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Structures and Monuments in Which Missouri Stone was Used

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  • Finished Products from Missouri Stone in Missouri (Continued)
    • New London (east of), Missouri - Limestone Used in the New London Area for Foundations, Sidewalks, Curbing, Sills, Coursing, etc. (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “The only quarry of importance near this city is owned by Mrs. Mary E. Megowen. It is located in lots 34 and 36, Spanish Grant Survey 3076, about one mile east of the city. This quarry, which was opened about fifteen years ago, consists of three openings, two of which are located on the same hill. The opening farthest east is situated at the bottom of the hill, on the north side. The second opening is west of this, and above it on the hillside. Combined, the two openings include practically all the beds which outcrop at this place. The third opening is located on an adjacent hill about 150 yards west. This one is larger than either of the other two....”

      “The stone has been used locally for caps, sills, foundations, sidewalks, crosswalks, curbing and to some extent for coursing. The two lower ledges in the third opening are best adapted for the latter purpose. A number of the ledges contain stone suitable for curbing, sills, etc. The quarries are worked intermittently to supply the local demand.”

    • Noel, Missouri - Limestone Bridge Abutments in the Noel Area (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “(The John P. Hughes limestone) quarry, which is located just west of the Kansas City Southern tracks, three-fourths of a mile south of town, is operated chiefly for the production of bridge abutments....”

      “The beds are generally separated by thin layers of blue shale. When first quarried and left to season in the sun, the stone from the lower ledge is very liable to crack. This does not occur if the stone is placed in an abutment before seasoning...The quarry has been operated about two years and an area 200 x 100 feet has been covered. Twenty-five men are employed. All the stone is cut and dressed at the quarry ready to be placed in the bridge....”

      “...tests show that this is one of the strongest limestones in the State, only being surpassed by that from Kesterson’s quarry at Jackson....”

      “The Kansas City Southern railroad owns a quarry located just east of the railroad, joining the Armstrong and Cravens quarry on the south. It has a west face about 330 feet long and has been worked to the east 240 feet. The stone is similar in all respects to that in the adjoining quarries...The quarry has been in operation about four years. The principal output is stone from bridge abutments....”

    • Noel (south of), Missouri - Limestone Curbing used in Kansas City (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “(The Armstrong and Cravens limestone) quarry, which is operated by James Armstrong and C. M. Cravens, is located about one mile south of Noel, just east of the Kansas City Southern railroad. The quarry, which was leased for five years from H. Hazelbaker, has been in operation about three years....”

      “The stone is all finely crystalline and has a slightly bluish color. Practically the entire output is curbing, which is shipped mainly to Kansas City...The company has offices and yards at 202 Oak street, Kansas City.”

    • Oran, Missouri - the Mill Foundation (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      The Turley & Briggs Quarry.

      “This quarry is located near the north limits of the town just west of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern railroad....”

      “This quarry was opened in 1902 and employs six men...The stone is being shipped to Oran, Missouri, where it is being used in the foundation to a large mill.”

    • Oseola (west of), Missouri - Monument to the Missouri Confederate Brigades (from the article entitled, “Monument Dedication An Upbeat Occasion,” by Patrick Brophy, on the Bushwacker Museum Online web site, Vernon County Historical Society web site in the “Articles of Interest” section.)

      According to this article, Red Missouri granite was used in the construction of the monument to the Missouri Confederate Brigades. The monument is located in the “roadside park overlooking the scenic Sac-Osage river junction, just west of Oseola, Mo., on Missouri Highway 82.”

    • Ozark, Missouri - Local Buildings Constructed of Limestone (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “Two quarries are located in the vicinity of (the city of Ozark, Missouri), which are owned respectively by Mr. T. Reives and Mr. Henry Spiece. The stone from the Spiece quarry is used exclusively in local buildings, while that from the other quarry (the Reives quarry) is used in the manufacture of curbing and flagging, which are shipped to Springfield and other cities in Southwest Missouri.”

    • Paris, Missouri - Limestone used for Caps, Sills & Coursing in the Paris Area (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “(The Gannaway limestone) quarry, which is owned by T. B. Gannaway, of Paris, is located north of the city, just north of the middle fork of Salt river. It is situated on a hillside and has a west face eighty feet long. The stone is limestone of Burlington age. The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom....”

      “...Stone which is used for caps, sills or coursing, should be selected in order to avoid that which contains iron sulphide. The stone is very durable and can be used for all ordinary constructional purposes. It would make a very good grade of white limes.

      “On the north bank of the river there is an old quarry, which was opened ten or fifteen years ago, which is worked from two to six months each year as occasion demands. The stone has the same characteristics as that described above, although the beds are somewhat thicker. The output is all consumed in and about Paris.”

    • Parkville, Missouri - the Park University Underground (AKA Parkville commercial Underground), Excerpts from Missouri Mining Heritage Guide, by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, March 2005. (The following excerpted quotations are used with the permission of John R. Park, author. Photographs of the Park University Underground are included in John Park’s book.)

      “The public portions of Park University are open to visitors. Service entrances and facilities of the underground mines are visible from nearby roads.

      “Park University, a four-year non-denominational Christian college, was founded in 1875.

      “Interestingly, the College operates an underground crushed-limestone mine, and some of the facilities of the College are housed in mined-out portions....”

      “The older portion of the mine (containing all of the space used by the college) is in the 20’ thick Argentine Limestone. About 150’ below the Argentine, the Bethany Falls Limestone (also about 20’ thick) is also being mined. Elsewhere in the Kansas City area, underground-former-mine-space is almost entirely in the Bethany Falls Limestone. In the mined areas, the rooms take up 78% of the square footage, with 22% left for pillars. Older rooms are 25’ wide, while more recently excavated rooms are 30’ wide between the pillars. The ceiling is roof-bolted. An impermeable shale layer above the limestone keeps the space dry (except for some lateral seepage near the edges). As the College is situated on a high bluff above the Missouri River, the upper mine may be entered by simple adits or drufts - making the use of the mined-out space convenient, and simplifying mining operations. The lower mine is accessed by an incline. The crushing plant, etc. is intentionally ‘hidden on the other side of the hill’, accessible from Coffee Rd. from SR 9. (commercial decline N39° 11.296’ W94° 40.716’)”

    • Parkville, Missouri - the Presbyterian Church (from Physical Geography of Missouri in First Annual Report on The Commissioner of Statistics, To The General Assembly of Missouri For The Year 1866, by Professor C. G. Swallow)

      “Our examinations in Missouri prove the existence of such materials in nearly every formation in the State. Limestones, suitable for building purposes, are abundant in the upper and middle coal series, in the St. Louis Limestone, the Archimedes limestone, the Encrinital limestone, the Chouteau limestone, the Onandaga limestones, the Cape Girardeau limestone, the Trenton limestone, and the second, third, and fourth Magnesian limestones.

      “All these formations are more or less employed in the places where they are exposed. Numbers one and six of the upper coal series furnish the rock used in the Presbyterian church, and the public house erected by Mr. Park, at Parkville, and in the public buildings at Fort Leavenworth, all of which indicate their durability and beauty; and the ease with which it is wrought into any desirable form renders it a very economical building material.”

    • Parkville, Missouri - the Public House at Parkville (from Physical Geography of Missouri in First Annual Report on The Commissioner of Statistics, To The General Assembly of Missouri For The Year 1866, by Professor C. G. Swallow)

      “Our examinations in Missouri prove the existence of such materials in nearly every formation in the State. Limestones, suitable for building purposes, are abundant in the upper and middle coal series, in the St. Louis Limestone, the Archimedes limestone, the Encrinital limestone, the Chouteau limestone, the Onandaga limestones, the Cape Girardeau limestone, the Trenton limestone, and the second, third, and fourth Magnesian limestones.

      “All these formations are more or less employed in the places where they are exposed. Numbers one and six of the upper coal series furnish the rock used in the Presbyterian church, and the public house erected by Mr. Park, at Parkville, and in the public buildings at Fort Leavenworth, all of which indicate their durability and beauty; and the ease with which it is wrought into any desirable form renders it a very economical building material.”

    • Plattsburg, Missouri - School Buildings, Sidewalks, Crosswalks, & Curbing (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “The (Trimble limestone) quarry owned and operated by J. A. Trimble is located about one mile north of Plattsburg, in the N.E. ¼ of the S.W. ¼ of sec. 13, T. 55, R. 32 W....”

      “The quarry is only operated when there is a local demand for footing or heavy foundation stone. It has been used in the public school buildings and for sidewalks, crosswalks and curbing.”

    • Princeton, Missouri - Monument Bases, Bridge Abutments, Heavy Constructional Work, Foundations, Sills, Crosswalks, etc. of Limestone (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “Two quarries have been opened in the Bethany Falls limestone on the hills about two and one-half miles south of Princeton. At this place the beds are comparatively massive and the stone has been used quite extensively for bridge abutments and other heavy constructional work....”

      • Princeton, Missouri - Monument Bases, Bridge Abutments, Foundations, Sills, Crosswalks, etc. of Limestone (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

        “(The Ballew limestone) quarry, which is owned by T. W. Ballew and operated by Al. Phillips, is located about two miles south of Princeton on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific railroad in the N. ½ of the N.E. ¼ of sec. 4, T. 64, R. 24 W. This quarry was opened in 1892 and has a face extending along the hill over a quarter of a mile...”

        “...It is worked from March to December, during which time from ten to twelve men are employed. The stone has been used for foundations, sills, crosswalks, monument bases, concrete, macadam and bridge abutments. The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific railroad has used this stone very extensively. It has also been used in Lineville, Allerton and Seymore, Iowa, and at Union, Missouri. One hundred car loads were shipped in 1900 and a similar amount in 1901; $1.00 a perch is obtained for rubble stone.”

    • Rhineland, Missouri - the Shrine of Our Lady Sorrows Chapel (history and photographs)

      According to this web site, the stone used for the chapel was taken from two nearby quarries in the early 1900s.

    • Rich Fountain, Osage County, Missouri - the White Stone Inn (The following information was obtained from the WTOC Points of Interest web site presented by Osage County, Missouri.)

      According to the Osage County web site, the White Stone Inn was originally “built from large hand-hewn blocks of Missouri limestone.”

    • Richmond, Missouri - Well Rock & Foundations of Limestone (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “(The Garner limestone) quarry, which is owned by Fletcher Graham and operated by E. B. Farrar, is located about three-fourths of mile north of the city, in the N.E. ¼ of sec. 25, T.52, R. 22 W. This quarry was opened in 1878 and has been worked during the quarry season for the last ten years. It is situated on the crest of a hill and has an irregular face about 300 feet long.

      “The rock is a finely crystalline, gray limestone occurring in thin beds separated by very irregular wavy bedding planes. The upper bed, eighteen inches thick, is a hard, brittle, dark gray limestone which is said to make a very good grade of quicklime. The stone is now used for well rock and foundations.”

    • Rolla, Missouri - Ed Clark Museum of Missouri Geology Building - Excerpt from Missouri Mining Heritage Guide, by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, March 2005. (The following excerpted quotations are used with the permission of John R. Park, author.)

      The (Ed Clark Museum building) is constructed of Carthage marble.”

    • Rolla, Missouri – the Engineering Building - Basement. (Photograph from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by Ernest Robertson Buckley and H. A. Buehler, 1904) The basement of the building was constructed out of pitted dolomite quarried at Jefferson City, Missouri.
      Plate XIV. Dolomite (Jefferson City) – Engineering Building, Rolla, Mo. (Basement constructed out of pitted dolomite.) Engineering Building, Rolla, Missouri, circa 1904

      “Mr. P. White owns a quarry located south of the Malcolm quarry. It is on the south side of the hill, south of the railroad, and has been operated quite extensively in the past.

      “In general, the stone from these quarries is the same, being pitted dolomite similar to that obtained at the Murray quarry. Large blocks can be quarried. The quarries are only operated when there is demand for the stone. It was used in the basement of the new Engineering building of the School of Mines at Rolla. “When first cut and dressed it has a light gray mottled color which gradually becomes darker upon exposure to the atmosphere.”

    • Rolla, Missouri - the Missouri Department of Natural Resources Sign at Rolla - the Base (The following information was presented by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey. The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.dnr.mo.gov/geology/newLtr.htm>

      Photo caption for the photograph of the sign: “In honor of 150 years of service and the division's new name, this new sign was unveiled during the division's open house celebration in October of 2003.”

      The article indicates that “A new sign was unveiled in front of the main building...Through material donated and the assistance of many individuals, a Missouri red granite foundation displays the division’s new name on a state of Missouri replica carved in Limestone.”

    • Rolla, Missouri – the University of Missouri – the Millennium Arch (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available. You can read more about the Millennium Arch on the Rolla Missouri Visitor’s Guide (PDF).)
      <http://www.umr.edu/~conted/millenniumarch.htm>

      The Millennium Arch was constructed of five pieces of Missouri granite quarried from Missouri Red Quarries near Ironton, Missouri.

    • Sedalia (north of), Missouri - the Bothwell Lodge State Historic Site
      • Boothwell Lodge State Historic Site, presented by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. (located at 19349 Bothwell State Park Road, Sedalia, MO 65301 )
      • Prairie Bluestem - “Bothwell Lodge, Near Sedalia, MO: Life In Missouri...History And Old Stuff...,” Thursday, June 14, 2007. (history and photographs)

        The Bothwell Lodge was known by local residents as “the castle on the hill north of Sedalia.” According to this web site, John Homer Bothwell, a Sedalia lawyer, constructed the house in stages from 1890 to 1929. He named it Stonyridge Farm. Stone quarried on the property was used for the house, outbuildings, and nature paths.

    • Sedalia, Missouri – the Depot (from the “Notes From Quarry and Shop” section in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Frank W. Hoyt, Publisher, New York, pp. 572.)

      Notes From Quarry and Shop: “They sawed stone for the new public library at Kansas City, Mo., will be furnished by Carthage Stone Co., Carthage, Mo. Will take nearly 100 carloads. The stone for new courthouse, Paris, Tex., 140 cars, is also being gotten out at Carthage. Also for depots at Parsons, Kan., and Sedalia, Mo.”

    • Sedalia, Pettis County, Missouri - the Sedalia Court House Building (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

      Warrensburg sandstone quarried from the Pickel Sandstone Quarry located north of Warrensburg, Missouri, was used in the construction of the Sedalia Court House building prior to 1904.

    • Sedalia, Missouri – the Sedalia Library Building - the base and columns (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by Ernest Robertson Buckley and H. A. Buehler, 1904, pages 133-134.)

      Limestone quarried from the Carthage, Missouri, area was used for the base and columns of the building. The color of the Carthage limestone ranges from brown and gray to white. Some of the stone has a faint blue tint.

    • Sheffield (east of), Missouri - the Washington Cemetery - Limestone Retaining Walls and Stone Fences (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “This company operates two quarries located on the cemetery grounds east of Sheffield. One of these is located east of 9th street and the other near the crest of the hill one-quarter of a mile east.

      “The quarry near the east end of 9th street has a face 225 feet long and twenty feet high. It is covered with six feet of clay stripping...”

      “This quarry is equipped with a permanent crushing plant, consisting of a No. 3 Gates crusher, 1 25-horse power engine, a 30-horse power boiler and a bucket elevator. This plant is situated just south of the above described quarry. All of the stone is crushed.

      “The quarry near the crest of the hill is in the ‘building stone’ ledge. The upper bed consists of from eight to twelve inches of finely crystalline, bluish gray limestone, having a buff color along the bedding planes. Underneath this are four inch, ten inch and four inch beds of finely crystalline, compact, gray limestone. This stone is not as badly decomposed as that in the Kansas City quarries. It is all broken into rubble which is now being used in retaining walls and stone fences about the cemetery property.”

    • Spanish Lake (northeast of), Missouri - the Limestone Buildings in the Spanish Lake Area (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “This quarry, which is operated by Phillip Emmerick, is located two miles northeast of Spanish Lake. It was opened in 1878 and has been worked intermittently since that time.

      “It is situated on a hillside and has a face 800 feet long and 18 ½ feet in height. The quarry has been worked into the hill a distance of 75 feet. The stone is a bluish gray, compact, fine grained limestone....”

      “The stone is used chiefly for buildings and macadam. It has been sold to some extent for rubble work.”

    • Springfield, Missouri - Curbing in Springfield and Southwestern Part of Missouri (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “Two quarries are located in the vicinity of (the city of Ozark, Missouri ), which are owned respectively by Mr. T. Reives and Mr. Henry Spiece. The stone from the Spiece quarry is used exclusively in local buildings, while that from the other quarry (the Reives quarry) is used in the manufacture of curbing and flagging, which are shipped to Springfield and other cities in Southwest Missouri.”

      “(The Reives limestone) quarry, which is located in the Finley creek bottom, one and one-half miles north of Ozark, is operated by W. R. Sims of Ozark....”

    • Springfield, Missouri – the Drury College Chapel (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)
      Plate XXXVIII. Burlington Limestone. Chapel at Drury College, built out of stone quarried at Springfield. Chapel at Drury College, Springfield, Missouri, circa 1904

      “The limestone (from Résumé Limestone Quarry) has been used for sills, caps and ashler blocks in many of the buildings in Springfield. Drury College Chapel and St. Johns Episcopal Church were erected entirely out of Springfield limestone. The suitability of the stone for this purpose is well illustrated by these buildings.”

    • Springfield, Missouri - the Federal Hospital Building (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

      Ozark Fleuri Marble (a limestone) quarried at Carthage, Missouri, was used in the construction in the interior of the Federal Hospital building.

    • Springfield, Missouri – the Frisco Hospital (trimmings) (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by Ernest Robertson Buckley and H. A. Buehler, 1904, pages 133-134.)

      Limestone quarried from the Carthage, Missouri, area was used for the trimmings of the hospital. The color of the Carthage limestone ranges from brown and gray to white. Some of the stone has a faint blue tint.

    • Springfield, Missouri - Houses in Springfield clad with “Phenix Stone” Limestone (Field Trip Guide to the Geology of Missouri State University’s Springfield Campus) [PDF]

      According to this field trip guide, many of the houses in Springfield use “Phenix Stone” as a facing stone. “Phenix Stone” was quarried in southwestern Missouri.

    • Springfield, Missouri - the Missouri State University - Field Trip Guide to the Geology of Missouri State University’s Springfield Campus, Dr. Kevin R. Evans, Department of Geography, Geology & Planning, Missouri State University, Edited by Dr. James F. Miller, Department of Geography, Geology & Planning

      Missouri State University, Dr. Thomas G. Plymate, Department of Geography, Geology & Planning, Missouri State University, Revised December 2006. [PDF]

      “Carthage Stone” is the main building stone used for public buildings on campus, but the cornerstone looks similar to another type of limestone quarried in southwest Missouri....”

      • Carrington Hall - According to this tour, “Carrington Hall is mostly constructed with a building stone known as ‘Carthage Stone’ or ‘Carthage Marble...’ The foundation of Carrington Hall is very different. It is made from granite, an igneous rock. Builders refer to this stone as ‘Missouri Red.’”

        “‘Phenix Stone’ is not common on the SMSU campus, but many of the houses in Springfield use it as a facing stone. Polished Phenix Stone was used to decorate the second floor of the Missouri State Capitol Building in Jefferson City...‘Phenix Stone’ is also Mississippian in age. Three different rock units were quarried at Phenix: the Burlington-Keokuk formation (for the adventurous, a block of the Burlington-Keokuk rests on the lawn at the southeast corner of Temple Hall), the Short Creek Oölite, and the Warsaw Formation.”

      • Stop 5 Staircase in Hill Hall: Hill Hall was constructed in 1924. The steps and facing on the main staircase are slabs of polished limestone. Limestone commonly accumulates in shallow tropical to subtropical seas. Since these stones were quarried in Missouri, it means that shallow seas once covered Missouri, and at that time, early 340 million years ago, Missouri was near the equator.”

        “Continuing the tour, walk out the east doors of Hill Hall. Ellis Hall, the building ahead of you, was faced with Carthage Stone.”

        “Return to the walkway between Cheek Hall and Siceluff Hall...On the south end of the west wing of Wells House, notice the material that was used for facing stone. It’s made of concrete slabs and Carthage Stone. Concrete commonly contains brown quartz sand grains that give it a rougher finish than cut Carthage Stone. Carthage Stone, of course, has fossils in it.”

      • Stop 7 Memorial Garden: Two quite different rock types can be seen in the Memorial Garden. The large black disk is a rock that builders refer to as “black granite”....”

        “The stones that form the ramp that leads to the gabbro monument are sandstone...This sandstone is yellow-brown in color, but sandstones can be red, white, green, gray, and black. The coloration of this sandstone is due to the oxidized iron in it...Quarries in northwestern Arkansas ship his material into southwestern Missouri because it is fairly inexpensive and needs little preparation before it is set in rustic landscaping like on the south end of Plaster....”

    • Springfield, Missouri – the St. Johns Episcopal Church (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “The limestone (from Résumé Limestone Quarry) has been used for sills, caps and ashler blocks in many of the buildings in Springfield. Drury College Chapel and St. Johns Episcopal Church were erected entirely out of Springfield limestone. The suitability of the stone for this purpose is well illustrated by these buildings.”

    • Springfield, Missouri - the U. S. Post Office Building (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

      Carthage Marble (a limestone) quarried at Carthage, Missouri, was used in the construction of the exterior of the U. S. Post Office building.

    • Springville, Missouri - the Monument to Honor Veterans Wounded in Combat, presented on The St. Clair Times web site, by Kellie Long, June 22, 2007. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.thestclairtimes.com/news/2007/st-local-0622-klong-7f22r1753.htm>

      According to this article, the “Springville/Blount Chapter 2213 of the Military Order of the Purple Heart has raised the funds necessary to establish a monument in Springville’s Big Springs Park to honor all combat-wounded veterans.” Red granite quarried in the foothills of Missouri will be used to create the monument by a stone cutter in Washington Valley.

    • Starkenburg, Missouri - Shrine of Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel, from web site presented by Shrine of Our Lady of Sorrows, Rhineland, Missouri. (According to the web site, there is a book available about the history of the Shrine of Our Lady of Sorrows.)

      According to the web site, the blueprints for the chapel were by Professor Becker of Mainz, Germany; and the architect was John Walchshauser from St. Louis. Quarrying the stone for the chapel started in 1906 when parishioners began to quarry the stone. William Bossman, August Daller, and Gerhard Koenig donated stone from their private quarries, and L. Van Beek and G. Overkamp donated rocks from their hillside to be used in the foundation of the building. The cornerstone was laid on may 24, 1907, by the Very Reverend O. J. Hoog. The chapel was dedicated on July 16, 1910, on the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.

    • St. Charles, Missouri - the Saint Charles County Court House (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “(The Thompson & Gray Company’s limestone) quarry is located at Jung’s Station on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas railroad about five miles west of St. Charles. It was opened in 1894 and has been worked intermittently since that time. It is situated along the bluffs just west of the M., K. & T. railway, and has a face about 525 feet long....”

      “The quarry is equipped with a crushing plant, steam drills and a saw mill. The stone from this quarry was used in the county court house at St. Charles.”

    • St. Charles, Missouri - the Shrine of the St. Rose Philippine Duschesne - the Sanctuary Furnishings (photographs and history)

      Red Missouri granite was used for the furnishings in the Sanctuary of the Shrine of the St. Rose Philippine Duschesne.

    • St. Francois County, Missouri - the Big River Railway Bridge - the Piers & Abutments (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties, ” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

      Limestone quarried from the St. Joe Lead Company, North Quarry located in township 38 north, range 4 east, section 35, St. Francois County, Missouri, was “used for piers and abutments for a railway bridge over the Big river.” “The stone varies in color from gray to yellow, is coarse grained, dendritic, and occasionally blotched with calcite crystals.”

    • St. Francois County, Missouri - the Foundations, Macadam, and Flagging (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties, ” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

      Limestone quarried from the P. V. Ashburn quarry located in township 36 north, range 6 east, section 31, southwest quarter, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used mostly for macadam, and to some extent for foundations and flagging. “The color of the stone varies, being yellow, gray and blue.”

      Limestone quarried from the J. B. Miller quarry located in township 36 north, range 6 east, section 31, southeast quarter, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used for foundations.

      Limestone quarried from the A. Parkhurst quarry located in township 35 north, range 5 east, section 2, near the center, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used for macadam.

      Limestone quarried from the Mrs. F. E. Toleman quarry located in township 35 north, range 5 east, section 1, northeast quarter, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used for foundations only. “The stone varies in color from yellow to gray, is fine grained, tough and hard, and is dressed with difficulty.”

      Limestone quarried from the Beals’ quarry located in township 35 north, range 5 east, section 2, near the center, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used “...principally for macadam and foundations.”

      Limestone quarried from the J. M. Ritters quarry located in township 36 north, range 5 east, section 23, northeast quarter, St. Francois County, Missouri, was used “...mostly for monument bases, window sills, etc.” “The stone is fine grained, gray to yellow in color...”

    • St. Francois County, Missouri - the Railway Ballast (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties, ” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

      Limestone quarried from the St. Joe Lead Company, North Quarry located in township 38 north, range 4 east, section 35, St. Francois County, Missouri, was “crushed and used largely for ballast in the construction of a railway bed.”

    • St. Francois County, Missouri - the Railway Company Construction of Bridge Abutments and Culverts (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties, ” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

      Limestone quarried from the Jno. Rothney quarry located in township 35 north, range 3 east, section 5, northeast quarter of northeast quarter, St. Francois County, Missouri, was “almost wholly to the railway company for the construction of bridge abutments and culverts.” “The stone is somewhat siliceous, and varies in color from yellow to pink and chocolate.”

    • St. Joseph, Missouri - the Sandstone used in the Atlantic Area (from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “The Carroll County Sandstone Company, by which (the White Rock sandstone) quarry is owned, is a corporation consisting of A. T. Kendrick, B. D. Kendrick, O. A. Kendrick and Wm. Bushy. The quarry was opened in 1868 and has been operated almost continuously ever since....”

      “As a whole, the stone consists of fine rounded grains of translucent quartz, cemented together chiefly with calcium carbonate. Small flakes of mica, grains of iron oxide and nodules of pyrites are lesser constituents of the rock. Large oval areas in the stone have been changed practically to a quartzite....”

      “This sandstone has been used in the construction of the Iowa State Capitol, the Methodist Church at Carrollton, the Public Library at Fulton and for bridge abutments along the Wabash railroad. It has also been shipped to the following cities for miscellaneous uses: St. Joseph, St. Louis, Kansas City and Marysville, Missouri; Lincoln, Nebraska; Ottumwa, Des Moines, Atlantic, and Bloomfield, Iowa.”

    • St. Joseph, Missouri - the Court House (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

      Eldorado or Ste. Genevieve Istrian Marble quarried from the Inkley Marble Quarries Company quarry located southwest of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, was used in the construction of the Court House building.

    • St. Joseph, Missouri - the United States Post Office (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

      Eldorado or Ste. Genevieve Istrian Marble quarried from the Inkley Marble Quarries Company quarry located southwest of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, was used in the construction of the Post Office building.

Finished Products from Missouri Stone in Missouri continued on Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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