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Marin County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc. *

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Angel Island, Marin County, California - Angel Island Sandstone Quarries (circa 1868) (The following excerpt is from The Natural Wealth of California Comprising Early History; Geography, Topography, and Scenery; Climate; Agriculture and Commercial products; Geology, Zoology, and Botany; Mineralogy, Mines, and Mining Processes; Manufactures; Steamship Lines, Railroads, and Commerce; Immigration, Population and Society; Educational Institution, Population and Society; Educational Institutions and Literature; Together with a detailed description of each county, its topography, Scenery, Cities and Towns, Agricultural Advantages, Mineral Resources, and Varied Productions, By Titus Fey Cronise, San Francisco: H. H. Bancroft & Company, 1868, pp. 79. The book is available for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format on Google Books – Full View Books.)

    The Harbors of California San Francisco Harbor.

    “There are a number of islands and harbors within San Francisco and connecting bays, of considerable importance.

    “Alcatraz island, near the entrance of the Golden Gate, is about 1,600 feet in length by 450 feet in width, containing about thirty-five acres. Its highest point is 135 feet above the waters of the bay. It is the key to the fortifications of the harbor.

    “Angel island is the largest in San Francisco bay. It contains upwards of eight hundred acres of good land, with an abundant supply of fresh water. It was formerly well timbered with oak, when it formed an interesting object in the landscape, as see from the city of San Francisco , four miles distant. It contains few trees now, but produces good crops of wheat and barley. There are upon it quarries of excellent building stone. Most of the rock used in constructing the fortifications on Alcatraz , and at Fort Point, was obtained at these quarries; the stone used in the erection of the Bank of California, one of the handsomest structures on the coast, was also obtained here.”

    “Yerba Buena, or Goat Island , lies directly opposite San Francisco. It is much smaller than Angel Island .

    “Molate island, or Red Rock, about four miles north of Angel island, is a barren rock, of some little importance, as it contains a vein of manganese ore, of which several shipments have been made to England.

  • “Bird Rock, and the Two Sisters, are unimportant but picturesque rocks, near the northern end of San Francisco bay. There are several other rocks and islands around the shores of this bay, which are not of sufficient importance to be noticed in this place....”

    • Angel Island, Marin County, California –  Sandstone Quarried on Angel Island circa 1891  (from transcription of Stones for Building and Decoration (pdf), by George P. Merrill, Curator for Geology in the United States National Museum, J. Wiley & Sons, 1891, pp. 251.

      “California. – Around the bay of San Francisco there occur sandstones of a considerable variety of colors, which are beginning to come into use to some extent.  The prevailing hues are brownish and gray.  On Angel Island, in Marin County, there occurs a fine sandstone of a bluish or greenish-gray color, which has been used in the Bank of California building, and others of a lighter shade are found in various parts of Alameda County.  A few miles south of San José, Santa Clara County, there are also inexhaustible supplies of light gray and buff stone, but which are at present worked only in a small way.”

      “According to Prof. Jackson* the Angel Island stone consists of grayish white quartz and feldspar, black mica scales, and angular fragments of black clay slate varying in sizes from 15 m.m. or more in diameter, to minute black particles that are thickly disseminated through the stone.  These granules and fragments are held in a dull, earthy, scarcely perceptible cement, hardened somewhat by carbonate of lime.  Submitted to the fumes of strong acid the stone lost its bluish tint and turned to a light gray, discolored by streaks and patches of yellow iron oxide.  The loss in weight during the exposure amounted to 2.13 per cent.  Heated in a muffle furnace to bright redness and allowed to cool to just below red heat the cube was found to be cracked completely through in several directions, and on then being plunged into cold water became friable and fell to fragments on handling.  As shown in the bank building above mentioned the stone weathers unfavorably.  Although erected only in 1864 disintegration has already gone so far that recourse has been had to a coating of paraffine in hope of arresting further decay.”

      (*  Footnote:  Annual Report State Mineralogist of California, 1888, p. 886.)

  • Angel Island, Marin County, California - Angel Island Sandstone Quarry

    (Also see: Angel Island, Marin County, California - Fort McDowell Quarry below.)

    • Angel Island, Marin County, California - Sandstone Quarrying (From Geologic Guidebook of the San Francisco Bay Counties: History, Landscape, Geology, Fossils, Minerals, Industry, and Routes to Travel, Bulletin 154, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, December, 1951. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      “In the sixties quarries were opened, on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay to furnish a bluish sandstone, and near Petaluma in Sonoma County for the production of basalt. During the eighties and nineties light-brown sandstone was quarried at Benicia in Solano County, and near San Jose in Santa Clara County....”

  • Angel Island, Marin County, California - Fort McDowell Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. “The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo,” by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Fort McDowell Quarry (formerly called Angel Island quarry). U. S. Government, owner; under supervision of the constructing quartermaster, U. S. Army, Fort McDowell. As the earlier name implies, this quarry is on Angel Island. It is on a rocky point on the east side of the island and was first opened up about 1890 by the engineering corps. The old crushing plant, steam driven, had a capacity of 40 tons per day. This has been displaced in 1913 by a new plant using electric power and having a capacity of 40 tons per hour. The new bunkers, with a storage capacity of 800 tons, load direct to barges.

    "Electric power is brought to the island by submarine cable from Sausalito. The equipment includes a No. 5 Symons gyratory crusher bucket elevator, and a trommel. Three sizes of product are made: screenings, inch and 1 -inch. The new plant cost $15,000, but it is estimated that it will save the government $60,000.

    "The rock is a blue-gray metamorphic sandstone in massive beds, with some partly oxidized material at the surface. Up to October, 1913, a total of 45,000 cubic yards of clean rock and 40,000 cubic yards of oxidized have been produced, the latter being used on roads and fills. It is estimated that there are 150,000 cubic yards yet available for quarrying, of which 70,000 cubic yards will be used for road work.

    "This quarry has furnished rock for concrete and other construction at several of the Bay posts, including Fort Mason, the Presidio and Alcatraz Island. With sand also obtained on the island this rock was employed in constructing the new buildings of the enlarged recruit depot of Fort McDowell, just above the quarry. These reenforced concrete structures represent an expenditure of $600,000 for materials alone, as the labor, except skilled civilian foremen, was furnished entirely by military prisoners. There is a barracks building and a mess hall with a normal capacity for 2000 men each. The upper floor of the mess hall is a drill hall. There is also a guardhouse, hospital, post exchange, administration building, and quarters for both commissioned and non-commissioned staff, all of concrete."

  • Angel Island, Marin County, California – Angel Island State Park – Serpentine and Sandstone Quarries. The previous version of this web site noted serpentine and sandstone quarries located within the state park, although the present version does not mention them at all. This web site gives you all the information you need to visit and explore Angle Island.
  • Angel Island, Marin County, California – Angel Island Quarry History  (Sandstone)  (The following information is from “The Quarries (Alcatraz History), presented by the Angel Island Association.)
  • According to this web site, the stone quarry which provided stone for the buildings on Angel Island, San Quentin Prison, Alcatraz Prison, the Naval base at Mare Island, the California Bank building in San Francisco, Fort Point at the San Francisco Presidio, and the Richmond breakwater was quarried on the east side of Angel Island from 1850 through 1922.

  • Angel Island, Marin County, California – Angel Island Quarry into the 1920s  (Sandstone) (The following quotation is from Deep California: Images and Ironies of Cross and Sword on El Camino Real, by Craig Chalquist, iUniverse, June 23, 2008, 732 pp., ISBN-10: 0595514626, ISBN-13: 978-0595514625, pp. 594. (Portions of this book are available on Google Books.)
  • “From the seafaring eye far enough out on the water Angel Island conceals its Bay behind the illusion of a continuous-seeming coastline.  Russian Hunters used the island in 1808 guard a storehouse for their otter skins.  From  1837 to 1853 Antonio Maria Osio ran a cattle ranch here prior to its takeover by the U.S. military.  Sandstone from cliffs along the eastern shore supplied Mare Island and other heavy construction projects into the 1920s.

  • Black Point, Marin County, California - the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company Quarries (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company. General offices, Phelan Building, San Francisco. In extending and regarding its ferry and train terminal at Sausalito this company is completing (May, 1914) a fill of 50,000 cubic yards.The company also has quarries at Black Point, Tiburon Point, and at Waldo, used intermittently for ballast and fills. The material from these cuts is decomposed and much fragmented.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • Escalle Station, Marin County, California - Escalle Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    Escalle Quarry. Jean Escalle, owner. This is a small quarry in a ravine at Escalle Station. The rock is a blue metamorphic sandstone, broken up by streaks of black slickensided serpentine. There is also a small broken vein of coal - a shaly lignite. There is considerable overburden of soil and oxidized rock. The county at one time had a portable crushing plant here getting out road material.”

  • Larkspur, Marin County, California - Rock Quarry. (This information was presented on the Northern California Movies web site, by Scott T. S. Trimble.) (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.norcalmovies.com/DirtyHarry/>

    This quarry is now the location of Larkspur Landing (Ferry terminal, etc.) The location was used for the final showdown between Clint Eastwood and Andy Robinson in the Movie "Dirty Harry." "The train tracks from which Eastwood jumped on the roof of the school bus are still there, right after exiting off Highway 101."

  • Manor Station (above), Marin County, California - the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company. General offices, Phelan Building, San Francisco. In extending and regarding its ferry and train terminal at Sausalito this company is completing (May, 1914) a fill of 50,000 cubic yards. The rock has been taken from land owned by the Roys Estate at Roys, above Manor Station. It is mostly a blue metamorphic sandstone, with some oxidized material. The company also has quarries at Black Point, Tiburon Point, and at Waldo, used intermittently for ballast and fills. The material from these cuts is decomposed and much fragmented.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • Marin County, California - San Rafael Rock Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: San Rafael Rock Quarry; Operator: San Raphael Rock Quarry; Address & County: 1000 Pt. San Pedro Rd., San Rafael, CA 94901, Marin County; Phone: (415) 459-7740; Latitude: 37.99, Longitude: -122.45, and Mine location number: Map No. 334; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Marin County, California - Tailings Pile from an Andesite Cobblestone Quarry (photograph) on the “to see a world from Ring Mountain, Marin County, California.” 

    On this web site, there is a photograph that is described as: "here in an aerial photo that shows the pronounced tailings pile from an andesite cobblestone quarry at the summit."

  • McNear's Point, Marin County, California - the Marin Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Marin Quarry; Gray Brothers, Mills Building, San Francisco, owners. Located on McNear's Point. The rock is a highly metamorphosed blue sandstone. It is used for rubble in seawall construction; at present being used by the State in the construction of the new mail dock, and large quantities were also used in the Santa Fe fill in China Basin. The rock is handled in skips, holding about 2 yards each, which are passed by four 60-foot derricks onto barges and towed to various points on the bay. Two Burleigh drills are used in the quarry. Sixty men are at work."

  • Olema (south of), Marin County, California - Olema Limestone Deposit (Limestone Deposit & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (The following notes and analyses are from "Limestone Deposits of the San Francisco Region," California Div. Mines Rept. 29, by Edwin C. Eckel, 1933, pp. 348-361.)

    "Olema deposit of Franciscan limestone is several miles south of Olema on the Bolinas road. There are remains of three old lime kilns which are said to have been used by the Russians during their sojourn on this coast about 1825. The size of trees growing in the kilns at the time of Eckel's visit indicated they had not been used since 1875. The limestone beds he found were covered by debris, except at one side, and the exposure showed about 50 feet of workable thickness and 100 feet along the outcrop of limestone. He believed that the topography suggested the possibility that the belt might run for several miles along the valley, with a greater thickness than now visible. From the analyses given below, it will be seen that the limestone is low in silica and magnesia and higher in CaCO3 than most other deposits of Calera limestone.

    "Sample 1 was taken by Junea Kelly and analyzed by U.S. Bureau of Standards; No. 2 was sampled and analyzed by C. A. Newhall. Fairfax, the nearest railroad point, is about 15 miles east.

    Sample No. 1: 1.1 % SiO2; 0.68% Al2O3; incl. Fe2O3; 97.98% CaCO3; 54.8% CaO; n.d. MgCO3; trace MgO; 43.2% CO2.

    Sample No. 2: 1.90 % SiO2; 0.76% Al2O3; 0.20 Fe2O3; 96.74% CaCO3; n.d.% CaO; 0.33 MgCO3; n.d. MgO; n.d. CO2.

    (For further information, see the article on: Old Lime Kilns Near Olema, by Adan E. Treganza, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, San Francisco State College in the California Stone Industry section.)

  • Olompali State Historic Park – Stone Quarry. Stone was quarried at the Bautista Ranch. (Originally, this site noted the preceding information, although the present version of the site does not.)
  • Point Bonita, Marin County, California - Fort Barry Sandstone Quarry

    (Fort Barry Sandstone Quarry - See: Point Bonita, Marin County, California - Point Bonita Sandstone Quarry below.)

  • Point Bonita, Marin County, California - Point Bonita Quarry (Fort Barry) (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Point Bonita Quarry (Fort Barry). U. S. Government, owner, under Engineer Corps, No. 414 Custom House, San Francisco. This quarry is on the sea cliff within the Fort Barry reservation, just inside of the Golden Gate; elevation 50 to 100 feet (U.S.G.S.). The quarry was opened up in 1900 to provide rock for concrete work in the fortifications. Since the first large job it has been worked only occasionally. The plant of 80 tons daily capacity is equipped with a No. 5 Gates gyratory crusher, 60 h.p. steam boiler (coal fired), 40 h.p. upright engine for hoist, 25 h.p. Westinghouse 'Junior' engine, wire screen (for two sizes), and bucket elevator. The rock is a metamorphic sandstone with occasional fine limestone streaks. At two or three other points on the reservation there are small cuts in red Franciscan chert, utilized for road material."

  • Point Reyes Station (east of), Marin County, California - the Marin Gravel Company (From Geology and Mineral Deposits of an Area North of San Francisco Bay, California: Vacaville, Antioch, Mount Vaca, Carquinez, Mare Island, Sonoma, Santa Rosa, Petaluma, and Point Reyes Quadrangles, Bulletin 149, by Charles E. Weaver, California State Division of Mines, September 1949. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Marin Gravel Company. The Marin Gravel Company crushed rock from Franciscan chert on Lagunitas Creek 2 miles east of Point Reyes Station. The pit, which is on the south side of Black Mountain has but a single face, which is 100 feet long and 50 feet high. Blasting is required and holes are made with wagon drills. Broken rock is passed through a jaw crusher located on the hill just below the pit floor. A belt conveyor takes the product to the secondary crusher, a gyratory, and the product of this is sized by a Symons vibrating screen. Five sizes are produced and are placed in stock piles divided by vertical radial steel partitions. Underground chutes from these discharge to a common belt conveyor which leads to a smaller bin of several compartments at the road level. Here there is a washing plant and also an asphalt plant."

  • Point Reyes Station (west of), Marin County, California - Tomales Bay Limestone Deposit (circa 1949) (From Geology and Mineral Deposits of an Area North of San Francisco Bay, California: Vacaville, Antioch, Mount Vaca, Carquinez, Mare Island, Sonoma, Santa Rosa, Petaluma, and Point Reyes Quadrangles, Bulletin 149, by Charles E. Weaver, California State Division of Mines, September 1949. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Limestone, though not widely distributed in the area investigated, once helped to support two cement plants. The Standard Portland Cement Company used an argillaceous limestone interstratified with Cretaceous beds near Napa Junction; travertine supplied the Pacific Portland Cement Company's plant at Cement. The pure crystalline limestone deposit which occurs in granodiorite west of Tomales Bay has not been exploited...."

    "The Tomales Bay deposit has been described by Eckel.* Coarsely crystalline limestone of possible Paleozoic age outcrops about a half mile west of Point Reyes Station and extends north about a mile to a point west of Trout Farm. The deposit is about half a mile wide and covers an area of 300 to 400 acres. It is cut off on the east and north by granodiorite and overlapped by Miocene shale on the southwest. The rock has been quarried for lime burning at several points, but Eckel thinks this work was done before 1900...."

    (* Page 89, footnote 73: Eckel, E. C., Limestone deposits of the San Francisco region: California Div. Mines and Mining Rept. 29, p. 353, 1933.)

  • Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - the Bull Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Bull Quarry; Bull & Gossard, Parrott Building, San Francisco, owners. Situated on the bay shore, on San Pedro Point, 4 miles east of San Rafael. The quarry was opened in August, 1904. The rock is a metamorphosed, dark-gray sandstone, extensively fractured and broken. It is loaded into three-ton skips, which are placed on barges by a 50-foot derrick. At present (October, 1904) they are shipping about 450 tons per day, to Jersey Island, in the Sacramento River, where it is used as rubble in building levees. Twenty-five men were at work in the quarry."

    (Also see: Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Daniel Contracting Company below.)

  • Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Daniel Contracting Company (Bull Quarry, also McNear Company, Inc.) (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Daniel Contracting Company (Bull Quarry, also McNear). Home office, 503 Market street, San Francisco. John H. Hopps, consulting engineer. This company is operating under lease one of the quarries on land owned by the McNear Company, Inc., at Point San Pedro, 6 miles east of San Rafael. It was known as the Bull quarry at one time, and for several years was operated by Wetmore Bros. The present operators have contracts aggregating approximately 1,000,000 tons, of rubble - 600,000 tons to the 'Key Route' mole, Emeryville, and 400,000 tons to the San Francisco seawall. They have opened up a quarry face of 1200 feet in width (see photo No. 125 B), and are shipping (June, 1914) an average of 2500 tons per day.

    Photo No. 125B. Panoramic view of Daniel Contracting Company's quarry at San Pedro Point, six miles east of San Rafael, Marin County, California. Face 1200 feet wide. Panoramic view of Daniel Contracting Company's quarry at San Pedro Point

    "In advance of the quarry face the thin skin of surface dirt was hydraulicked off. Machine drills are used and occasionally a short tunnel is driven into the face about 25 feet, branching right and left at the end. The tunnel is charged with 5 to 10 tons of dynamite wired in duplicate, and exploded with a 220-volt current. The rock is mostly a hard, bluish, Franciscan metamorphic sandstone, though part it is yellowish brown where oxidized. The formation is massive and more or less fractured. Pieces up to 3 or 4 feet across are shipped - as large as can be handled conveniently by the steam shovel. There is a small amount of clay on some of the fractures, and there is clay and shale at the north end of the sandstone. The material is loaded by the steam shovels into side-tipping dump cars and run out onto the loading pier (see photos Nos. 114 and 115) in trains by small steam locomotives. There it is dumped onto a grizzly with 2 -inch openings. The coarse drops into a skip with bottom discharge in which it is transferred to the barges alongside by an overhead traveling electric crane of seven tons capacity. The fines are elevated by two belt conveyors (each driven by a 15-h.p. motor) to the waste bin from which they are hauled and dumped along the shore. The company has a service twelve 'skip' barges (see foreground of photo No. 114), and deck barges (for large single stones), two bottom dump (note barge 'B' in background of photo No. 114), and two side-dump barges. The first named hold 40 to 50 skips of four cubic yards capacity each - a barge capacity of 200 to 300 tons. The bottom dump barges carry 900 tons each, and the side dumps about 700 tons. These last two classes are used for subaqueous dumping, and the skips when the fill has reached above the level of the water or for fills ashore.

    Photo No. 114. Daniel Contracting Company's loading pier and barges at San Pedro Point, Marin County, California Daniel Contracting Company's loading pier and barges at San Pedro Point
    Photo No. 115. Daniel Contracting Company's pier and quarry at San Pedro Point, Marin County, California. Daniel Contracting Company's pier and quarry at San Pedro Point
    .

    "The equipment, which has a rated capacity to ship 4000 tons per two ten-hour shifts, besides that already noted includes: three steam shovels (with two cubic yard buckets); eight 'dinky' locomotives (six in service); air compressor, 150 h.p., electric driven. Crude oil fuel is used. Seventy-five to 90 men are employed. There is also a crushing and screening plant of 250 cubic yards per day (ten hours) capacity, which is operated only intermittently.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 318."

  • Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - the McNear Quarries

    (McNear Quarries - See: Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Daniel Contracting Company above.)

  • Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - the San Francisco Bay Improvement Company's Quarry (formerly the Jordan Quarry) (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "San Francisco Bay Improvement Company's Quarry (formerly the Jordan Quarry). This large quarry is on the bay shore at Point San Pedro, 5 miles east of San Rafael. It was opened in 1884. The rock is a grayish-blue, metamorphosed sandstone, and is used for rubble. Large quantities were used in the Santa Fe fill in China Basin. It is loaded at the quarry face into skips, which are placed on small cars and drawn out onto the wharf to be loaded on barges. The company owns five barges, each of 5000 tons capacity. The output averages 7 tons daily. Sixty-five men are employed."

    (Also see: Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Daniel Contracting Company (Bull Quarry, also McNear)

  • Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Wetmore Bros.

    (Wetmore Bros. - See: Point San Pedro, Marin County, California - Daniel Contracting Company above.)

  • Porter's Point, Marin County, California - Granite Quarrying (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "There is a specimen of granite in the museum of the State Mining Bureau from Porter's Point, and the records show a production of 7000 cubic feet valued at $5,000 reported in 1895.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 8; Bull. 38, p. 364."

  • San Anselmo (north of), Marin County, California - Dodge & Croker

    (Dodge & Crocker - See: Anselmo (north of), Marin County, California - Short Ranch Quarries below.)

  • San Anselmo (west edge of), Marin County, California - Marin Rock Company Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Marin Rock Company. B. Brizzolara, president, 119 Jackson street, San Francisco; C. A. Macomber, superintendent, San Anselmo. This quarry is on the west edge of San Anselmo, at an elevation of 100 feet (U.S.G.S.). Work began in 1909. The rock is a metamorphic sandstone, in parts serpentinized. There are also streaks of a soft black clay gouge, slickensided. The hardest and cleanest of the rock is used for rubble. A derrick raises the rock in skips to the crusher. A 30 h.p. motor runs the compressor, and a 7 h.p. the hoist. There are two other motors for the crushing and screening machinery, 10 and 5 h.p. A gasoline engine was formerly used. The coarser breaking is done with a jaw crusher, and the finer by a Gates 'D' gyratory. The revolving screens make four sizes of product. The company also has a Springfield traction road roller for street work. Twelve or fifteen men are required when in full operation (50 tons per day capacity). The waste is used for fills about town."

  • San Anselmo (north of), Marin County, California - Raymond Land Company Quarries

    (Raymond Land Company Quarries - See San Anselmo (north of), Marin County, California - Short Ranch Sandstone Quarries below.)

  • San Anselmo (north of), Marin County, California - Short Ranch Sandstone Quarries - Dodge & Crocker (Sandstone) (Excerpts from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Short Ranch Quarries. Dodge & Croker, San Anselmo, and the Raymond Lake Company, 1048 Mills Building, San Francisco, each has a small quarry on land formerly a part of the Short ranch, 1 mile north from San Anselmo. They are both operated intermittently, and the product is used for curbs and rubble walls, being sold at $2 to $5 per load (about 2 cubic yards). The rock is a blue metamorphic sandstone."

  • San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - Gray Bros.

    (Gray Bros. - See: San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - San Francisco Quarries Company below.)

  • San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - Jordan Quarry

    (Jordan Quarry - See: San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - San Francisco Quarries Company below.)

  • San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - San Francisco Bay Improvement Company Quarry

    (San Francisco Bay Improvment Company Quarry - See: San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - San Francisco Quarries Company below.)

  • San Pedro Point, Marin County, California - San Francisco Quarries Company (at one time called the Jordan Quarry, also the San Francisco Bay Improvement Company) (Sandstone) (Excerpts from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "San Francisco Quarries Company (one time called Jordan Quarry, also San Francisco Bay Improvement Company). Anson Blake, president; L. A. Wittenmyer, secretary; S. H. Whitney, superintendent. Home office, Balboa Building, San Francisco. This is one of the three McNear quarries at San Pedro Point, 6 miles east of San Rafael.

    "Beginning January, 1914, this company also has a lease on the third quarry which is between its present working face and the McNear Brick Company plant. This third quarry was at one time operated by Gray Bros. and later by the Western Development Syndicate, but has been idle for several years.

    "The San Francisco Company's main quarry was opened up originally in 1876 by Dennis Jordan, and this company has been operating it the past ten years. The quarry is credited with a total output to date of about 3,000,000 cubic yards. 'Sling' rock (large single pieces), rubble, and crushed rock are supplied. It is on the bay shore (see panoramic photo). The rock is hauled in skips on cars to the wharf and loaded onto the barges by a derrick.

    Panoramic photo. Quarry and pier of San Francisco Quarries Company at San Pedro Point, Marin County, California. Quarry and pier of San Francisco Quarries Company at San Pedro Point

    "The rock is a massive, hard, blue-gray metamorphic sandstone, and a fine face of up to 200 feet high (see photo No. 122) and about 500 feet wide is now exposed. There are occasional small lime and quartz seams. Steam operated machine drills are used. There are four derricks, with steam hoists, burning coal. The crushing plant, with a capacity of 700 tons per day, uses electric power. In addition, 300 tons of rubble per day can be handled, making a total daily capacity for the quarry of 1000 tons, with about 100 men employed. The output varies with the market demands. Crushed rock is delivered in San Francisco at $1.20 per cubic yard, or it is sold at the quarry pier at 90 cents to $1. These prices are for large tonnages.

    "The company has six barges with capacities of 400 to 600 tons each. The 600-ton barge (see photos No. 120 and No. 121) is self-discharging and carries a crew of five men. In the hold there is a dynamo run by a 50 h.p. gasoline engine. This furnishes power for the motor driving the conveyor belt under the pockets and the motor at the head of the bucket elevator. The bucket elevator can be raised and lowered and swung sideways on an arc so as to vary the point and height of discharge as required. It is stated that this barge cost $40,000 to build and equip. From 4 to 5 hours are required to load 500 cubic yards into it by derrick, but at the San Pablo quarry (Contra Costa County) of the same company, the same amount is loaded by two conveyor belts in 1 hours.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

    Photo No. 120. Barge 'San Pablo' (self-dumping) of San Francisco Quarries Company at pier, Marin County, California. Showing bin arrangement. Barge 'San Pablo' (self-dumping) of San Francisco Quarries Company at pier
    Photo No. 121. Barge 'San Pablo' of San Francisco Quarries Company, at pier. Side view. Barge 'San Pablo' of San Francisco Quarries Company, at pier
    Photo No. 122. Two hundred-foot high quarry face of San Francisco Quarries Company, Marin County, California. Two hundred-foot high quarry face of San Francisco Quarries Company
  • San Rafael, Marin County, California - the Forbes Quarry (Chert) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Forbes Quarry; E. Schwiesan, San Rafael, owner. On the hillside, in the northwest portion of San Rafael. The rock is a hard, red chert, and was used for concrete and macadam purposes. A small jaw crusher was used. The quarry has been extensively worked, but is idle at present."

    • San Rafael (north of), Marin County, California - Forbes Quarry (Sandstone & Shale) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "Forbes Quarry. Miss Kate Forbes, San Rafael, owner. This red chert quarry is in a hill at the north edge of town and has been utilized for street and concrete work. The material is much foliated and breaks up small without requiring a crushing plant. There is also some sandstone and shale interbedded. Idle in 1913.

      "Bibl.: R. XII, p. 389; XIII, p. 625; Bull. 38, p. 318."

  • San Rafael (north of), Marin County, California - the Hoffman Quarry (Shale) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Hoffman Quarry; B. H. Hoffman, owner. A small quarry 3 miles north of San Rafael, on the Petaluma road. The rock is a siliceous shale, and is used for macadam."

    • San Rafael (north of), Marin County, California - Hoffman Quarry (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "Hoffman Quarry. B. H. Hoffman, owner. This is a small quarry 3 miles north of San Rafael, on the Petaluma road, which is used occasionally for road work nearby. Idle in 1913.

      "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • San Rafael, Marin County, California - the Hotaling Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Hotaling Quarry; A. P. Hotaling, San Rafael, owner. Situated at the end of Clark street, San Rafael. The rock is a hard, compact, blue sandstone, and is used for macadam and concrete. It is not worked regularly."

    • San Rafael, Marin County, California - Hotaling Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "Hotaling Quarry, Hotaling Estate Company, owners, Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Steffini-Bartini Company at one time worked it under lease. It is at the south end of Clark street, San Rafael, and is operated intermittently on a royalty basis of $1 per load (about 2 cubic yards). The rock, which is a blue metamorphic sandstone, is used for curbings and rubble walls. The Presbyterian Church in San Rafael is built with rubble from this quarry. Production to date has been about 10,000 cubic yards. There is no plant.

      "Bibl.: R. XII, p. 389; XIII, p. 625; Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • San Rafael (northeast of), Marin County, California - the Mount Tamalpais Cemetery Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mount Tamalpais Cemetery Quarry, in the upper end of the cemetery, 1 miles northeast of San Rafael. The rock is a hard, blue-colored, metamorphosed sandstone, comparatively free from fractures. It is used, rough dressed, in building fronts and curbings in the cemetery; it is also crushed for macadam and concrete. At the present time it is only worked as the rock is needed in the cemetery."

    • San Rafael (northeast of), Marin County, California - the Mount Tamalpais Cemetery Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "The Mount Tamalapis Cemetery Quarry is in the cemetery northeast of San Rafael. The rock is a metamorphic sandstone and has been employed for curbings and other uses about the grounds. It is worked only intermittently.

      "Bibl.: R. XII, p. 389, Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • San Rafael, Marin County, California - the San Rafael Development Company Quarry (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "The San Rafael Development Quarry Company has a quarry of red rock at the end of Mission street (Pine Hill), San Rafael, but it has not been operated recently."

    • San Rafael, Marin County, California - the San Rafael Rock Quarry (Book)

      San Rafael Rock Quarry Initial Study and EIR, by Marin County (California) Community Development Agency, Environmental Science Associates.

  • San Rafael, Marin County, California - the Steffini-Bartini Company's Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Steffini-Bartini Company's Quarry, in the southwest portion of San Rafael, on Greenwood street, just above the brewery. It is a small quarry of hard, blue, metamorphosed sandstone, containing considerable lime in fractures. The rock is used, rough dressed, for foundation walls in San Rafael, and also crushed for macadam and concrete."

    Also see: San Rafael, Marin County, California - the Hotaling Quarry (Sandstone) above.

  • Sausalito, Marin County, California - Fort Baker Quarries (Sandstone & Chert) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Fort Baker Quarry. U. S. Government, owner. Palmer, McBride & Quayle of San Francisco have a contract to deliver to the Exposition grounds in San Francisco 75,000 cubic yards or more (but not to exceed 120,000 cubic yards) for road building. They are equipped to handle 1500 tons per day at the quarry, but the unloading facilities at the Exposition can as yet take care of only 500 tons. A steam shovel, oil burning, is used and two small locomotives with dump car trains. The barges carry 250 to 300 cubic yards and a locomotive crane with clam shell bucket unloads them. Twenty-three men were employed (November, 1913).

    "The rock is taken from the hill back of the guardhouse and the barracks. It is a much altered and fractured Franciscan metamorphic sandstone, dark greenish and brown in color and fine grained. Back of the hospital there is a small quarry in red chert, which is used occasionally for road repairs around the reservation."

  • Schuetzen Park Station (near), Marin County, California - J. Martin Miller - Stone Deposit (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "J. Martin Miller has 5 acres near Schuetzen Park Station, containing rock suitable for road work. Only small amounts have been used so far as there is no regular quarry opened up."

  • Tiburon, Marin County, California - the Tiburon Point Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Tiburon Point Quarry. The California Northwestern Railway Company operates a quarry in rear of the ferry slip at Tiburon, as it needs the rock for ballast.

  • Tiburon Point, Marin County, California - the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company Quarries (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company. General offices, Phelan Building, San Francisco. In extending and regrading its ferry and train terminal at Sausalito this company is completing (May, 1914) a fill of 50,000 cubic yards. The company also has quarries at Black Point, Tiburon Point, and at Waldo, used intermittently for ballast and fills. The material from these cuts is decomposed and much fragmented.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

  • Tomales Bay, Marin County, California - Olema Limestone Deposit (Limestone Deposit & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (The following notes and analyses are from "Limestone Deposits of the San Francisco Region," California Div. Mines Rept. 29, by Edwin C. Eckel, 1933, pp. 348-361.)

    "Tomales Bay deposit lies about half a mile west of Tomales Bay. The outcrop is about 1 mile long north to south by half a mile wide near the head of the bay, according to Eckel. It is Gavilan limestone, cut off by the Montara granite on the north and east and covered on the southwest by Miocene shale. The area of exposed limestone is 300 to 400 acres, on Rancho Punto de los Reyes. The limestone was quarried at several places to make lime, probably 40 to 50 years ago. The beds show a steep dip and have a vertical range of 300 feet or more. The deposit is about 4 miles inland from Drake's Bay and about 15 miles by road from Fairfax on the Northwestern Pacific Railroad...."

  • Waldo, Marin County, California - the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company Quarries (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in November, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Northwestern Pacific Railroad Company. General offices, Phelan Building, San Francisco. In extending and regrading its ferry and train terminal at Sausalito this company is completing (May, 1914) a fill of 50,000 cubic yards. The company also has quarries at Black Point, Tiburon Point, and at Waldo, used intermittently for ballast and fills. The material from these cuts is decomposed and much fragmented.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 319."

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