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Quarries in Missouri & Quarry Links, Photographs, and Articles
St. Louis – W. H. Gage thru St. Louis County

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the W. H. Gage Glue Co. (from Monumental News Magazine, January 1939, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 31.)

    (Listed in the “Machinery - Tools - Supplies” section) W. H. Gage Glue Co., 19 So. First St., St. Louis, Mo. - Supplies.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Wade Bros. Construction Company’s Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which was opened in 1890, is located at McCauslin avenue and Moonen streets. The office of the company is located at 2272 Old Manchester Road.

    “The quarry consists of a rectangular, sunken pit 250 feet by 350 feet, with a vertical face of about 60 feet. The stripping, consisting of twelve feet of loess, has been removed from a considerable distance back from the face of the quarry. The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom:

    6 ft. - Gray, sandy textured limestone.

    4-6 ft. - Solid, bluish gray limestone, having a sandy texture.

    2 ft. - Fine grained, bluish gray limestone. Very brittle.

    1 ft. 8 in. - Fossiliferous, bluish gray limestone.

    12 ft. 6 in. - Finely crystalline limestone in beds from four to eight inches in thickness. The heaviest beds are near the top.

    25 ft. - Finely crystalline, white limestone, in beds from three to six inches in thickness.

    5 ft. 6 in. - Fine grained, flinty limestone.

    5 ft. - Bluish gray limestone.

    6-8 ft. - Somewhat impure, bluish gray limestone, in beds from two inches to one foot in thickness.

    “The lower two ledges are below the level of the present working face, the upper one is a natural drain through which the water is carried off.

    “The major joints strike north and south, N. 70° E. and N. 80° E.

    “The stone is not injured by the frost and can be quarried at all seasons of the year. Analyses, which the company had made of the limestone from different parts of the quarry, show 98 per cent. calcium carbonate. Such portions are sufficiently pure to be suitable for furnace flux. The output of the quarry is chiefly rubble and crushed stone. The equipment consists of a No. 3 Gates crusher and accessories, steam drill, engine, boiler and necessary hand tools. About fifteen men are employed.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Watson Construction Company Limestone Quarry located at Grand & Chouteau Avenues (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and section.

    Watson Construction Company (H, 13): - This firm has a quarry which is situated on the south-west corner of Grand and Chouteau avenues. It was opened in December, 1889. The section here is the same as that given of the Fruin, Bambrick and Company’s third Quarry....”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Watson Construction Company Limestone Quarry located at Vigus Station (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location.

    Watson Construction Company (65): - This company has a quarry which is situated in the bluffs of the Missouri river, at Vigus Station. The stone quarried is probably St. Louis Limestone. The quarry is connected with the St. Louis, Kansa City & Colorado railway. Stone is swung from the quarry by derricks directly to the freight cars. The product is mostly riprap.

    “The following section,* in descending series, was obtained here: -

    Section.

    1. Soil and Loess - 9-11 feet.

    2. Residuary clay - 4-5 feet.

    3. Limestone, partially decomposed - 4-5 feet.

    4. Limestone, drab, fine grained, hard, brittle, conchoidal fracture, in thin layers, one to three inches thick - 2 feet, 6 inches.

    5. Limestone, like No. 4, but coarser grained and has calcite veins - 8 inches.

    6. Limestone, drab, coarse grained, brittle, sub-conchoidal fracture, suture joints, specked with calcite and chert, occasional chert concretions, quarries as one bed in some places, but in others it splits into two beds - 3 feet, 10 inches.

    7. Limestone, like No. 6, but contains pyrite crystals - 8 inches.

    8. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, many calcite blotches - 1 foot, 1 inch.

    9. Limestone, like No. 8, but in layers three or four inches thick - 2 inches.

    10. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, specked with calcite, very fossiliferous, often quarries in solid blocks, but in places splits into many beds - 4 feet, 5 inches.

    11. Limestone, in heavy beds, much weathered, and covered mostly with talus - 10 feet.

    Total thickness of rock - 27 feet, 7 inches.”

  • St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - the Joseph Webber Quarry (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    The following information was taken from the table entitled, “Table IV. Tables indicating the Amount and Kinds of Rock in the Different States”: The Joseph Webber Quarry, City of St. Louis, Saint Louis County, Limestone, color: drab; quarry opened in 1875.

  • St. Louis, Missouri – the Weis & Jennett Marble Company (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, February 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 2, pp. 16)

    “The Weiss & Jennett Marble Company, of St. Louis, Mo., has been incorporated by Joseph Weiss, George Jennette, John Fausek and others.”

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Weis and Jennett Marble Company(from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, January 1926, Vol. 3, No. 9, pp. 71. This information was also published in the following issues of Throvgh The Ages Magazine: May 1923, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 43; June 1923, Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 42; August 1923, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 42; September 1923, Vol. 1, No. 5, pp. 4 3; October 1923, Vol. 1, No. 6, pp. 43; November 1923, Vol. 1, No. 7, pp. 43; December 1923, Vol. 1, No. 8, pp. 43; February 1924, Vol. 1, No. 10, pp. 43; April 1924, Vol. 1, No. 12, pp. 43; May 1924, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 43; June 1924, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 43; July 1924, Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 43; August 1924, Vol. 2, No. 4, pp. 43; September 1924, Vol. 2, No. 5, pp. 43; July 1925, Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 71; April 1927, Vol. 4, No. 12, pp. 67; October 1927, Vol. 5, No. 6, pp. 65; September 1928, Vol. 6, No. 5, pp. 67; and January 1932, Vol. 9, No. 9, pp. 67.)

      The Weis and Jennett Marble Company is listed in the “List of Quarries and Marble Manufacturers Represented in the Membership of the National Association of Marble Dealers” section of this issue. Joseph Weis is listed as their representative.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Weis and Jennett Marble Company - Member of the St. Louis Marble Manufacturers Credit Association and the National Association of Marble Dealers (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, January 1932, Vol. 9, No. 9, pp. 50.)
      Miniature of a Banking Room in marble, one of eight models now on display in the Building Industries Exhibit Bureau, St. Louis. Weis and Jennett Marble Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Jan. 1932 advertisement

      In a spirit of co-operation for the promotion of Marble this page has been subscribed for by the members of the St. Louis Marble Manufacturers Credit Association who are also members of the National Association of Marble Dealers, and whose names are listed below:

      In keeping with the very desirable policy of this magazine it is our intention to show from time to time installations of marble work by various members.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Western-Electric Company - St. Louise Branch (Advertisement) (from Architecture, Constructive, Decorative, Landscape, May 1911, Vol. XXIII, No. 5, pp. xii.)

    Western-Electric Inter-phones

    Provide the most convenient means of communication between rooms, floors or departments of the modern home, public building or business establishment. Every architect should have our bulletin No. 4662. Write our nearest house for a copy. The Western Electric Company Furnishes Equipment for Every Electrical Need.

    Western-Electric Company

    New York - Philadelphia - Boston - Pittsburg - Atlanta - Buffalo - Chicago - Indianapolis - Cincinnati Minneapolis - Milwaukee - St. Louis - Kansas City - Denver - Dallas - Omaha - San Francisco - Los Angeles - Seattle - Salt Lake City - Portland - Winnipeg - Montreal - Toronto - Vancouver - Antwerp - London - Berlin - Paris - Johannesburg - Sydney - Tokyo

    Manufacturer of the 5,000,000 “ Bell ” Telephones

  • St. Louis, Missouri – the Western Stone Company (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, January 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 2, pp. 214)

    “St. Louis, Mo. – Western Stone Company, of St. Louis; capital, $12,500; incorporated by Louis H. Meyer, John J. Weber, James K. Taylor, and others.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri – Williams Patent Crusher and Pulverizer Company (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 22.)

    Williams Patent Crusher and Pulverizer Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 1921 advertisement

    Williams Patent Crusher and Pulverizer Company

    Plant and General Office: 2701-2723 North Broadway

    St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.

    67 Second Street, San Francisco, Calif.

    37 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, Ill.

    Williams Stone crushers - “Mammoth” and “Jumbo” take the place of a whole battery of crushers.

    The Williams Mammoth Crusher takes Limestone up to 36 inches and breaks it down to 10 inches and smaller. The “Jumbo” takes 14-inch secondary crusher, the “Jumbo” takes stone as fast as the largest jaw crusher can deliver it, or from 50 to 200 tons per hour. It takes only about 1 h.p. per ton of rock crushed per hour, to operate the “Jumbo.” With finer screens, the “Jumbo” will crush limestone for agricultural purposes.

    Original Hammer Principle

    The hinged hammer principle originated and perfected by Williams can be adapted to any conditions in your plant. The Williams Engineering Department makes no charge for complete analysis of your needs and preliminary plans. Put your crushing problems up to us.

    Used by Over Fifty Cement Companies

    Over fifty prominent cement manufacturers are satisfied users of Williams Stone Crushers. The Monarch Cement Co., Humboldt, Kans., crush stone with a No. 6 Jumbo for 400,000 to 600,000 barrels of cement per year with practically no repair expenses in five years. They say: “It has been a source of pleasure to operate this crusher from every standpoint.” The Southwestern portland Cement Co. of El Paso, Tex. reports that a Williams Jumbo cuts their horsepower requirements to 100 h.p. for 100 tons per hour.

    Williams – Patent Crushers – Grinders - Shredders

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - William Wieman Limestone Quarry located at Cora & Margaretta Avenues (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and product.

    Wieman, William (G-6): - Mr. Wieman’s quarry is situated on the south-west corner of Cora and Margaretta avenues. The product is mostly building stone and macadam. The quarry was opened in 1880. It is sixty feet long, thirty feet wide and exposes the following columnar section, in descending series: -

    Section.

    1. Loess - 5-30 feet.

    2. Residuary clay and decomposing limestone - 5 feet.

    3. Limestone, light gray - 4 inches.

    4. Limestone and chert in thin alternating layers - 1 foot, 6 inches.

    5. Limestone, light gray - 4 feet.

    Total thickness of rock - 5 feet, 10 inches.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Work House Limestone Quarry located at the foot of Meramec Street (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location.

    Work House Quarry (K, 19): - This quarry is situated at the foot of Meramec street, on the Iron Mountain and Southern railway. It has been opened about forty years. The most important product is macadam. The laborers employed are all convicts. The quarry is deep, large and somewhat oval in shape. The following section,* in descending series, shows the character of the beds:

    Section.

    1. Loess as stripping - 5-20 feet.

    2. Limestone, (Analysis No. 43), in broken and weathered beds - 6 feet, 6 inches.

    3. Limestone, (Analysis No. 44), dark drab, fine grained - 2 feet, 9 inches.

    4. Limestone, (Analysis No. 45), light drab, fine grained, two inch layer of chert near top - 2 feet, 4 inches.

    5. Limestone, (Analysis No. 46), drab and yellowish, fine grained grades in places to No. 4 without separation - 1 foot, 3 inches.

    6. Limestone, (Analysis No. 47), cross bedded, alternating layers of chert and limestone - 6 feet, 6 inches.

    7. Limestone, (Analysis No. 48), gray and brown, rather fine grained, several beds of limestone from two to twelve inches thick, two layers of chert two to six inches thick - 3 feet, 10 inches.

    8. Limestone, (Analysis No. 49), gray, brown and drab, coarse grained - 4 feet, 2 inches.

    9. Limestone, (Analysis No. 50), gray, fine grained, laminated, four to five beds from one to six inches thick - 2 feet.

    10. Limestone, (Analysis No. 51), lavender, lithographic, hard, brittle, conchoidal fracture, very fine grained - 1 foot, 4 inches.

    11. Limestone, (Analysis No. 52), very dark gray, rather fine grained, slightly cross bedded - 1 foot.

    12. Limestone, (Analysis No. 53), same as No. 11 - 3 feet, 9 inches.

    13. Limestone, (Analysis No. 54), gray and drab, fine grained hard, carries oblong and spherical masses of chert - 2 feet, 4 inches.

    14. Limestone, (Analysis No. 55), and chert in alternate but non-continuous layers - 12 feet.

    15. Limestone, (Analysis No. 56), dark gray, considerable chert - 3 feet, 6 inches.

    16. Limestone, (Analysis No. 57), dark and light gray, overlaid by two feet of cert with little limestone, laminated, cross bedded - 3 feet.

    17. Shale - 1 inch.

    18. Limestone, (Analysis No. 58), gray, drab and greenish, coarse grained, stylolites, fossiliferous, chert band at top - 2 feet, 3 inches.

    19. Shale - ½ inch.

    20. Limestone, (Analysis No. 59), light yellow, drab and gray, large balls of chert a foot or more in diameter near top, fossiliferous and geodal - 6 feet.

    21. Limestone, (Analysis No. 60), gray to brown, line of chert at top, stylolites, soft, fine and coarse grained - 4 feet, 9 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 69 feet, 4 ½ inches....”

    Work House quarry, St. Louis Limestone. Work House quarry, St. Louis Limestone (table), St. Louis, Missouri (circa 1890)
    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Workhouse Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “The largest quarry in St. Louis is located on Meramec street just east of the workhouse and is operated by the city. An average of (unreadable) hundred convicts are worked regularly in this quarry. The only product at present is crushed stone. About six cars of stone are shipped each day and are used in repairing the city pavements.

      Plate XXXVI. Crushing macadam by Hand, St. Louis, Mo. Plate XXXVI. Crushing macadam by Hand, St. Louis, Missouri (circa 1904)

      “This quarry has an opening about 850 feet by 325 feet. The beds have an apparent gentle dip to the southwest. The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom:

      10-30 ft. - Loess stripping.

      33 ft. - Limestone in beds from one to five feet in thickness. Most of the stone contains flint nodules. It makes very good macadam, but is not suitable for buildings. These beds have been removed by erosion at the north end of the quarry.

      3 ft. - Fine grained, compact, gray limestone in two beds. The stone weathers to a white and stands out in marked contrast with the beds on either side.

      4 ft, 6 in. - Heavy bed of very finely crystalline, gray limestone. A good building stone.

      25 ft. - Granular to crystalline, gray limestone. Containing flint nodules and suture joints. Cannot obtain much building stone from this portion of the quarry.

      7 ft. 6 in. - Finely crystalline, light gray limestone. Rather porous. A suture joint occurs one foot from the top. Contains occasional nodules of flint.

      7 ft. 10 in. - Medium grained, crystalline, gray limestone. Contains suture joints from six inches to one foot apart.

      5 ft. 8 in. - Gray, finely crystalline limestone, containing small sutures. Ledge shows cross bedding.

      3 ft. 6 in. - Coarsely crystalline, drab colored, magnesian limestone. Contains large crystals of calcite in a finely crystalline matrix.

      3 ft. 3 in. - Dark, fossiliferous limestone. The lower ledges are rather impure. The stone in a number of the ledges is soft and when fresh is often carved by the convicts.

      “A small crushing plant has recently been erected at the quarry.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Henry Zeiss’ Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and product.

    Zeiss, Henry (49): - Two quarries belonging respectively to Mrs. James Zeiss and to Henry Zeiss, are at present worked as one quarry. They adjoin each other in the bluff of St. Louis Limestone, in the neighborhood of Mr. Theby’s quarry, mentioned above. There is about two hundred and fifty yards of workable face to the quarry. It was opened in 1872. The product consists of macadam, dimension stone, ‘furnace rock,’ etc.

    “The following section, in descending series, was obtained: -

    Section.

    1. Loess - 6 feet.

    2. Limestone, decomposing, and residuary clay - 10 feet.

    3. Limestone, lavender, with mottled appearance, vary grained, calcite blotches at bottom, very fossiliferous - 2 feet, 4 inches.

    4. Limestone corresponding to numbers 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the Theby section as given above - 12 feet, 9 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 25 feet, 1 inch.”

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Zeiss Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “This quarry, which is located west of Broadway on Keiser road, is operated by Henry Zeiss of 9125 Minnesota avenue. It has a working face along the bluff of 650 feet. It is reported that this quarry will not be operated after the present year. The following is a section from top to bottom:

      25-30 ft. Loess stripping.

      8 ft. - Gray limestone in thin beds.

      5 ft. - Crystalline, gray limestone, containing clay pockets. Near the top, the stone has a dark reddish brown color.

      2 ft.; 2 ft. 4 in.; 2 ft. 4 in.; 6 ft. 6 in. - Finely, crystalline, gray limestone. Bottom beds splits in middle.

      6 ft. 6 in. - Finely crystalline, gray limestone in beds from four to ten inches in thickness. Is used, in part, to make caps and sills. A very good building stone.

      4 ft. - Gray limestone. Shelly.

      “The major joints strike N. 85° and N. 20° W. This quarry has a natural drainage.

      “The stone has been used for buildings, macadam, furnace flux and the manufacture of mineral wool. For furnace flux it brings sixty cents per ton. The quarry employes (sic) about twenty men.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri – Zelnicker (Advertisement) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, January 1919, Vol. XL, No. 1, pp. 48. This advertisement was also published in the following editions of Stone Magazine: June 1919, Vol. XL, No. 6, pp. 282; and December 1919, Vol. XL, No. 12, pp. 576.)

    Zelnicker, St. Louis, Missouri, Jan. 1919 advertisement

    First – Get Bulletin 250 – 88 Pages of Bargains

    Zelnicker in St. Louis

    Before buying or selling Rails – Locomotives – Cars – boilers – Compressors – Cranes, Hoists, Machinery, Wire Rope, etc.

  • St. Louis County, Missouri - Redwoods Reservation - Limestone Quarry Remnants (Limestone), presented on the Conservation Atlas web site.

    According to this web site, visitors to the Redwoods Reservation will be able to view “remnants of extensive limestone, clay and gravel quarrying.”

    Redwood Reservation - Quarry Trail Photographs, photographs on the mohiking.com web site.

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