Logo Picture Left SideLogo Picture Right SideLogo Text at Center
Home > Search > Site Map > Maine > The Maine Stone Industry > Maine Granite Quarry List - Page 1

Maine Granite Quarries
List and Location of Individual Quarries

The following information was taken from:

The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738

By T. Nelson Dale

Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey
Government Printing Office, Washington, 1923.

Go to Page

Map Showing the Distribution of Granite and Related Rocks in Maine - 1922

Map Showing the Distribution of Granite and Related Rocks in Maine - 1922.
From The Commercial Granites of New England, pg. 206

See map listings in Quarries & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles section of the Maine Page according to location.

[Cliick on image to view map (800K)]

The Occurrence of Granite in Maine by George Otis Smith [1]

"Areally, granite is perhaps the most abundant rock in Maine.  Slates, schists, sandstones, and limestones of various types occur in the different sections of the State, but the mountains and hills of the interior and the islands and headlands of the coast for the most part all exhibit slopes and cliffs of massive granite.

"The areal distribution of the granite is somewhat irregular.Three general granite regions may be distinguished for convenience of description-that of the western tier of counties, that of the eastern part of the State, and the Mount Katahdin area, in the north-central part of the State.  In addition to these larger regions there should also be mentioned three small areas in Lincoln, Kennebec, and Somerset counties, which are intermediate in position between the three main regions."

Distribution of Granite Quarries [2]

"The (above) map.shows the location of the principal quarries and groups of quarries and prospects, which include 115 separate openings.A number of unimportant paving-block and under-pinning quarries have been overlooked or intentionally omitted.  A typical one-man paving-block quarry which from its changing location is called in Maine 'a motion".."

Quarries of Granite Proper [3]

"With the exception of the important quarries at Hallowell, Kennebec County, and North Jay, Franklin County, and the minor ones at Fryeburg and Bryan Pond. Oxford County, Pownal, Cumberland County, Norridgewock and Hartland, Somerset County, Oak Hill and Lincolnville, Waldo County, and Dedham, Hancock County, all the granite quarries of Maine and along the seaboard, either on islands or on bays or navigable rivers, or within 4 miles of them.  The inland quarries are all on railroads or within a short distance of them.  The distance to rail from a few quarries is 3 miles, for one 5 miles, but as the product of these quarries is used entirely for monumental work the cartage is a matter of less moment.  The Maine granite industry may be said to have its center in Penobscot and Bluehill bays and the island about them.  A line drawn from Clark Island, south of Rockland, north-northeast to Frankfort, thence about east to Franklin, in Hancock County, thence southwestward through Bar Harbor, and thence around the islands southwestward back to Clark Island, would embrace an area of about 1,200 square miles, which would include the bulk of the granite industry."

Quarries of "Black Granite" [4]

"Of the total number of quarries, 18 are of 'black granite,' although a few obscure ones may have been overlooked.  Their location is shown by a separate symbol on the (above) map.  They are in York, Lincoln, Waldo, Penobscot, and Washington counties.  Of these only the Addison (Washington County), Vinalhaven (Knox County), and Round Pond (Lincoln County) quarries are at tidewater, but as the 'black granites' are used only in small quantities for expensive work the cost of transportation is a minor consideration."


Cumberland County

Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine

Freeport, Cumberland County, Maine

Pownal, Cumberland County, Maine

Westbrook, Cumberland County, Maine


Franklin County

Jay, Franklin County, Maine


Hancock County

Bluehill, Hancock County, Maine

South Brooksville, Hancock County, Maine

Dedham, Hancock County, Maine

Franklin, Hancock County, Maine

Long Island (Black Island), Hancock County, Maine

Mount Desert (on Mount Desert Island), Hancock County, Maine

Stonington District, Maine

Sullivan, Maine

Swans Island, Maine

Tremont, Mount Desert Island, Maine


Kennebec County

Hallowell, Kennebec County


Knox County

Muscle Ridge Plantation, Knox County, Maine

South Thomaston

St. George, Maine

Vinalhaven and Hurricane Islands - Known as the "Fox Islands"


Lincoln County

Bristol, Lincoln County, Maine

Waldoboro, Lincoln County

Whitefield, Lincoln County


Oxford County

Fryeburg, Oxford County, Maine

Oxford, Oxford County, Maine

Woodstock, Oxford County, Maine


Penobscot County

Hermon, Penobscot County, Maine

Guilford, Penobscot County, Maine


Somerset County

Hartland, Somerset County, Maine

Norridgewock, Somerset County


Waldo County

Frankfort, Waldo County, Maine

Lincoln, Waldo County, Maine

Swanville, Waldo County Maine


Washington County

Addison, Washington County, Maine

Baileyville, Washington County, Maine

Calais, Washington County, Maine

Jonesboro, Washington County, Maine

Jonesport, Washington County, Maine

Marshfield, Washington County, Maine

Millbridge, Washington County, Maine


York County

Alfred, York County, Maine

Berwick, York County, Maine

Biddeford, York County, Maine

Hollis, York County, Maine

Kennebunkport, York County, Maine

Wells, York County, Maine


Cumberland County

Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine

  • The Grant Quarry [5]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Brunswick, 3 miles west of Brunswick village, on the south side of the Maine Central Railroad, on the Merriman farm."  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium gray with a fine texture.  When measured for the 1923 report, the opening measured about 75 by 50 feet and had a depth of 5 feet.  Transport from the quarry was by team to the railroad nearby.  At the time of the inspection, the quarry had not been in operation for many years.

    Accessory mineral:  Zircon.

    Granite from this quarry was used in the following examples:  The chapel at Bowdoin College at Brunswick and the First Parish Church in Portland, Maine.

Freeport, Cumberland County, Maine

  • The Freeport Quarry [6]

    This quarry was "half a mile southeast of Freeport station, on the Maine Central Railroad, on the east side of a hillock 80 feet high, with northeast-southwest axis."  The operator was Long & Saunders Quarry Co. of Quincy, Massachusetts.  The granite was a medium-gray color with a slight bluish tinge and a fine texture.  Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (microcline, orthoclase), smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (olioclase), black mica, and white mica.

    The Freeport Quarry opened in 1886.  When measured in 1905 the quarry was about 600 feet from northeast to southwest by about 100 feet across.  It had a working face of 55 feet high.  Transport of the granite was by cart half a mile to the railroad or three-fourths of a mile to the dock.  At the time of the inspection, the quarry had been idle since 1913.

    Monuments created from the granite from the Freeport Quarry are:  the Humboldt monument in Chicago, Illinois; and the Scott monument in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; the front of the Maine building at the Chicago's World's Fair (which was afterwards moved to Poland Springs, Maine); and the Polished tanks at Poland Springs.

Pownal, Cumberland County, Maine

  • The Pownal Quarry [7]

    This quarry was "in the southern corner of the town of Pownal, 2 miles north-northeast of Yarmouth Junction on the Maine Central and Grand Trunk railroads."  The operator was Fred C. Greene of Freeport.  The granite was reportedly a light-gray color with a fine texture.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  very slightly smoky quartz, potash feldspar (microcline), soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica, with accessory zircon, apatite, and magnetite.

    The Pownal Quarry was opened in 1880.  In 1905 the quarry measured 300 by 200 feet and had an average depth of 3 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cart 2 miles to the dock or railroad.  At the time of the inspection the quarry had not been in operation since 1915.

    Granite from the Pownal Quarry was used in the following examples:  the Baker mausoleum at Woodlawn Cemetery; the hotel at the corner of Seventh Street and Central Park; the Van Norden Trust Building at the corner of Sixtieth Street and Fifth Avenue; the French monument in Calvary Cemetery, New York.

Westbrook, Cumberland County, Maine

  • Pride's Quarry [8]

    This quarry was "in the town of Westbrook, 3 miles northeast of Westbrook (Saccarappa) and a quarter of a mile north of Prides Corners."  The operator was James H. Pride, R.D. in Woodford.  The granite was a medium-gray color with conspicuous black mica and had a fine texture. 

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, a little soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and biotite with accessory apatite.

    Pride's Quarry opened in 1898.  When measured in 1905 the quarry was about 200 by 100 feet and had a depth of 6 feet.  Transport of the granite was to the nearest railroad at Westbrook about 3 miles away.

    Granite from Pride's Quarry was used for curbing and bases of monuments locally.


Franklin County

Jay, Franklin County, Maine

  • The Maine & New Hampshire Granite Corporation's Quarries [9]

    Granite from these quarries was reportedly a very light gray color referred to as "North Jay White" and had a fine texture.

    There were three openings to the quarry, which opened in 1872, referred to as the upper quarry, the lower quarry, and the boulder quarry.  In 1905 the upper quarry measured 425 feet north to south by 200 feet east to west and had an average depth of 20 feet.  The lower quarry, which was adjacent to the west, measured 500 feet north to south and 35 feet.  These openings were on the west side of the north-south ridge.  The boulder quarry was a little north of the other two quarries.  It measured 150 feet square and had a depth of 20 feet.    Transport of the granite was by gravity track to the Maine Central Railroad, which was 1,300 feet distant and 300 feet down.  Byproducts of the quarries were rough stone, paving blocks, and crushed stone.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, a little soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and biotite with accessory zircon, apatite, and magnetite.

    Granite from the Maine & New Hampshire Granite Corporation's quarries was used in buildings and monuments in the following examples:  General Grant's tomb, Riverside Drive, New York; Richard Smith Soldiers and Sailors' Memorial gateway at Fairmount Park and the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. building in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the Hahnemann monument in Washington; city hall in Portland, Maine; the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Building and Field Annex Building in Chicago, Illinois; the Union Trust Building in South Bend, Indiana; and the Exchange National Bank Building in Tulsa, Oklahoma.


Hancock County

Bluehill, Hancock County, Maine

  • The White Quarry [10]

    This quarry was "in the town of Bluehill, 1 miles east of Bluehill village."  The operator was Jesse B. Park (Inc.), 1328 Broadway, New York.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray with a slightly bluish color and a coarse to medium texture.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), together with accessory zircon and magnetite.

    The White Quarry was opened about 1855.  In 1906 the quarry measured 300 by 350 feet and had a depth that ranged from 15 to 45 feet.  Transport of the granite was by team one-third mile to the docks.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1913.

    The waste granite was used for paving blocks. Granite from the White Quarry was used in the following examples:  the Woman's Hospital in New York; the Mercantile Trust Co. and Caledonian Insurance Co. buildings in St. Louis, Missouri; the basement story of the District of Columbia Municipal Building; the First Day and Night Bank, the Delamar and Brokaw residences, in New York; the chemical laboratory of the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York; the chemical laboratory of the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey; and the fountain and large monolithic bowl in Deep River, Connecticut.

  • The Chase Quarries [11]These quarries were "in the town of Bluehill, 3 miles east of Bluehill village, and north of Woods Point."  The granite was reportedly a medium to light-gray color with a coarse texture.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), with accessory magnetite.

    About 350 feet east of the upper opening there was an area about 200 feet square which produced granite of a medium bluish-gray color with a fine texture referred to as the Chase monumental granite.  It was only quarried occasionally for local monumental use.

    Transport of the granite was by cable road 1,400 feet from the main quarry to the cutting shed and by locomotive track 650 feet more from the shed to the dock.  At the time of the report, the quarries were no longer in operation.

    Granite from the Chase Quarries was used in the following examples:  the New York Stock Exchange, the Lying-in Hospital, the Manhattan Trust Building, and the Grand Union Hotel on Forty-second Street, New York; the General Thomas monument and the trimmings to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Washington; the League Island Dry Dock; and the post office at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

South Brooksville, Hancock County, Maine

  • The Bucks Harbor Quarries [12]

    These quarries were located "at Bucks Harbor, South Brooksville."  The operator was the John T. Brady & Co., 103 Park Avenue, New York.  Granite from an opening one-half mile southeast of South Brooksville was reportedly a light grayish-buff color with conspicuous black mica and a coarse to medium texture.  From another opening one-fourth mile northeast of South Brooksville was reportedly a medium-gray color with conspicuous black mica and a coarse texture.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  a light cream-colored potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, a milk-white soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), with accessory magnetite.

    The quarries had two openings:  "one lying half a mile southeast of the village (Brooksville)" and the other "one-fourth mile northeast of the village (Brooksville.)"  The first opening measured 200 feet by 100 feet with a depth from 5 to 20 feet in 1905 and the other opening in 1905 measured about 200 by 100 feet with a depth from 5 to 10 feet.  Transport of the granite was to two granite wharves owned by the company, which afforded 12 feet of water at low tide.  In 1917 the quarries were idle.

Dedham, Hancock County, Maine

  • The Brown Quarry [13]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Dedham, 1 miles east of Holden station (East Holden post office) on the Maine Central Railroad, on the northeast side of a hill 840 feet above sea level and having a northwest-southwest axis."  The operator was William J. Brown of East Holden, Maine.

    Granite from the Brown Quarry was reportedly a dark-gray with lightish-grayish feldspars and a very coarse texture. 

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  Potash feldspar (orthoclase and microcline), smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), together with accessory zircon, apatite, and secondary magnetite and chlorite.

    Transport of the granite was by cart 1 miles to the cutting shed at Holden station.  At the time of the report, the quarry had been idle since 1917.  The granite from the quarry was used for bridge work.

Franklin, Hancock County, Maine

  • The Robertson Quarry [14]

    This quarry was located in the town of Franklin.  The operator was Harvey E. Robertson of North Sullivan, Maine.  The granite was reportedly a medium-gray color with a coarse to medium texture. 

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  potash feldspar (orthoclase and microcline), slightly smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), with accessory magnetite and pyrite.

    The Robertson Quarry was opened in 1892.  When measured in 1905, the quarry was 300 feet north to south by 300 feet east to west.  It had a depth from 5 to 15 feet.  The granite was transported by cart 1 miles to the dock in the bay.

    Granite from the quarry was used for curbing, paving blocks, and "random" stone.

  • The Bragdon Quarry [15]

    This quarry was located in the town of Franklin.  The operator was L. C. Bragdon of Franklin.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a medium texture.  In 1905 the quarry measured 300 feet north to south by 150 feet east to west.  It had a depth from 10 to 20 feet and was drained by a siphon pipe.  Transport of the granite was by cart two miles to the wharf.  At the time of the report the quarry had been idle since 1919.  Granite from the quarry was used for curbing, paving blocks, and "random" stone.

  • The T. M. Blaisdell Quarry [16]

    This quarry was "in East Franklin, 1 mile above the head of navigation."  The operator was T. M. Blaisdell of East Franklin, Maine.  The granite from the quarry was reported a medium to dark gray color with a medium texture. 

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  Potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), slightly smoky quartz, lime-soda feldspar (oligoclase to oligoclase-albite), black mica (biotite), together with accessory magnetite and zircon.

    The T. M. Blaisdell Quarry opened about 1875.  When measured in 1905 the quarry was 200 by 300 feet and had a varying depth.  The quarry had a working face on the north of 53 feet high.  Transport of the granite was by cart a few hundred feet and then by lighter a mile to the schooners.  Granite from the quarry was used for curbing, paving, bridges, docks, and "random" rock.

  • The W. B. Blaisdell Quarry [17]

    This quarry was "in the town of Franklin, on the southeast side of Sullivan River."  The operator was the W. B. Blaisdell & Co. of Franklin, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.

    Minerals in descending order of abundance:  Potash feldspar (microcline and orthoclase), smoky quartz, soda-lime feldspar (oligoclase), and black mica (biotite), together with accessory magnetite, zircon, apatite, and secondary epidote and chlorite.

    The W. B. Blaisdell Quarry opened about 1875.  When the quarry was measured in 1905, it was 300 by 250 feet and had a depth from 15 to 35 feet.  Transport of the granite was by "lifters" drawn by horses 1,000 feet to the schooners at the dock. The granite was used for curbing and paving.

  • The Bianchi Quarry [18]

    This quarry was located "between Mill Pond and Great Pond roads in West Franklin."  The operator was the Emerald Granite co. (Stephen Bianchi), 46 Cornhill, Boston, Massachusetts.  The granite, referred to as "Emerald Granite" was reportedly a very dark greenish-gray color.  "The polished face (was) black, irregularly speckled with bale blue-greenish gray, and cuts almost white."  The "Black Granite" was used for inscribed monuments.  The report noted that the Bianchi quarry was idle in 1921 and 1922.

  • The Bradbury Quarry [19]

    This quarry was located "in West Franklin, near the north end of Grape Pond."  The operator was F. Bradbury & Sons of West Franklin, Maine.  The granite was reportedly a dark-grayish, slightly purplish color with a very coarse texture.  The quarry was a triangular area with each side measuring about 75 feet when measured in 1905.  The quarry had a depth in places of 15 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cart to the railroad about 900 feet.  The granite was used for railroad culverts.

Long Island (Black Island), Maine

  • The Black Island Quarries [20]

    This quarry was located "in the northeastern part of Black Island, which lies south of Mount Desert, in the town of Long Island."  The operator was the Black Island Granite Co. of New York in 1905.  Granite from the upper quarry was reportedly a light pinkish-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.  The granite from the lower quarry, referred to as "Redcliff" was reportedly a medium pinkish-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.  Accessory minerals:  Titanite, magnetite, and zircon.

    The Black Island Quarries opened in 1892 and consisted of the upper quarry ("about one-fourth mile south of the dock at the northeast corner of the island"), which measured 500 by 300 feet with a depth from 10 to 40 feet; and the lower quarry, known as "Redcliff," which was "a little south of the dock.about 100 feet square."  By the time of the report, the quarries were abandoned.

    The granite from the upper quarry was used for buildings and thin sheets were used for paving.  The granite in the Black Island Quarries was used for monuments and columns.  An example of the use of the Black Island Quarries granite was in the Park Building in Brooklyn, New York.

Mount Desert, Hancock County, Maine

  • The Hall or McMullen Quarry [21]

    This quarry was "in the town of Mount Desert, southeast of the village of 'Hall Quarry' and four-fifths mile north of the Robinson Mountains."  The operator was the Booth Bros. & Hurricane Isle Granite Co., 208 Broadway, New York.  The granite was reportedly a light-buff grayish color with a coarse to medium texture.

    Accessory minerals:  Apatite and a little secondary calcite within the oligoclase.

    The Hall or McMullen Quarry opened about 1880.  In 1905 the quarry measured 250 feet north to south by 250 feet from east to west.  The quarry had a depth of 50 feet at the west side.  Transport of the granite was by track 800 feet to the wharf, which was accessible to schooners of 20 feet draft.

    Granite from this quarry was used in the following examples:  the United States Mint in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the basement of the New York Customhouse; the Brooklyn anchorage to the Manhattan Bridge; and the bridge over the Potomac at Washington.

  • The Campbell & Macomber Quarry [22]

    This quarry was located "in the town of Mount Desert, half a mile north of the top of Robinson Mountain, at its foot, and two-fifths of a mile south of Hall Quarry village."  The quarry was owned by Hale & Hamlin of Ellsworth, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was referred to as "Somes Sound Pink."  It was reportedly a light pinkish-gray color with a medium to coarse texture.

    The Campbell & Macomber Quarry opened about 1880.  When the quarry was measured in 1905 it was 150 by 200 feet and had a depth of about 20 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1,600 feet to the wharf on Somes Sound.  At the time of the report, the quarry was no longer in operation.

    The granite from the quarry was used in the following examples:  the Crocker residence in Darlington, New Jersey; the Danforth Library in Paterson, New Jersey; the First National Bank in Baltimore, Maryland; and the Phoenix National Bank in Hartford, Connecticut.

  • The Snowflake Quarry [23]

    This quarry was "on Mount Desert, about a quarter of a mile northwest of Hall Quarry village."  The operator was the Allen Granite Co. of Mount Desert, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine texture.

    The Snowflake Quarry measured about 200 feet square with a depth from 5 to 10 feet when measured in 1905.  At the time of the report, the quarry was abandoned.  The granite from the quarry was used for paving blocks, which were carted about a half a mile to the wharf.

  • The Allen Quarry [24]

    Allen Quarry, west side of Somes Sound, Mount Desert, Maine, looking  N. 15 W.  Showing thin lenticular sheets crossed by small vertical diabase dike faulted one fourth sheet from bottom, with a displacement of 16 inches along the sheet. (from The Commercial Granites of New England)

    This quarry was located a quarter of a mile east of the Snowflake Quarry. The operator of the Allen Quarry, like the Snowflake Quarry, was the Allen Granite Co. of Mount Desert, Maine.  The granite is this quarry is similar to that in the Snowflake Quarry.  In 1905 the Allen Quarry measured 100 by 50 feet and had a depth of 10 feet.

Stonington District, Maine [25]

"The granite industry which centers in Stonington is distributed over an area of about 4 miles square.Some of the quarries are on Deer Isle, others are south of it, on Crotch Island, so named from the inlet which divides it, and the rest are on neighboring islets..The Stonington quarries embrace several varieties of granite."
  • The Ryan-Parker Quarry (Crotch Island) [26]

    This quarry was located on Crotch Island in the southeastern part at Thurlow Head.  The operator was the Crotch Island Granite Co. of Grand Central Terminal in New York.  The granite from the quarry, referred to as "Crotch Island," was reportedly a lavender-tinted medium-gray color with a coarse texture.  "Its polished surface is attractive on account of the contrasts between pale lavender, white, and black particles, and it is therefore in demand for base courses and wainscoting."

    The Ryan-Parker Quarry opened about 1880.  When the quarry was measured in 1905 it was about 700 by 300 feet and had a depth from 20 to 75 feet with an average of 35 feet.  Transport of the granite was by gravity on tracks 75 to 100 feet long to the wharves.  At the time of the report the quarry had been idle since 1916.

    The granite from this quarry was used mainly for massive construction and buildings.  Examples where this granite was used are:  the piers of Blackwells Island Bridge and the retaining wall of Riverside Drive in New York.

  • The Goss Quarry (Crotch Island) [27]

    This quarry was "adjacent to and north of the Ryan-Parker quarry, on Thurlow Head."  The operator was the John L. Goss Corporation of Stonington, Maine.  The granite was reportedly identical to that found in the Ryan-Parker Quarry which was a lavender-tinted medium-gray color with a coarse texture. 

    The Goss Quarry was opened about 1872.  In 1905 the quarry measured about 350 feet square having a maximum depth of 120 feet and a minimum depth of 10 feet.

    The granite from the quarry was used mainly for bridges and buildings.  Smaller beds were used for paving blocks.  Granite from this quarry was used in the following examples:  the Post Office at Lowell, Massachusetts; the courthouse at Dedham, Massachusetts; the Merchants National Bank in New Bedford, Massachusetts; Larz Anderson Bridge in Cambridge, Massachusetts; the picture gallery of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts; the Pilgrim Monument in Provincetown, Massachusetts; the public library in Laconia, New Hampshire; the Ninth Regiment Armory and the trimmings of the University Heights Bridge in New York; the Rockefeller fountain in Pocantico Hills, New York; and the National Security Bank in Los Angeles, California.

  • The Benvenue Quarry (Crotch Island) [28]

    This quarry was located on "the west side of Crotch Island."  The quarry was opened by the Benvenue Granite Co. in 1906, but the company went out of business in 1915.  The granite in the quarry was identical to the granite in both the Ryan-Parker and Goss quarries.

  • The Sherwood Quarries (Crotch Island) [29]

    These quarries were located "north of Mill Cove, Crotch Island."  The operator was S. Clinton Sherwood, 14 Wall Street, New York.  The granite in the lower and northern quarry was reportedly a light-gray color with a very slight buff tinge.

    The lower quarry was opened in 1889.  It covered a triangular area and in 1905 each side measured 75 feet long and 40 feet deep.  Transport of the granite was by track 100 feet to the wharf.  The quarry was worked only for special orders and produced stone for monuments, bases, etc.

    Granite from the upper quarry, which was opened in 1890, was reportedly a pinkish-buff color with a coarse texture.  In 1905 the upper quarry measured 200 by 100 feet with an average depth of about 15 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cable and engine along a 900-foot track to the dock on the east side of the island.  The granite from this quarry was used as "random" stone.

  • The St. Helena Quarry (St. Helena Island) [30]

    This quarry was "on St. Helena Island.2 miles southeast of Stonington."  The operator was Benisch Bros., 895 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, New York.  The granite in the quarry was reportedly a pinkish-buff color with a coarse texture.  At the time of the report, the St. Helena Quarry was idle.  By the time of the 1923 report, the quarry had been idle since 1917.

    The Marine Wireless Operators' monument in New York, was built using granite from this quarry.

  • The Latty Quarry (Green Island)[31]

    This quarry was "in the southeastern part of Green Island, 1 mile southeast of Stonington."  The operator was Latty Bros. Granite Co. of Slatington.  Granite from the quarry was reported to be a pinkish-buff color with a coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by a 100-foot track to the wharf.

    The quarry was opened in the spring of 1905, although at the time of the report it was abandoned.

  • The Stonington Quarry (Spruce Island) [32]

    This quarry was "on the west shore of Spruce Island, 3 miles east-southeast of Stonington."  The granite in the quarry was reportedly a pinkish-buff color.  Some of the pinkish-buff granite was rimmed with a cream-colored granite. 

    The Stonington Quarry was opened in 1905, although at the time of the report it was abandoned.

  • The Moose Island Quarry (Moose Island) [33]

    This quarry was "in the southeastern part of Moose Island, three-fourths mile west-southwest of Stonington."  The operator was the John L. Goss Corporation of Stonington, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was a lavender-tinted medium-gray color with a coarse texture that that found at the Goss and Ryan-Parker quarries on Crotch Island.

    The Moose Island Quarry opened in 1873.  When the quarry was measured in 1905, it was 600 by 200 feet and had an average depth of about 17 feet.  Transport of the granite was by a track 200 feet to the wharf.

    Granite from the Moose Island Quarry was used in the Gate house at Central Park and the steps of Columbia University in New York; and in the trimmings of the Hampton Dormitory in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  • The Settlement Quarry (Deer Isle) [34]

    This quarry was "on Deer Isle, on Settlement Hill east of Webb Cove, 2 miles northeast of Stonington."  The owner was the Rodgers Granite corporation, 271 West 125th Street in New York, although at the time of the report, the quarry was being leased by the George A. Fuller Co. of New York..  The granite in the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray with a slightly lavender tint, blotched with a cream white and a coarse texture. 

    The Settlement Quarry opened in 1900.  Two quarries were measured in 1905:  one was located near the tope of the hill and measured 500 by 400 feet and had a depth from 10 to 18 feet; the other was on the west side and measured 600 by 60 feet and had a depth up to 14 feet.  Transport of the granite was by locomotive and 2,500 feet of track.  The cutting shed was 1,000 feet from the upper quarry and 600 feet from the cutting shed to the wharf.

    The granite from the Settlement Quarry was used in massive construction.  The granite was used in the following examples:  the dry dock at Norfolk, Virginia; the base and approach for the addition to Bancroft Hall, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland; the fish pier at Boston, Massachusetts; the sea wall at Providence, Rhode Island; the retaining wall at Riverside Drive (138th Street to the end); the Brooklyn and Manhattan approaches and piers to the Manhattan Bridge in New York.  At the time of the report the quarry was supplying part of the granite for the new courthouse in New York.

Sullivan, Maine

  • The Crabtree & Havey Quarry [35]

    This quarry was "in the town of Sullivan, three-fourths mile from Sullivan River."  the operator was the H. H. Havey & Co. of North Sullivan, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart three-fourths mile to the wharf.

    The Crabtree and Havey Quarry opened in 1865.  When the quarry was measured in 1905 it was 300 feet north to south, 200 feet east to west and had a depth from 10 to feet.  Granite from the quarry was used mainly for curbing and crossings.

  • The Stimson Quarries [36]

    This quarry was located in Sullivan.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  The quarry had three openings, and the main opening measured 200 feet square and had a depth from 15 to 30 feet.  Transport of the granite was by cart half a mile to the wharf.

  • The Dunbar Quarry [37]

    This quarry was located "2 miles northwest of Sullivan village, in the town of Sullivan."  The operator was Dunbar Bros. of Sullivan, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium gray color with a coarse to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart 1 miles to the wharf.

    The Dunbar Quarry opened in 1901.  When the quarry was measured in 1905 it was 250 by 100 feet and had a depth from 4 to 8 feet.  Granite from the quarry was used for "random" stone, curbing, and paving.

  • Hooper, Havey & Co.'s Quarry [38]

    This quarry was located in North Sullivan.  The granite from this quarry was reportedly a medium-gray color with a fine to medium texture.  Transport of the granite was by cart half a mile to the wharf.

    The Hooper, Havey & Co.'s Quarry opened about 1894.  When the quarry was measured in 1905, it was 300 by 150 feet and had a depth from 15 to 20 feet.  Granite from the quarry was used as "random" stone, street material, curbing, crossings, and paving blocks.

  • The Pettee Quarry [39]

    This quarry was located "three-fourths mile north of East Sullivan, on the road to Tunk Pond."  The owner was J. A. Pettee of East Sullivan, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a very dark gray color with a fine to medium texture.  The quarry measured "only 15 by 15 feet and 8 feet deep (and) is on the west side of a knoll 20 to 25 feet high."

    Granite from the Pettee Quarry was only quarried occasionally in small blocks for monuments.

  • The Sinclair Prospect [40]

    This quarry was "1 miles north of East Sullivan, on Herbert and Thaddeus Sinclair's (formerly Smith Bean's) farm, near Charles Dowel's sawmill."  The rock (black granite) was reportedly an almost black shade with white blotches having a medium to coarse texture.  "The ledge (was) exposed for a length of 50 feet north-south and a height of 20 feet.  A vertical joint strikes N. 20 W.  An opening 10 by 5 feet and 5 feet deep was made here in 1902."

Swans Island, Maine

  • The Baird Quarry [41]

    This quarry was "on Swans Island, east side of the old harbor, not quite 1 mile east of Swans Island village and three-fourths mile southeast of Minturn."  The operator was Matthew Baird Contracting Co., 433 East Ninety-second Street, New York.  The granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium pinkish-buff color with a medium to coarse texture.  Transport of the granite was by gravity and cable on a track 1,200 feet to the wharf.

    The Baird Quarry opened in 1901.  In 1905 the quarry measured 500 by 250 feet and had an average depth from 15 to 18 feet.

    The granite from this quarry was used for random stone, dimension stone, and paving stone.  The stone was transported to the company's cutting works in New York.

  • The Toothachers Cove Quarry [42]

    This quarry was "near the end of toothachers" cove, in the western part of Swans Island, 1 miles north-northwest of Swans Island village.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a medium pinkish-gray color with a coarse texture.

    The Toothachers Cove quarry measured 50 by 25 feet with a working face of 20 feet high in 1905.  There were two other small openings.  The quarry was idle in 1905 and in 1917.

Tremont, Mount Desert Island, Maine

  • The Carroll Quarry [43]

    This Quarry was in the "town of Tremont, on Mount Desert Island, at Southwest Harbor."  The operator was John Carroll of Southwest Harbor, Maine.  Granite from the quarry was reportedly a pinkish-greenish medium-gray color with a medium texture. 

    The Carroll Quarry measured 100 feet north to south by over 30 feet east to west and had a working face on the east 15 feet high in 1905.  The quarry was only occasional worked, and the granite was used locally for foundations.



[Top of Page]