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Structures and Monuments in Which
Vermont Stone was Used

Finished Products from Vermont Stone

  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Virginia
    • Arlington, Virginia – the Arlington Memorial at the Arlington National Cemetery in The Marble Industry of Vermont, Free Press Printing Co., Burlington, Vermont, No date of publication – early 1920s

      “The Arlington Memorial, designed by Carrere & Hastings as a tribute to the nation’s soldiers and sailors, and built by the United States Government across the Potomac from Washington.  It is 260 feet long and 236 feet wide, covering 60,000 square feet of space.  It has seats inside the colonnade for 5,000 persons.  It was constructed entirely of white Vermont marble – a contract which called for the quarrying and finishing of about 450 carloads of stock and an expenditure of nearly $750,000.”

      “The Arlington Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.”

      “The Arlington Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.”

      • Arlington, Virginia – the Arlington Memorial, National Cemetery, Arlington, Va. (from Little Pictures of a Big Industry: The Story of Vermont Marble, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, early 1900s.)

        According to this booklet, the Arlington Memorial in the National Cemetery is the world's largest cemetery monument. The marble for the memorial was quarried by the Vermont Marble Company. The architects of the memorial were Carrere & Hastings.

    • Kenmore, near Fredericksburg, Virginia – the Mary Washington Monument  (from “The Mary Washington Monument,” from The Monumental News, December 1893, pp. 532.  

      The Mary Washington Monument located at Kenmore near Fredericksburg, Virginia (1893)

      The Mary Washington Monument located at Kenmore near Fredericksburg, Virginia (1893)

    • According to the above article, the Mary Washington Monument was made from light Barre granite quarried at Barre, Vermont.
    • Winchester, Virginia – the Rouse Mausoleum (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Jones Light Quarry in Barre, Washington County, Vermont was used in the construction of the Rouse Mausoleum in Winchester, Virginia.
  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Washington State
    • Seattle, Washington – the Wilson Portrait Statue (from The Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, 1912)
      “Light Rutland Italian” marble from the Vermont Marble Company’s West Rutland Quarries Marble Quarry located on the east side of West Rutland, Vermont was used in the construction of the Wilson portrait statue at Seattle.
    • Spokane, Washington – the Old National Bank (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Fletcher Quarry located at Woodbury, Washington County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the old National Bank in Spokane, Washington.
  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Washington, D. C.
    • Washington, D. C. – the Admiral Schley Monument (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried at the Wetmore & Morse Quarry in Barre, Washington County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Admiral Schley Monument in Washington, D.C.
    • Washington, D.C. – the Arlington Memorial Bridge (photograph) The facing of spans are of granite from Georgia, Vermont, North Carolina, New Hampshire, and Maine.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Champlain Apartment Building (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)
      Marble from the Hollister Marble Quarry located in Pittsford, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Champlain Apartment Building. (The exact location of the building is not indicated.)
    • Washington, D. C. – the Continental Hall (the exterior) (from "Vermont Marble - Part I. Quarries of the Norcross-West Marble Co., Dorset Vermont," written by Ernest H. West, from Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, March, 1909, pages 271-275.)
      Dorset marble was used in the exterior of the Continental Hall about 1909. The quarry was owned and operated by Norcross-West Marble Co.
    • Washington, D. C. – the D.A.R. Building (from "Vermont Marble - Part I. Quarries of the Norcross-West Marble Co., Dorset Vermont," written by Ernest H. West, from Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, March, 1909, pages 271-275.)
      Dorset marble was used in the completion of the D.A.R. building about 1909. The quarry was owned and operated by Norcross-West Marble Co.
    • Washington, D.C. – the Department of Agriculture, North Building (photograph)
      The Department of Agriculture, North Buildings wings were built of Vermont marble.
    • Washington D.C. – the District of Columbia World War Memorial (photograph)
      The District of Columbia World War Memorial was built with Vermont marble.
    • Washington, D.C. – the General Sherman Monument (the base) (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Fletcher Quarry located in Woodbury, Washington County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the General Sherman Monument.
    • Washington, D.C. – the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. The photograph below is from: Marble Color Plates: Imported and Domestic Catalog (PDF, 6 MB), Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, no date of publication, early- to mid-1900s.
      “The Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C. Imperial Danby Marble. Eggers & Higgins, Architects.” “The Thomas Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C. Imperial Danby Marble. Eggers & Higgins, Architects.”
      • Washington, D.C. – the Jefferson Memorial (photograph) Exterior columns and walls built with white marble from Vermont.

        The exterior columns and walls of the Jefferson Memorial are constructed of white marble from Vermont.

    • Washington, D.C. – the Municipal Building (The following information is from a colorized postcard photograph, circa early 1900s-mid-1900s.)
      The back of the postcard states: "Municipal Building. Washington, D.C. This magnificent structure, erected at a cost of $2,000,000, houses all the departments of the municipal government, except the courts. It is of Vermont white marble."
    • Washington, D.C. – the Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institutio (photograph)
      The exterior of the two main floors of the Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute, was built of white Vermont granite.
    • Washington, D.C. – the National Gallery of Art West Building (photograph).
      The exterior of the building was built using light-pink marble from Tennessee. The floors were verde antique marble from Vermont. The columns in the rotunda were built using brecciated marble from Carrara, Italy. The restrooms were built with marble from Missouri. The fountains at each end were built with travertine marble from Jasper County, Missouri. The walls of the galleries were built with fossil-bearing limestone from Alabama.
    • Washington D.C. – the National Museum - 1st & 2nd Stories (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Woodbury and Ellis quarries in Dummerston, Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the new first and second stories of the National Museum in Washington, D.C. built circa 1923.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Plaza Hotel (Excerpts from article contributed by the Pam Gilbert of the Dorset Historical Society, May 2007, sponsors of the “It’s All About Marble,” Dorset’s Marble Heritage event which was held on Sunday, July 27th, 2008, from at the Dorset Historical Society, Bley House Museum, on VT-30, Dorset. For more information about this special Dorset Historical Society event, or for general DHS information, please contact the Dorset Historical Society at (802) 867-0331.)
      “Dorset, Vermont - Dorset Historical Society’s former board members Art Gilbert and Terry Tyler are all smiles now that the marble mile-marker monuments and sculpting blocks have been delivered to the Dorset Historical Society Bley House Museum, located on Vermont Route 30 in Dorset . A slab and a block of Plateau marble weighing a total of 13 tons were donated by Kirsten and Dick McDonough, owners of the Norcross-West quarries of South Dorset....”
      “The Plateau Marble was chosen for some of the most prestigious buildings beginning with 4 monoliths for columns of the Montreal Fine Arts Museum, cornerstone for the New York Public Library, cornices and columns for the Harvard Medical School, the building of the Plaza Hotel and  DAR in Washington, D.C., to name a few....”
    • Washington D.C. – the Post Office (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Woodbury and Ellis quarries in Dummerston, Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Post Office in Washington, D.C.
    • Washington, D.C. – the Rayburn Building (photograph). The exterior walls of the building were built using White Cherokee marble from Georgia and Vermont marble. The perimeter base of the building was built with pink granite from New Hampshire. The east and west courts and the paving borders were built with pink granite. The inner court and the base were built of pink granite from Salisbury, North Carolina and limestone from Indiana.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Senate Office Building (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)
      Marble from the Vermont Marble Company’s West Rutland Quarries Marble Quarry located on the east side of West Rutland, Vermont, and some from Danby, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Senate office building.
    • Washington, D. C. - the United States Senate Office Building (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)
      Cream and white marble from the Eastman Marble Prospect located on the west side of West Rutland, Vermont, was used for the mantels in the United States Senate office building.
    • Washington, D.C. – the Supreme Court Building (photograph and history)
      "Vermont marble was used for the exterior, while the four inner courtyards are of crystalline flaked, white Georgia marble. Above the basement level, the walls and floors of all corridors and entrance halls are either wholly or partially of creamy Alabama marble."
    • Washington, D.C. – the U.S. Capitol (photograph).
      The center of the Capitol was built with Aquia Creek sandstone from Virginia. The Senate and House wings were built with dolomitic marble from Lee, Massachusetts. The Rotunda floor was built with sandstone from Seneca, Maryland. The columns of the wings were built with white marble from Cockeysville, Maryland. The center steps were built with granite from Renville, Minnesota. The west elevation steps were built from granite from Mount Airy, North Carolina. The west elevation balustrade was built with marble from Vermont. The interior balustrades and columns of stairs leading to the House and Senate galleries and wall of Marble room were built with marble from Tennessee. The east front exterior was built with White Cherokee marble from Georgia covering the original Aquia Creek sandstone. The 24 exterior columns were built with marble from Georgia. The interior columns, the Statuary Hall, the Old Senate Chamber and foyer were all built with marble from the Potomac in Maryland. The columns in the Crypt and those with the corn and tobacco leaves were built with sandstone from Aquia Creek in Virginia. The columns on the ground floor in the east addition were built with brecciated marble from Colorado.
    • Washington D.C. – Union Station (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Woodbury and Ellis quarries in Dummerston, Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Union Station in Washington, D.C.
      • Washington, D.C. - Union Station - the Counter and Base (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.) 
        Marble from the Barney Marble Company Serpentine Quarry located south of Roxbury Station, Vermont, was used for the counter and base at Union Station.
      • Washington, D.C. – Union Station (photograph)
        Union Station was built with Vermont granite.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Vermont Memorial Stone contributed to the Washington Monument (photograph and history), presented by the National Park Service. The information below is from the National Park Service files and is presented with a photograph of the contributed Vermont stone.

      The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones in placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Vermont Memorial Stone entry can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

      The Vermont Memorial Stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 3.

      The Washington Monument web site has recently been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument.

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

      The following information relating to the Vermont Memorial Stone can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 3.

      Name: Vermont

      Level: 170-ft.

      Donor: State of Vermont

      Dates: 1850s/1885

      Original material: marble

      Dimensions: 4' 2" x 3' 8"

      Sculptor/Carver: not known

      Original inscription: Vermont [abbr.]

      Documented material history:

      • 1850s: “Vermont has sent a block of pure white native marble...” [RW]

      • 1880: “In Lapidarium” [CG]

      Images:

      • 1880 Gedney drawing

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

      • 2000 NPS slides

  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Wisconsin
    • Madison, Wisconsin – the Wisconsin State Capitol.
      The State Capitol was constructed of "Hardwick White" White Granite, from "A Forceful Vermont Industry," from The Vermonter, The State Magazine, Published monthly by Chas. R. Cummings, White River Junction, Vermont, January 1911.
      • The Wisconsin State Capitol (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.) (You can view photographs of the Wisconsin State Capitol by clicking here to visit the State Capitol Tour.)
        Granite quarried at the Woodbury and Ellis quarries at Dummerston, Bethel, Windsor County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Wisconsin State Capitol.
      • The Wisconsin State Capitol (from "A Forceful Vermont Industry," from The Vermonter, The State Magazine, Published monthly by Chas. R. Cummings, White River Junction, Vermont, January 1911)
        The State Capitol was constructed of "Hardwick White" White Granite.
      • The Wisconsin State Capitol (history and photograph) (from “Tools and Machinery of the Granite Industry,” by Paul Wood, Part I., Vol. 59, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 41, in The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association.)
        According to Paul Wood’s article, white granite from the Bethel, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Wisconsin State Capitol.
    • Winchester, Virginia – the Rouse Mausoleum (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Jones Light Quarry located at Barre, Washington County, Vermont, was used in the construction of the Rouse Mausoleum in Winchester, Virginia.
  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Unnamed/Unknown Locations in the United States

    PLEASE NOTE: If you know where any of the memorials listed below are located, I’d appreciate if you could contact me so I can place them in the correct locations. Peggy B. Perazzo

    • Unknown location – the August Belmont, Jr., Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 23.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The ‘Belmont’ cross is a fine example of carving in white Rutland marble, and was erected by W. A. Cottrell, of Newport, R.I., for a memorial to August Belmont, Jr., of the famous New York Belmont family.  This is a ledger cross, but our illustration was made in te shop with the cross in an upright position to get a better reproduction of the wealth of detail in the spray of carved roses.  The dimensions are 3-0x5-7x1-0.”

      The August Belmont, Jr., Memorial. “Belmont Ledger Cross. Newport, R.I. W. Q. Cottrell, Contr.” (pp. 24) August Belmont, Jr., Memorial, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Ibach Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 22.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “…the Ibach memorial is reminiscent of the well known Major Orlando J. Smith monument, save that the classic suite of moldings in the panels of the former have been replaced with a very effective Gothic motif.  Essentially simple if not severe in design, the Ibach memorial is saved from austerity by the cusps introduced in the paneling and the subtle entasis which marks the vertical lines of the composition.

      “The name is properly decorative and in harmony with the design, the while very legible and suggesting the interesting work possible with the sand blast in skilled hands.  Barre granite was the medium for this interesting monolith and it was erected by the Presbrey-Leland Company and executed in their shops at Barre.  The dimensions are:  7-6x3-6x4-2.”

      The Ibach Memorial “Sarcophagus Tablet with Gothic Decoration.  Presbrey-Leland Co., Contrs.” (pp. 28) Ibach Memorial, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Julius Harry Estey Memorial Tablet  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 25.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The little ‘Julius Harry Estey’ tablet is also the work of the Grant Granite Co., and is executed in West Dummerston white granite.  It is a careful modern reproduction of an old Colonial headstone, a type that offers a wealth of suggestion for small one-piece stones.”

      The Julius Harry Estey Memorial tablet. “Modern Colonial Headstone.  Grant Granite Co., Contrs.” (pp. 28) Julius Harry Estey Memorial tablet, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Gerber Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 26.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The ‘McCoy’, the ‘Gerber’ and the ‘Peck-Taylor’ are other typical examples of (the tall, heavy monumental tablet form).  The Gerber was erected by James Horne, of Luverne, Minn., and is of Barre granite, cut by Young Brothers Co. of Barre….”

      The McCoy Monument. “Jas. Horne, Contr.” (pp. 31) McCoy Monument, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Loughridge Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 22.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “A tablet form of much originality and distinctness of style is the ‘Loughridge,’ embodying a charming and unusual treatment of the classic decoration on the cap, and lines of rarely graceful contour.  This is the work of the Denver Marble and Granite Co., of Denver, Col., and was designed for them by S. R. Pool.  Following are the dimensions:  Base, 6-2x3-0x0-10; die, 5-0x1-10x5-6.  It was executed in light Barre granite by Novelli & Calcagni, of Barre, Vt.”

      The Loughridge Memorial. “Denver Marble & Granite Co., Contrs.” (pp. 30) Loughridge Memorial, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the McCoy Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 26.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The ‘McCoy’, the ‘Gerber’ and the ‘Peck-Taylor’ are other typical examples of (the tall, heavy monumental tablet form).  The McCoy was erected by E. L. Hockensmith, of Wadsworth, Ohio…It is of light Barre granite and was furnished by W. A. Hambleton, Mansfield, Ohio.”

      The McCoy Memorial. “Jos. Carabelli Monumental Works, Contrs.” (pp. 27) The McCoy Memorial, ca 1921
    • Unknown Location – the Matilda R. Perry Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 23.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The ‘Perry’ memorial is an architectural type in which the die is set in a well designed composition of columns supporting a classic entablature.  This work was designed by Lawrence V. Boyd, the Philadelphia architect, and sold and erected by the Edw. A. Carroll Co., of that city.  It was executed in white Rutland marble by the Vermont Marble Company, and is of the following dimensions:  Plinth, 3-1 ¾ x1-5 ½ x0-7 ½; cap, 2-7x0-11x0-6 ¼ ; die, 1-8x0-8 1/8 ; base, 3-0x1-1 5/8x0-10.

      The Perry Memorial. “Imposing Form of the Classic Canopy.  McDonnell & Sons, Contrs.” (pp. 23) Perry Memorial, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Sheets Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 26.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The tall heavy monument tablet form with decorated cap and bases has long been a standard type for the more massive cemetery memorials, and when executed with the proper size and scale, has much of dignity to commend it.  The ‘Sheets’ memorial illustrated, shows successful treatment with its graceful lines and correctly decorated cap.  This was erected by the Joseph Carabelli Monument Works, of Cleveland, Ohio, and is one of the following dimensions:  Base, 9-0x5-6x1-5; second base, 7-0-3-8 ½ x1-5; die, 5-10x2-6x7-9.  This work was cut in Barre granite by Novelli & Calcagni.”

      The Sheets Memorial. “E. L. Hockensmith, Contr.” (pp. 27) Sheets Memorial, ca. 1921
    • Unknown location – the Seiberling Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 230.)  (If you know the location of this monument, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

      “The tall graceful tablet of pyramidal form, known as the ‘Palms’ design, executed for Monumental News some years ago by John F. Stanley, has been the forerunner of a large number of fine forms along the same general lines of the truncated pyramid, and has been one of the most successful modern types for simple memorials that we have.  In the’Sieberling’ (sic), illustrated, the general form of this fine tablet has been carried out in good lines, and a heavy spray of beautifully carved wild roses draped over the top to make a rich and effective decoration.  Charles G. Blake & Co., of Chicago, were the contractors for this memorial, which was executed in their shops in Dummerston white granite.”

      The Seiberling Memorial. “Chas. G. Blake & Co., Contrs.” (pp. 30) Seiberling Memorial, ca. 1921
  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Canada
    • Montreal, Canada – the Bank of Montreal - 34 Large Columns (from The Commercial Granites of New England, Bulletin 738, 1923.)
      Granite quarried from the Norcross Quarry located at Windsor, Vermont, was used for the 34 large columns at the Bank of Montreal.
    • Montreal, Canada - the Fine Arts Museum - the 4 Columns (Article contributed by the Pam Gilbert of the Dorset Historical Society, May 2007, sponsors of the “It’s All About Marble,” Dorset’s Marble Heritage event held on Sunday, July 27th, 2008, at the Dorset Historical Society, Bley House Museum, on VT-30, Dorset. For more information about this special Dorset Historical Society event, or for general DHS information, please contact the Dorset Historical Society at (802) 867-0331.)
      “Dorset, Vermont - Dorset Historical Society’s former board members Art Gilbert and Terry Tyler are all smiles now that the marble mile-marker monuments and sculpting blocks have been delivered to the Dorset Historical Society Bley House Museum, located on Vermont Route 30 in Dorset . A slab and a block of Plateau marble weighing a total of 13 tons were donated by Kirsten and Dick McDonough, owners of the Norcross-West quarries of South Dorset....” “The Plateau Marble was chosen for some of the most prestigious buildings beginning with 4 monoliths for columns of the Montreal Fine Arts Museum, cornerstone for the New York Public Library, cornices and columns for the Harvard Medical School, the building of the Plaza Hotel and  DAR in Washington, D.C., to name a few....”
    • Toronto, Canada – the Royal Bank of Canada (from "Vermont Marble - Part I. Quarries of the Norcross-West Marble Co., Dorset Vermont," written by Ernest H. West, from Mine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, March, 1909, pages 271-275.)
      Dorset marble was used in the completion of the bank building. The quarry was owned and operated by Norcross-West Marble Co.
    • Toronto, Ontario, Canada – St. James’ Cemetery – the Cowan Memorial  (Wells-Lamson Quarry Company, Barre, Vermont, advertisement from Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 7, July 1921, pp. 11)

      Wells-Lamson Quarry Company, Barre, Vermont
      It has the Stamp of Character

      Wells-Lamson stock has that firm texture that takes a rich finish and stamps it with character – the kind of character you want your monuments to have.  It is the choice of the critical dealer – a standard bearer in monumental granite.

      In cemeteries all over the country Wells-Lamson granite is adding its picturesque beauty to stately avenues or endeavoring to hide its charm in some quiet corner. 

      The Cowan memorial was designed and executed by McIntosh Granite Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ontario.  It is erected in St. James’ Cemetery, Toronto.  The soft, dull, velvety effect so desirable in hammered work is here seen at its beast and demonstrates fully the reason for the choice of Wells-Lamson stock for hammered memorials.

  • The Cowan memorial in St. James’ Cemetery, Toronto, Canada (Wells-Lamson Quarry Company, Barre, Vermont, advertisement from Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 7, July 1921, pp. 11) The Cowan memorial in St. James’ Cemetery, Toronto, Canada (Wells-Lamson Quarry Company, Barre, Vermont, advertisement from Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 7, July 1921, pp. 11)
  • Finished Products from Vermont Stone in Venezuela

    • Caracas, Venezuela – the Jorge Uslar Hijo Cross  (The Marble Industry of Vermont, Free Press Printing Co., Burlington, Vermont, No date of publication – early 1920s)
      Manufactured out of Vermont Marble for the Davis Granite Co. of New York, and erected in Caracas, Venezuela” “Manufactured out of Vermont Marble for the Davis Granite Co. of New York, and erected in Caracas, Venezuela”  in "The Marble Industry of Vermont"

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