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Structures and Monuments in Which Colorado Stone was Used

  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Arizona
    • Kingman, Arizona - the Mohave County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Phoenix, Arizona - the Adams Hotel. The hotel was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Arkansas
    • Little Rock, Arkansas - the Arkansas State Capital Rotunda, presented on the web site of the Arkansas Secretary of State. (The information below was obtained from the “Arkansas State Capital Virtual Tour.”) According to the tour, the Rotunda was “The interior (of the rotunda) is constructed of marble from three states. The marble on the floors and walls came from Vermont. The columns around the third floor are Colorado marble, and the grand staircases are Alabama marble.”
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in California
    • California - 40 School Buildings throughout California. These buildings were built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Athletic Club. The club was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Citizen's National Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Examiner Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Fidelity Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Hellman National Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Merchants' National Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Merritt Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Merritt National Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - the Pan-American Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Los Angeles, California - River, Judson D. - in the Judson D. River Home - the Fireplace Mantle. The fireplace mantle in the Judson D. River home was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Oakland, California - the Tribune Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Pasadena, California - the Huntington Park Memorial. The memorial was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Myers Rex, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Pasadena, California - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • San Francisco, California - the Municipal Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • San Francisco, California - the SubTreasury Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Colorado
    • Boulder, Colorado - the old Union Pacific Train Depot & Other Historical Buildings in and around Boulder built of Lyons Sandstone.

      According to the City of Boulder web site in the “Amazing Facts” section, the pink Lyons sandstone “was quarried on Open Space and Mountain Parks. Stone from Anderson Quarry, near the mouth of Skunk Canyon...” This stone was used in the old Union Pacific train depot, which is located on Pearl and 30th Streets in Boulder, and in other historical buildings in and around Boulder.

    • Boulder, Boulder County, Colorado - The University of Colorado - Helms and Sewell Hall (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.ci.boulder.co.us/openspace/about/area_histories.htm>

      Including Helms and Sewell Hall, many buildings at the University of Colorado were constructed from Lyons Sandstone from quarries on Mount Sanitas.

    The University of Colorado Home Page

    "Most of the buildings of the University of Colorado are faced with Permian Lyons Sandstone, which is widely used for buildings and flagstones throughout the Boulder-Denver area. The Univesity Museum, shown here, was established in 1902, and contains over a million scientific specimens, including many Colorado fossils and minerals. Exhibits in the Hall of Earth portray Colorado's geologic history.

      (This photograph is taken from Prairie, Peak and Plateau: A Guide to the Geology of Colorado, Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin 32, by John and Halka Chronic, 1972, pg. 100.) University of Colorado campus Museum
    • Boulder, Colorado - Building Materials Vocabulary - University of Colorado at Boulder Campus Buildings, etc., presented by Campus Architect, Department of Facilities Management, University of Colorado at Boulder. (Several photographs are presented on this web site to correspond with the information on Colorado building stone and the stone used on the campus. Below is only a small amount of the information available in this section of Campus Architect Building Materials Vocabulary section of the web site.)

      The sandstone quarries located between Boulder and Loveland, provided the stone for use on the University of Colorado at Boulder campus. According to this web site, the stone is not quarried as block dimension stone in the area but is fractured in layers. The color of the sandstone ranges from “red on the south to white on the north.”

      Sandstone

      The quarries located along the front range have been in operation since at least the 1880s. Although the quarries declined in 1912, there was a revitalization of the quarries in the 1930s and 1940s during the World War II years. The sandstone is described as “lying in shallow layers near the surface along the front range,” is relatively hard, and ranges in color “from purple to a deep dark red to almost white with the red colors found near Boulder and the lighter colors as far north as Loveland. The deep rich reds are more scarce as are the buffs streaked with iron oxide (stain faced).”

      Limestone (from Indiana, Kansas, and Texas Quarries)

      The stone most commonly used as window and door surrounds, lintels, coping, and other trim on campus buildings is predominantly limestone quarried in Kansas, although there are some examples of limestone from Kansas and Texas quarries as well. The colors of the limestones used “vary from variegated to gray, yellow (buff), and pink. A mixture of gray and buff is used on campus. Texas limestone can include fossils and can be more pink or yellow than quarries in other States. Kansas (limestone) provides a little harder and less absorptive stone than others, but can be ‘yellowish’ and of a sugar cube finish. Indiana (limestone) is grayer, but all limestone will yellow up over time.”

    • Colorado Springs, Colorado - Historical and Architectural Survey of Downtown Colorado Springs, 2003-04 - Survey Report, May 2004 (Revised) [PDF]

    • Colorado Yule Marble Quarry Stone used to create the "Bust of the Savior" John B. Andelin, Sculptor. There are two versions created by Mr. Adelin.
    • Denver, Colorado - Historic Civic Center Walking Tour (Twelve buildings are included in this online walking tour)
    • Denver, Colorado – the oldest Buildings in Denver constructed of Sandstone (The following information is from the article, “When In Denver, Get It At Lower’s,” by Dave Lanara.)
    • Dave Lanara’s article provides a an extensive, detailed account of John P. Lower’s life and businesses, including his partnership in the Fort Collins Redstone Company (which operated a sandstone quarry near Fort Collins) with George F. Wilson at the link above. According to Dave Lanara’s article: “Most of the oldest buildings in Denver that still survive were built using stone from his Fort Collins Redstone Company.”

    • Denver, Colorado - the Barth Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Broadway Bank. The bank building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado – the Brown Hotel (history and photographs), presented by Our Scottish Ancestors web site.
    • (from the web site) “… Colorado red granite and Arizona sandstone were used on the exterior of the building while Onyx was used extensively in the interior walls of the hotel.  The firm of ‘Geddes & Seerie’ were the stone contractors for this project….”

    • Denver, Colorado - the Bus Terminal Building (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)

      According to this book, travertine quarried near Wellesville, Colorado, was used in the construction of the bus terminal building.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Capital Life Insurance Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception - the vestibules, pillar bass, balustrades, baseboards, and confessionals
    • According to the Molly Brown House Museum web site, the cathedral is an example of the French Gothic Revival architectural style. Indiana limestone was used on the exterior of the cathedral. Italian Carrara marble was used for the carved altars, and “Colorado Yule marble makes up the vestibules, pillar bass, balustrades, baseboards, and confessionals.” Construction was completed in 1912.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Cheesman Memorial. The memorial was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the City and County Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Colorado Life Insurance Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Colorado National Bank. The Colorado National Bank is constructed with a red freestone quarry at Morrison, Colorado. (From Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.)
      • Denver, Colorado - the Colorado National Bank Building. The building was built in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Colorado State Capitol (photographs and history) "The building was constructed using all Colorado material except the brass and oak trimmings. Granite was quarried from Gunnison. The wainscoting and pillar facings are of Colorado Onyx, a material unique only to the Colorado Capitol. When this rare stone's supply was exhausted the basement was finished in white marble. The foundations and walls are Fort Collins Sandstone." (The marble was quarried from Marble, Colorado.)
      • The State Capitol Building and granite steps leading to the entrance (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)

        According to this book, Aberdeen Granite quarried in Gunnison County, Colorado, was used in the construction of the State Capitol building and the steps that lead up to the entrances of the building. It also states that 283,500 cubic feet of the Aberdeen Granite was used.

      • Marble used in the Colorado State Capitol (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
        <http://me-www.colorado.edu/centers/combustion/statecap.html>

        The unique red marble used in the Colorado State Capitol was called Beulah Red Marble (also known as Colorado Onyx), named for a nearby town quarried for use in the capitol between 1894 and 1900. This site states that it is the "only known deposit of red marble in the world." The entire deposit was used in the Capitol.

      • The State Capitol. The capitol was built in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
      • The State Capitol Interior Walls (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)

        According to this book, the “colorful interior walls” of the State Capitol building are constructed of a limestone called “Beulah Marble.” This limestone is quarried west of Pueblo, Colorado.

      • The State Capitol Annex. The capitol annex was built in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
      • The Colorado State Capitol – Gray granite quarried from the Aberdeen granite quarry located 6 miles west of Gunnison, Colorado, was used in the construction of the Colorado State Capitol Building (history and photographs), presented on the Our Scottish Ancestors web site.
    • Denver, Colorado - the Colorado State Museum. The museum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
      • Colorado State Museum located at the SE Corner of Sherman Street and East 14th Avenue in Denver. (The link from which the following information was obtained in no longer available.)
        <http://www.springsgov.com/pln/historic/documents/RPTCOSPfin.pdf>

        According to the Denver Neighborhoods Walking Tour web site, the old State Museum building was a “Classic palace of Greek Revival detail.” The museum was built in 1913, and the architect was Frank Edbrooke. Originally it was located near the State Capitol but was later moved to 1300 Broadway. After restoration, the building was used as legislative offices. The four marble columns that support the entrance portico are “...(s)heathed in polished Colorado yule marble.”

    • Denver, Colorado – the County Jail Building (from the “History of the State of the State of Colorado....,” by Frank Hall, Rocky Mountain Historical Company, 1895, pp. 504, in the “John P. Lower” biography. This book is available on Google Books - Full View Books for reading or downloading in PDF.)
    • The Fort Collins Redstone Company “furnished the (sandstone) stone for the Essex building, the Mining Exchange and the county jail, in Denver, and were the first to send a trainload to New Orleans and thence to New York by steamer. It reached New York May 1, 1888, where it was used in connection with an additional trainload of the same sent overland, via Chicago, in a building at 9 East Seventy-first street.” The company ended in bankruptcy circa 1888.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Daniels & Fisher's block and many others. The Daniels & Fisher's block is constructed with a red freestone quarry at Morrison, Colorado. (From Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.)
      • Denver, Colorado - the Daniel and Fisher Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Denver Courthouse (from the “Girl Scout Fact Sheet on Yule Marble,” Girl Scout Troop 357) Yule Marble was used in the construction of the Denver Courthouse.

    • Denver, Colorado – the County Courthouse (The following information is from the “County Courthouse” section of “Fort Collins History and Architecture,” on the Fort Collins History Connection web site.)
    • According to this article, “The Fort Collins Redstone Company donated a red sandstone cornerstone from their local quarries for the (county courthouse) building.”

    • Denver, Colorado - the Denver City Hall Stone Base (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)

      According to this book the base of the Denver City Hall was constructed of Cotopaxi Granite which was quarried in Fremont County, Colorado.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Denver General Hospital (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)
    • According to this book, travertine quarried near Wellesville, Colorado, was used in the construction of the Denver General Hospital.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Empire Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado – the Essex Building (from the “History of the State of the State of Colorado....,” by Frank Hall, Rocky Mountain Historical Company, 1895, pp. 504, in the “John P. Lower” biography. This books is available on Google Books - Full View Books for reading or in PDF.)
    • The Fort Collins Redstone Company “furnished the (sandstone) stone for the Essex building, the Mining Exchange and the county jail, in Denver, and were the first to send a trainload to New Orleans and thence to New York by steamer. It reached New York May 1, 1888, where it was used in connection with an additional trainload of the same sent overland, via Chicago, in a building at 9 East Seventy-first street.” The company ended in bankruptcy circa 1888.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Federal Reserve Bank Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the First National Bank. The First National Bank is constructed with a red freestone quarry at Morrison, Colorado. (From Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Fitzsimons Army Hospital. The hospital was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Foster Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Gas and Electric Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Gates Rubber Company Building (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)
    • According to this book, travertine quarried near Wellesville, Colorado, was used in the construction of the Gates Rubber Company building.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Immaculate Conception Cathedral. The cathedral was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado – the Jeppersen Terminal at DIA. Yule Marble from Marble, Gunnison County, Colorado, was used in the construction of the terminal. (From Yule Marble Quarry Slide Show by Dr. Vince Matthews, Senior Science Advisor, Colorado Geological Survey. The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://geosurvey.state.co.us/general_info/YuleMarble_files/frame.htm>

      Yule Marble from Marble, Gunnison County, Colorado, was used in the construction of the terminal.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Metropolitan Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado – the Mining Exchange Building (from the “History of the State of the State of Colorado....,” by Frank Hall, Rocky Mountain Historical Company, 1895, pp. 504, in the “John P. Lower” biography. This book is available on Google Books - Full View Books for reading or downloading in PDF.)
    • The Fort Collins Redstone Company “furnished the (sandstone) stone for the Essex building, the Mining Exchange and the county jail, in Denver, and were the first to send a trainload to New Orleans and thence to New York by steamer. It reached New York May 1, 1888, where it was used in connection with an additional trainload of the same sent overland, via Chicago, in a building at 9 East Seventy-first street.” The company ended in bankruptcy circa 1888.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Molly Brown House Exterior (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123. A photograph of a portion of the exterior is included with this article.)

      According to this book, gray blocks of “Castle Rock Rhyolite” were used on the exterior of the Molly Brown house. Permian sandstone quarried at Manitou Springs, Colorado, was used for the red trim on the exterior, and Permian dune sandstone quarried near Lyons, Colorado, was used for the flagstone in the sidewalks.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Mt. States Telephone & Telegraph Co. Building. (The following information is from a colorized postcard, #163; unmailed) The back of the postcard reads: "The new building of the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Co. of Denver is the tallest building in Colorado. It is telephone headquarters for the entire Rocky Mountain Region. It is constructed of Colorado materials: granite and travertine from the quarries of the state--bricks and terra cotta from Denver--steel from the Pueblo mills. The building stands on the site of the Pony Express Corrals of the early west. Its top floors look out on a range of snow-capped peaks several hundred miles in length."

    • Denver, Colorado - the New Customs House. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Old Customs House. The customs house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Pioneer Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Schubert Theatre. The theater was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - St. Dominic (history) Quarries in Monte Vista, Colorado, and Boise, Idaho provided the dark grey, light grey, and buff-colored stone used on the exterior of St. Dominic's built in 1889.

    • Denver, Colorado - St. Elizabeth (history) The St. Elizabeth Catholic Church was constructed in 1878 of rusticated rhyolite (lava stone) from Castle Rock quarries at Castle Rock, Douglas County, Colorado.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Symmes Block. The Symmes Block was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - Tabor Block Cigar Store. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Tabor Opera House. The Tabor Opera House is constructed with a red freestone quarry at Morrison, Colorado. (From Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.)

    • Denver, Colorado – the Telephone Building, Headquarters of the Mt. States Telephone & Telegraph Co., “The new building of the Mountain States Telephone and Telegraph Co. at Denver is the tallest building in Colorado. It is telephone headquarters for the entire Rocky Mountain Region. It is constructed of Colorado materials: granite and travertine from the quarries of the state–bricks and terra cotta from Denver–steel from the Pueblo mills. The building stands on the site of the Pony Express Corrals of the early west. Its top floors look out on a range of snow-capped peaks several hundred miles in length." (This quotation was taken from a colorized postcard photograph, No. 163; Sanborn Souvenir Co., Denver, Colo.; unmailed)

    • Denver, Colorado - the Thatcher Memorial Vault. The vault was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Trinity United Methodist Church (photographs and history)

      You can read about the architecture and ornamentation of the church in the “Our Story - Trinity United Methodist Church: Pioneers of Colorado Methodism” section of the “About Us” section of the web site. In this section it is stated that the church was designed in the “Modern Gothic architecture.” It is also stated that: “By using blocks of locally quarried Castle Rock rhyolite on the building’s face exterior, Robert Roeschlaub was able to stay true to the traditions of the ‘Arts and Crafts movement.’ This simply means that he looked to nature for inspiration. The rhyolite facing and sandstone trim allow the church to blend with its native surroundings.”

      The Trinity United Methodist Church on Steve Mastin’s web site (photographs and history) According to Steve Mastin, the exterior of the Trinity United Methodist Church was “faced with locally quarried Castle Rock rhyolite.” The church was built in 188 in the Modern Gothic style.

    • Trinity United Methodist Church (The following information is from Messages in Stone: Colorado’s Colorful Geology, edited by Vincent Matthews, Ph.D., Katie Keller Lynn, and Betty Fox, Colorado Geological Survey, 2003, “Industrial Minerals and Construction Materials,” pp. 121-123.)
    • According to this book, light gray Wall Mountain Tuff, quarried in Douglas County, Colorado, was used in the construction of the Trinity Methodist Church. The industry name for the tuff is Castle Rock Rhyolite.

    • Denver, Colorado - the Union Depot. The Union Depot is constructed with a red freestone quarried at Morrison, Colorado. (From Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883.)
      • Denver, Colorado - the Union Station. Union Station was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Denver, Colorado - the Veterans Monument between Broadway & Lincoln, photographs and presented by Steve Mastin.

      According to Steve Mastin, the Veterans Monument was constructed in 1990 “of red sandstone from the Boulder area....”

    • Denver, Colorado - the Voorhies Memorial - the Colonnade, photographs and presented by Steve Mastin.

      According to Steve Mastin, the colonnade around the reflecting pool at the Voorhies Memorial was constructed from Turkey Creek Sandstone in 1919. The Voohies Memorial is located at the north end of Civic Center Park.

    • Fort Lupton, Weld County, Colorado - St. Williams Catholic Church (history) The exterior of St. Williams was constructed of buff-colored Colorado sandstone quarried from the Buckhorn Valley, ninety miles from Fort Lupton.
    • Glenwood, Springs, Colorado - the Taylor Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Golden, Colorado - the Astor House Museum. The museum was constructed with stone quarried in Golden.
    • Greeley, Colorado - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Gunnison, Colorado - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Longmont, Colorado - the First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 803 Third Avenue and Terry. (photographs in the “Our Products” section of the Loukonen Bros. Stone Co. web site- scroll downward)

      In the past Loukonen Bros. Stone Co. of Longmont provided the stone for the original portion of the church on the east side. The company again provided stone in 2001.

    • Longmont, Colorado - the Longmont Recreational Center and Museum on East Quail Road. (photographs in the “Our Products” section of the Loukonen Bros. Stone Co. web site- scroll downward)

      Loukonen Bros. Stone Co. of Longmont provided the stone for the building from December 2001 through March 2002.

    • Lyons, Colorado - the Lyons Redstone Museum Building, presented by the Town of Lyons. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://townoflyons.com/about_lyons.html>

      “The Lyons Redstone Museum is in the town's old schoolhouse which was built in 1881 for numerous children whose families came to Lyons to work in the quarries.”

    • Lyons, Colorado - 15 Sandstone Structures in Lyons, Colorado, presented by the Chamber of Commerce (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available, although you can visit the Lyons Chamber of Commerce to read about their local quarries in the “Things to Do” and “Stone” sections of their web site.)
      <http://www.lyons-colorado.com/stone_and_quarries.htm>

      “Designated as a historic district, Lyons has fifteen sandstone structures which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. These were all constructed of native stone by master craftsmen between the early 1870s and 1917. They include commercial, residential and public buildings. There are still quarries operating today that provide beautiful sandstone and other products to the surrounding cities and around the country.”

    • Mancos, Colorado - the Mancos High School (photograph and history)

      The Mancos High School was constructed of locally-quarried sandstone in 1909.

    • Manitou Springs, Teller County, Colorado - Rockledge Country Inn. The inn was constructed of Manitou greenstone from a nearby quarry. (The web site from which this information was obtained is no longer available. You can view a photograph of the Inn at the AAA web site by clicking here.) <http://www.virtualcities.com/ons/co/m/com8701.htm>
    • Montrose, Colorado - Salida Granite - Montrose County Courthouse. Material presented in this link <http://www.montrosecounty.org/historic.htm> stated that Salida Granite was used in the construction of the Montrose County Courthouse. (This link is no longer available.) This site is presented by Montrose, Colorado.
    • Pueblo, Colorado - the Pueblo County Courthouse built of Turkey Creek Sandstone

      According to Stone City Depot section of the Pueblo County Historical Society’s web site, the stone used in the construction of the Pueblo County Courthouse was Turkey Creek Sandstone quarried near Pueblo. The Colorado-Kansas railroad, completed in 1909, operated between Pueblo and Stone City. You can see a photograph of the Pueblo County Courthouse on Wikipedia.

    • Pueblo, Colorado - the Vail Hotel. The hotel was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Salida, Colorado - the Salida Library - The Salida Library was built of brick and granite and limestone quarried in the area. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.peaksnewsnet.com/walking/8.html>
    • Trinidad, Las Animas County, Colorado - the Carnegie Public Library. Stone used in the construction of the Trinidad Carnegie Public Library originated from local quarries. Although there were several small quarries in the region, three main quarries provided the stone during the Victorian period for the area. (The web address from which this information was obtained, is no longer available.) <http://www.trinidadco.com/stories2000/news/05/09/sidebar_carnegie.html>
    • Westminster, Colorado - the Westminster University of Colorado on Crown Point (photograph and history) The building was constructed of red sandstone quarried in the Red Rocks region of Colorado. Today it is owned and operated by the Pillar of Fire Church and can be seen from the Denver metropolitan area.
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Idaho
    • Pocatello, Idaho - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Illinois
    • Chicago, Illinois - the Field Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Chicago, Illinois - the Otis Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Chicago, Illinois - the Rosehill Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Chicago, Illinois - the Telephone Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Indiana
    • Evansville, Indiana - the First National Bank Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Iowa
    • Plover, Iowa - the Lind Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Kansas
    • Independence, Kansas - the Post Office. The post office was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Louisiana
    • Shreveport, Louisiana - the National Bank Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Massachusetts
    • Cambridge, Massachusetts - the Wiednener Memorial. The memorial was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Michigan
    • Detroit, Michigan - the Forty-three story Office Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Minnesota
    • Minneapolis, Minnesota - the McKnight Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.).
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Missouri
    • Branson, Missouri - Roy Rogers Museum - Lifesize Statue of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. The following information was obtained from the Roy Rogers Museum web site, although the link from which it was obtained is no longer available.
      < http://www.themarblesculptor.com/porfolio_Humanform.htm>

      In 1995 Doug Scott Sculpted this lifesize statue of Roy Rogers and Dale Evans in Colorado Yule Marble. You can see the statue on permanent display at the Roy Rogers Museum.

    • Independence, Missouri - the Mormon Auditorium. The auditorium was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Kansas City, Missouri - the Chambers Estate Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Kansas City, Missouri - the Community Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Kansas City, Missouri - the Rialto Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • St. Louis, Missouri - the German-American Institute. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.).
    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Samuel Cupples House, located at 221 N. Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63103 on the St. Louis University campus near Lindell and Spring Avenues. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.st-louis-cvc.com/factSheets/fact_samuelCupples.asp?PageType=4>

      According to this web site, the Samuel Cupples house was constructed in 1890 of “purple Colorado sandstone and pink Missouri granite from the Elephant Rocks quarries in southern Missouri.” English stone carvers were brought to create the elaborate stone carvings including the limestone gargoyles.

  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Montana
    • Billings, Montana - the Montana Power House. The power house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Great Falls, Montana - the Rainbow Hotel. The hotel was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Helena, Montana - the State Capitol. The State Capitol was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Nebraska
    • Broken Arrow, Nebraska - the I.O.O.F. Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Greeley, Nebraska - the County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Hastings, Nebraska - the Old Courthouse, presented by the Adams County Historical Society. The foundation was constructed of Colorado sandstone. The building was demolished in 1964. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://incolor.inebraska.com/achs/court.html>
    • Lincoln, Nebraska - the Bancroft High School. The high school was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Lincoln, Nebraska - the Chapin Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Lincoln, Nebraska - the Lincoln High School. The high school was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Omaha Nebraska - the Brandeis Subway Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Omaha Nebraska - the Douglas County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Omaha, Nebraska - Forest Lawn Memorial Park Chapel, presented by the Forest Lawn Cemetery Association (photographs and history)

      According to this web site, the architect of the Forest Lawn Memorial Park Chapel was John McDonald and the general contractor was Walter Peterson, both of Omaha. The Corner Stone was laid on December 27, 1991, and the first funeral service in Chapel was held on September 15, 1914. The Chapel underwent major renovation in 1990.

      The marble used in the Chapel was supplied by the Colorado Yule Marble Company of Marble, Colorado. Marble was used in the Chapel in the interior in the floor, two large marble seats, desk and chair, and the four marble electroliers. The entire exterior was constructed of St. Cloud granite.

    • Omaha, Nebraska - the Union Pacific Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Omaha Nebraska - the West Lawn Mausoleum. The mausoleum was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Omaha Nebraska - the Woodman of the World Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • St. Paul, Nebraska - the Howard County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Sydney, Nebraska - the First National Exchange Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in New York
    • New York City, New York – the Building at 9 East Seventy-first Street (from the “History of the State of the State of Colorado....,” by Frank Hall, Rocky Mountain Historical Company, 1895, pp. 504, in the “John P. Lower” biography. This book is available on Google Books - Full View Books for reading or downloading in PDF.)
    • The Fort Collins Redstone Company “furnished the (sandstone) stone for the Essex building, the Mining Exchange and the county jail, in Denver, and were the first to send a trainload to New Orleans and thence to New York by steamer. It reached New York May 1, 1888, where it was used in connection with an additional trainload of the same sent overland, via Chicago, in a building at 9 East Seventy-first street.” The company ended in bankruptcy circa 1888.

    • New York New York - the Cambridge Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • New York, New York - the New York Municipal Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Ohio
    • Cleveland, Ohio - the City Hall. The city hall was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Cleveland, Ohio - the Cuyahoga County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Youngstown, Ohio - the County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Oklahoma
    • Enid, Oklahoma - the Enid High School. The high school was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Tulsa, Oklahoma - the County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Tulsa, Oklahoma - the Studebaker Company Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Tulsa, Oklahoma - the Tulsa High School. The high school was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Oregon
    • Portland, Oregon - the Bedell Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Portland, Oregon - the First National Bank Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Rhode Island
    • Providence, Rhode Island - the Providence County Court House. The court house was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Texas
    • Houston, Texas - the Southern Pacific Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Houston, Texas - the Union National Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Myers Rex, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Utah
    • Salt Lake City, Utah - the Boston Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Salt Lake City, Utah - the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Station. The station was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Salt Lake City, Utah - the new House Building. The building was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Salt Lake City, Utah - the Mormon Battalion Monument (From Quarry Days in the Ute Trail Area, an article by Dick Dixon, Colorado Central Magazine, by Dick Dixon, Colorado Central Magazine)

      Granite from the Salida Granite Co. Federal Quarry was used in the construction of the of the Mormon Battalion Monument in Salt Lake City, Utah.

  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Washington
    • Seattle, Washington - the Union Bank. The bank was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Washington, D. C.
    • Washington, D. C. - the Lincoln Memorial (photograph)
      • Lincoln Memorial Building, Washington D.C. (photograph)
      • Washington, D. C. - the Lincoln Memorial. The memorial was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
    • Washington, D. C. - the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery (history) "Nature Honors The Unknown Soldier," By Lt. Donald R. Neil, Q. M. C., The Quartermaster Review, January-February 1932. Details of the construction of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
      • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The tomb was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
      • The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (photograph) This web site is presented by the Arlington National Cemetery.
    • Washington, D. C. - the United States Capitol (photograph)

      The center of the Capitol was built with Aquia Creek sandstone from Virginia. The Senate and House wings were built with dolomitic marble from Lee, Massachusetts. The Rotunda floor was built with sandstone from Seneca, Maryland. The columns of the wings were built with white marble from Cockeysville, Maryland. The center steps were built with granite from Renville, Minnesota. The west elevation steps were built from granite from Mount Airy, North Carolina. The west elevation balustrade was built with marble from Vermont. The interior balustrades and columns of stairs leading to the House and Senate galleries and wall of Marble room were built with marble from Tennessee. The east front exterior was built with White Cherokee marble from Georgia covering the original Aquia Creek sandstone. The 24 exterior columns were built with marble from Georgia. The interior columns, the Statuary Hall, the Old Senate Chamber and foyer were all built with marble from the Potomac in Maryland. The columns in the Crypt and those with the corn and tobacco leaves were built with sandstone from Aquia Creek in Virginia. The columns on the ground floor in the east addition were built with brecciated marble from Colorado.

    • Washington, D. C. - the Washington Monument. The monument was built in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
      • The Washington Monument - Colorado Stone Contributed to the Washington Monument, presented by the National Park Service.

        The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Colorado Memorial Stone entry can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

        The Colorado stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed in “WAMO Stones Section 5” at the above web address.

        Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument at the following web address.

        “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

        “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

        The Colorado stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed in “WAMO Stones Section 5” at the above web address.

        Donor: The State of Colorado

        Location: 290-Foot Level, East Wall, 27th Landing Dimensions: 4 feet by 2 feet

        Inscriptions: "Colorado 1876"

        Material: The Marble came from Yule, Colorado. The same marble was used for the outside of the Lincoln Memorial and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

        Sculptor: F. F. Edbrooke

        Carver: Information not available

        Date: The insertion of this stone began on October 23, 1913, but the dedication exercises were held August 1, 1914.

        More Information: For the dedication exercises Congressman George J. Kindel was the speaker. His speech proved to be an argument against government restriction on business. Attending was Senator Edward Keating who rose to his feet in astonishment, declaring... ” “I did not anticipate that the ceremonies... would be disturbed by the raven-like croakings.”

        Sources for above information: Park File

        Documented material history:

        • 1913: “A letter from Gov. Ammons to Colonel Spencer Cosby stating that Edbrooke’s design was submitted June 12, 1913. The stone was shipped to the Monument, October 1, 1913 and work commenced for placing the block on October 23, 1913. The stone being set by the Washington Granite Monument Co...” [MR]

        Additional documented material information: “Colorado Yule Marble, quarried from Marble, Colorado.” [MR]

        Images:

        • 1949 photograph [Times-Herald, September 2, 1949.]

        • 1957 Allen photograph

        • 1974 photograph

        • 1980 photograph

        • 2000 NPS slides

  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Wisconsin
    • Oshkosh, Wisconsin - a Private Vault (The location is not specified.) The vault was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)
  • The Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Wyoming
    • Cheyenne, Wyoming - the State Capital. The capitol building was completed in 1890. The foundation for the building was of flagstone quarried near Fort Collins, Colorado. White sandstone, quarried near Rawlins, Wyoming, was used for the upper floors. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.nkjo.opole.pl/50states/wy/wy.htm>
    • Laramie, Wyoming - University of Wyoming Campus - the S. H. Knight Geology Building. (The web site from which this information was obtained is no longer available. You can read more about the history of the S. H. Knight Building by clicking here. The University of Wyoming now offers a Virtual Tour of the University of Wyoming.)

      The Weber Quarry - Utah (photograph in the “Decorative and Dimensional Stone” section of the Wyoming Geological Survey web site) The university quarry provided the orange-buff sandstone in the wing beneath the red roof and the identification sign. Sandstone quarried at the Webber quarry in Utah was used in the construction of the rest of the building. Grey Indiana limestone was used for the trim. Lyons Sandstone from Lyons, Colorado, was used for the steps. Granite from the Ames Monument quarry (15 miles southeast of Laramie, Wyoming), was used to trim the capping on the low wall at the base of the west wing. There were other types of stone used in the interior walls and floors.

  • Finished Product from Colorado Stone in Italy
    • Italy - the Garabaldie Statue (The specific location is not stated.) The statue was built entirely or in part from Yule Creek marble. (From Marble, Colorado: City of Stone, by Duane Vandenbusche and Rex Myers, 1970, 4th printing 1987.)

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