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Marin County

  • Marin County – List of Stone Quarries, Etc.
  • Marin County Stone & Building Resources (circa 1867) (pdf) – Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the States and Territories West of the Rocky Mountains, by J. Ross Browne, Report to the Committee on Mines and Mining, House of Representatives During the Second Session of the Fortieth Congress, 1867-1868, Ex. Doc. No. 202, 1868. 
  • Marin County Sandstone Resources (circa 1913) – Included in chapter in “California” (pdf), by G. F. Loughlin, in the Mineral Resources of the United States Calendar Year 1913, Part II. Nonmetals, United States Geological Survey, 1914.
  • Marin County Mines and Mineral Resources (circa 1913-1914) – Excerpts from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. “The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo,” by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), San Francisco, California, July, 1915, 1916.
  • Marin County Mineral Industry (circa 1919) - Excerpt from California Mineral Production for 1919, Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, 1920
  • Marin County Limestone Industry and Deposits (through 1947) - Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California.
  • “Old Lime Kilns Near Olema”, by Adan E. Treganza, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, San Francisco State College, Geologic Guidebook of The San Francisco Bay Counties, Prepared under the direction of Olaf P. Jenkins, California Division of Mines Bulletin 154, San Francisco:  December 1951, pp. 65-72.

  • Marin County Mines and Mineral Resources (circa 1913-1914) - Excerpts from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), San Francisco, California, July, 1915, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.

    "Exclusive of San Francisco County, Marin is the smallest county in California, having a land area of only 529 square miles. The Pacific Ocean is its western boundary, Sonoma County on the north and east, San Pablo and San Francisco bays on the east, with the latter and Golden Gate on the south. Its topography is quite rugged and picturesque, with occasional small and fertile valleys. Its most prominent topographic feature is Mount Tamalpais which overlooks both bay and ocean region from an elevation of 2600 feet. Other notable features are Tomales, Drakes, Bodega and Bolinas bays, on the ocean side, and Richard's Bay on the inland side. Angel and Belvedere islands are included in Marin County. The areas around San Rafael, Mill Valley, Sausalito, and intermediate points are popular suburban residence sections.

    "The mineral resources of Marin County, while limited numerically, are none the less important individually. They are mainly structural and industrial materials. In the order of their production to date they are: brick, stone industry, mineral water, granite, salt, and copper. Their total recorded output is $3,869,799 to the end of 1913.

    "In addition to the above, occurrences have been noted as asphaltum and petroleum, chrome, coal, jasper, garnets, manganese, and natural gas. Attempts have been made to exploit some of these, but without commercial success so far."

    The following information is taken from the table on page 243 entitled, "Marin County - Table of Mineral Production."

    Granite Production in Marin County (listed in the Miscellaneous and unapportioned" section.)

    1895: 7,000 cubic feet granite; Value: $5,000.

    Stone Industry Production in Marin County (stone only):

    1894: Value: $16,850.
    1895: Value: $7,790.
    1896: Value: 7,849 tons; Value: $8,260.
    1897: 6,000 tons; Value: $7,200.
    1898: 1,710 tons; Value: $1,800.
    1899: 4,400 tons; Value: $5,150.
    1900: 3,000 tons; Value: $2,500.
    1901: 34,000 tons; Value: $27,987.
    1902: 149,450 tons; Value: $105,350.
    1903: 144,715 tons; Value: $140,332.
    1904: 216,576 tons; Value: $170,995.
    1905: 113,000 tons; Value: $44,250.
    1906: 54,000 tons; Value: $53,000.
    1907: 157,100 tons; Value: $134,111.
    1908: 111,686 tons; Value: $66,700.
    1909: 132,010 tons; Value: $100,000.
    1910: 112,000 tons; Value: $74,700.
    1911: 173,646 tons; Value: $108,786.
    1912: 5,300 tons; Value: $3,000.
    1913: 428,357 tons; Value: $198,953.
    Totals: 1,854,799 tons; Value: $1,244,724.

  • Marin County Mineral Industry (circa 1919) - Excerpt from California Mineral Production for 1919, Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, 1920, pp. 152.

    Area: 529 square miles.
    Population: 27,342 (1920 census)
    Location: Adjoins San Francisco on the north.

    "Mineral production in Marin County during the year 1919 reached a value of $228,974, as compared to the 1918 output, worth $176,183, the increase being due to crushed rock, and brick. This county is not especially prolific in minerals, although among its resources along these lines are brick, gems, manganese, mineral water, soapstone, and miscellaneous stone.

    "In thirty-seventh place, commercial production for 1919 was:"

    (Headings for the information below are: Substance, Amount, and Value.)

    Stone, miscellaneous, ---, $127,111
    Other minerals,* ---, $101,863
    (Total value) $228,974

    (* Includes brick and mineral water.)

    Marin County, 1916 Map, from California Mineral Production for 1919 (with County Maps), Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco: California State Printing Office, 1920, pp. 187 Marin County , 1916 Map
  • Marin County Limestone Industry and Deposits (through 1947) - Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "There was some early-day production of lime in Marin County, but limestone has not been produced for 50 years, and is not generally listed among the mineral resources of Marin County. Nevertheless, an important deposit of Gavilan (Paleozoic ?) limestone occurs at the head of Tomales Bay, and a deposit of Calera (Franciscan) limestone has been noted south of Olema on the road to Bolinas. Both were described by Edwin C. Eckel (33, pp. 353, 356).* They are called here for convenience Tomales Bay deposit and Olema deposit...."

    (* "Limestone Deposits of the San Francisco Region," California Div. Mines Rept. 29, by Edwin C. Eckel, 1933, pp. 348-361.)

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