in Fall River, Massachusetts; the Western Savings Bank Building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the National Bank of Commerce in Kansas City, Missouri, with two 2-story fronts with carved and polished surfaces; and the Dimock family mausoleum (Egyptian style), in New London Connecticut.

  • The Booth Bros. Jonesboro Quarry [98]

    This quarry was "in the town of Jonesboro,.1 miles east of Jonesboro village."  The operator was the Booth Bros. Hurricane Isle Granite co., 208 Broadway, New York.  Granite from the quarry, "Jonesboro Red," was reportedly a pinkish-gray color with a coarse to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was along a track one-third mile to the wharf on Englishmans Bay.

    The granite from the Booth Bros. Jonesboro Quarry was used for building.  At the time of the report, the quarry was not in operation.

Jonesport, Washington County, Maine

  • The Minerva Cove Quarry [99]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Jonesport on the north side of Head Harbor Island, about 3 miles southeast of Jonesport."  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a dark reddish-gray color with a pinkish and greenish feldspar, "but in the upper sheets has a white instead of a greenish feldspar" with a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 700 feet and 50 feet down grade from the upper opening to the wharf.  From the opening at the wharf stones were loaded by derricks directly on schooners.

    The Minerva Cove Quarry had five openings:  "(1) 100 by 25 and 14 feet deep; (2) 50 by 25 and 40 feet deep; (3) 300 by 70 and 35 feet deep; (4) triangular, 100 by 150 by 75 feet deep, with working face 35 feet high; (5) 50 by 25 and 20 feet deep."  At the time of the report, the quarry was no longer in operation.

    Granite from the quarry was used for buildings and following are some examples:  the Colorado building at 14th and G Streets in Washington; the State Armory at Providence, Rhode Island; the power house of the Metropolitan Street Railway (Interurban), 95th to 96th Streets and First Avenue to the Hudson River in New York.

  • The Hardwood Island Quarry [100]

    This quarry was "in the town of Jonesport, on Hardwood Island, which lies 3 miles southwest of Jonesport village."  The operator was Rockport Granite Co. of Rockport, Massachusetts.  Granite from the quarry, "Moose-a-Bec Red," was reportedly a dark reddish-gray color, with a white and pinkish feldspar.  Transport of the granite was by lifting the blocks onto the wharf, which was 125 feet from the quarry.

    In 1905 the Hardwood Island Quarry measured 150 by 60 feet and had a depth of 15 feet, "but its bottom was between tide levels."

    Granite from this quarry was used for buildings as in these examples:  the wainscoting and stairway to the main entrance of the Suffolk County Courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts; the American Baptist Publication Society Building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the 25 columns in the Catholic Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey; the Germania Life Insurance Building in New York; Miami Hotel in Dayton, Ohio; the Cuyahoga Hotel in Cleveland, Ohio; the Old State National Bank in Evansville, Indiana; and the city baths in Kansas City, Missouri.

Marshfield, Washington County, Maine

  • The Marshfield Quarry [101]

    This quarry was "in the town of Marshfield, 3 miles north of Machias."  The operator was Butler & Berry of Machias, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium pinkish-gray color with a medium to fine texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 3 miles to the railroad or the wharf at Machias.

    The quarry opened about 1894.  In 1905 the quarry measured 200 by 150 feet and had a depth from 2 to 10 feet.

    The granite from the Marshfield Quarry was used for monuments and buildings as in the following examples:  the basement and front steps of the E. S. Draper residence on Beacon Street in Boston, Massachusetts; and the monuments for Boston and for local demand.

Millbridge, Washington County, Maine

  • The Millbridge Quarry [102]

    This quarry was "in the town of Millbridge, near Millbridge village, in the southwestern part of Washington County."  The operator was Swanton & Wallace of Millbridge, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium buff color with a medium texture.  "The Millbridge quarry was not visited by the writer, and the firm failed to reply to questions as to dimensions of quarry and product."  At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.


York County

Alfred, York County, Maine

  • The Bennett Quarry [103]

    This quarry was "in the town of Alfred, 1 mile southwest of Alfred village, south of the Portland & Rochester Railroad, at the north foot of a 480-foot hill."  The operator was Bennett Bros. of Alfred, Maine, in 1905.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a slightly greenish dark-gray color with conspicuous black mica and a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the Alfred railroad station.

    The Bennett Quarry opened prior to 1875.  In 1905 the quarry measured 60 by 150 feet and had a depth up to 30 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry was no longer in operation.

    The granite from the Bennett Quarry was used for curbing and buildings.  An example is the Parsons Memorial Library in Alfred village, Maine.

Berwick, York County, Maine

  • The Spence & Coombs Quarry [104]

    This quarry was "in the town of Berwick, 1 miles southeast of North Berwick village and station."  The operator was Perry Bros. of Concord, New Hampshire.  Granite from the quarry ("black granite") was reportedly a very dark olive-brownish color with a medium texture.  There were two openings in the quarry.  In 1905 the quarry was "about 25 feet square by 5 to 10 feet deep."  Granite from the quarry was used entirely for monuments, and the quarry was only worked occasionally.

  • The Miniutti Quarry [105]

    This quarry was "in North Berwick, in the township of Berwick."  The operator was Miniutti Bros. & co. of Concord, New Hampshire.  Granite from the quarry, "North Berwick Black Granite," was reportedly a very dark olive-greenish color with a medium texture. 

    The Miniutti Quarry was opened about 1912.  In 1922 the quarry was idle.  Granite from the quarry was used for inscribed monuments.

Biddeford, York County, Maine

  • The Ricker Quarry [106]

    This quarry was "in Biddeford city, at 19 Granite Street."  The operator was George H. Yates of Biddeford, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray shade with conspicuous smoky quartz and slightly bluish-white feldspar with a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the railroad. 

    The Ricker Quarry opened in 1865.  In 1905 the quarry was 100 by 50 feet and had a depth from 5 to 25 feet.  Granite from the quarry was used for monuments, etc.

  • The Gowen Emmons Quarry [107]

    This quarry was "in Biddeford city, at 17 Granite Street."  The operator was Frank Morin of Biddeford, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with conspicuous smoky quartz and slightly bluish-white feldspar and a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the railroad.

    The Gowen Emmons quarry opened about 1865.  In 1905 the quarry had two openings:  an old opening 200 feet northeast to southwest, 100 feet across and had a depth from 30 to 70 feet; and a new opening 250 feet from northeast to southwest, 200 feet across with a depth from 10 to 60 feet.

    Granite from the Gowen Emmons Quarry was used for buildings and monuments and examples are the hospital at Dover, New Hampshire; and the Lincoln Monument in Springfield, Illinois.

  • The Wormwood Quarry [108]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Biddeford, 1 miles southwest of Biddeford city, in West Biddeford."  The operator was Ira T. Wormwood & Sons of Biddeford, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium pinkish-buff color with a coarse texture.

    At the time of the report, the quarry measured 40 by 20 feet and had a depth from 6 to 8 feet.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1916.

    Granite from the Wormwood Quarry was used for buildings.  Examples are:  the trimmings on the St. Joseph's Church in Biddeford, Maine.  Material for the dry dock at Charleston, Massachusetts, was quarried from an old adjacent opening.

  • The Andrews Quarries [109]

    These quarries were "in the town of Biddeford, about 1 miles southeast of Biddeford city and half a mile south of Saco River."  The operator was George Willett Andrews of Biddeford.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with conspicuous black mica with a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart half a mile to the Saco River, or 2 miles to the railroad at Biddeford.

    The Andrews Quarries opened in 1862 and again in 1895.  There were six small openings of varying dimensions.  One of the quarries was a "boulder quarry," which was worked in 1905.  At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.

    Granite from the Andrews Quarries was used in buildings, monuments, etc.  Examples are:  the Tribune Building in New York; and the General Dix monument in Portland, Maine.  "This quarry has furnished granite for the Delaware and Saco River breakwaters and curbing for Dover and Rochester, N. H."

Hollis, York County, Maine

  • The Bear Hill Quarry [110]

    This quarry was "in the town of Hollis, on Bear Hill, 1 mile west-southwest of Bradbury station (Hollis Center) on the Portland & Rochester Railroad."  The operator was E. M. Bradbury of Hollis Center, Maine, in 1905.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium to light gray color with a slight greenish tinge, evenly spangled with black and white mica and a medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart one-fourth mile to the railroad.

    The Bear Hill Quarry opened in 1855 and reopened in 1901.  There was an older opening of irregular shape and a later opening 50 feet square with a depth from 5 to 10 feet.

    The Bear Hill Quarry produced granite for the foundation of a pulp mill at Bar Mills and for a dam on the Saco River.

Kennebunkport, York County, Maine

  • The Day Quarry [111]

    This quarry was "in the town of Kennebunkport, 3 miles southwest of Biddeford."  The operator was A. H. Day & Co. of Biddeford, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with conspicuous black mica and a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 mile to the railroad siding.

    The Day Quarry opened about 1899.  In 1905 the quarry measured 50 feet square and had a depth from 25 to 30 feet.  At the time of the report the quarry had been idle since 1913.

    The Day Quarry produced granite for bridge work and some of it was used in the dry dock at Kittery, Maine.  Some was used for bridges on the Boston & Maine Railroad.

  • The Ross Quarry [112]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Kennebunkport, 3 miles southwest of Biddeford."  The operator was Ellis & Buswell of Woburn, Massachusetts, in 1905.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a light-gray shade, with translucent milky-white feldspars, dark, smoky quartz, and black mica with a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart one-third mile to the siding on the Boston & Maine Railroad.

    The Ross Quarry was opened in 1887.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 200 feet square and had a depth of 35 feet.

    Granite from the Ross Quarry was used mostly for bridge work and can be seen in the following examples:  the gateway at Hope Cemetery in Kennebunk, Maine (except the balls on the posts); the Renwick tomb in the cemetery near Kittery, Maine; and the railroad bridge at Haverhill, Massachusetts.

Wells, York County, Maine

  • The Lord Quarry [113]

    This quarry was "in the town of Wells, about 1 mile east-northeast of Wells Depot on the Boston & Maine Railroad (eastern division), near a school house at a road fork."  The operator was Granville W. Lord of Wells Depot, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was a light pinkish-gray color, with sparse conspicuous biotite, and a medium to coarse texture.

    The openings to the Lord Quarry were small.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1915.


[1] The Commercial Granites of New England, pg. 205.

[2] Ibid., pgs. 209-210.

[3] Ibid., pg. 210.

[4] Ibid., pg. 210.

[5] Ibid., pgs. 210-211.

[6] Ibid., pg. 211.

[7] Ibid., pg. 211-212.

[8] Ibid., pg. 212.

[9] Ibid., pgs. 212-214.

[10] Ibid., pgs. 214-215.

[11] Ibid., pgs. 215-216.

[12] Ibid., pgs. 216-217.

[13] Ibid., pgs. 217-218.

[14] Ibid., pgs. 218-219.

[15] Ibid., pg. 219.

[16] Ibid., pgs. 219-220.

[17] Ibid., pg. 221.

[18] Ibid., pg. 221.

[19] Ibid., pg. 221.

[20] Ibid., pgs. 221-222.

[21] Ibid., pgs. 222-223.

[22] Ibid., pg. 223.

[23] Ibid., pg. 223-224.

[24] Ibid., pg. 224.

[25] Ibid., pg. 224.

[26] Ibid., pgs. 224-225.

[27] Ibid., pgs. 226-227.

[28] Ibid., pg. 227.

[29] Ibid., pgs. 227-228.

[30] Ibid., pg. 228.

[31] Ibid., pg. 228.

[32] Ibid., pgs. 228-229.

[33] Ibid., pg. 229.

[34] Ibid., pg. 229-230.

[35] Ibid., pg. 230.

[36] Ibid., pg. 230-231.

[37] Ibid., pg. 231.

[38] Ibid., pg. 231.

[39] Ibid., pg. 231-232.

[40] Ibid., pg. 232.

[41] Ibid., pg. 232.

[42] Ibid., pg. 232.

[43] Ibid., pg. 233.

[44] Ibid., pg. 233-235.

[45] Ibid., pg. 233-235.

[46] Ibid., pgs. 235-236.

[47] Ibid., pgs. 236-237.

[48] Ibid., pg. 238.

[49] Ibid., pgs. 238-239.

[50] Ibid., pg. 239.

[51] Ibid., pgs. 239-240.

[52] Ibid., pg. 240.

[53] Ibid., pgs. 240-241.

[54] Ibid., pg. 241.

[55] Ibid., pg. 241-242.

[56] Ibid., pgs. 243-244.

[57] Ibid., pgs. 244-245.

[58] Ibid., pg. 245.

[59] Ibid., pg. 245.

[60] Ibid., pgs. 245-246.

[61] Ibid., pg. 246.

[62] Ibid., pg. 246.

[63] Ibid., pg. 246.

[64] Ibid., pgs. 246-247.

[65] Ibid., pgs. 247-248.

[66] Ibid., pgs. 248-249.

[67] Ibid., pgs. 249-250.

[68] Ibid., pgs. 251-252.

[69] Ibid., pgs. 252-253.

[70] Ibid., pg. 253.

[71] Ibid., pgs. 253-254.

[72] Ibid., pg. 254.

[73] Ibid., pg. 255.

[74] Ibid., pg. 255.

[75] Ibid., pg. 255.

[76] Ibid., pgs. 256-257.

[77] Ibid., pg. 257.

[78] Ibid., pgs. 257-258.

[79] Ibid., pgs. 258-259.

[80] Ibid., pg. 260.

[81] Ibid., pg. 260.

[82] Ibid., pg. 261.

[83] Ibid., pg. 261.

[84] Ibid., pg. 262.

[85] Ibid., pgs. 262-263.

[86] Ibid., pg. 263.

[87] Ibid., pgs. 263-264.

[88] Ibid., pg. 264.

[89] Ibid., pg. 264.

[90] Ibid., pg. 264.

[91] Ibid., pg. 265.

[92] Ibid., pgs. 265-266.

[93] Ibid., pg. 266.

[94] Ibid., pgs. 266-267.

[95] Ibid., pg. 267.

[96] Ibid., pg. 267.

[97] Ibid., pg. 267-269.

[98] Ibid., pg. 269.

[99] Ibid., pg. 270.

[100] Ibid., pgs. 270-271.

[101] Ibid., pgs. 271-272.

[102] Ibid., pg. 272.

[103] Ibid., pgs. 272-273.

[104] Ibid., pg. 273.

[105] Ibid., pg. 273.

[106] Ibid., pg. 274.

[107] Ibid., pgs. 274-275.

[108] Ibid., pg. 275.

[109] Ibid., pg. 275-276.

[110] Ibid., pg. 276.

[111] Ibid., pgs. 276-277.

[112] Ibid., pg. 277.

[113] Ibid., pgs. 277-278.

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