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Quarries in Missouri & Quarry Links, Photographs, and Articles
St. Louis - General Info. thru Baldwin

  • St. Louis, Missouri – 1890 Stone Quarries Table & Sketch Map showing the location of the Quarries, Clay Works and Clay Pits in the City of St. Louis (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)
  • St. Louis, Missouri – Map of St. Louis showing the location of quarries. (The following map is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    Plate XXXIV. Map of St. Louis showing the location of quarries. Plate XXXIV. Map of St. Louis (Missouri) showing the location of quarries (circa 1904)
  • St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - the St. Louis Area Quarries (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    “Saint Louis Quarries. - The most extensive quarries in this state are located in and near the city of Saint Louis. The formation is the Saint Louis division of the sub-Carboniferous period. The extent of the quarry industry in this locality is not so much due to the superiority of the stone as to its accessibility to the Saint Louis market. A representative section of the quarries is shown at Mr. Moran’s quarry, which shows 20 feet of loose material; 20 feet of thin, shelly limestone, in layers from 3 to 8 inches in thickness; 3 feet of brownish-colored limestone, containing some chert. From this quarry a specimen of Productus marginicinctus, a very rare fossil peculiar to this group, has been obtained.

    “The stone from this quarry is used for the construction of foundations and other ordinary building purposes, and for street pavements, especially for macadam. The stone from the best Saint Louis quarries is strong and durable, and is also well adapted to the manufacture of lime. Its principal use has been in the construction of foundations. The excavation has been carried at one quarry to a depth of 60 feet, but at present the quarry is not worked to a greater depth than 40 feet, 20 feet of the lower portion of the excavation being filled with water. A section at this quarry shows 8 feet of cap-rock; 8 feet of limestone in thin layers; 9 feet of limestone in layers 12, 4, and 2 inches thick, and below this is a massive, heavy bed of limestone; still lower the beds are from 1 foot to 2 feet thick, this being the most applicable for building purposes. The quarry of Mr. Philip Steifel has become somewhat noted for its fine mineral specimens, including calcite, pearl-spar, dog-tooth spar, millerite, and fluor-spar. The fluor-spar is of a yellow color; the calcite is white, or colored on the outside with millerite. In some places the limestone has a greenish tint from the presence of nickel-sulphide. The millerite has bunches of stray hair-like crystals of a bronze color, and each crystal is a delicate hair-like mineral. It has been found penetrating the calcite and extending from side to side in the limestone. It is also frequently found associated with the pearl-spar.

    “Among the most valuable of these quarries as regards the quality of the material are three at Cote Brilliant, about 2 ½ miles from the city of Saint Louis. Its development is only retarded by its being at a greater distance from the market than many of the other quarries.

    “A section at one of these quarries shows 25 feet of loose material; 15 feet of gray limestone, in layers about 3 inches in thickness; 4 feet of limestone, in layers of variable thickness; 2 feet of close-grained gray limestone; five 3-inch layers of gray limestone; one 22-inch layer of gray limestone; and 15 feet of limestone below the water level.

    “The best layers are pure limestone, susceptible of being quite highly polished, very strong and durable, and quite well adapted for architectural purposes.

    “The formation in the quarry of Mr. Gottlieb Eyerman probably belongs to the upper portion of the Saint Louis group, though it may belong to the next higher, the Chester group.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the St. Louis Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    St. Louis.

    “Practically all the common building stone, as well as the limestone used for macadam and concrete in St. Louis, is obtained from the formation known as the St. Louis Limestone. This formation belongs to the Mississippian or Lower Carboniferous. It has an estimated thickness of 250 feet and underlies a large part of the eastern half of St. Louis county, including the city of St. Louis. North and west of the city, it is overlain with beds belonging to the Pennsylvanian or Upper Carboniferous.

    “The Mississippian series forms precipitous bluffs along the Mississippi river south of the city, and constitute a part of what is known as the St. Louis Carboniferous basin.

    “In Bullet No. 3, published by the Missouri Geological Survey in 1890, there are several tables of chemical analyses which indicate the variations in the composition of the different beds. These tables have been copied in this report and will be found in Chapter XI. The variations in composition between different beds show that there must have been a considerable difference in the condition at that time the sediments were deposited. The insoluble residue varies from 0.76% to 19.96%; the combined oxides vary from 0.16% to 11.75%; calcium carbonate varies from 75.00% to 97.36%; and the magnesian carbonate varies from 0.59% to 31.95%. The variations in composition are not gradual, but often very abrupt. For example, in the Steifel quarry, two adjacent beds contain respectively 3.41% and 18.70% of insoluble matter, while the percentage of magnesian carbonate is respectively 0.76% and 31.51%. Similar abrupt changes in composition occur at other horizons. As a whole, the upper portion of the formation is a purer calcium carbonate limestone than the lower.

    “At one time the purer beds of limestone were used in the manufacture of quicklime, which is reported to have been of very good quality. When the large kilns were built west and south of the city for the manufacture of lime from the Trenton formation, the quicklime industry was abandoned at the quarries in which St. Louis limestone was being exploited. Some of the beds in this formation are almost pure calcium carbonate and perfectly adapted for use in the manufacture of Portland cement. at Fort Bellfontaine, the St. Louis Portland Cement Company is using this limestone and Coal Measure shale for the manufacture of an excellent grade of cement.

    “The quarries in the city are known as ‘bluff quarries’ and ‘sunken quarries.’ The former occur along the Mississippi river bluffs, while the latter occur in the city where the stone can be obtained only by working below the surface. A number of these rectangular, sunken quarries have reached a depth of from 100 to 125 feet. The stone is usually hoisted from the sunken quarries with steam hoist, although in a number of cases inclined roadways have been built, up which the stone is hauled by team. Where the stone is hoisted, it is usually loaded on the floor of the quarry into movable wagon boxes which are moved directly from the derrick onto the wagon frames. The ‘bluff quarries’ require very little machinery. The stone is usually well jointed and is comparatively easy to quarry.

    “The Quaternary deposits consist of loess, which covers a large part of the county. This deposit frequently has a thickness of thirty or forty feet and is sometimes a source of considerable expense in working the quarries. In the case of a sunken quarry, when the soil and clay are once removed, there is no more stripping, but in the ‘bluff quarries’ there is continual removal as the quarry is extended into the hill.

    “The principal products of the St. Louis quarries are rubble and crushed stone. The output of the latter product has increased very rapidly during the past few years, until now it constitutes the most valuable product. Very little of the stone is cut or dressed for building construction, although a number of the beds have every appearance of being desirable building stone. The Hill-O’Mera Construction Co. and the Stolle Stone Co. each produce a small amount of cut stone. None of the other companies operate channelers or saws. The purer calcium carbonate stone, at a number of the quarries, is used for furnace flux. At two of the smaller quarries, the stone is used chiefly for this purpose. At the Fruin-Bambrick Construction Co.’s quarry, a small amount of the limestone is ground into ‘flour,’ which is used in finishing interior walls and in the construction of asphalt pavements.

    “The total value of the production of the St. Louis quarries for 1903 was $834,614.03. The following table gives the value of the different products of the quarries:

    Rubble - $88,309 P - $119,617.80

    Crushed stone - 865,446 yds. - $635, 536.31

    Cut stone - 1,500 cu. ft. - $1,500.00

    Riprap - 25,376 yds. - $20,126.96

    Flux }

    Flour } $38,480.39

    Miscellaneous uses - $19,352.58.

    “Formerly many large quarries were operated in different parts of the city. Many of these have been filled and buildings erected on the sites of the former quarries (by 1904). Quarrying along the river bluffs is not as extensive as formerly.”

    “The following is a list of the quarries inspected in 1902 in the city of St. Louis and environs:

    J. W. Allen. Joseph Knaus.
    Atlantic Quarry & Construction Co. Kempf and Hoge.
    Bambrick-Bates Construction Co. J. A. Lohrum.
    Wm. Bemmey. Nic Lamb.
    Albert Bussen. T. Madden (Maddensville).
    T. Cavanaugh. E. K. Moss (Maddensville).
    City Workhouse. Martin Kempf (Barretts).
    Crystal Spring Quarry (Vigus). Meramec Highlands
    Phillip Emmerick Mound City Construction Co.
    Eyerman Bros. Perkinson Bros.
    Jacob Freidrich. Wm. Pepper.
    Fehlig Construction Co. H. Ruecking & Co.
    Fruin-Bambrick Construction Co. John Rupricht.
    Geo. T. Fink. St. Louis Portland Cement Co.
    Geisel Construction Co. Stolle Stone Co.
    Haller Bros. Sinclair Construction Co. (Vigus).
    Herman Construction Co. Phillip Stifel.
    Hill-O’Mera Construction Co. Wade Bros. Construction Co.
    Fred Hoffman.  
  • St. Louis Area of Missouri - Limestones and Dolomites in the St. Louis Area (St. Louis County, Jefferson County, and Lincoln County) (Excerpt from Limestones and Dolomites in the St. Louis Area,* Report of Investigations No. 5, by Norman S. Hinchey,** R. B. Fisher, and W. A. Calhoun,*** State of Missouri Department of Business and Administration, Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1947. Published in cooperation with the Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior. Used with permission.)

    (Footnotes to page 5)

    * Published by permission of the director, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior. This paper represents cooperative work between the Rolla Division, Metallurgical Branch, of the Bureau of Mines and the Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources.

    ** Geologist, Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources and assistant professor of geology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.

    *** Metallurgists, Bureau of Mines, Rolla Division, Metallurgical Branch, Rolla, Missouri.

    Introduction

    Purpose and Nature of the Investigation. This investigation was initiated for the purpose of obtaining basic data pertaining to certain rocks occurring in the St. Louis area in east central Missouri. The study involved determination of the chemical quality of rock samples taken from selected strata in the area. Chemical analyses were made in the course of the laboratory work.

    “The investigation was made (1) to evaluate rock materials that have not been exploited commercially and (2) to discover new uses for rock deposits already in use as raw materials in the mineral industries. In order to obtain reliable data, field procedures were restricted as to selection of sites for sampling and the methods of sampling at each site.

    “Field study included reconnaissance over the region in an attempt to appraise any readily visible variations in the composition of the stratigraphic units found in the area. This phase of the investigation revealed many obvious variations in a number of the surface exposures in the sequence of sedimentary rock formations which make the bedrock of the region.

    “Many of the accessible exposures of rock were avoided in the sampling because hand samples could not be considered truly representative of the variable composition of such rocks. In the detailed descriptions of some of the sections sampled for analysis, mention is made of the variations in composition seen in outcrops or freshly quarried exposures. At places these changes are rather abrupt, not only from bed to bed vertically, but also along certain beds themselves in a lateral direction.

    “Every attempt was made to obtain relatively unweathered, fresh material. Consequently, quarried faces of rock were sampled in preference to natural outcrops, shallow road cuts, or natural bluff faces. Nevertheless, most of the samples from open quarry faces or from tunnel quarries were fairly representative of the type of material which would be encountered in ordinary quarrying operations. Near-surface strata that showed obvious alteration by weathering processes were not sampled for analysis.

    “In the selection of sites for sampling, attention was given to such economic factors as proximity of the rock to possible market, accessibility for quarrying or mining operations, and availability of transportation facilities.

    “In the main, the sampling was confined to limestones in the area, although one section of shale was sampled. These limestones included a variety of dominantly calcareous rocks. Some were relatively pure limestones, whereas others were impure and might be classed as magnesian, dolomitic, argillaceous, or siliceous, depending upon the nature and amount of their impurities.

    Methods of Sampling. The selection of beds to be sampled depended on the nature of the strata encountered. In rare cases where relatively uniform composition was obvious, sampling was done at approximately regular intervals through the vertical section. At most of the localities, however, samples were taken to represent each of the principal changes in Lithology encountered in the vertical section. In a few instances where variation was noted among relatively thin beds of a sequence, a sample was made up that represented an average of these beds. These few samples are thus somewhat similar to channel samples.

    “In the effort to obtain relatively fresh material, large blocks often were sledged to minimize the amount of surface-altered material in the sample. Final chipping and trimming of samples was done with the ordinary bricklayer’s hammer, and the material was collected in labeled cloth sacks for shipment to the laboratory. Each sample contained approximately 750 to 1,000 grams of rock, although no attempt was made to be exact in this regard.

    Location of Samples. The various locations at which rock sections were sampled are shown on the accompanying map, Figure 1. Each location is designated by a letter of the alphabet, and these locality letters correspond to the key letter in the designation of the various individual samples taken for analysis. Thus, sample A-5 was obtained at locality A and was sample 5 from that locality. The same sample numbers were used for each of the specimens in the tabulations of analyses and in the detailed descriptions of the measured rock section at each of the localities. Reference to the detailed descriptions of the measured rock section at each of the localities. Reference to the detailed description of the rock section will give the reader knowledge of the occurrence, thickness, lithologic appearance, approximate elevation, stratigraphic position, and similar pertinent data for each rock unit sampled and analyzed. A detailed description of the geographic location of each locality which should be of aid in visiting any of the sites is also given. The locality is placed by its section, township, range designation and by the direction and distance to the nearest town. Of the 17 localities sampled, 13 are in St. Louis County, 3 in an adjoining portion of Jefferson County, and 1 in Lincoln County.

    Figure 1. Locality Map - Localities Samples. Figure 1. Locality Map - Localities Samples. (St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1947)

    General Remarks. About 270 samples were obtained and analyzed from 17 localities in the course of the field work. These samples were from Ordovician and Mississippian geologic formations. The approximate stratigraphic position of each of the rock sections in the geologic sequence of sedimentary strata in the area is indicated on the generalized graphic columnar section, Figure 2. A summary of the stratigraphic distribution of the sections (localities), and the samples are indicated as follows:

    Geological Origins of Samples Geological Origins of Samples (St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1947)

    “The stratigraphic distribution of the individual localities sampled are tabulated as follows:

    St. Louis formation: Localities D, E, G, H, J, N, and S.

    Spergen formation: Localities E and M.

    Maquoketa formation: Locality F.

    Kimmswick formation: Localities K, P, Q, R, and U.

    Plattin formation: Locality C.

    Joachim formation: Localities A and B.

    Previous Work. Chemical and physical tests of rock samples from the St. Louis area have been made in the past by the Missouri Division of Geological Survey. As the results of some of these analyses were published, the following publications should be noted:

    “(1) ‘The Clay, Stone, Lime, and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,’ by G. E. Ladd, Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin 3, 1890.

    “(2) ‘The Quarrying Industry of Missouri,’ by E. R. Buckley and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, volume 2, second series, 1904.

    “(3) ‘The Lime and Cement Resources of Missouri,’ by H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, volume 6, second series, 1907.

    Acknowledgments.

    “The authors express appreciation for the assistance of Edward L. Clark, director and state geologist, Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources; C. Travis Anderson, former Chief, Rolla Division, Metallurgical Branch, Bureau of Mines; and R. G. Knickerbocker, Chief, Rolla Division, Metallurgical Branch, Bureau of Mines. Grateful acknowledgment is also made to the staff of the Rolla chemical analytical laboratory for the many analyses made in connection with the work.

    Stratigraphy.

    “The accompanying generalized geologic columnar section (Figure 2) shows graphically the approximate stratigraphic position of each of the rock sequences, as indicated by the proper reference letter opposite that portion of the geologic section sampled. Thus, it may be seen that samples taken at locality A were obtained from beds in the Joachim formation, approximately 40 feet below the contact between the Joachim and the overlying Plattin formation.

    “The geologic columnar section also indicates in a somewhat generalized way the lithologic composition, approximate local thickness, geologic age, and stratigraphic relations of the various rock units of the local geologic section. All of the formations shown are known to occur at the surface or beneath the surface residual material and soil cover in St. Louis or St. Louis County.”

    Figure 2. Generalized Geologic Columnar Section. Figure 2. Generalized Geologic Columnar Section (St. Louis, Missouri, circa 1947)

    (Please Note: The individual Field Descriptions and Analytical Information entries are placed according to location in the Missouri “Quarries” section below for St. Louis and other designated localities. A list of the Locality designations and locations are provided below, although this list is not included in the publication.)

    Locality A - Glencoe (near), St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality B - Eureka (east of), St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality C - Eureka (east of), St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality D - Rock Hill, St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality E - Osage Hills (east of), St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality F - Valley Park, St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality G - St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - Bussen Quarries Inc.

    Locality H - Rock Hill, St. Louis County, Missouri - Riverview Quarry & Materials.

    Locality J - St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - Bussen Quarries Inc.

    Locality K - Glencoe (northwest of), St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality N - St. Louis County, Missouri.

    Locality P - Glen Park, Jefferson County, Missouri.

    Locality Q - Glen Park, Jefferson County, Missouri.

    Locality R - Barnhart (north of), Jefferson County, Missouri.

    Locality S - White House Station (south of), St. Louis County, Missouri - Bussen Quarries, Inc.

    Locality U - Elsberry (southeast of), Lincoln County, Missouri.

    “Classification of Limestones

    “Limestone occurs in nature with a wide gradation of constituents, from a pure limestone to calcareous shale, sandstone, or dolomite. The content of a limestone may vary from a pure calcium carbonate to one in which the impurities may vary more than 50 percent. A pure, dry calcium carbonate loses practically 44 percent of its weight during burning, while the clay, iron, and sands that may be present lose very little. Therefore, the percentage of impurities in a lime is almost double that of the limestone. The nature of a lime is greatly affected by the kind and amount of these impurities. Consequently, a rigid classification of products derived form raw materials which may have such a wide range of composition is impossible, especially where the different constituents have a different effect upon the properties of the lime. For this reason no distinct division can be made between any classes of lime that appear in this report.

    “The industrial uses of a lime, hydrated lime, and limestone can be classified into three general groups: high calcium only, magnesium permissible, and high magnesium required.* It would be impossible to definitely classify a lime for use in any particular industry since each industry has certain chemical or physical requirements that must be met. Therefore, before any limestone deposit is considered for a commercial operation on the basis of the following classifications, it is recommended that conclusive tests be made to verify its quality.

    (* Page 72 footnote: National Bureau of Standards, Lime: Its Importance and Uses, Circ. 30.)

    High Calcium Lime. Industries that require high-calcium lime, hydrated lime, and limestones are as follows: natural cement, sand-lime brick, soda ash, caustic soda, bleaching powder, calcium carbide, calcium cyanamide, sugar, and tanning.

    “Samples having possible use in these industries are as follows;

    C - (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27)

    D - (5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28)

    E - (0, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14)

    K - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

    G - (3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)

    H - (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25)

    J - (1, 2, 8, 9)

    M - (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11)

    N - (1, 2, 3, 4, 4A, 5, 6)

    P - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18)

    Q - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16A, 16B, 16C, 16D, 16E)

    R - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)

    S - (1, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 19)

    U - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13)

    Calcium and/or Magnesia Lime. Industries using lime, hydrated lime, and limestone where magnesia impurities can be tolerated and are not necessarily detrimental are as follows: glass, water purification, illuminating gas, ammonia, calcium nitrate, fertilizers,* insecticide, sprays, wood distillation, paints, glycerin, lubricants, and candles.

    (* Page 73 footnote: Magnesia is at least as valuable as lime for use as a fertilizer.)

    “Samples having possible use in these industries are as follows:

    C- 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27)

    D - (5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28)

    E - (0, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14)

    K - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

    G - (3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 22, 23, 24, 25)

    J - (1, 2, 8, 9)

    M - (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11)

    N - (1, 2, 3, 4, 4A, 5, 6)

    P - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18)

    Q - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 16A, 16B, 16C, 16D, 16E)

    R - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16)

    S - (1, 2A, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 19)

    U - (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13)

    Magnesia Lime. Industries using lime, hydrated lime, and limestone, where magnesium is definitely required in the processes are as follows: ceramics and paper.

    “Samples having possible use in these industries are as follows:

    S - (2A, 3)

    Hydraulic Lime. The gray limes are classified as hydraulic limes and natural cements. These limes contain appreciable clay and silica materials which give the lime varying degrees of hydraulic properties. The hydraulic limes exhibit some slaking in water and at the same time have some hydraulic properties of cement. The specific uses for this type of product appear to be confined to the construction and structural industry, and even there in specialized cases.

    “The samples in this hydraulic lime classified are as follows:

    A - (1, 2, 3,)

    B - (2, 4, 5, 6, 7)

    C - 5

    D - (13, 15, 14, 25, 26, 27)

    E - (1, 3, 4)

    G - (1, 7, 17, 18)

    H - (6, 17 A, 17B, 21)

    J - (3, 4, 5, 6)

    M - (5, 8)

    R - 17

    S - (2, 5, 14, 16, 17, 18)

    Natural Cements. This type of material is obtained from argillaceous limestones which contain 10 to 30 percent sandy and argillaceous matter, and will not slake without first being finely ground. They harden under water much more rapidly and form a harder final product than hydraulic lime. The samples that are in this natural cement classification are:

    B - (1, 3)

    D - (9, 12, 18)

    G - (2, 6)

    H - (5, 18)

    J - 7

    P - 19

    S - 6

    Mineral Wool. In order to select the samples that are suitable for use in the production of mineral wool, the percentages of the constituents determined by the calcined analysis of each sample were combined as 3 components - SiO2, RO, and R2 O3. The RO was composed of CaO and MgO and the R2 O3 of AO2 O3 and Fe2 O3. In consideration of the ternary system, SiO2 -RO-R2 O3, it was observed that some of the samples were suitable for use as a raw material in the manufacture of mineral wool. Four classifications were made in accordance with the quality of the material and were as follows:

    “(1) Samples classified as suitable for the manufacture of mineral wool are: F - (3, 6, 9, 11, 14)

    “(2) Samples classified as probable woolrock material are: F - (5, 10, 12, 13, 15)

    “(3) Samples classified as being a good lime blend material for the production of mineral wool are: F - (2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20)

    “(4) Samples considered as having a possible use as a lime blend material in the manufacture of mineral wool are: F - (13, 15, 21, 22)

    “The samples F-1, F-(1), and M-9 were not classified for industrial use as the percentages of constituents present did not indicate that they could be used in any of the industries mentioned in this report.”

  • St. Louis Area of Missouri - Limestones and Dolomites in the St. Louis Area (St. Louis County, Jefferson County, and Lincoln County)

    Locality H (Field Descriptions and Analytical Information)

    Remarks. The samples from this locality were taken from a freshly quarried face at the quarry of the Riverview Quarry & Materials.

    “Location: In the NW ¼ NE ¼ sec. 33, T. 48 N., R. 6 E., St. Louis County, Missouri. This quarry, also known as the Heintz quarry, is in the east bluff of the Missouri river, about one-fourth mile north of the end of the New Halls Ferry Road. Samples were taken from the northeast part of the quarry.

    Transportation. The quarry is served by all-weather roads, and barge-loading facilities are available on the Missouri River a few rods west of the quarry.

    Elevation. The quarry floor at the north end of the quarry is approximately 425 feet above sea level (1946), and this elevation was taken as an assumed datum to which elevations noted in the description of the geologic section refer. The elevations, which are given as greater than 464, are not true sea level elevations and do not refer directly to the assumed datum (quarry floor). The beds in the quarry dip to the southwest, and the highest beds sampled (above an elevation of 464 feet) are in the southwest part of the quarry. The elevations greater than 464 feet would be correct if there was no dip at the location and if the bluff were correspondingly higher. Therefore, all elevations cited that were greater than 464 feet above sea level are placed in quotation marks. These elevations represent the proper relative stratigraphic position of the beds in the sequence, but not their proper sea level elevation.

    Stratigraphic Position. The limestone strata sampled at this locality are in the upper part of the St. Louis formation (Mississippian). The uppermost beds in the quarry are thought to lie in a stratigraphic position which is near the top of the St. Louis formation - perhaps no more than 25 feet below the base of the overlying Ste. Genevieve formation (Mississippian).

    Samples. Twenty-seven samples, H-1 to H-25, inclusive, were taken at this location. Three samples, H-17, H-17A, H-17B, were taken from a single bed in the sequence at different places in the quarry. This special procedure was used in an attempt to determine the nature of the pronounced lateral variation in composition, particularly obvious in the case of this bed (No. 11 in the geologic section described below).

    Geologic Section. The sequence, from top to bottom, is as follows:

    20. Loess and residual soil; thickness variable, usually 10 to 20 feet - 15 feet.

    19. Limestone, similar to No. 18 below; bedding planes better developed and more open as a result of surface weathering. Elevation, ‘470’ to ‘475’ feet. Sample H-25 from these beds is an average sample, roughly representing an aggregate of the 5 feet of limestone beds.

    18. Limestone, variable, gray, fine-grained to medium-grained; in beds 2- to 6 inches thick - average about 3 inches. A prominent 1- to 2-inch shaly limestone and limy shale parting occurs at an elevation of ‘467 1/2 ‘ feet and another at an elevation of ‘468’ feet. Elevation, ‘464’ to ‘470’ feet. Sample H-24 from these beds is an average sample, roughly representing an aggregate of the 6 feet of beds - 6 feet.

    17. Limestone, gray, medium-grained; irregular stylolitic partings ½ to 3 inches apart. Elevation, 462 to 464 feet. Sample H-23 was taken at an elevation of 463 feet. - 2 feet.

    16. Limestone, gray; fine- to medium-grained beds 2 to 7 inches thick; similar to No. 15, but with coarser texture and thicker beds. Elevation, 459 ½ to 462 feet. Sample H-22, taken at an elevation of 460 feet, is an approximate average sample of the beds - 2 ½ feet.

    15. Limestone, gray, dense to sublithographic; in beds 1 to 2 inches thick; separated by gray shale partings that make about 5 percent of the total. Elevation, 457 to 459 ½ feet. Sample H-21, taken at an elevation of 458 feet, is an average sample of the aggregate of these beds. - 2 ½ feet.

    14. Limestone, gray, fine-grained, dense. Elevation, 455 ½ to 457 feet. Sample H-20, taken at an elevation of 456 feet, is an average sample to represent these beds. - 1 ½ feet.

    13. Limestone, gray, fine-grained to dense and sublithographic with conchoidal fracture. Elevation, 454 to 455 ½ feet. Sample H-19 was taken at an elevation of 455 feet. - 1 ½ feet.

    12. Limestone and shaly limestone, greenish-gray, granular and fossiliferous. A 6- to 8-inch bed of semiclastic character. Elevation, 453 ½ to 454 feet. Sample H-18 was taken at an elevation of 454 feet. - ½ foot.

    11. Limestone, variable, dolomitic at places, gray to blackish-gray, fine-grained to granular. Lateral variation in this bed is pronounced. Brown-black dolomite replaces the limestone at several places in the quarry. Marked variations occur within a few inches laterally along the bed. Elevation, 451 to 453 ½ feet. There is a distinct parting near the middle. Samples were taken at places in this stratum to show contracting compositions. They were taken at the horizon of elevations 453 and labeled H-17, H-17A, and H-17B. - 2 ½ feet.

    10. Limestone, cherty at top, dark gray and brownish-gray, finely laminated with thin wavy banding; a distinctive bed, sharply delimited above and below; micro-breccia in part; ¼- to 1-inch shaly partings above and below the bed; some dark gray and black chert at top; thickness uniform. Elevation, 450 to 451 feet. Sample H-16 was taken at an elevation of 451 feet. - 1 foot.

    9. Limestone, whitish-gray, finely oölitic, a single distinct massive bed; a few fossils. Thickness 1 ½ to 2 feet. Elevation, 448 to 450 feet. Sample H-15 was taken at an elevation of 449 feet, and sample H-14 was taken at 448 feet. - 2 feet.

    8. Limestone, gray, granular to suboölitic, fossiliferous. Contains examples of Lithostrotionella Canadense in upper part. Elevation, 446 to 448 feet. Sample H-13 was taken at an elevation of 447 feet. - 2 feet.

    7. Limestone, few chert nodules; gray, medium-grained, crystalline with streaks of dense texture, fossiliferous beds 1 to 6 inches thick are separate by blue-gray shaly partings. Elevation, 442 ½ to 446 feet. Samples were taken as follows: H-12 was taken at an elevation of 445 feet; H-11 at 444; and H-10 at 443 feet. - 3 ½ feet.

    6. Limestone with shaly partings, gray; variable texture from medium-grained to dense; beds 1 to 8 inches thick. Elevations, 438 to 442 ½ feet. Samples were taken as follows: H-9 was taken at an elevation of 442 feet; H-8 at 441; and H-7 at 439 feet. - 4 ½ feet.

    5. Limestone, variable, somewhat argillaceous and magnesian at places, gray and greenish-gray, dense, fossiliferous. Variable character made representative sampling difficult. Elevation, 436 to 438 feet. Sample H-6 was taken at an elevation of 438 feet, and H-5 was taken at 437 feet. - 2 feet.

    4. Limestone, like No. 3 below, but irregularly crystalline in upper 2 or 3 inches. A hard green shaly parting at top. Elevation, 435 to 436 feet. Sample H-4 was taken at an elevation of 436 feet. - 1 foot.

    3. Limestone, gray, fine-grained with some areas of lithographic texture. Elevation, 433 ½ to 435 feet. Sample H-3 was taken at an elevation of 434 feet. - 1 ½ feet.

    2. Limestone, gray, medium-grained. Elevation, 432 to 433 ½ feet. Sample H-2 was taken at an elevation of 433 feet. - 1 ½ feet.

    1. Limestone, gray, fine-grained. One foot exposed. Elevation, 432 to 433 feet. Sample H-1 was taken at an elevation of 432 feet. Lower 7 feet (elevation 425 to 432) is covered with spalls to quarry floor. - 8 feet.

    Base of section sampled.

    Analytical Information on Limestone Samples of St. Louis Formation At Locality H. The chemical analyses of the 27 samples from locality H are as follows:

    Analyses of Samples at Locality H Analyses of Samples at Locality H (St. Louis County, Missouri, circa 1947)
  • St. Louis, Missouri - “Does Sawing (Stone) Constitute A Part of The Dressing?” (from Stone Magazine, April 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 5, pp. 414)

    Does Sawing (Stone) Constitute A Part of The Dressing?

    “A very knotty question was submitted for adjustment to the St. Louis Board of Public Improvements recently (1898). It involves the validity of an ordinance passed last April providing that all stone used in city work shall be dressed within the territorial limits of the State of Missouri. The law is strictly a union labor enactment, and if the board is compelled to have its validity tested such action will undoubtedly cause a united howl on the part of union labor organizations in the city. As the board will have to do something in the matter, it is placed in a very delicate position.

    “The one question was opened by a communication submitted by E. J. Stamm and S. M. Lederer, local stone dealers. They cited the ordinance mentioned and then stated that a large quantity of stone was being shipped here from another state for use on city contracts, and that it was sawed before it reached St. Louis. They contended that the sawing constituted to a large degree all the dressing necessary. In conclusion they asked the opinion of the board on the matter.

    “The board resolved itself into committee of the whole and discussed the question at length, but failed to arrive at any definite conclusion. Messrs. Stamm and Lederer endeavored to demonstrate that sawing was the biggest part of dressing stone. The board finally arose and reported progress. The stone dealers will insist on a decision in this matter.

    “The stone which the dealers have reference to in their communication is the gray granite from Georgia used for curbing. It is sawed at the quarry and with a little trimming up is ready for use. This granite costs the property holders about $1 per foot. If the same granite were shipped to St. Louis in the rough and dressed it would cost, probably, $1.25 per foot. Thousands of feet of this Georgia granite are used there annually in steel construction. In case it should be decided that it is a violation of the ordinance to ship the granite already sawed the property owners will have to pay the difference in cost, to say nothing of the increased freight charges that would accrue by shipping the stone rough.

    “The local stone dealers are very anxious that the granite shall be sent in the rough. In that event they would get the contracts for dressing it and would reap a considerable income from that source. If the board decides that sawing is not a part of the dressing, then the matter will be disposed of. On the other hand, if the opposite conclusion is reached, the board will either have to order the granite in the rough or attack the validity of the ordinance. The private opinion of some of the members is that the Municipal Assembly has no authority to enact such a law, and that it conflicts with the constitution. [Up to April 4 the board had come to no decision. - Editor Stone.]”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the St. Louis Stone Business in St. Louis in June 1898 (from Stone Magazine, June 1898, Vol. XVII, No. 1, pp. 205)

    “The stone business here is none too brisk (circa June 1898), yet there are quite a few jobs in progress. The object seems to be to substitute some other material. I believe stone is the item to be attacked where a reduction in cost of construction is required. There was a church let last week, and I am informed that Connery & Conroy, of this city are the successful parties for the cut-stone, which is to be Bedford. There is another large job to be let this week on Fourth street, which is to be of Carthage stone. Stone comes regularly, and I’m very much interested in its contents. Grace.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. G. Reinhardt Co. (Advertisement) (from American Stone Trade, October, 1927, pp. 25.) (This same advertisement ran in the following issues of American Stone Trade: June, 1929, pp. 49; July, 1931, Vol. XXXI, No. 12, pp. 53; April, 1932, Vol. XXXII, No. 9, pp. 39; August, 1932, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, pp. 47.)

    A. G. Reinhardt Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Oct. 1927 advertisement

    Everlasting China Portraits

    A.G. Reinhardt Co., 3431 Hartford Street, St. Louis, Mo.

    Established 1884.

    Makers of Portraits for Monuments, Burned-in-on China, Guaranteed Non-Fading. Send for List.

  • St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri - the A. O. Engelmann & Co. Quarry (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    The following information was taken from the table entitled, “Table IV. Tables indicating the Amount and Kinds of Rock in the Different States”: The A. O. Engelmann & Co. Quarry, City of St. Louis, Saint Louis County, Limestone/Dolomite, color: drab; quarry opened in 1871.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co.

     See: Leschen & Sons Rope Co. below.

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Abbott Granite Company (from Stone Magazine, June 1898, Vol. XVII, No. 1, pp. 142)

    “St. Louis, Mo. - Abbott Granite Co., has been incorporated by A. F. Abbott, E. D. Anthony, A. L. Berry and J. Weinberg. Capital stock $10,000.”

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Frank Albernacius & Adam Kern Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Albernacius, Frank, and Adam Kern (L, 17): - Mr. Albernacius and Mr. Kern operate small quarries in the bluff immediately adjoining Mr. Lohrum’s quarry. The product consists of macadam, paving and dimension stone. These quarries have been worked eighteen and nine years respectively.

    Section.

    “Following is the section here, in descending series: -

    1. Stripping 6 feet.
    2. Limestone, gray, fine grained, in six inch layers - 2 feet.
    3. Limestone, gray, fine grained, compact - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    4. Limestone, gray, fine grained, compact - 6 inches.
    5. Limestone, dark gray to drab, fine grained - 1 foot, 8 inches.
    6. Limestone, light gray - 6 feet.
    7. Limestone, light gray - 1 foot.
    8. Limestone, very thin layers - 5 inches.
    9. Limestone, thin layers, with shale partings - 2 feet.
    10. Limestone, gray, compact - 1 foot.
    11. Limestone, gray, fine grained, in two layers - 3 feet, 6 inches.
    12. Limestone, dark gray, rather coarse grained - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    13. Limestone, brownish, impure, thin layers - 10 feet.
    14. Limestone, inaccessible, in beds six to thirty-six inches thick - 6 feet, 2 inches.
    15. Limestone, thin layers, jointed and weathered - 7 feet.
    16. Limestone, gray, fine grained, in three layers - 5 feet.
    17. Limestone, gray and brown - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    18. Limestone, gray, fine grained, in two twelve inch layers - 2 feet.
    19. Limestone, gray, carries thin layers in chert - 3 feet.
    20. Limestone, gray, fine grained, in two twelve inch layers - 2 feet.
    21. Limestone, dark gray, fine grained - 6 inches.

    Total thickness of rock - 67 feet, 3 inches.”

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the F. Albernesius Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Leschen & Sons Rope Co. (Advertisement) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, September 1892, Vol. V., No. IV, pp. xvii. The same or similar advertisement also ran in the following issues of Stone: November 1892, Vol. V, No. VI, pp. xvii; April 1893, Vol. VI, No. V, pp. xi; May 1893, Vol. VI, No. VI, pp. xxiii; December 1896, Vol. XIV, No. 1, pp. xxv; February 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 3, pp. xvi; March 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 4, pp. xxii; April 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 5, pp. xiii; May 1897, Vol. XIV, No. 6, pp. xvi; December 1897, Vol. XVI, No. 1, pp. xvi; January 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 2, pp. xxiv; February 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 3, pp. xxiv; March 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 4, pp. xxv; April 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 5, pp. xxvi; May 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 6, pp. xxiv; December 1898; Vol. XVIII, No. 1, pp. 83; February 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 3, pp. 81; March 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 4, pp. 167; April 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 5, pp. 261; May 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 6, pp. 361; June 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 1, pp. 87; July 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 2, pp. 187; August 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 3, pp. 289; September 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 4, pp. 389; October 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 5, pp. 489; November 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 6, pp. 589; March 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 3, pp. 277; April 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 4, pp. 377; May 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 5, pp. 477; June 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 6, pp. 577; and the advertisements that follow.)

    A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., 920 & 922 N. Main Street, St. Louis, MO.

    Manufacturers of Hercules Wire Rope

     

    For sale by Scoville Iron Works, Chicago, Ill.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. (Advertisement) (from Stone Magazine, December, 1895, Vol. XII, No. 1, pp. 89)

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 1895 advertisement.

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co.

      Manufacturers of Hercules Wire Rope. All genuine Hercules Wire Rope is made with a Red Strand. Best on Earth. (Trade Mark Registered.)

      920 & 922 N. Main St., St. Louis, MO.

      Chicago Office: 451 Marquette Building.

      Send for Catalogue. Correspondence Invited.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. (Advertisement) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, December, 1897, pp. xvi.)

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., St. Louis Missouri, Dec. 1897 advertisement

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co.,

      Manufacturers of Hercules Wire Rope. (Trade Mark Registered.)

      All genuine Hercules Wire Rope is made with Red Strand. Best on Earth.

      920 & 922 N. Main St., St. Louis, Mo.

      Chicago Office & Warehouse: 19-21 S. Canal St.

      Send for Catalog. Correspondence Invited.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, May 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 6, pp. 362 and 364)

      “A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company, of St. Louis, one of the foremost houses in their line of business in the country, are the sole makers of the patent flattened strand wire rope. This has 150 per cent more wearing surface than ordinary ropes. Owing to the number of wires that are at all times exposed for wear in flattened strange rope for a considerable distance along their respective lengths, a smooth or comparatively smooth surface is presented even whilst new, and the wear is consequently light upon any one individual wire, and the tendency to become brittle is minimized. These ropes are made up with the wires in the strands and the strands in the ropes laid in the same direction (Lang’s Lay). Flattened strand ropes are free from all tendency to spin or kink, hence a considerable saving in wear of pulleys and sheaves is effected by their smooth surface.”

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. (Advertisement) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, May 1899, Vol. XVIII, No. 6, pp. 361)

      A. Leschen and Sons Rope Co., 920-922 North Main Street, St. Louis, MO.

      Sole Manufacturers of Finlayson’s Patent

      Patent Flattened Strand Wire Rope. - Wire Rope Tramway. The only satisfactory rope on the market. Estimates on application. Also “Hercules” Wire Rope and all kinds of Round Strand Wire Rope.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. (Advertisement) (from Stone Magazine, January 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, pp. 73)

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Jan. 1902 advertisement

      A Leschen & Sons Rope Co. of St. Louis, MO.

      Branch Offices:

      92 Centre St., New York, N.Y. - 137 East Lake St., Chicago, Ill. - 85 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal.

      Leschen Co’s. Wire Rope Tramway at Cement Works, Ogelsby, Ills.

    • St. Louis, Missouri – the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company Booklet (1902) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, April 1902, Vol. XXIV, No. 4, “Stone Trade Notes” section, pp. 363)

      “The A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company, with main offices and warehouses at St. Louis, have issued a revised wire rope list. The many users of wire rope who have had this little booklet in the past, are aware of the great amount of useful information that it contains. There are figures giving the allowable working strain, the approximate breaking strain, the average weight of rope per foot, the minimum size of drums or sheaves, and the diameter of hemp rope of equal strength, for all of the different sizes of wire ropes. Aside from this the booklet is devoted to the different forms of hooks, sockets, shackles, clips, clamps, turnbuckles, blocks and sheaves, etc. The latter portion is devoted to the patent automatic wire rope tramways, which this firm manufactures and which have been used with great success all over the world. The specialty of the Messrs. Leschen is the patent flattened strand Hercules rope. The advantages claimed for this rope are its flexibility, its freedom from all tendency to spin or kink and its diminished wear in passing over sheaves and blocks. The book is full of useful suggestions as to splicing, lubricating, etc.”

    • St. Louis, Missouri – the A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, April 1903, pp. 231)

      A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co., Established 1857
      Wire Rope for Mines, Quarries, Elevators, Etc. – Aerial Wire Rope Tramways
      920-922 North First St, St. Louis, Mo.
      Branch offices:  92 Centre St, New York City, New York – 137 Lake St., Chicago, Ill.
      85 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal.

  • A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company, St. Louis, Missouri (image in ad) “Leschen Co.’s tramway at San Juan Gold Mining Co., Telluride, Colo.,” The Monumental News, April 1903, pp. 231. A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company, St. Louis, Missouri (image in ad) “Leschen Co.’s tramway at San Juan Gold Mining Co., Telluride, Colo.,” The Monumental News, April 1903, pp. 231.
  • St. Louis, Missouri - the Allen Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned and operated by J. W. Allen of 4824 Broadway, is located just east of his residence, on the river bluff west of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern railroad tracks. It has been worked as far as possible to the west and for about 250 feet north and south. The limits of the property will only allow quarrying for about thirty feet more to the south. The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom:

    15-20 ft. - Loess stripping.

    20 ft. - Fine grained, gray limestone; thinly bedded. Two layers twelve to fourteen inches in thickness. Makes good pier stone.

    1 ft. 6 in. - Finely crystalline, hard, dark blue limestone. Splits into ten and eight inch-layers.

    12-14 ft. - Granular, porous, bluish gray limestone, rather soft and works easily.

    4 ft. - Massive bed of white limestone.

    “This quarry is not being operated very extensively. The rock is used mainly for rubble and furnace flux. For the latter purpose, all but the one and one-half foot can be used.”

  • St. Louis County, Missouri - Abandoned Limestone (Limestone) (from Limestones and Dolomites in the St. Louis Area, Report of Investigations No. 5, by Norman S. Hinchey, R. B. Fisher, and W. A. Calhoun, State of Missouri Department of Business and Administration, Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1947. Used with permission.) (For an explanation of the study of which this section is a part, see: St. Louis Area of Missouri - Limestones and Dolomites in the St. Louis Area (St. Louis County, Jefferson County, and Lincoln County)

    Locality N (Field Descriptions and Analytical Information)

    Remarks. The exposure of beds at this locality is in a small, recently quarried face. The quarry floor has been used for the storage of maintenance materials by the State Highway Department of Missouri.

    Location. In the NW ¼ SE ¼ sec. 14, T. 44, N., R. 5 E., St. Louis County, Missouri, on the southeast side of U. S. Highway No. 66, one-third mile west of Geyer Road.

    Transportation. The site adjoins the right-of-way of U.S. Highway No. 66.

    Elevation. The base of the section sampled (quarry floor) is approximately 520 feet above sea level.

    Stratigraphic Position. The limestone beds sampled are in the lower part of the St. Louis formation (Mississippian), approximately 10 feet above its base.

    Samples. Seven samples, N-1 to N-6, inclusive, were taken at this place. An additional sample, N-4A, was included in the series.

    Geologic Section. The sequence, from top to bottom, is as follows:

    4. Surficial material; thin soil and clay. Thickness, about 5 feet to 8 feet.

    3. Limestone, similar to No. 2 but weathered into thin beds 1 inch to 6 inches thick. - 3 feet.

    2. Limestone, gray, granular, medium-grained; essentially discontinuous; some slight cross-bedding seen on weathered surfaces. Elevation, 520 to 531 feet. Samples were taken as follows: N-6 was taken at an elevation 531 feet; N-5 at 529; N-4 and N-4A at 526; N-3 at 524; N-2 at 522; and N-1 at 521. - 11 feet.

    1. Floor of quarry, limestone, very cherty, gray, fine-grained; large (6- to 8-inch) chert nodules in abundance. Not sampled. - ---

    Base of section.

    Analytical Information on Limestone Samples of St. Louis Formation At Locality N. The chemical analyses of the seven samples, N-1 to N-6 inclusive, and N-4A are given in the compilation below. The samples were taken in the lower part of the St. Louis formation at locality N.

    Analyses of Samples at Locality N. Analyses of Samples at Locality N (St. Louis County, Missouri, circa 1947)
  • St. Louis, Missouri - the American Lithographic Stone Co. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • St. Louis, Missouri – American Pulverizer Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 19.)

    American	Pulverizer Co., St. Louis, Missouri, Dec. 1921 advertisement

    American Pulverizer Co., 18th and Austin Streets, St. Louis, Mo.

    What is Your Margin of Profit? In these days of High Labor Costs and Keen Competition, Production Costs are a Paramount Consideration.

    Can You Stand Competition? Can you compete with the other fellow in the price and the quality of your ground limestone?

    The Ring Principle

    The American Pulverizer operates on the famous Ring Principle, which is recognized as the most efficient and economical method of grinding materials of Medium hardness. The capacity of our No. 36 equipment is 10 to 12 tons per hour, and the operating cost is only 15 to 18 cents per ton, including power, labor and depreciation. Here is Your Opportunity - We have prepared a leaflet, “How to Make Money Grinding Limestone” especially for those who want to make their dollars work overtime.

    Write today for your copy

  • St. Louis, Missouri - the American Tripoli Co. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • St. Louis County, Missouri - the Antire Road Quarry, presented by mindat.org.

    According to this web site, the location of this quarry is: “Map Reference: 38°30’41"N, 90°32’51"W.”

  • St. Louis, Missouri – the Artistic Monumental Marble Works, T. G. Schrader, Proprietor (Business Card)

    Compliments of T. G. Schrader, Artistic Monumental Marble Works

    N.E. Cor. Blair Ave. & N. Market St.

    T. G. Schrader, Artistic Monumental Marble Works business card, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Also see: “St. Louis, Missouri – T. G. Schrader, Proprietor, Artistic Monumental Marble Works” for more information on this firm.

  • St. Louis City, Missouri - Henry Baldwin Limestone Quarry, located between Itaska & Maeder Streets (Limestone) (from “The Clay, Stone, Lime and Sand Industries of St. Louis City and County,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Geological Survey of Missouri, Bulletin No. 3, Supplement, Missouri, December 1890.)

    Location.

    Section.

    Baldwin, Henry (I, 20): - Mr. Baldwin’s quarry is situated between Itaska and Maeder streets, east of Pennsylvania avenue. It has been worked continuously since 1872, when it opened. The product is mostly building and dimension stone. The quarry is two hundred and thirteen feet long, by one hundred and thirty feet wide, and exposes the following columnar section, in descending series: -

    1. Loess - 15 feet.
    2. Residuary clay mixed with the gravel of the drift - 12 feet.
    3. Limestone partially decomposed - 5 feet, 10 inches.
    4. Limestone, gray and brown, siliceous, coarse-grained, contains patches of calcite, and, at the top and bottom concretions of chert - 7 feet.
    5. Limestone, gray, very coarse-grained, crystalline and fossiliferous - 3 inches.
    6. Limestone, gray, fossiliferous in two or more layers - 2 feet, 6 inches.
    7. Limestone, gray, coarse-grained, in two or more layers - 4 feet, 6 inches.
    8. Limestone, gray, fine and coarse in grain in many layers - 6 feet.

    “Total thickness of rock - 26 feet, 1 inch.”

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