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Proctor Vermont – Vermont Marble Co.
(Later a part of the Producers’ Marble Co.)

Continued on Page 1 2 3 4

Title page of the Producers' Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, '87, and '89 (Vermont) Cemetery stone in the Producers' Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, '87, and '89 (Vermont) Cemetery stone in the Producers' Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, '87, and '89 (Vermont)

Title page of the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

One of the cemetery stones in the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

One of the cemetery stones in the Producers’ Marble Co. Catalogs of 1886, ’87, and ’89 (Vermont)

Front cover of "Symbols of Service," one of the monumental catalogs by the Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont Sample page of a monument to a soldier in Symbols of Service Sample page of a monument to a soldier in "Symbols of Service (Vermont Marble Co., 1919)

Front cover of Symbols of Service, one of the monumental catalogs by the Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont

Sample page of a monument to a soldier in Symbols of Service

Sample page of a monument to a soldier in Symbols of Service

Photograph of the carved side of this 1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait, and officer in the American Revolutionary War ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919) Front side of the 1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait, and officer in the American Revolutionary War ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919) Sample page of a monument to a soldier in "Symbols of Service" (Vermont Marble Co., 1919)

Photograph of one side of this 1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait, and officer in the American Revolutionary War

“This slab was raised on a Vermont farm soon after the Declaration of Independence was signed.” (Carved side of this 1776 cemetery stone belonging to Lt. Col. Joseph Wait show to the left.)

Sample page of a monument to a soldier in Symbols of Service

“Grouped on this page are some of the more important emblems of the American Army.” ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919) “This page is given up to the specialty marks of the Navy, with one space set apart for the sign of the Marine Corps.” ("Symbols of Service," Vermont Marble Co., 1919)

“Grouped on this page are some of the more important emblems of the American Army.”

“This page is given up to the specialty marks of the Navy, with one space set apart for the sign of the Marine Corps.”

Front cover of "The Book of Vermont Marble," 1929 “The William H. Porter Mausoleum, Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, as it looked in the early stages of construction. Trowbridge & Livingston, Architects.” “This recent photo (circa 1929) of the old Custom House, Erie, Pa., shows the excellent condition of the marble after nearly a hundred years of exposure. Edward Summers, Architect.”

Front cover of The Book of Vermont Marble

“The William H. Porter Mausoleum, Woodlawn Cemetery, New York, as it looked in the early stages of construction. Trowbridge & Livingston, Architects.”
(circa 1929)

“This recent photo (circa 1929) of the old Custom House, Erie, Pa., shows the excellent condition of the marble after nearly a hundred years of exposure. Edward Summers, Architect.”

“Marble Colorplates: Imported & Domestic” catalog (front cover) List of Marble Plates in “Marble Colorplates: Imported & Domestic” “One of the home plants housing the Marble Exhibit, Monument & Exterior Building Shops, Proctor, Vt.”

“Marble Colorplates: Imported & Domestic” catalog (front cover)

List of Marble Plates in “Marble Colorplates: Imported & Domestic”

“One of the home plants housing the Marble Exhibit, Monument & Exterior Building Shops, Proctor, Vt.”

  • Proctor, Vermont – Vermont Marble Company – Marble Statuary (pdf), Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont, no date of publication, 7 pp.  (Includes many photographs of the statuary sold by the Vermont Marble Company in addition to a list of their offices and branch finishing plants. A few of the photographs are below.)
Front cover of "Marble Statuary" Vermont Marble co. brochure Samples of religious statuary in "Marble Statuary" Vermont Marble co. brochure “Marble for the Church” & the Vermont Marble Company office and plant locations (pg. of brochure)

Front cover

Religious statues available from the Vermont Marble Co. Marble Statuary brochure

“Marble for the Church” & the Vermont Marble Company office and plant locations

Vermont Marble Quarry View. (West Rutland), 1940 Vermont Marble Company’s Stone Yard, 1940 Facts about Marble: Glacier Marks on Vermont Marble Deposit, 1940

Vermont Marble Quarry View.  (West Rutland)

Vermont Marble Company’s Stone Yard

Facts about Marble: Glacier Marks on Vermont Marble Deposit

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, National Cemetery, Arlington, Va., 1940 Pillars Memorial, Garden of Memory, Fostoria, Ohio, 1940 Old Vermont Marble Headstones, 1940

Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

Pillars Memorial, Garden of Memory, Fostoria, Ohio

Old Vermont Marble Headstones

  • Proctor, Vermont – Vermont Marble Company History & Sketches – Marble in New England, Newcomen Address by Redfield Proctor, President Vermont Marble Company, The Newcomen Society of England – American Branch, Printed in U.S. A. The Barta Press  (no date of publication – probably mid-1900s)
Front cover of Marble in New England, by Redfield Proctor (probably 1950s) Sketch of marble quarry in Marble in New England Sketch of marble yard and shed in in Marble in New England

Front cover of Marble in New England, by Redfield Proctor (probably 1950s)

Sketch of marble quarry in Marble in New England

Sketch of marble yard and shed in in Marble in New England

Sketch of interior of marble quarry in in Marble in New England Sketch of marble quarry and yard in in Marble in New England Sketch of marble yard and derrick in in Marble in New England

Sketch of interior of marble quarry in in Marble in New England

Sketch of marble quarry and yard in in Marble in New England

Sketch of marble yard and derrick in in Marble in New England

Sketch of marble yard and derrick in in Marble in New England Sketch of cutting shed in in Marble in New England Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. Mill, Center Rutland, Vermont, in Marble in New England

Sketch of Baxter Manufacturing Co. marble yard and derrick in in Marble in New England

Sketch of cutting shed in in Marble in New England

Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. Mill, Center Rutland, Vermont, in Marble in New England

Sketch of marble yard and shed in in Marble in New England sketch of marble yard, derricks, and shed in Marble in New England Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. Boston Yard, Rutland & Continental Marble (building marble, wall capping, tiles &c.) in Marble in New England

Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. Continental Mills - Turned Work & Tiles (marble yard and shed) in Marble in New England

Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. marble yard, derricks, shed, and office in Marble in New England

Sketch of Rutland Marble Co. Boston Yard, Rutland & Continental Marble (building marble, wall capping, tiles &c.) in Marble in New England

  • Proctor, Vermont – Marble Sample Box by the Vermont Marble CompanyThe below images of the marble samples, box, and accompanying literature are also available for viewing in PDF.

    Below are images of the top of a box of marble samples and images of the sample stones. The box was produced by the Vermont Marble Company of Proctor, Vermont. These stone samples were used in monument shops and by traveling agents to enable their customers to choose the type of marble they wished to use for their cemetery stones. The Vermont Marble Company was one of the largest suppliers of cemetery stones across the United States.

Lid of box of “Samples of Vermont Marble,” Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont Marble samples inside of box of “Samples of Vermont Marble,” Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, business card from box of “Samples of Vermont Marble”

Lid of box of “Samples of Vermont Marble,” Vermont Marble Company

Marble samples inside of box of “Samples of Vermont Marble,” Vermont Marble Company

Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont, business card from box of “Samples of Vermont Marble”

  • Key to samples in box of “Samples of Vermont Marble,” Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, VT Key to Samples: (1) Verde Antique quarried at Roxbury, Vermont. Commercially this is known as a marble, but technically it is a serpentine – a hydrous magnesium silicate rock. The serpentine forms by action of volcanic waters upon an older igneous intrusive and it is called a metamorphic rock. Used widely for both exterior and interior work. (2) Champlain Red quarried at Swanton, Vermont. This is a dolomitic limestone formed by sedimentation of calcareous sea life. Its broken shells of calcium carbonate have been replaced by dolomite and their form destroyed completely. The red color is due to the presence of iron compounds. (3) Radio Black is quarried at Isle La Motte, Vermont, in Lake Champlain. This is a dolomitic limestone formed by sedimentation of calcareous sea life. Fossils of shells are not uncommon. The black color is bitumen. A notable installation is in the NBC Building in Radio City. (4) Neshobe Gray quarried at West Rutland, Vermont. This very pure calcium carbonate rock owes its color to finely divided graphite. The shell fragments of the original limestone have been recrystallized into sparkling calcite grains. (5) Pittsford Valley quarried at Florence, Vermont. Like all the calcite marbles, it is very pure and was a limestone of sedimentary origin. The limestone was recrystallized to the marble which is a highly metamorphic rock. It is used extensively for memorials as well as for building interiors and exteriors. (6) Danby Imperial. One of several varieties quarried at Danby, Vermont. It is more highly recrystallized than either of the above varieties. This pure calcium carbonate marble has been used in many well known building exteriors – among them are the Supreme Court Building, the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C. (7) Light Cloud. (8) Brocadillo: Two samples of different varieties of white marble, sometimes with green marking from the largest marble quarry in the world at West Rutland, Vermont. It is over 99% pure calcite and the green markings are due to traces of silicates in various forms. Many famous building interiors are finished in this marble. See the World’s Largest Marble Exhibit, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vt.


    Map of Vermont Marble Company Plants, quarries, mills & shops, & lumbering
    from inside of the box of marble samples

    Map of Vermont Marble Company Plants, quarries, mills & shops, & lumbering from inside of the box of marble samples“Marked in red on this map are the important Vermont plants of the Vermont Marble Company.There are quarries in Isle La Motte, Swanton, Roxbury, Florence, West Rutland and Danby – mills or shops in Proctor, Center Rutland and West Rutland – power stations in Weybridge, Beldens, Proctor and Center Rutland – lumbering operations in Grafton and Windham.

    “Outside the state, the Company has quarrying interest in Colorado, Missouri, Montana and Alaska. It has branches in nine American cities, one third of which are equipped with finishing plants.

    “The chief interest, however, centers in Proctor, because there, in addition to the long line of wonder-working shops, the visitor has free access to the largest Marble Exhibit in the world.”

  • Proctor, Vermont – Vermont Marble Company Booklet: Lettering in Marble: A few plates and a few words of explanation - all bearing on the subject of lettering as it applies to the memorial trade, issued by the Vermont Marble Company, Procter, Vermont. (booklet in PDF format)
  • Proctor, Vermont - Marble Exhibit (circa 1967) (From Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 72.)

    “Vermont is known in minerals centers for high quality ornamental stone.”

    “Vt. 3 north of U.S. 4. - At Proctor, near Rutland, a marble exhibit is open to the public during the summer months. The various applications of marble are on display. Marble is quarried underground in Vermont.”

    • Proctor, Vermont - the Vermont Marble Museum - the World’s Largest Marble Exhibit (present-day marble exhibit)

      (From the web site) “Marble is an important Vermont natural resource - it has touched nearly everyone! We hope you enjoy our introduction to the exhibit. It’s your connection to the history, science and art of Vermont Marble! We have been presenting the past present and future of marble, as used in art, as building material and amazing world of everyday uses for more that 20 years!”

    • Proctor, Vermont – Vermont Marble Co. Marble Exhibit – Postcard Folder (pdf) (no date of publication) (Some of the postcard photographs from the postcard folder are presented below. Use the pdf link in the preceding sentence to view the rest of the postcard photographs in the folder.)
Outside cover of the Vermont Marble Co. Marble Exhibit postcard folder "Panorama view - Proctor Shops - Vermont Marble Company" '"Main Office - Vermont Marble Company - Proctor, Vermont"

Outside cover of the Vermont Marble Co. Marble Exhibit postcard folder

“Panorama view - Proctor Shops - Vermont Marble Company”

“Main Office - Vermont Marble Company - Proctor, Vermont”

  • “…The Vermont Marble Company has quarries in Vermont, Colorado and Alaska, besides importing from Europe.  As the photographs reveal, marble is taken from the quarries – deeply hewn into the earth’s surface – in large blocks, then cut, shaped and polished for its various uses.  Color and texture vary according to the geological history of the deposit from which it is taken.”

“Sutherland Falls – Proctor, Vermont”  (postcard photo) “Quarry scenes – Vermont Marble Company – West Rutland, Vermont”  (postcard photo) “Channeling machine drilling out quarry block”  (postcard photo)

Sutherland Falls – Proctor, Vermont”

Quarry scenes – Vermont Marble Company – West Rutland, Vermont”

Channeling machine drilling out quarry block

“Sawing marble with diamond saw”  (postcard photo) “Planing flutes in large column”  (postcard photo) “Rubbing marble to size – Proctor, Vermont”  (postcard photo)

Sawing marble with
diamond saw

Planing flutes in large column

Rubbing marble to size – Proctor, Vermont”

“Turning marble urn on lathe”  (postcard photo) “Hand carving flowers on marble memorial”  (postcard photo) “Lettering marble war memorial by hand”  (postcard photo)

Turning marble urn on lathe

Hand carving flowers on marble memorial

Lettering marble war memorial by hand

“Last Supper Carving in Marble Exhibit – Proctor, Vermont”  (postcard photo) “A carving on display at the Marble Exhibit, Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont, U.S.A.” (postcard photo)

Last Supper Carving in Marble Exhibit – Proctor, Vermont”

A carving on display at the Marble Exhibit, Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vermont, U.S.A.”

  • The Carrara of America,” by Day Allen Willey, in Scientific American, Vol. XCI, No. 10, November 5, 1904, pp. 309, 317-318.
    “A Vermont Marble Quarry 200 feet Deep.” (circa 1904)

    “A Vermont Marble Quarry 200 feet Deep.”

     
    “Fifty-Ton Electric Crane Used for Loading Cars.” (circa 1904) “Channeling Machine at Work, Showing Vertical and Horizonal Cuts.” (circa 1904) “One of the Locomotive Cranes in Use at the American Carrara.” (circa 1904)

    “Fifty-Ton Electric Crane Used for Loading Cars.”

    “Channeling Machine at Work, Showing Vertical and Horizonal Cuts.”

    “One of the Locomotive Cranes in Use at the American Carrara.”

    “View of Quarry, Showing the Method of Supporting the Sides by Leaving Buttresses of Marble in the Cut.” (circa 1904) “Quarry at Proctor with Gang of Electric Channeling Machines.” (circa 1904) “Type of Steam Drill Used in Quarrying.” (circa 1904)

    View of Quarry, Showing the Method of Supporting the Sides by Leaving Buttresses of Marble in the Cut.”

    “Quarry at Proctor with Gang of Electric Channeling Machines.”

    “Type of Steam Drill Used in Quarrying.”

  • Proctor, Vermont - Marble Quarry (The Philadelphia Museums) This photograph shows a corner of one of the great quarries in what is the most important marble producing section of the United States. Photo of Vermont Marble QuarryThere are in this country other deposits of limestones, some of which are now being worked and others which will produce very largely in the future, but the quarries lying in the neighborhood of Rutland and Proctor, Vermont, produce annually more handsome marble many times over than is taken out in all the rest of America. This is due to the fine quality of stone in the quarries, the improved and efficient methods of working and the convenient transportation facilities which enable the stone to be easily put on the market. Old-fashioned and laborious methods of quarrying and handling the stone have been entirely displaced by the most modern machinery. The stone is too easily cracked and broken to allow of blasting. It is therefore cut out of the beds, in which it lies, by machines called "channelers". These consist of rows of long chisels, set in a strong travelling framework. This gang of chisels is arranged so that it is worked by machinery and vibrates up and down cutting a channel or groove in any desired direction. When the groove is sufficiently long and deep the channeler is set at work in another place cutting a cross channel and the bottom is also perforated. The block can then be easily split away by means of wedges. Blocks of marble thus dislodged are lifted by cranes and derricks worked by steam or electricity and carried rapidly and easily to the railroad cars for transportation. The picture shows one large block of marble being thus lifted to the surface of the ground. The clean-cut steps in the sides of the quarry show plainly how the machines have cut away the marble in great blocks. In the bottom of the quarry are some portable engines which furnish power for the quarrying machinery. A few laborers have been engaged in cleaning away the snow. At Proctor, Vermont, there are very extensive works where large amounts of this marble are dressed to size for building purposes before being shipped away. Much of it is sawed into slabs and polished for ornamental work. Vermont produces some pure white marble, a great deal of which is somewhat bluish in color, some which is variegated and some which is almost jet black.
  • Proctor, Vermont – “A Vermont Marble Quarry,” Harpers’ Weekly Journal of Civilization, New York, November 21, 1903, pp. 1856.
    A Vermont Marble Quarry” at Proctor, Vermont, Harpers' Weekly, November 21, 1903 Vermont Marble Quarry, Proctor, Vermont, Harper's magazine, circa 1903
  • Proctor, Vermont - the Proctor Marble Quarry - Vermont Marble Company (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Proctor quarry, in full operation in 1900 but idle since 1907 and full of water in 1910, is about 0.4 mile northwest of Proctor station, on the north side of the village, a mile north of the Columbian quarry. (See Pl. I.) It is about 200 feet square, with an offset on the east side, and in 1900 was 175 feet deep. Owner, Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vt.

    “Marble 70 to 185 feet thick is exposed, lying between the uppermost bed of the dolomite, series on the east and the intermediate dolomite on the west.

    “The marble, ‘Sutherland Falls’ (specimens D, XIX, 140, c, d), is a calcite marble of bluish-white color with thin dark-gray spots and bands, probably dolomitic, along the bedding plane. Its texture is uneven and of grade 5 (coarse). It resembles very closely the ‘Riverside; Marble, described on page 126.

    “The general structure I shown in section G, Plate III. The marble beds form the eastern limb of a syncline about 150 feet in depth, but instead of curving over directly on the east to form an anticline, they turn sharply to dip at a low angle to the east for a space of 50 feet and then turn again to resume the direction of the synclinal limb. The effect of this minor fold in the anticlinal part of the fold is to double over some of the marble beds in the lower eastern part of the quarry and reduce the apparent thickness. Between 1900 and 1907 the quarry was also worked toward the east. The section on the north wall of this eastern extension shows the eastward-dipping beds of this minor and easterly overturned fold crossed by low eastward-dipping joints, along which several caves as much as 3 feet in height have been eroded by percolating water. The dolomite which overlies the marble on the west differs microscopically from that of the dolomite series which underlies it on the east. (See p. 30.)

    “It is reported that the reasons for abandoning this quarry were the abundance of joints and the thinning of the beds at the turn of the syncline.”

  • Proctor, Vermont - the Shangrow Marble Quarry - Vermont Marble Company (from Commercial Marbles of Western Vermont, Bulletin 521, by T. Nelson Dale, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1912.)

    “The Shangrow quarry, abandoned between 1900 and 1910, is 1 ¼ miles north-northwest of Proctor station and 1 ½ miles N. 15° W. of the Proctor quarry, in Proctor Township. (See Pl. I.) Owner, Vermont Marble Co., Proctor, Vt.

    “The marble beds exposed in 1900 consisted, beginning at the top, of 32 feet of banded graphitic marble overlying 14 feet of graphitic quartzose dolomite veined with quartz, under which was an unknown thickness of banded marbles like those above it. The beds belong to the upper Graphitic series of the marble formation.

    “The marble, ‘mountain dark’ (specimen D, XIX, 149, B, C, rough), is a graphitic banded calcite marble of alternating dark-gray to black and light bluish-gray bands (beds) ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 inches in width and of uneven and irregular texture, with grain diameter of 0.05 to 0.62, mostly 0.12 to 0.37 millimeter, and thus of grade 4 (medium); one grain seen measured 0.37 by 2.37 millimeters. In the graphitic bands the calcite grains are generally of smaller diameter, ranging from 0.05 to 0.17 millimeter. The marble contains small quartz particles, small cubes of pyrite, quartz lenses up to 0.37 millimeter in diameter, and in the dark bands abundant graphite. Some bands are muscovitic and pyritferous.”

  • Proctor, Vermont – Vermont Marble Company Quarries, Mill, and Yard – The following photographs are from The Marble Industry of Vermont, Free Press Printing Co., Burlington, Vermont, No date of publication – early 1920s.  (A few of the photographs and part of the introduction to the booklet can be found below.  You can read the entire booklet by using the link near the beginning of this paragraph.)

    “Not long after the close of the Revolutionary War, someone discovered that the ledges of Vermont could be made to produce good fireplace stones.  In 1790, after Jonas Stewart had turned one of the quarry slabs into a tombstone, people began to see that the product was really valuable.  Thus was the first American marble quarry opened and a great industry started.

    “For nearly a hundred years, many different men tried in vain to place the Vermont marble industry on a stable basis.  Something always seemed to stand in the way.  The first real advance came about forty years ago, when the organization at Sutherland Falls, became known as the Vermont Marble Company.  Under that name the business fought its way into an era of prosperity.

    “In the seventies, there was only one quarry in operation, and all the blocks were hauled to the mills by oxen.  A few scattered houses stood where the village of Proctor now stands.  Today, the site of that old mill is marked by a huge group of modern structures, the largest marble manufacturing company in the world.

    “What are some of the things that have gone into the making of the Vermont Marble Company?  First of all, there are seventy-five or more quarries with a combined yearly output of about 1,000,000 cubic feet.  There are shops and mills in Proctor 1,500 feet in length, with other plants at Center Rutland, West Rutland, Florence, Brandon, Middlebury, Swanton, Roxbury, Danby, Dorset, Manchester, Bluff Point, N. Y. (New York), San Saba, Tex. (Texas), and Tokeen, Alaska.  There are branches in the larger cities, many of which are equipped for finishing marble.  There are about fifty traveling salesmen….”

Front cover of "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s) “The Proctor Plant of Today with a Marble Yard Covering Eleven Acres.” in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s) “Moving Marble Three Hundred and Fifty Feet Underground.” in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s)

Front cover of The Marble Industry of Vermont (early 1920s)

“The Proctor Plant of Today with a Marble Yard Covering Eleven Acres.”

“Moving Marble Three Hundred and Fifty Feet Underground.”

"Starting Marble Block From Quarry" in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s) “Sawing Fifty-Two Slabs from Marble Block,” “Marble on the Rubbing Bed,”

"Starting Marble Block From Quarry"

“Sawing Fifty-Two Slabs from Marble Block”

“Marble on the Rubbing Bed”

“Polishing Marble,” "Cutting Marble With Diamonds" in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s)

“Polishing Marble”

"Cutting Marble With Diamonds" in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s)

“Cutting Marble Block from Floor of Quarry,”  in "The Marble Industry of Vermont" (early 1920s) “A Marble Caver at Work,”

“Cutting Marble Block from Floor of Quarry.”

“A Marble Caver at Work”

Proctor, Vermont – the Vermont Marble Company – Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective September 1, 1946, Price List for Design Book No. 21, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont.

    Title page of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21) Pages 32 & 33 of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21) Pages 6 & 7 of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21)

    Title page of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21)

    Pages 32 & 33 of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21)

    Pages 6 & 7 of the Vermont Marble Co. Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective Sept. 1, 1946 (Price List for Design Book #21)

  • Vermont Marble Company Whole Sale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 3, 1950, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, Vermont  (Branches:  Chicago – 1105 West Lawrence Avenue; Cleveland – 1737 Euclid Avenue; Dallas – 1513 Wall Street; New York – 101 Park Avenue; Philadelphia – 1524 Chestnut Street; San Francisco – 525 Market Street)
  • Front cover of the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950 Index for the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950 Pages 2 & 3 listing the varieties of monumental marble (Vermont Gray, Pittsford Valley, & Rutland White) in the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950

    Front cover of the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950

    Index for the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950

    Pages 2 & 3 listing the varieties of monumental marble (Vermont Gray, Pittsford Valley, & Rutland White) in the Vermont Marble Co. Wholesale Price List of Monumental Marble, Effective January 1, 1950

Continued on Page 1 2 3 4

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