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Quarries in Missouri & Quarry Links, Photographs, and Articles
St. Louis – John H. McCarty thru Linn’s

  • St. Louis, Missouri - John H. McCarty Monument Co. (from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, May 1930, Vol. 6, No. 11, pp. 27)

    The John H. McCarty Monument Company was listed as one of the customers of the Mount Brothers of Memphis Missouri, who sold their Air Take-off Device used in carving cemetery stones.

    • St. Louis City, Missouri - Conrad Kempf Limestone Quarry located at the intersection of Minnesota & Maeder Street (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

      Location and product.

      Kempf, Conrad (I, 20): - Mr. Kempf has a quarry situated next to Mr. Friedericks, which was opened in 1883. Dimension and building stone, and macadam are produced. The quarry is drained by a subterranean stream. It is about one hundred and eighty feet long by one hundred feet wide, and exposes the following columnar section, in descending order:

      Section.

      1. Loess - 10-20 feet.
      2. Residuary clay, mixed with the gravel of the drift - 18 inches.
      3. Limestone, partially decomposed - 6 feet.
      4. Limestone, drab, uniform fine grained, highly fossiliferous, in two and sometimes three layers - 5 feet.
      5. Limestone, gray and light brown, chert layers and concretions - 3 feet.
      6. Limestone, light gray, uniform fine grained - 1 foot, 2 inches.
      7. Limestone, dark and light gray, rather fine grained, quite hard - 1 foot, 10 inches.
      8. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, in three layers - 1 foot, 8 inches.
      9. Limestone, dark gray, coarse grained, fossiliferous - 4 feet, 10 inches.
      10. Same as number 9 - 6 inches.
      11. Limestone, gray, coarse and fine grained, in a variable number of layers - 3 feet, 8 inches.

      Total thickness of rock - 27 feet, 8 inches.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the C. Kempf Co. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Kempf Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

      “This quarry, which is located two miles north of Barretts Station, on the Missouri Pacific railroad, was opened by John Reige in 1875 and has been worked intermittently ever since. It is situated on the west side of the bluff and has a working face of about 150 feet.

      “The rock is limestone and occurs in two ledges of ten feet each. The stone in the lower ledge is very fossiliferous and varies in color from yellowish buff to gray, depending upon its position with reference to the bedding and jointing planes. It has a granular matrix, in which are imbedded large and small crystals of calcite. It can be split into beds about two feet in thickness.

      “The upper ledge varies in thickness from six to ten feet. The stone has a yellowish or buff color and is somewhat softer than in the lower bed. It can be split into beds of almost any thickness. The quarry is covered with one foot of broken chert nodules and three feet of red clay. The major joints strike N. 70° E., N.50° E. and N. 30° E. The quarry is worked entirely by hand and the stone is used chiefly in buildings, bridge abutments and macadam pavements.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Kempf and Hoge Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned and operated by Conrad Kempt and John Hoge, is located on Pennsylvania avenue and Maeder street, and joins the Frederick quarry on the east.

    “It consists of a large sunken pit which is being worked mainly along the south side. The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom:

    20-25 ft. - Loess stripping.

    22 ft. - Fine grained, compact, light gray limestone in beds from two to six inches in thickness.

    6 ft. - Finely crystalline, gray limestone. Contains tight sutures from two to ten inches apart. Small nodules of flint occur in the upper part of the bed. It is badly decomposed along the eastern side of the quarry, where it has a brown color. It contains pockets of clay and soil and where these occur the stone is chiefly waste.

    3 ft. 6 in. - Consists of three beds of limestone. One has an arenaceous texture, another is very brittle and is known as the ‘glass ledge,’ and the third is a gray limestone which works well into ashler blocks.

    1 ft. 6 in. - Compact, gray limestone, used mainly for piers.

    7 in. - Crystalline, gray limestone, used for sewer intakes.

    1 ft. 4 in. - Gray limestone, used for piers.

    7 ft. 6 in. - Finely crystalline, gray limestone in beds from two to six inches in thickness. Thin seams of shale occur between the beds.

    10 ft. - Soft, yellowish gray limestone in beds from four to eight inches in thickness.

    “The lower ten feet is soft and partly decomposed on account of which it is not quarried at the present time. The stone in the upper part of the face is very durable. The thin white beds have been used in the manufacture of limestone flour. The quarry is supplied with natural drainage. The stone is hoisted in movable wagon boxes by means of a derrick and steam hoist. Five men are employed in the quarry.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Adam Kern Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Kern, Adam: - See Albernacius.”

  • St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - the Michael Kinealy Quarry (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    The following information was taken from the table entitled, “Table IV. Tables indicating the Amount and Kinds of Rock in the Different States”: The Michael Kinealy Quarry, City of St. Louis, Saint Louis County, Limestone/Dolomite limestone, color: drab; quarry opened in 1875.

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Kinealy and Sons Limestone Quarry located between Florissant, 22nd, Penrose & Angelica streets (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and product.

    Kinealy and Sons (K, 7): - This firm has a quarry which is situated in the block between Florissant, Twenty-second, Penrose and Angelica streets. It was opened in the spring of 1889. Building stone, curbing and macadam are the chief products. The quarry is about sixty feet long, fifty feet wide and exposes the following columnar section, in descending series: -

    Section.

    1. Loess, drift and decomposing limestone - 26 feet.
    2. Limestone, lavender, fine grained, very fossiliferous - 1 foot.
    3. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, crystalline - 1 foot, 6 inches.
    4. Limestone, gray to lavender, coarse grained in several layers - 4 feet.
    5. Limestone, gray to drab, fine grained, very fossiliferous - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    6. Limestone, gray and lavender, fine and coarse grained, in layers from two to ten inches thick - 6 feet, 6 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 15 feet, 6 inches.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Kinealy Bros. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
    • St. Louis, Missouri – the Edward Kinealy & Bros. Quarry (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, March 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 4, “Notes from Quarry and Shop” section, pp. 410)

      “St. Louis, Mo. – Kate Brennan filed suit for damages in the sum of $5,000 against Edward Kinealy & Bros, who operate a rock quarry on Florissant avenue and Twenty-second street. Her husband, she says, while employed by the defendant, received injuries which resulted in his death.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the King & Zesch Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Knaus Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is operated by Mr. Joseph Knaus of 4337 California avenue, is located at the intersection of Minnesota avenue and Delor street. It is a large, rectangular, sunken pit 250 feet by 20 feet. It is bounded on three sides by city streets, and must be quarried out of the bottom. The quarry now has a 55-foot vertical face, covered with from two to twenty-five feet of loess stripping. The bottom of the quarry is in the ‘sewer intake ledge,’ and the same stone is obtained as at the Eyerman quarry. The upper sandy ledge is not as distinctly cross bedded as in the Eyerman quarry. At the east end, the stone above this bed has been removed by erosion. At the west end, about ten feet of heavily bedded limestone occurs above the sandy ledge. The beds have an apparent gentle dip to the west. Considerable water enters the quarry, but it is carried away by a natural underground outlet at the northwest corner. The water is pumped from the west side into this drain.

    “The major joints strike north and south, and apparently do not extend to a depth of more than forty feet from the surface. A fault occurs at the east end, having a downthrow of about fifteen feet to the west. This fault zone is about eight feet wide and consists of limestone boulders, cemented together with calcite.

    “From three to five men are employed at this quarry. The stone is hauled up an inclined roadway at the east end. Rubble and foundation stone are the chief products. In the past some of the stone has been broken by hand for macadam.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Knaus and Willis Stone Quarry (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Knaus and Willis (J, 19): - See Allen.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - the Krug and Zesch Limestone Quarry located at Minnesota & Delor Avenues (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and product.

    Krug and Zesch (I, 20): - This firm has a quarry at the corner of Minnesota and Delor avenues. It was first worked in 1869. The output consists of macadam, paving, building stone and ‘furnace rock.’ The quarry is drained by a subterranean stream. It is about two hundred feet long, one hundred feet wide, and exposes the following vertical section, in descending series: -

    Section.

    1. Loess, yellow clay - 5-20 feet.
    2. Drift (gravel) and residuary clay - 1 foot.
    3. Limestone, decomposed - 3 feet.
    4. Limestone, very siliceous - 5 feet.
    5. Limestone, in three beds, gray, fine grained, lower and upper beds rather siliceous - 3-4 feet.
    6. Limestone, in two beds, almost white, rather coarse grained, suture joints - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    7. Limestone, gray, very fine grained, compact, brittle, called ‘glass ledge’ - 1 foot, 3 inches.
    8. Limestone, dark gray and brown, numerous calcite crystals, disintegrates rapidly - 1 foot, 10 inches.
    9. Limestone, gray, compact - 1 foot, 2 inches.
    10. Limestone, in thin layers, white and gray, cherty - 4 feet.
    11. Limestone, in thin layers, white and gray - 5 feet.
    12. Limestone, gray, fine grained, chert concretions and layers - 4 feet.
    13. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, siliceous - 4 feet.
    14. Limestone, gray, coarse grained - 3 inches.
    15. Limestone, gray, coarse grained - 4 inches.
    16. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, fossiliferous - 1 foot, 8 inches.
    17. Limestone, gray, coarse grained, easily disintegrated - 7 inches.
    18. Limestone, gray, rather coarse grained, hard - 1 foot, 8 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 40 feet, 3 inches.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the L. M. Rumsey Manufacturing Co. (Advertisement) (from Mines and Minerals, A Mining and metallurgical Journal, June, 1902, Vol. XXII, No. 11, pp. 71)

    L. M. Rumsey Manufacturing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, June 1902 advertisement

    Knowles Steam Pump Works

    Pumps For Every Possible Duty. Steam, Power, Electric, and Air-Driven Pumps for Mining Service. High-Pressure, Compound, Triple-Expansion, Direct-Acting, and Flywhell Pumping Engines, also Pumps with Mechanically operated Water Valves. Single and Duplex Air Compressors

    Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, London.

    For Sale By L. M. Rumsey, Mfg. Co., St. Louis

    Hendrie & Bolthoff Mfg. & Supply Co., Denver, Colo. - The Mine & Smelter Supply Co., Salt Lake City, Utah

    Park & Lacy Co., San Francisco, Cal. - Anaconda Cooper Mining Co., Butte, Mont.

    Montana Hardware Co., - Butte, Mont. - A. M. Holter Hardware Co., Helena, Mont.

    The Scranton Supply & Machinery Co., Scranton, Pa. - The Pennsylvania Supply Co., Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

    Hazleton Machinery & Supply Co., Hazleton, Pa.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co. (Advertisement ) (from Mines and Minerals, A Mining and metallurgical Journal, June, 1902, Vol. XXII, No. 11, pp. 71)

    Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., St. Louis, Missouri, June 1902 advertisement

    The Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., Cincinnati, Ohio

    313 McPhee Building Denver

    Air Compressors - All Types - All Sizes

    Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit, Pittsburg, Philadelphia, Boston, New York, Cleveland, Atlanta.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Lamb Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned and operated by Nicholas Lamb, is located on 66 th street, directly north of Delmar Garden. It is a rectangular sunken pit about 200 feet by 125 feet. It is ninety feet deep and has from ten to thirty feet of loess stripping.

    “The stone is taken out in ledges from four to six feet thick. It is the usual dark gray, crystalline limestone of the St. Louis formation, and is used chiefly for buildings and street construction.

    “The quarry is equipped with a No. 3 Gates crusher and accessories, three derricks and a steam hoist. The crushed stone is separated into three sizes, two and one-half inch, one and one-half inch and screenings.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - James Lauritzen Limestone Quarry located at Webser (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location and product.

    Lauritzen, James (56): - Mr. Lauritzen’s quarry is situated at Webster. The product consists of building and dimension stone, and macadam. The quarry is in the St. Louis Limestone.

    “The following section, in descending series, was obtained here: -

    Section.

    1. Stripping, soil, residuary clay and decomposing limestone - 5 feet.
    2. Limestone, almost white, fine grained, crystalline, conspicuously cross bedded - 5 feet.
    3. Limestone, dark gray, coarse grained, suture joints, chert concretions, in numerous layers - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    4. Limestone, drab, lithographic, in eight layers - 3 feet, 9 inches.
    5. Limestone, chocolate to gray, fine grained, fossiliferous - 9 inches.
    6. Limestone, lavender, fine grained, chert concretions - 1 foot.
    7. Limestone, lavender, fine grained, fossiliferous, in four layers - 2 feet.
    8. Limestone, varying in color and texture, in layers one or two inches thick - 3 feet.
    9. Limestone, lavender, fine grained, in layers from six to eight inches thick - 2 feet, 6 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 20 feet, 6 inches.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - F. W. Linn’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)

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