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Structures and Monuments in Which Florida Stone was Used

  • The Finished Products from Florida Stone in Florida
    • Anastasia Island, St. Augustine, Florida - Lighthouse Park (history), presented by Dean Ray.
    • Bulowville, near Flagler Beach, Florida – Charles Bulow’s Sugar Mill  (today known and open to the public as Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park)

      The “8 eirie ghost towns” online article includes a section on Charles Bulow’s Sugar Mill on which a photograph of the sugar mill is presented.  According to this article, the mill was constructed of coquina blocks. (Excerpts from the article follow.)

      “Born: Charles Bulow bought almost 4,700 acres in 1821 and established a plantation where he grew sugar cane, cotton, rice and indigo. His son, John, built the area’s largest sugar mill out of the hardy local coquina rock.

      “Died:  John Bulow’s alliance with the Seminole Indians was fractured when the United States tried to force the Seminoles to move west of the Mississippi River.  This attempt at ethnic cleansing started the Second Seminole War.  In an 1836 skirmish during the war, Seminoles burned Bulow’s plantation and mill, and they most likely freed his slaves.

      “It lives on:  Now called Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park, the coquina-block ruins still stand amid live oak trees and not far from housing developments....”

    • Florida - Vicksburg Limestone “Chimney Rock” (excerpt from Mineral Industries and Resources of Florida, by E. H. Sellards, From the Sixth Annual Report of The Florida State Geological Survey, 1914.)
    • Vicksburg Limestone: - The Vicksburg limestone has been used to some extent for building purposes. This is true especially of that phase of the Vicksburg known as the ‘chimney rock’ described in the preceding reports as the Marianna and the Peninsular limestones. The chimney rock when first taken from the ground is very soft and can be easily sawed into blocks. Upon exposure to the air it hardens, due, as in the case of the coquina, to the evaporation of moisture from the interstices of the rock. The chimney rock was early used both in Alabama and Florida for the construction of chimneys and to some extent for building purposes.

      “Locally the Vicksburg and some of the other limestones in Florida become very close grained and compact. In this condition the limestone is hard, approaching marble in appearance. Although little used this phase of the limestone formation is capable of producing a good building stone."

    • Holly Hill, Florida - the Holly Hill Municipal Building, 1065 Ridgewood Avenue. The information below was obtained from the Flordia’s History Through its Places web site. (Scroll down to the entry.)(The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.freac.fsu.edu/HistoricPlaces/Counties/Volusia.html>

      According to this web site the building was constructed of local coquina stone.

    • Homestead, Florida - the Coral Castle (previously Rock Gate Park), constructed by Ed Leedskalnin.

      Mr. Leedskalnin constructed the Coral Castle, that was previously called "Rock Gate Park." Mr. Leedskalnin was born in Latvia in 1887, and he constructed "Rock Gate Park" as his monument to his sweetheart and fiancée, Agnes Scuffs. On the day before their marriage she told him she would not marry him as he was "too old and too poor." You can visit this web site to read his Biography to learn more about his history and his work on the Coral Castle. Mr. Leedskalnin cut the large blocks of coral using only hand tools, and there are no records indicating anyone witnessed him cutting the stone or working on the castle. According to this account, he only worked at night by the light of a lantern. He first began building the furniture out of coral in Florida City until about 1936. At that time, with the help of a friend, he moved his coral furniture to Homestead, Florida. In Florida he eventually built a coral wall to enclose his property. Each section of the wall is nine feet tall, four feet wide, and three foot thick. Today this park is open to the public, and you will find information about visiting on this web site. Also on this web site there is a discussion forum available regarding the Coral Castle and Mr. Leedskalnin.

    • Key West, Florida - Buildings in the Area of Locally-Quarried Oolitic Limestone (circa 1886). from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, pp. 393.

      “The Oolitic limestone occurring at Key West has been quarried and used in the construction of numerous private and public buildings in that vicinity.”

    • Lake Wales, Florida - Bok Tower Gardens presented by Dru J. Murray. (photograph) (Scroll down to the Bok Tower Gardens entry.) A huge bell tower is located in the garden. The bell tower is constructed of pink and gray marble and coquina stone from St. Augustine.
      • Bok Tower Gardens - "Garden visit offers ideas - and a little peace," by Mary Collister, St. Petersburg Times Online, published March 9, 2001.

        This article describes the gardens in great detail. It is also noted in the article that pink and gray Georgia marble and coquina stone from St. Augustine, Florida, were used in the construction of the tower.

    • Miami, Florida - the Halcyon Hall Hotel (excerpt from Mineral Industries and Resources of Florida, by E. H. Sellards, From the Sixth Annual Report of The Florida State Geological Survey, 1914.)

      “Miami Oolite: - The Miami oolitic limestone has been used successfully as a building stone at Miami. This formation extends for some distance along the eastern border of the Everglades north and south from Miami. As in the case of the other limestones when first taken from the quarry it is relatively soft and easily worked, but hardens upon exposure. The court-house, Halcyon Hall hotel and some other buildings at Miami are constructed of this rock.”

    • Miami, Florida - the United States Courthouse (excerpt from Mineral Industries and Resources of Florida, by E. H. Sellards, From the Sixth Annual Report of The Florida State Geological Survey, 1914.)

      “Miami Oolite: - The Miami oolitic limestone has been used successfully as a building stone at Miami. This formation extends for some distance along the eastern border of the Everglades north and south from Miami. As in the case of the other limestones when first taken from the quarry it is relatively soft and easily worked, but hardens upon exposure. The court-house, Halcyon Hall hotel and some other buildings at Miami are constructed of this rock.”

      • The United States Courthouse in Miami (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available. This information was presented on the Federal Historic Buildings web site.)
        <http://w3.gsa.gov/web/p/interaia_save.nsf/0/edadfcd6fd2cb511852565d900539ed9?OpenDocument>

        According to this web site, the Courthouse was one of the largest structures built of Coquina stone quarried near key Largo at Windley Key. This Coquina stone was called Key Stone. The building was designed in the Spanish-Mediterranean Revival style and opened on July 1, 1933.

    • New Smyrna Beach, Florida - the New Smyrna Beach Historic District Buildings (photograph and history). The following information was obtained from the Florida’s History Through its Places web site.(The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.freac.fsu.edu/HistoricPlaces/Counties/Volusia.html>

      Coquina stone was used on porch piers, pedestals and copings of the buildings in this historic district.

    • New Smyrna Beach, Florida - the Woman’s Club of New Smyrna - the Large Fireplace (photograph and history). The following information was obtained from the Florida ’s History Through its Places web site. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.freac.fsu.edu/HistoricPlaces/Counties/Volusia.html>

      Coquina stone was used in the construction of the large fireplace in the interior.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the City of St. Augustine & the Fort of San Marco (The following text and engravings were published in “Scenes in Florida,” in Picturesque America, with Illustrations by Harry Fenn, 1872.)
      St. Augustine
      Fort of San Marco, St. Augustine Coquina Quarry, Anastasia Island

      Fort of San Marco, St. Augustine.

      Coquina Quarry, Anastasia Island.

      (pp. 118-119) “The quaint little city of St. Augustine, Florida, the oldest European settlement in the United States, is situated on the Atlantic coast, in a narrow peninsula formed by the Sebastian and Matanzas Rivers, on the west side of a harbor which is separated from the ocean by the low and narrow island of Anastasia. It lies about forty miles south of the mouth of the great river St. John’s, and about one hundred and sixty miles south from Savannah, in Georgia....”

      “The most conspicuous feature in the town is the old fort of San Marco, which is built of coquina, a unique conglomerate of fine shells and sand, found in large quantities on Anastasia Island, at the entrance of the harbor, and mined with great ease, though it becomes hard by exposure to the air. It is quarried in large blocks, and forms a wall well calculated to resist cannon-shot, because it does not splinter when struck.

      “The fort stands on the sea-front at one end of the town. It was a hundred years in building, and was completed in 1756, as is attested by the following inscription, which may still be seen over the gateway, together with the arms of Spain, handsomely carved in stone: ‘Don Fernando being King of Spain, and the Field-Marshal Don Alonzo Fernando Herida being governor and captain-general of this place, St. Augustine of Florida and its provinces, this fort was finished in the year 1756. The works were directed by Captain-Engineer Don Pedro d Brazos y Garen.’

      “While owned by the British, this was said to be the handsomest fort in the king’s dominions. Its castellated battlements; its formidable bastions, with their frowning guns; its lofty and imposing sally-port, surrounded by the royal Spanish arms; its portcullis, moat, draw-bridge; its circular and ornate sentry-boxes at each principal parapet-angle; its commanding lookout tower; and its stained and moss-covered massive walls - impress the external observer as a relic of the distant past: while a ramble through its heavy casements - its crumbling Romish chapel, with elaborate portico and inner altar and holy-water niches; its dark passages, gloomy vaults, and more recently-discovered dungeons - brings you to ready credence of its many traditions of inquisitorial tortures; of decaying skeletons, found in the latest-opened chambers, chained to the rusty ring-bolts, and of alleged subterranean passages to the neighboring convent....”

      The Convent-Gate St. Augustine Cathedral A Street in St. Augustine

      The Convent-Gate.

      St. Augustine Cathedral.

      A Street in St. Augustine.

      Scene in St. Augustine A Garden in Florida St. Frances Street, St. Augustine

      Scene in St. Augustine. - The Date Palm

      A Garden in Florida

      St. Francis Street, St. Augustine.

      The City Gate Interior of St. Mark's Castle Ruins of a Spanish Fort at Matanzas Inlet

      The City Gate

      Interior of St. Mark’s Castle

      Ruins of a Spanish Fort at Matanzas Inlet

      (pp. 185-195) “In 1740, war again existing between Spain and England, an expedition against St. Augustine was organized by the famous General Oglethorpe, then Governor of Georgia. He obtained assistance from South Carolina and from England a naval force of six ships. About the first of June his forces reached St. Augustine, which was defended by a not very numerous garrison commanded by Don Manual de Monteano, the Governor of Florida, a man of energy and resolution. After a siege of five or six weeks, carried on chiefly by bombardment from Anastasia Island, Oglethorpe became satisfied that he could not take the place, especially as his fleet had withdrawn in apprehension of bad weather, and he accordingly embarked his troops and sailed away on July 9th.

      “Two years later, the Spanish Governor of Florida, the energetic Monteano, having received reinforcements from Cuba, sailed from St. Augustine with thirty-six vessels and three thousand men to the system of Vauban. Half a mile to the north was a line, with a broad ditch and bastions running from the Sebastian Creek to St. Mark’s River; a mile from that was another fortified line, with some redoubts, forming second line of communication between a staccato fort upon St. Sebastian River, and Fort Moosa, upon the St. Mark’s River. Within the first line, near the town, was a small settlement of Germans, who had a church of their own. Upon the St. Mark’s River, within the second line, was also an Indian town, with a stone church built by the Indians themselves, and in very good taste. These lines may be still distinctly traced. The churches spoken of, outside the city, as well as Forts Moosa and Staccata, have long since disappeared, but their sites are known.

      “‘During the English occupation, large buildings were erected for barracks, of sufficient extent to quarter five regiments of troops. The brick of which they were built was brought from New York, although the island opposite the city afforded a much better building material in the coquina stone. The lower story only of the British barracks was built of brick, the upper story being of wood. These barracks stood at the southern extremity of the town, to the south of the present barracks, and the length and great extent of the buildings front on the bay added greatly to the appearance....”

      “...The old Convent of St. Mary’s is a suggestive relic of the days of papal rule. The new convent is a tasteful building of the ancient coquina. The United-States barracks, recently remodeled and improved, are said to have been built as a convent, or mastery. The old government-house, or palace, is now in use as the post-office and United-States court-rooms. As its rear is a well-preserved relic of what seems to have been a fortification to protect the town from an over-the-river or inland attack. An older house than this, formerly occupied by the attorney-general, was pulled down a few years ago. Its ruins are still a curiosity, and are called (though incorrectly) the governor’s house.

      “The ‘Plaza de la Constitucion’ is a fine public square in the centre of the town, on which stand the ancient markets, and which is faced by the cathedral, the old palace, the convent, a modern Episcopal church, and other fine structures. In the centre of the plaza stands a monument erected in honor of the Spanish Liberal Constitution.

      “The old Huguenot burying-ground is a spot of much interest, so is the military burying-ground, where rest the remains of those who fell near here during the prolonged Seminole War. Under three pyramids of coquina, stuccoed and whitened, are the ashes of Major Dade and one hundred and seven men of his command, who were massacred by Osceola and his band. A fine sea-wall of nearly a mile in length, built of coquina, with a coping of granite, protects the entire ocean-front of the city, and furnishes a delightful promenade of a moonlight evening. In full view of this is the old light-house on Anastasia Island, built more than a century ago, and now surmounted with a fine revolving lantern.

      “The appearance of St. Augustine to the visitor from other parts of the country is as quaint and peculiar as its history is bloody and varied. Nothing at all like it is to be seen in any part of the United States. It resembles some of the old towns of Spain and Italy. The streets are quite narrow; one, which is nearly a mile long, being but fifteen feet wide, and that on which a principal hotel stands being but twelve feet, while the widest of all is but twenty-five feet. An advantage of these narrow streets in this warm climate is that they give shade, and increase the draught of air through them as through a flue. Indeed, some of the streets seem almost like a flue rather than an open way; for many of the houses, with high roof and dormer-windows, have hanging balconies along their second story, which seem almost to touch each other over the narrow street; and the families sitting in these of a warm evening can chat confidentially, or even shake hands with their over-the-way neighbors.

      “The street-walls of the houses are frequently extended in front of the side-garden - the house-roof, and perhaps a side-balcony, covering this extension - or the houses are built around uncovered courts, so that, passing through the main door of a building, you find yourself still in the open air, instead of within the dwelling. These high and solid garden-walls are quite common along the principal streets; and an occasional latticed door gives you a peep into the attractive area beyond the massive structure, with perhaps a show of huge stone arches, or of a winding staircase between heavy stone columns, or of a profusion of tropical vegetation in the winter-garden, bringing to mind the stories in poem and romance of the loves of Spanish damsels, and of stolen interviews at the garden-gate, or elopements by means of the false key or the bribed porter. The principal streets were formerly well paved or floored with shell-concrete, portions of which are still to be seen above the shifting sand; and this flooring was so carefully swept that the dark-eyed maidens of Old Castile, who then led in society here, could pass and repass without soiling their satin slippers. No rumbling wheels were permitted to crush the firm road-bed, or to whirl the dust into the airy verandas, where in undisturbed repose sat the Spanish dons and dames.

      “There are two convents in St. Augustine, whose nuns are mainly occupied in the education of young girls. There are among them a number of nuns brought over from France a few years since, who teach, besides their own language, the art of making lace....”

    • Saint Augustine, Florida - Buildings in Saint Augustine of Coquina/Limestone (as of 1886) (from Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, Chapter entitled “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, pp. 393.

      On Anastasia Island, about 2 miles from Saint Augustine, there was formerly quarried to a considerable extent a very coarse and porous shell limestone which was used in the construction of the old city of Saint Augustine and of Fort Marion, which was built about the middle of the eighteenth century. The rock is composed simply of shells of a bivalve mollusk more or less broken and cemented together by the same material in a more finely divided state. Fragments of shells an inch or more in diameter occur. The rock is loosely compacted and very porous, but in a mild climate like that of Florida is nevertheless very durable. The quarries were opened upwards of two hundred years ago, but the stone is not now extensively used, owing in part to the dampness of houses constructed of it, and in part to the cheapness of wood. The rock, which is popularly known as Coquina (the Spanish word for shell), is of Upper Eocene age. In the quarries the stone lies within a few feet of the surface, and can be cut out with an ax, in sizes and shapes to suit.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Casa de Solana, 279 George Street, today known as the St. Francis (history). The following information was obtained from the article entitled, “St. Augustine's oldest inn built for defense,” by Robert Tolf, Special correspondent, Posted June 8, 2003.

      In the early 1800s, the first owner of the Casa de Solana Don Manuel Lorenzo, had coquina stone used in the construction of his new home.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Castle Garden Bed and Breakfast (photograph). This is a Moorish Revival Inn which was built around the 1860s. The building was formerly known as the Castle Warden Carriage house and was constructed with an exterior of coquina stone.St. Augustine, Florida - the Castillo de San Marcos.
    • St. Augustine, Florida - Castillo de San Marcos - "It's St. Augustine's most famous stone; and it has a history, by Margo C. Pope, the "St. Augustine Record" (staugustine.com), March 12, 2000 (photograph and history). The Coquina stone from Anastasia Island quarries was used in building the Castillo de San Marcos, which was built from 1672 and 1695. The rock was quarried on Anastasia Island and transported to the building site for the construction of the Castillo. It was soft when quarried but hardened after the rock dried.
    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Cathedral of St. Augustine (photograph and history), located on Cathedral Street.

      According to this web site, the cathedral was built of coquina stone in 1797. (Scroll down to entry.)

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the old Convent of St. Mary’s (The following is from the “St. Augustine, Florida ” section of “Scenes in Florida," in Picturesque America, Illustrations by Harry Fenn, 1872. (Also see the section: St. Augustine, Florida - the City of St. Augustine & the Fort of San Marco above.)

      “...The old Convent of St. Mary’s is a suggestive relic of the days of papal rule. The new convent is a tasteful building of the ancient coquina. The United-States barracks, recently remodeled and improved, are said to have been built as a convent, or mastery....”

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Dr. Peck House (The following information is from the Highway Byways web site.

      According to this web site, the Dr. Peck House was built of native coquina stone in the 1740s.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Fernandez-Llambias House, presented on waymarking.com. More photographs and history about the Fernandez-Llambias house is available on Wikpedia.

      The Fernandez-Llambias House was constructed about 1763 and is one of the oldest restored original buildings in St. Augustine. The house was owned by Pedro Fernandez, and the outer walls are of coquina stone covered by stucco.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - Fort Marion (history and pictures)(The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.library.miami.edu/archives/shedd/stone.htm>

      According to this letter by Henry W. F. Little, Fort Marion (as were many southern Spanish Forts) was built with blocks of coquina stone, which was mainly quarried on Anastasia Island. (The letters are a part of the Calvin Shedd Papers by the University of Miami, Archives and Special Collections.)

    • St. Augustine, Florida - Fort Matanzas National Monument, presented by the National Park Service.
      • Fort Matanzas (photographs). Fort Matanzas was constructed with coquina stone.
    • St. Augustine, Florida - Guide to St. Augustine as it is Today - 1918: St. Augustine Under Three Flags: Tourist Guide and History, presented on the Floridpedia web site.
    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Markland (the Andrew Anderson House) (photograph and history), located at 102 King Street.

      According to this web site, the building was originally constructed in the Classical Revival style of coquina block in 1893 with later alterations. (Scroll down to entry.)

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Coquina Pyramid Monument to Major Dade (The following is from the “St. Augustine, Florida” section of “Scenes in Florida, in Picturesque America, Illustrations by Harry Fenn, 1872. (Also see the section: St. Augustine, Florida - the City of St. Augustine & the Fort of San Marco above.)

      “Under three pyramids of coquina, stuccoed and whitened, are the ashes of Major Dade and one hundred and seven men of his command, who were massacred by Osceola and his band.”

      • The Post National Cemetery - Monument to Major Dade and the Soldiers Under his Command, presented on the Floripedia web site.

        “...Near the Barracks on Marine Street is the Post National Cemetery. Beneath the three pyramids lie the remains of the 139 men of Major Dade’s command who were killed by the Indians December 28, 1835.”

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Old City House Today known as the Old City House Inn and Restaurant (photographs and history)

      The Old City House was reportedly constructed with a coquina stone façade in 1873 from stone found on the site.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Oldest House AKA Gonzalez-Alvarez House, 14 St. Francis Street, St. Augustine, Florida (photograph and history)

      According to this web site:  “In 1760, he commissioned Juan Perez, Master Builder, to add the northeast coquina room to his earlier wooden house....”

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the O’Reilly House (photograph and history), located at 32 Aviles Street.

      According to this web site, the house was originally constructed in 1763 of stuccoed coquina stone. (Scroll down to entry.)

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Rodriquez-Avero-Sanchez House (photograph and history), located at 52 St. George Street. According to the Florida ’s History Through Its Places web site, the house was partially constructed of coquina stone. (Scroll down to entry.)
    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Sanchez Powder House Site (photograph and history), located on Marine Street.

      According to this web site, the powder house was originally built of coquina stone with a tile roof. (Scroll down to entry.)

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Saint Augustine National Cemetery - the Three Pyramids & Surrounding Wall, web site presented by the St. Augustine Cemetery.

      According to this web site, the three pyramids that mark the burial place of soldiers about 1842 were made of native coquina stone. The wall that enclosed the cemetery property and the rostrum used for official ceremonies were also made of coquina stone. It is also noted that the Dad Monument, which was topped by a marble obelisk, was of coquina stone.

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Sea Wall of Coquina Stone (The following is from the “St. Augustine, Florida ” section of “Scenes in Florida," in Picturesque America, Illustrations by Harry Fenn, 1872. (Also see the section: St. Augustine, Florida - the City of St. Augustine & the Fort of San Marco above.)

      “...A fine sea-wall of nearly a mile in length, built of coquina, with a coping of granite, protects the entire ocean-front of the city, and furnishes a delightful promenade of a moonlight evening....”

    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Ximenez-Fatio House Museum (photograph, history, & visiting information), presented by OldCity.com.
    • St. Augustine, Florida - the Zero Stone to the Top of the Tamiami Trail (St. Augustine to Lake City), presented on the Drive the Old Spanish Trail web site.

      A six-foot diameter ball constructed from coquina stone was created to mark the beginning of the Tamiami Trail.

    • St. Petersburg, Florida – the White Gardens on the grounds of the Science Center of Pinellas County. (Scroll down to the “ White Gardens and Mosaic Walk of The States” section.) (The following quotation is used with permission.) Information and a photograph of a part of the White Gardens mosaic walk is available in the “Science Center of Pinellas County” section of Wikipedia.

      “White Gardens was originally constructed in 1961 at the site of the former National Bank on Tyrone Boulevard. The Gardens was a vision of the National Bank’s Chairman of the Board, Starley M. White, who dedicated it to the citizens of St. Petersburg. In 1971, White Gardens was moved because of vandalism to its present home at the Science Center of Pinellas County, Inc.

      “Since moving to the Science Center, the appearance of White Gardens has changed a bit. At its first home on Tyrone Boulevard, the center part of the Gardens, which is now a park, was a 150 foot oval lake complete with spraying fountains. The Gardens also used to contain over 220 native Florida stones, many of which were boulders weighing over nine tons. Most of these rocks were not moved along with the rest of the contents to the Science Center.”

    • Tallahassee, Florida – Lichgate Cottage on High Road – the Foundation & Chimney.  Lichgate cottage, built by the late Laura Jepsen, is located at 1401 High Road, in Tallahassee, Florida, and is maintained by the Laura Jepsen Institute volunteers.

    The “History” section of the Lichgate cottage web site states that the late Laura Jepson used gneiss for the foundation of the house, which was quarried in Lithonia, Georgia, according to her book, Lichgate on High Road.  One of the Laura Jepsen Institute volunteers wrote that, “The home was built in 1955-57, (Laura Jepson) had a master stone mason from North Carolina build the home.” 

    According to the “Lichgate on High Road” article on Wikipedia:  “The Lichgate cottage was the home of the late Laura Jepsen, a professor of comparative literature at Florida State University from 1946 to 1978.  After her death on Christmas Eve, 1995, the property was sold to the Laura Jepsen Institute, which was established by a group of former students, colleagues, and acquaintances, inspired by her life's work. The Laura Jepsen Institute currently maintains the grounds. The property is open to the public and small groups. Features include a large live oak tree, a Tudor style fairy-tale cottage, and gardens. Available for weddings, showers and small parties.”

  • Finished Products from Florida Stone in Washington D.C.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Washington Monument Memorial Stones - the State of Florida Memorial Stone & the Grand Lodge of Florida Memorial Stone, presented by the National Park Service (photograph and history)

      The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones in placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The State of Florida Memorial Stone and the Grand Lodge of Florida Memorial Stone entries read as follow below and can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

      The Florida state stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed in WAMO Stone Section 2, and the Grand Lodge of Florida memorial stone can be viewed in WAMO Stone Section 4.

      The Washington Monument web site has recently been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument.

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

      The Florida stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed in WAMO Stone Section 2. (The following information about the Florida stone in the Washington monument comes from the National Park Service web site.)

      Donor: State of Florida

      Dates: c.1968/c.1968

      Original materials: limestone, silver seal, silver leaf (coated with wax) in letters

      Dimensions: 2' x 3' 11"

      Sculptor/Carver: not known

      Original inscription: Florida [abbr.]

       Documented material history:

      • 1966: “the City Council was in unanimous accord to purchasing a block of stone 2' x 4' x 2' [sic] to be placed in Washington’s Monument with a Bronze Plaque bearing the name of the City of Bradenton inlaid in the stone.” [“Minutes of City Council, May 25, 1966,” Bradenton, Florida.]

      • 1968: “The current stone was installed on January 11, 1968, and was paid for by the City of Bradenton, Florida.” [Photocopy of NACC catalog of state commemorative stones, n.d., source cited: “Park Files;” NACC.]

      Documented material history of original stone:

      • 1850: “From Florida, a block of stone called rotten limestone; the State seal to be engraved on it...” [DNI, August 7, 1850.]

      • 1850: “‘I caused a block of limestone to be quarried near St. Marks of suitable dimension and texture to be forwarded to the Washington Monument.’ This announcement of the donation by the Governor appears to have been made sometime after the stone had been received in Washington. November 25, 1850. A letter dated April from Governor Brown to Whittlesey advising Mr. Whittlesey that the block had been sent. The letter was dated April 16, 1850.” [MR]

      • 1850s Wilcox drawing

      • 1880 Gedney drawing

      • 1880: “Face of stone disintegrated...” [CG]

      • 1909: “The surface and inscription of this stone is entirely decayed. Nothing can be deciphered.” [ICE]

      • 1885: “Badly disintegrated” [Sched.]

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      Images:

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

      • 2000 NPS slides

      Documented material history:

      • 1966: “the City Council was in unanimous accord to purchasing a block of stone 2' x 4' x 2' [sic] to be placed in Washington’s Monument with a Bronze Plaque bearing the name of the City of Bradenton inlaid in the stone.” [“Minutes of City Council, May 25, 1966,” Bradenton, Florida.]

      • 1968: “The current stone was installed on January 11, 1968, and was paid for by the City of Bradenton, Florida.” [Photocopy of NACC catalog of state commemorative stones, n.d., source cited: “Park Files;” NACC.]

      Documented material history of original stone:

      • 1850: “From Florida, a block of stone called rotten limestone; the State seal to be engraved on it...” [DNI, August 7, 1850.]

      • 1850: “‘I caused a block of limestone to be quarried near St. Marks of suitable dimension and texture to be forwarded to the Washington Monument.’ This announcement of the donation by the Governor appears to have been made sometime after the stone had been received in Washington. November 25, 1850. A letter dated April from Governor Brown to Whittlesey advising Mr. Whittlesey that the block had been sent. The letter was dated April 16, 1850.” [MR]

      • 1850s Wilcox drawing

      • 1880 Gedney drawing

      • 1880: “Face of stone disintegrated...” [CG]

      • 1909: “The surface and inscription of this stone is entirely decayed. Nothing can be deciphered.” [ICE]

      • 1885: “Badly disintegrated” [Sched.]

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      Images:

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

      • 2000 NPS slides

      The Grand Lodge of Florida memorial stone can be viewed in WAMO Stone Section 4.

      Name: Masons, Grand Lodge of Florida

      Level: 230-ft.

      Donor: Masons, Grand Lodge of Florida

      Dates: c.1850s/1885

      Original material: marble

      Dimensions: 2' 4" x 4' 10"

      Sculptor/Carver: not known

      Original inscription: Presented by the Grand Lodge. Of the State of Florida.

      Documented material history:

      • 1880: “... in Lapidarium” [CG]

      Images:

      • 1880 Gedney drawing

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

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