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Quarries in Missouri & Quarry Links, Photographs, and Articles
Knobnoster thru Maysville

  • Knobnoster, Missouri – W. M. Vannata’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Koch (south of), Missouri - Bussen Quarries Inc. Limestone Quarries

    (See: St. Louis, Missouri - the Bussen Limestone Quarry & St. Louis, Missouri - Bussen Quarries, Inc. entries.)

  • Koeltztown (east of), Missouri - the Schlief Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned by Albert Schlief of Westphalia, is located in the S.E. ¼ of the S.E. ¼ of sec. 4, T. 41 N., R. 10 W., about three-fourths of a mile east of the village.

    “Three beds, having a thickness respectively of 4, 10 and 22 inches, have been worked at intervals for a distance of 500 feet. The stone is a pitted dolomite, very similar to that quarried at the Hoer quarry near Westphalia. Quarrying consists chiefly in removing the surface stone where there is practically no stripping.

    Laboratory Examination.

    Physical Tests. - Two-inch cubes of pitted dolomite from this quarry were tested in the laboratory with the following results:

    Specific Gravity - 2.79

    Porosity - 9.99 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption - 3.98

    Weight per cubic foot - 157.0 lbs.

    Tensile strength - 364 lbs. per sq. inc.

    Crushing strength - 12,641 lbs. per sq. in. on bed.

    8,743 lbs. per sq. in. on edge.

    “These tests indicate that the stone lost as a result of the freezing test an average of 964.5 pounds per square inch.”

  • LaBelle, Missouri - O. H. Brosius’ Marble Works (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, May 1899, Vol. XVIII., No. 6, pp. 338)

    Stone Trade Notes: “O. H. Brosius has established a new marble works at LaBelle, Mo.”

  • La Plata, Missouri - Z. T. Durham’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Labelle, Missouri - the Wilson & Scroggin Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Lafayette County, Missouri - the Limestone & Sandstones of Lafayette County, from “Notes on The Clays and Building Stones of Certain Western Central Counties Tributary to Kansas City,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin No. 5, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, July 1891, pp. 46-86.

    Lafayette County. - Formation represented.

    “In Lafayette county are represented the Quaternary and Coal Measure formations. The Quaternary deposits are similar to those in Jackson county. The Coal Measures are represented chiefly by the middle beds which occupy nearly the whole are of the county. A few patches of the Upper Coal Measures occur in the Western part of the county.”

    The Building Stones and The Stone Industry (of Lafayette County, Missouri) - Sandstones chiefly worked.

    “Both limestones and sandstones occur. The sandstones are quarried systematically, but the limestones are worked in a small way, locally, to be used for foundations. The beds of limestone which are so worked come from immediately above, or below, the Lexington Coal bed.”

  • Lafayette County, Missouri - D. H. Davis’s Sandstone Quarry, from “Notes on The Clays and Building Stones of Certain Western Central Counties Tributary to Kansas City,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin No. 5, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, July 1891, pp. 46-86.

    Davis, D. H.: - Mr. Davis has a sandstone quarry situated in township 51 N. 24 W., section 18, east half of the northwest quarter.

    Quarry dimensions. - Stone soft and brownish.

    “The quarry has a face about one hundred and forty-five feet long, and exposes, vertically, about twelve feet of sandstone. The bed is cut by vertical joint planes which are about five feet apart. Its maximum thickness is twelve feet, but it is usually parted by a bedding plane so that the largest block ordinarily obtainable is about five feet thick. Blocks of stone five by five by four and a half feet in size are readily obtainable, and one of these dimensions may be increased, sometimes, to ten feet. The sandstone when dry has a yellow color. When freshly quarried it is brownish, very soft, and easily worked. There are numerous ferruginous streaks running through the bed.

    Product.

    “About four thousand five hundred cubic yards of stone have been removed from the quarry. Of this amount, about one thousand yards went to waste. One half of the remainder was used locally, and the other half was shipped away by rail. The following is the section made at the quarry, in descending series: -

    Sections.

    1. Slop of stripping.

    2. Limestone, blue - 1 foot, 3 inches.

    3. Shaly sandstone - 1 foot, 3 inches.

    4. Sandstone - 12 feet.

    5. Shale, dark colored, sandy - 20+ feet.”

  • Lafayette County, Missouri - the “Railroad Quarry,” located at Sec. 23, 51 N. 26 W. (from “Notes on The Clays and Building Stones of Certain Western Central Counties Tributary to Kansas City,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin No. 5, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, July 1891)

    Quarry material and dimensions.

    Railroad Sandstone Quarry. - This quarry is situated on the J.C. & B. branch of the Missouri Pacific railway, township 51, north range 26 west, Section 23, middle of the north-west quarter of the south-east quarter. The quarry is twelve hundred feet long, but the available face is only seven hundred and fifty feet long. The stone is irregularly stained with iron, is soft and easily crumbled. The sandstone is about twenty feet thick, but the lower ten feet, only, is workable. This lower part is divided into three layers of equal thickness, which are strongly cross-bedded in places.

    “The following is the section obtained here, in descending series: -

    Section.

    1. Soil and clay - 10 feet.

    2. Shale - 10 feet.

    3. Shaly sandstone - 10 feet.

    4. Sandstone, the workable part - 10 feet.”

  • La Grange, Missouri - the La Grange Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    La Grange.

    “There are extensive outcrops of stone along the river bluffs at La Grange, which have been quarried in a number of places for local building stone and rip rap. Quarries are owned at this place by the following named parties: L. Hagood, J. H. Brosi, Ried and Brosi and D. K. Oyster.”

  • LaGrange, Missouri - the Brosi Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located in the N.E. ¼ of the S.E. ¼ of sec. 36, T. 61, R. 6 W., on the south side of South street, in the city of LaGrange. The face of the quarry is 150 feet long and 25 feet in height. The stone is a blue and buff, crystalline limestone, containing a large quantity of disseminated chert. The chert destroys the value of the stone for constructional purposes, other than foundations. The chert and limestone, together, would make a very suitable road metal, although the limestone when used alone is too soft.”

  • LaGrange (northwest of), Missouri - the Haygood Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located in the N.E. ¼ of the N.W. ¼, sec. 25, T. 61 N., R. 6 W., about two miles northwest of the city. It is situated near the crest of a hill and has a face about 150 feet long and six feet in height. There is a stripping of three feet of clay, underneath which occur beds 8 in., 8 in., 6 in., 6 in., 1 ft. 6 in., and 1 ft. in thickness.

    “The stone is a fine to coarsely crystalline limestone which contains considerable argillaceous material. The color varies from a light gray to a yellowish buff. The stone in the two lower beds is somewhat softer than that in the remainder of the quarry.

    “The major joints strike north and south, N. 70° W., and N. 75° E. Most of these joints are open and frequently the walls are coated with a thin layer of travertine.

    “This quarry is owned by L. Hagood and operated by his son, Horace Hagood. It is worked intermittently. The stone is used chiefly for buildings in the vicinity of LaGrange.”

  • LaGrange (northwest of), Missouri - the Oyster Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “A small quarry, about one-fourth of a mile west of the Burlington railroad near the south limits of the town, is owned and operated by Mr. Oyster. The working face of the quarry is about 150 feet long. The following is a description of the beds from the top to the bottom:

    1-3 ft. - Red clay. Stripping.

    3 ft. - Limestone. Thin beds five inches to one foot in thickness, containing numerous chert nodules. Badly broken by joints.

    4 ft. 6 in. - Soft, yellow limestone, containing numerous chert nodules.

    3 ft. 2 in. - Buff colored limestone, containing numerous lenses of chert. Upper half of the bed has a bluish color.

    7 in. - Blue shale.

    1 ft. - Dark colored, crystalline limestone. This is a solid bed and contains fossil crinoids.

    3 ft. 6 in. - Yellowish gray limestone, having numerous chert nodules disseminated through it.

    2 ft. - Dark blue limestone. Very few fossils. Can be split into two layers eighteen inches in thickness. The upper layer contains many chert nodules.

    4 ft. 7 in. - Dark blue, coarsely crystalline limestone, containing many small chert nodules. The upper two feet can be split into beds from four to six inches in thickness.

    2 ft. - Dark blue, coarsely crystalline limestone. Can be split into two beds about a foot in thickness.

    “This quarry was opened about 1899 and has been worked mainly for rip rap and ballast for the Burlington railroad. None of the stone appears to be suitable for ashler blocks, but foundation stone can be obtained from the quarry.

    “The major joints strike N. 30° E., practically parallel with the face of the quarry.”

  • LaGrange, Missouri - the Ried & Brosi Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located in the same section of land as that owned by J. H. Brosi, being on the opposite side of South street. The face is thirty-five feet in height and the following is a description of the different beds from top to bottom.

    2-5 ft. - Broken stone and clay stripping.

    15 ft. - Blue and buff limestone in layers from eight to twelve inches in thickness, interstratified with beds of chert from four to eight inches thick.

    6 in. - Blue shale containing many crinoid stems.

    2 ft. 10 in. - Lt. gray, fossiliferous, crystalline limestone.

    2 ft. 3 in. - Gray, crystalline, fossiliferous, medium grained limestone.

    4 ft. - Bluish gray, crystalline, fossiliferous limestone, containing small cavities, calcite geodes and chert nodules.

    6 in. - Shaly rock which weathers very rapidly.

    1 ft. 10 in. - Blue, coarsely crystalline, fossiliferous limestone, containing many chert nodules.

    5 ft. - Gray, coarsely crystalline cherty limestone.

    “The only stone in this quarry which is apparently free from chert nodules is found in the two beds immediately underneath the six-inch layer of blue shale. The stone from these beds can be cut and dressed into ashler blocks, caps, sills, steps, etc. The ends of the blocks which are broken across the bed, show pencil-like markings, caused by the fossils which are particularly abundant in the lower bed. The cherty limestone can only be used for rip rap and rough rubble.

    “When active, this quarry is operated during the summer months. About forty men are usually employed. The rubble stone is sold at 75¢ per perch. The stone has been used largely in river improvements.”

  • Lamar, Missouri - the Lamar Area Sandstone Quarries (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “One quarry has been opened in the Lower Coal Measure sandstone near the southeast limits of the city, just north of the Kansas City, ft. Scott and Memphis railroad. It is owned by B. A. Beamer of Lamar and has been operated intermittently since 1889. The quarry has a southeast face 900 feet long. The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom:

    3 ft. - Dirt stripping.

    1 ft. 6 in. - Shelly sandstone, highly colored.

    1 ft. - Brownish buff, fine grained sandstone.

    1 ft. 4 in. - Reddish to light colored, fine grained sandstone. This bed contains highly colored bands parallel to the bedding, especially in the upper portion.

    2 ft. 4 in. - Brown to purple fine grained sandstone.

    “Two well developed sets of joints, striking N. 50° E. and N. 47° W., occur in this quarry. They are from three to ten feet apart and break the stone into rectangular blocks. They are of great help in quarrying. The sandstone is somewhat micaceous and rather soft and porous. Stratification planes occur throughout the different beds and along these the stone splits very easily and with a very smooth fracture.

    “These beds lift easily along their bedding planes and blasting is not required in any part of the quarry. The stone breaks across the bedding with a very straight fracture, into rectangular blocks of any moderate size. The lowest bed furnishes large blocks, which are used for making watering troughs.

    “The color varies so greatly in the different beds that where the stone is laid on its bed, it would be impossible to construct a wall having a uniform color. In order to obtain a uniform color, the lower bed which has a quite constant purple color is split along the bed and laid on edge. Undoubtedly the stone is weaker when laid in this manner and if the superstructure is heavy it cannot be done without danger. Besides building stone, this quarry produces flagging and curbing which are used in Lamar.”

  • Lamar, Missouri - M. Cole’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Lamar, Missouri - J. Ellis’ Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
    • Lamar, Missouri - Joseph Ellis (from Stone Magazine, June 1898, Vol. XVII, No. 1, pp. 136)

      “Lamar, Mo. - Joseph Ellis, marble, succeeded by S. P. Scott, Jr.”

  • Lamar, Missouri - James Hall (from Stone Magazine, May 1898, Vol. XVI, No. 6, pp. 544)

    “Lamar, Mo. - James Hall, marble, reported to have recorded chattel mortgage for $329.”

  • Lamar, Missouri – the Lamar Sandstone Company (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, June 1899, Vol. XIX, No. 1, “Stone Trade Notes” section, pp. 47)

    “The Lamar, Mo., Sandstone Co. capital stock $2,000, has been incorporated by E. H. Adams, T. A. Perry, E. A. Stone and others.”

  • Lamar (east of), Missouri - Taylor Quarries, Inc. (Limestone Quarry) (present-day company) (photograph)

    “Taylor Quarries, Inc. is a family-owned limestone quarry in operation for 38 years. We have Warsaw-formation limestone which is light grey in color.

    “Our rock is crushed and/or sized for uses in everything from ag-lime, road stone, construction materials, to large landscape boulders.”

  • Lathrop, Missouri - the Maret Bros. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Lebanon, Missouri - the Reagan & Williamson Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Leeds (south of), Missouri - the Edward Crebo and Company’s Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “The quarry of Edward Crebo and Co. is located a half mile south of Leeds on the east side of the Missouri Pacific railroad. When visited, it was just being opened and the ground cleared to install a crushing plant. The entire output is to be used for railroad ballast and concrete work.

    “The quarry is situated on an east and west ridge which is about 225 feet in breadth. The beds are the lowest quarried in the vicinity of Kansas City. The following section gives the succession of strata from top to bottom:

    0-1 ft. - Stripping.

    6 ft. - Lower portion of Bethany Falls limestone.

    3 ft. - Dark shale.

    1 ft. 1 in. - Fine grained, dark limestone.

    4 ft. - Clay.

    13 ft. - Fine grained, dark gray beds of limestone from two to thirty inches thick, separated by thin beds of shale along rather irregular bedding planes. The lower beds are from two to two and one-half feet thick.

    “The lower is the most important ledge. The overlying shale beds cause rather expensive stripping. The quarry was in operation during 1903 and produced a large quantity of crushed stone.”

  • Lexington, Missouri - J. Egert’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Lexington, Missouri - the Sanding & Co. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Liberal, Missouri - the Liberal Area Sandstone Quarries (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “The Lower Coal Measure sandstone, which outcrops in the vicinity of Liberal, is quarried both north and south of the city. The beds are thick and massive and break into very regular blocks. Stone can be obtained of any desired dimensions.

    “Three quarries are operated at this place, two of which are owned by ‘The Liberal Stone and Coal Co.’ and the third by W. H. Curless. The stone is essentially the same at the three quarries, excepting at the north quarry of the Liberal Stone and Coal Co., where it has been impregnated with bitumen or asphalt. The stone has been used mainly for buildings (local), bridge abutments, sidewalks and curbing.”

  • Liberal, Missouri - William Curless’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Liberal (north of), Missouri - the Curless Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is located about a mile west of Liberal, in the N.W. ¼, S.E. ¼, sec. 3, T. 32, R. 33 W., is owned and operated by W. H. Curless of Liberal, Missouri. It consists of three openings situated near one another on the west side of a hill. The middle opening is the only one which is worked at present, although considerable stone has been quarried from the other two. The opening which is farthest north has been worked into the hill 150 feet and now has a face six feet deep and 200 feet long. The south opening has a twelve-foot vertical face, consisting of several thick beds from which might be obtained stone of large dimensions. The stone contains an occasional cavity filled with iron oxide and near the bottom it is streaked brown with iron oxide.

    The middle opening which is being worked contains the best stone in the quarry. The working face is about 250 feet long and consists of a single massive bed of sandstone eight feet in thickness. Above this bed occur a four-inch layer of shale, a six-inch bed of sandstone, eighteen inches of sandy shale, a twenty-inch bed of sandstone and four feet of alternating shale and sandstone in layers about four inches in thickness.

    “The stone is a fine grained, micaceous sandstone, varying in color from gray to a buff, the latter color being due to small specks of disseminated iron oxide. Near the top of the quarry occurs a twelve-inch bed of reddish colored stone containing a higher percentage of iron oxide.

    “The major joints in this quarry, which are open from one to three inches, contain a heavy red plastic clay. These joints strike N. 55° W., N. 30° E. and east and west. The strike of a number of these is not constant in direction, varying from 15° to 30°.

    “The Knox system of blasting is used. The stone breaks with a very smooth fracture, splitting with plugs and feathers into blocks of almost any desired thickness.

    “A large part of the stone from this quarry has been used in bridge abutments, for which purpose it is well adapted. The prices obtained in 1901 for all work measured in the wall were as follows:

    For dimension stone - $3.00 per yard.

    Ashlery, from 12-16 in. sq. - $2.50 per yard.

    Bridge rubble stone 12-14 in. thick - $2.00

    Wall and culvert stone - $1.75

    Laboratory examination.

    Microscopic. - An examination of the thin section of this stone under the microscope shows that it consists chiefly of roundish to sub-angular grains of quartz. The interstices contain calcite, kaolin, iron oxide and chlorite. The quartz individuals are small but quite uniform in size. The grains are not very firmly bounded together.

    Physical Tests. - Two-inch cubs were subjected to strength and weathering tests with the following results:

    Crushing strength - 4942 lbs. per sq. in.

    Tensile strength - 306.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Transverse strength - 708.9 lbs. per sq. in.

    Specific Gravity - 2.686

    Porosity - 22.95 per cent.

    Ratio of absorption - 10.23.

    Weight per cubic foot - 129.3 lbs.

    Crushing strength of specimens subjected to the freezing test, 5,742.7 lbs. per sq. in.

    “An examination of the above results indicates that the stone does not have a high tensile, crushing or transverse strength; that the porosity is high; and that the stone is apparently very little affected by alternate freezing and thawing.”

  • Liberal (north of), Missouri - the Liberal Stone and Coal Company’s Sandstone Quarries (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    The asphaltic sandstone quarry, which is located two miles north of Liberal, in the N.W. ¼ of the S.W. ¼ of sec. 23, T. 33, R. 33 W., is owned by Mr. Geo. H. Walser and operated by George H. Walser and C. H. Carter, Jr., under the firm name of ‘The Liberal Stone and Coal Co.’ This quarry is situated on the west side of a hill, west of the Missouri Pacific railroad, and has a west face about 300 feet long. It has been worked into the hill about 150 feet.

    Plate XLII. Asphaltic Sandstone. Quarry and yard of the Liberal Stone and Coal Co., Liberal, Mo. Plate XLII. Asphaltic Sandstone. Quarry and yard of the Liberal Stone and Coal Co., Liberal, Missouri (circa 1904)

    “The stripping, which is thickest in the middle of the quarry, consists of from one to ten feet of shale and clay. In the stripping, about four feet from the bottom, occurs a six-inch bed of very hard, black, fossiliferous, fine grained limestone. Underneath this bed, the stripping is a yellowish clay, while above it is a carbonaceous shale and red clay.

    “The sandstone is very fine grained and micaceous, and has a black color, due to the asphalt content. It is somewhat harder than the stone in the other quarries of this place. It has faint stratification planes parallel to the bedding. These are short and discontinuous, never persisting throughout the length of the bed. They are very common in all parts of the stone.

    “The face of the quarry consists of one channel cut from three to four feet in depth. The beds dip slightly to the north and the channel cut increases in depth in that direction. The exact thickness of the workable stone is not known. That in the floor of the quarry is similar to that in the face.

    “The joints, which strike N. 20° E., are very prominent, and are from ten to fifteen feet apart. They are stained with iron oxide. Apparently there is no joints at right angles to this set.

    “The stone is sawed parallel to the bedding and cut into pieces suitable for crosswalks, sidewalks and curbing. The large amount of asphalt in this stone makes the absorption very low in comparison with that from the other quarries. On the sawed surface weathering sometimes loosens small pieces, which fall away leaving shallow depressions in the stone.

    “The company is obliged to haul the stone by team from the quarry to a nearby spur of the Missouri Pacific railroad. Derricks are used to load the cars.

    “Steam derricks, steam drills, channelers and gang-saws are used in getting out the stone. When in operation the quarry employs an average of ten men for nine months during the year. Owing to litigation, it is now idle.

    This company owns another quarry one-half mile south of the city, in the W. ½ of the N.E. ¼ of sec. 11, T. 32, R. 33 W. The opening which is being worked consists of a cut 40 feet wide, 10 feet deep and extending into the hill about 200 feet.

    “The stone is a fine grained, slightly micaceous, grayish buff sandstone. Small spots of sulphide and flecks of oxide of iron are disseminated through it The floor of the quarry is an arenaceous, micaceous shale, overlying a seam of coal which is mined in this region. Above the shale is a twelve-foot bed of sandstone, which, at the east end f the quarry, splits along a shaly seam, two feet from the floor. This parting plane does not continue through the quarry. The upper foot of the stone is badly decomposed. The beds have a dip to the east, and having a dip of 4° from the horizontal, are two very ferruginous streaks six to eight inches wide. Owing to their position these streaks injure the otherwise uniform color of the stone.

    “The joints are from twenty to thirty feet apart, except in the western portion of the quarry, where they are considerably closer. They have a dip of from 9° to 11° W., from the vertical, and strike N. 36-42° W.

    “The quarry is connected by spur with the Missouri Pacific railroad. It is equipped with machinery, including a derrick, for loading the stone.

    Laboratory Examination

    Physical Tests. - Samples of both the ordinary and asphaltic sandstones from this quarry were tested to determine their strength and durability. The following are the results of the tests made on samples of the yellow sandstone:

    Crushing Strength - 4,370.6 lbs. per sq. in.

    Tensile Strength - 202.6 lbs. per sq. in.

    Transverse Strength - 418.61 lbs. per sq. in.

    Specific Gravity - 2.70

    Porosity - 21.58 per cent.

    Ratio of absorption - 10.19 per cent.

    Weight per cubic foot - 132.3 lbs.

    Crushing strength of samples subjected to the freezing test - 3,188.7 pounds.

    “The following are the results of tests made on the asphaltic sandstone:

    Crushing Strength - 9,002 lbs. per sq. in.

    Tensile Strength - 344.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Transverse Strength - 769.93 lbs. per sq. in.

    Specific Gravity - 2.445

    Porosity - 7.01 per cent.

    Ratio of absorption - 3.05 per cent.

    Weight per cubic foot - 142 lbs.

    Crushing strength of samples subjected to the freezing test - 9,230 pounds.

    “An examination of these results indicates the superior quality of the asphaltic over the ordinary yellow sandstone. The asphaltic sandstone has a higher strength, crushing, tensile and transverse; the porosity is about one-third that of the yellow sandstone; and for the samples tested the asphaltic sandstone lost nothing in strength through freezing and thawing, while the yellow sandstone lost about 33 1/3 per cent.”

  • Liberty, Missouri - the Liberty Memorial Art Stone (from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, May 1930, Vol. 6, No. 11, pp. 27)

    The Liberty Memorial Art Stone was listed as one of the customers of the Mount Brothers of Memphis Missouri, who sold their Air Take-off Device used in carving cemetery stones.

  • Libertyville (near), Missouri - the Dolomite Quarry (Dolomite) (from A Report on Mine La Motte Sheet, including Portions of Madison, St. Francois and Ste. Genevieve Counties, by Charles Rollin Keyes, State Geologist, Missouri Geological Survey, Reports on Areal Geology (Sheets 1-4) Volume IX, 1896)

    “Other quarrying has been done in the dolomite formation especially to the east and south of Fredericktown and also near Libertyville. At both localities splendid ledges for building stone have been developed.”

  • Little Rock (north of), Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri - the Arnold Stone Company Quarries (Limestone) (from Geology of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, by Stuart Weller and Stuart St. Clair, Vol. XXII, Second Series, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, Rolla, Missouri, 1928. Used with permission.)

    Arnold Stone Company Quarry. One of the largest stone quarries in this county is operated by this company, one-fourth mile north of Little Rock. Operations were begun many years ago, and a large quarry was formerly worked just south of the present one. The quarry now operated has a working face 700 feet long. The height of the face varies somewhat but ranges from 120 to 140 feet.

    “The St. Louis and Ste. Genevieve formations are exposed in this quarry, the former furnishing the bulk of the stone. The overburden is glacial clay and loess varying in thickness from 10 to 30 feet. This material is described in detail in the footnote on page 252. It is removed by hydraulicking. The beds exposed rise gently to the north and in the north face the overburden has a thickness of 10 feet. It is underlain by 20-25 feet of relatively thin-bedded limestone forming the lower part of the Ste. Genevieve formation, the base of which appears to be marked by a thin green argillaceous sandstone only a few inches in thickness. this part of the face is cut by many clay-filled joints and bedding planes, and in general has the appearance of ‘boulder ground.’ The rock is finely crystalline, slightly sandy, and dark gray in color.

    “The underlying St. Louis limestone forms roughly the lower 90 feet of the quarry. It is composed of dense to fine-grained, fossiliferous limestone. The characteristic ‘lithographic stone’ is present. In color it varies through shades of gray. Fossils are common. Nodules and lenses of dense, live, fossiliferous chert are common, particularly in the upper part. The chert varies in color from blue-black, through blue-gray, brown and red. Some of this material has evidently replaced the limestone, for some specimens examined show the original structure of the limestone and also a gradation between the two.

    “After removal of the loess overburden, holes are drilled with compressed air drills and shot with low strength dynamite to eliminate spalls and to insure large pieces. The stone is loaded by hand onto small box cars and trammed to a hoist located on the river bank. The cars are lowered over barges, and the stone dropped through hopper bottoms. All the output is consumed in improving the Mississippi River, the chief use being for rip rap.

    “Forty or more men are employed, many of whom live on the property. A commissary is maintained for the convenience of the workmen.”

  • Little Rock (2 miles from), Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri - the Southeast Missouri Quarries Company Quarry & Plant (Limestone/Marble) (from Geology of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, by Stuart Weller and Stuart St. Clair, Vol. XXII, Second Series, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, Rolla, Missouri, 1928. Used with permission.)

    The Southeast Missouri Quarries Company. This quarry, now abandoned (circa 1928), is located on the river bluff about two miles above Little Rock on the north side of Lower Frenchman Hollow. Actual stripping operations were started here in April, 1914. Some fifteen to twenty-eight feet of loess and residual clay were removed, chiefly by hydraulicking. The plant was equipped with Worthington hydraulic pumps that supplied a four-inch stream with one hundred and seventy-five pounds pressure at the nozzle. This was not found altogether satisfactory, however, and the process was aided by shooting.

    “The quarry was opened from the top and was remarkable in the small amount of waste rock, as but little preliminary work was necessary before stone of commercial value was obtainable. The upper portion of the exposure, the horizon last worked, is approximately ninety-four feet above the St. Louis and San Francisco railway tracks, or about that distance above the base of the formation. The floor of the quarry is broken by solution channels along old joint cracks, but this in no wise damages the surrounding rocks. The limestone at this horizon is a light buff in color, highly oolitic, with an abundant admixture of finely broken fossil remains. When first quarried the rock is rather soft, but rapidly hardens on exposure. Below the floor of the quarry at a depth from twenty to thirty feet the lithology is slightly different; it grades into harder, more crystalline texture, slightly darker in color, sometimes with a bluish tint. Some of these lower beds take a beautiful polish. While the company had an opening in these crystalline beds they were operating almost entirely in the upper, more oolitic portions. The quarry was equipped with a thirty-ton, stiff-leg, all-steel derrick of the most modern pattern, and two Wardwell channelling (sic) machines. The product of the company was shipped chiefly to St. Louis. Blocks of any desired size up to thirty tons, the capacity of the hoisting apparatus, were obtainable.

    “The stone has a uniform color and tex ture, is easy to work, and is free from ‘crows feet’ or stylolites. The quarry has not been operated for a number of years.”

  • Lockwood, Missouri - E. P. Helms’ Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Logan, Missouri - G. W. Logan’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Loughboro, Missouri - John Rotherly’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri - the Louisiana, Missouri, Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    Louisiana. (Missouri)

    “The following quarries are located in the vicinity of Louisiana: the C. C. Pratt quarry, situated at the west end of the city; the Hart quarry, southwest of the city; the Marble Head Lime Co.’s quarry, two miles north of the city; and the City quarry at the foot of eighth street. The stone at all of the quarries, with the exception of the City, is of Burlington age and is situated at the top of the bluffs about 200 feet above the Mississippi river valley.”

    Miscellaneous Quarries

    “Near the top of the bluff, in the north part of the city, is a quarry from which a large part of the accessible stone has been removed. The stone belongs to the Burlington formation and corresponds very closely to that in the other quarries.

    “The Buffalo Creek quarry is located about a mile south of the depot and close to the Burlington railroad. The stone has been quarried mainly from the Niagara formation. It has not been worked for a great many years.

    “There are several quarries a few miles from the city which are worked intermittently to supply local demands. Their distance from the railroad, however, will probably prevent any extensive development.”

  • Louisiana, Missouri - the Buffalo Creek Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “The Buffalo Creek quarry is located about a mile south of the depot and close to the Burlington railroad. The stone has been quarried mainly from the Niagara formation. It has not been worked for a great many years....”

  • Louisiana, Missouri - Jas. Casey Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Louisiana, Missouri - the Eighth Street Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “At the foot of Eighth street there is an exposure of forty feet of limestone, belonging to the Lithographic formation, which has been used for macadamizing the streets of the city. The city does not own a crushing plant and the stone is broken by tramps and prisoners which are lodged in the city jail.

    “This is the best limestone that can be obtained in this region for street paving and should be used more generally for this purpose.”

  • Louisiana, Missouri - the Frank G. Buffum Manufacturing Company (Advertisement) (from Monumental News: Granite, Marble, Stone, Bronze, Sculpture, November 1929, Vol. 41, No. 11, pp. 563)

    Frank G. Buffum Manufacturing Co., Louisiana, Missouri, Nov. 1929 advertisement

    Cut Your Sand Blast Costs

    With the Dinky Super-Service High Compression Nozzles

    They cut at least twice as fast and last longer than any other nozzle on the market. They embody a complete revolution in nozzle manufacture, and cost no more than ordinary nozzles. Write for our special offer for a trial of these nozzles at our expense.

    Frank G. Buffum Mfg. Co., Louisiana, MO.

    • Louisiana, Missouri - the Frank G. Buffum Manufacturing Company (Advertisement) (from Monumental News: Granite, Marble, Stone, Bronze, Sculpture, May 1930, Vol. 42, No. 5, pp. 262)

      Frank G. Buffum Manufacturing Co., Louisiana, Missouri, May 1930 advertisement

      Dinky Sand Blast Nozzles Cut Your Costs in half

      Manufactured according to a patented design from heat treated steel and are guaranteed to cut faster and last longer than any nozzle on the market. Sample and prices on request.

      Frank G. Buffum Manufacturing Company, Louisiana, Missouri

  • Louisiana, Missouri - H. L. Hart’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)

    Louisiana (southwest of), Missouri - the Hart Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned by Mr. Hart of St. Louis, was at one time a large producer of building stone, but at the present time it is not being worked.

    “The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom:

    20 ft. - Very dark brown limestone in layers, varying in thickness, from one to two feet. Many large chert nodules. In places the brown limestone is not over two or three feet in thickness.

    10 ft. 4 in. - Nearly white, crystalline limestone containing many remains of crinoids. Suture joints show conspicuously where the channeler has been used. The weathered face shows bedding planes from two to six inches apart.

    9 ft. 4 in. - Light gray crystalline limestone. Can be split into beds from six inches to a foot in thickness.

    3 ft. 3 in. - Buff colored limestone containing great numbers of crinoid remains. The uppermost foot of this bed contains many small particles of iron oxide which give the stone a deep buff color.

    3 ft. 6 in. - Light colored coarsely crystalline limestone. Abundant crinoid remains and a few lenses of chert. This ledge can be capped into three layers.

    4 ft. 4 in. - Coarsely crystalline, buff colored limestone. Many fossil crinoids and a few small chert nodules. Can be capped into three layers 1 ½ ft., 1 ½ ft. and 1 ft. in thickness.

    5 ft. 4 in. - Gray, coarsely crystalline limestone. Numerous crinoid remains.

    “The face of the quarry has been badly shattered by blasting and for this reason the stone does not show up as well for dimensional purposes as it otherwise might. The principal joints strike north and south and east and west. Minor joints strike N. 55° E. and N. 55° W. The quarry has a north face extending for a distance of 350 feet east and west. Steam drills and a channeler have been used in quarrying the stone. The quarry is also equipped with steel tracks and cars for removing the stone to the bottom of the hill.

    “About half way down the bluff, evidences of shale were found, but the talus is so thick that it completely covers the deposit. This same bed was observed along the creek, a half a mile west, where it is exposed along the base of the bluff to a depth of about thirty feet. The shale and limestone occurring together make this an inviting place to consider the possibilities of manufacturing Portland cement.”

  • Louisiana, Missouri - the Pratt Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is located a short distance west of the city limits, is owned and operated by C. C. Pratt. At present very little work is being done at the quarry, although it has been worked very extensively in former years. The stone is used extensively for foundations. Formerly the quarry produced crushed and pulverized rock for ballast, macadam, concrete, glass, flux, etc. Quicklime was also manufactured. Steam drills, a Gates crusher, pulverizers and screens were used in the quarrying and preparing the stone for the market.

    “The following is a description of the beds in the quarry from the top to the bottom:

    1-5 ft. - Clay, stripping.

    20 ft. - Limestone. This bed is split into thin layers, containing many large chert nodules. The thickness varies in different parts of the quarry.

    8 ft. 6 in. - Light gray limestone. Bedding planes are from six inches to one foot apart. Stone is much broken by joints.

    6 ft. - Nearly white, crystalline limestone.

    4 ft. 3 in. - Buff colored limestone, containing an abundance of fossil crinoids.

    6 ft. - Light gray, coarsely crystalline limestone, containing many crinoid fossils.

    8 ft. - Dark buff colored limestone, containing large nodules of chert. The upper portion of the bed is much darker than the lower.

    4 ft. 10 in. - Dark gray, coarsely crystalline limestone, containing fossil crinoids and occasional small calcite geodes.

    “The principal joints strike north and south and east and west. Two other less prominent sets strike N. 55° E. and N. 30° W. The stone has weathered along some of these jointing planes leaving irregular V-shaped seams, which are filled with clay. Such seams are known to the quarrymen as mud seams and are common to most of the limestone quarries in this region.”

  • Louisiana, Missouri - M. A. Rosengreen’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Lutesville (west of), Missouri - the Hahn Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “Two quarries owned respectively by J. H. Turley and E. P. Briggs and Mrs. Hahn, are located near this place.

    The Hahn Quarry.

    “This quarry, which is owned by Mrs. Hahn and operated by Jesse Han, is located three-eighths mile west of Lutesville. It is situated near the bottom of a hill and has a face 150 feet long. The stone is similar to that in the Turley and Briggs quarry, being a fine grained, magnesian limestone. It occurs in unlimited quantities and is suitable for rough rubble masonry. It is used exclusively to supply the local market. The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom:

    2 ft. - Stripping.

    4 ft. - Yellowish gray limestone containing stratification planes. Poor quality of stone.

    6 in. - Layer of dark flint nodules.

    5 ft. - Yellowish, arenaceous limestone, containing a bedding plane near the middle. Contains dries.

    4 ft., 2 in. - Yellowish gray, fine grained, magnesian limestone of the pitted type, described as occurring in the Jefferson City quarries.

    3 ft., 6 in. - Thick bed of buff, grayish, siliceous limestone. This bed will split along the bluish stratification planes.

    “The major joints strike N. 65° W., N. 74° W., and N. 35° E. No machinery is used other than hand tools.”

  • Lutesville, Missouri - the Turley & Briggs Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “Two quarries owned respectively by J. H. Turley and E. P. Briggs and Mrs. Hahn, are located near this place.

    The Turley & Briggs Quarry.

    “This quarry is located near the north limits of the town just west of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern railroad. It is situated on the east side of a bluff and has a face sixty feet long and ten feet high. The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom:

    3 ft. - Gray, fine grained, compact, limestone. Contains many dries which break the stone into small pieces.

    11 in. - Similar stone. Broken into small pieces by short tight seams.

    1 ft., 4 in. - Gray, fine grained, sub-crystalline limestone, containing small cavities one-fourth to one-half an inch in diameter. This bed can be split in the middle.

    1ft., 3 in. - Limestone similar in texture to that in the bed above. Contains small nodules and geodes of quartz and dries.

    2 ft., 8 in. - Fine grained, gray, limestone. Contains yellowish stratification planes along which it splits easily.

    1 ft., 2 in. Gray limestone.

    “This quarry was opened in 1902 and employs six men. A small kiln has been built to test the stone for the manufacture of quick lime. The stone is being shipped to Oran, Missouri, where it is being used in the foundation to a large mill.”

  • Macon, Missouri - J. P. English’s Marble and Granite Works & Monument Business (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, December 1898, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, pp. 45 and 46)

    “Macon, Mo. - J. P. English has purchased the marble and granite works of Thomas E. Wisdom.”

    “Macon, Mo. - J. P. English recently purchased of Thomas E. Wisdom, his monument business.”

  • Macon, Missouri – Edward Farley, Granite & Marble Dealer (Obituary) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, March 1919, Vol. XL, No. 3, pp. 127)

    Death of a Prominent Stone Man

    “Edward Farley, a well-known granite and marble dealer of Columbia, Mo., died at his home in that city on February 25. Mr. Farley, who was one of sixteen children, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, on December 23, 1832. He came to America in 1849 and located at St. Louis, Mo., serving his apprenticeship there with Wilson & Co. He was married in 1860 and had a family of six boys, one of whom died in infancy. He is survived by his wife and five sons, Henry A., of Peoria, Ill.; Frank L. and Wm. E., of Columbia, Mo., Louis R., of Rock Island, Ill., and Robert E., of Detroit. During the Civil War he worked as a journeyman in Ottumwa and Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. He first engaged in business at Macon, Mo., in 1865, moving his business to Columbia, Mo., in 1867, and remained in the retail monument business up to the time of his death. During the past few years his son, Wm. E., was associated with him and managed the business. At his funeral his five sons and his last surviving brother acted as pallbearers. Mr. Farley was respected throughout the trade for his integrity and sterling character.”

  • Macon, Macon County, Missouri - the Fox Monument Co., Ben W. Fox, Proprietor (Obituary) (from American Stone Trade, July, 1934, Vol. XXXIV, No. 12, pp. 34.

    “Ben W. Fox, of Macon, Mo., died at his home in that city on June 24th, as the result of a heart attack, at the age of 56 years. He was the proprietor of Fox Monument Co., which he has conducted for the past 22 years. Associated with him in the business are his two sons, Gerald Fox and Howard Fox, who will continue the well established institution. Mr. Fox, the decedent, was a native of Shelbina, and grew up there. He first went into the monument business at Brookfield. He was prominent in the Elks Lodge, and a consistent member of the Christian Church. His aged mother survives, now living in Oklahoma, and she was able to attend the funeral on June 27. One married daughter survives besides the two sons already mentioned, and also two brothers and a sister. Burial was made in the family lot in Oakwood Cemetery.”

  • Macon, Missouri - the Wisdom & Reed Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Macon, Missouri - Thomas E. Wisdom’s Marble and Granite Works & Monument Business (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, December 1898, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, pp. 45 and 46)

    “Macon, Mo. - J. P. English has purchased the marble and granite works of Thomas E. Wisdom.”

    “Macon, Mo. - J. P. English recently purchased of Thomas E. Wisdom, his monument business.”

  • Madge, Missouri - the Madge Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    Madge.

    “The Madge Stone Co. and the Joplin-Elk River Stone Co. operate quarries located on the same hill east of the Kansas City Southern railroad at this place. Both quarries are at the same level and similar stone is taken out of both.”

  • Madge, Missouri - the Joplin-Elk River Stone Company’s Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located on the north side of the hill (east of the Kansas City Southern railroad). The same beds are worked as in the lower portion of the quarry of the Madge Stone Co. The quarry, which has been in operation about two years, has not been worked far enough into the hill to give the entire succession. The rock is very similar in quality to that quarried by the Madge Stone Co. The beds, which occur directly above the 7-foot, blue, shaly bed, are somewhat heavier than in the Madge Stone Co.’s quarry. They are used either for heavy bridge stone or capped into range and curbing. This company confines itself to the production of curbing, rubble, bridge abutments, etc. The quarry is connected with the Kansas City Southern railroad by side track and is equipped with two derricks and a hoist for handling the stone.”

  • Madge, Missouri - the Madge Stone Company’s Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry has a west face of about 500 feet along the hill. The stone is fine grained, bluish limestone, lying in well stratified beds. The stone above the 7-foot shaly bed is coarsely crystalline and very fossiliferous. The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom, showing the uses to which the stone in the different ledges is being put.

    15 ft. - In beds from 2 to 8 inches in thickness. Upper nine feet is very flinty. Some flagging and rubble can be obtained from the heavier beds, but most of the stone is crushed.

    6 in. - Rubble.

    1 ft. - Footing, bridge and range.

    8 in. - Footing and some range.

    1 ft. - Footing, bridge and range.

    9 in. - Footing and bridge with some rubble.

    8 in. - Footing and range.

    4 in. - Flagging.

    1 ft. 3 in. - Bridge. Can be capped six inches from top.

    4 in. - Rubble and flagging.

    10 in. - Footing and some range.

    1 ft. 1 in. - Bridge. Bed contains suture joints.

    8 in. - Footing.

    7 in. - Rubble.

    1 ft. 11 in. - Used mostly for bridge stone.

    1 ft. - Footing and bridge. Caps seven inches from the bottom.

    1 ft. 4 in. - Footing, bridge and rubble. Caps seven inches from top and six inches from bottom.

    6 in. - Curbing, light footing and rubble.

    7 in. - Curbing, light footing and rubble.

    11 in. - Bridge, footing and rubble.

    1 ft. 7 in. - Rubble. Shows small suture joints.

    10 in. - Bridge stone and footing.

    9 in. - Footing.

    6 in. - Rubble.

    2 ft. - Bridge stone. Also crushed. Contains nodules of pyrite.

    7 ft. - Bluish colored stone, disintegrate rapidly because of shaly layers and bedding planes. Crushed.

    6 in. - Curbing and rubble.

    1 ft. - Caps into three 4 inch flagging. Occasionally used for bridge stone.

    1 ft. 2 in. - Bridge and footing. Caps along clay seams four inches from the bottom.

    1 ft. - 5 in. - Bridge stone and some range. Can be capped five and ten inches from the bottom.

    7 in. - Range and curbing.

    7 in. - Range and Curbing.

    1 ft. 7 in. - Bridge and some range. Bed contains iron sulphide. Splits into two beds twelve and seven inches in thickness.

    “The major joints strike N. 5° E. and are from 25 to 30 feet apart. A second set, almost prominent, strike east and west. Thee joints greatly facilitate quarrying operations.

    “The waste of the quarry and the thin beds in the upper part of the section are crushed for macadam and railroad ballast. The lower portion beneath the seven-foot bed of bluish stone is the most valuable in the quarry. The stone in these beds is quarried by means of plugs and feathers. It breaks easily into blocks which can be used for range, curbing and bridge work.

    “This quarry has been in operation about five years and employs from ten to forty men. the quarry is equipped with a No. 3 Gates crusher, 34-horse power engine, 40-horse power boiler, two steam drills and two derricks.”

  • Madison County, Missouri - Building Stones in Madison County, Missouri (circa 1890) - “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties, Missouri,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890, pp. 22-44.
  • Madison County, Missouri - the Cedar Bottom Marble Quarry (Marble) (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

    Cedar Bottom Quarry. In township 33 north, range 5 east, section 36, northwest quarter, a stratum of dark red variegated marble, which takes an excellent polish, has been opened on (sic). Only a very small amount of stone has been taken out, however, and this mostly for samples.”

  • Madison County, Missouri - the H. L. Gale Marble Quarry

    See: “Fredericktown, Madison County, Missouri - the H. L. Gale Marble Quarry.

  • Madison County, Missouri - the L. M. Hebener Marble Quarry (Marble) (from“Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

    L. M. Hebener. In township 32 north, range 5 east, section 17, southwest quarter of the southwest quarter, a small marble quarry was opened some time before the civil war. The best stratum is about eighteen inches thick. The marble is of a light gray color, variegated with streaks of brown and green. It takes an excellent polish, but needs to be dressed with care, owing to its ‘plucky’ qualities. Several car loads were shipped to St. Louis.”

  • Madison County, Missouri - the Kansas City Company Quarry (Diabase & Granite)

    See: “Skrainka, Madison County, Missouri - the Kansas City Company Diabase/Granite Quarry

  • Madison County, Missouri - the Milne and Gordon Granite Quarry (Granite) (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

    Milne and Gordon. In township 33 north, range 7 east, section 25, northeast quarter, are two small quarries in a granite ledge, which were opened in 1886. The granite here is capable of furnishing large blocks of dimension stone, has very little stripping upon it, and is conveniently near the railroad. The stone has a dark reddish color, due to a prevailing feldspar, and is beautifully mottled with grains of translucent quartz and dark specks of biotite or hornblende. It takes a high lustrous polish and makes a very handsome stone for ornamental purposes. It does not dress very easily, however. The total output of the quarries to date amounts to about five thousand paving blocks and a small amount of dimension stone. These quarries will soon be developed on a large scale by the present owners.”

  • Madison County, Missouri - the Slater Marble Quarry (Marble) (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

    Slater Quarry. In township 33 north, range 5 east, section 23, south half, a marble quarry has been worked intermittently for about fifteen years. A heavy stripping was removed over an area of about seventy-five square yards, and a shaft was sunk through about eighteen feet of marble strata. The quarry is now full of water. Blocks lying about show that some of the strata are at least twenty inches in thickness. The marble varies considerably in color, the handsomest variety resembles the thinner stratum in Gale’s quarry, described above, but it has a redder shade. These marbles take an excellent polish, but are quite ‘plucky.’ A few small shipments have been made.”

  • Madison County, Missouri - the Wright’s Marble Quarry (Marble) (from “Notes on The Building Stones, Clays and Sands of Iron, St. Francois and Madison Counties,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin 1, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, April 1890.)

    Wright’s Quarry. About a mile and a half east of Gale’s quarry, on the Fredericktown road, a small quarry was opened, in the marble, ten years ago (circa 1880). The thickness of the beds here cannot be ascertained. The marble has a dark brown or chocolate color, which is relieved by veins of calcite. It is fine grained, and takes an excellent polish, but is ‘plucky,’ like the last described. Two car loads were shipped to Boston and New York.”

  • Madisonville, Missouri - James Levey’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Maitland, Missouri - the John Bishop Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Maitland, Missouri - J. E. Oldfield’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Malden, Missouri - C. H. Mason’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Marceline, Missouri – David L. Williams, Marble Yard (circa 1916) (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, December 1916, Vol. XXXVII, No. 12, “Notes from the Stone Fields” section, pp. 656)

    “David L. Williams will open a marble yard at Marceline, Mo.”

  • Marion County, Missouri - Business & Industry of Marion County - Quarries & Lime Works

    There are several interesting links on this web site, but the sections on “The Limes Industry of Marion County” and the “Hannibal Quarries” are of particular interest. In the “Hannibal Quarries” section, the Hannibal Lime Company is discussed and two photographs relating to the company are presented.

  • Marionville, Missouri - Marionville Marble Works, J. C. Forbes, Proprietor (Excerpt from Historical and Descriptive Review of Missouri, Vol. 1. The Central and Southwestern Sections, Kansas City: Jno. Lethem, 1891, pp. 54.)

    “Marionville Marble Works, J.C. Forbes Proprietor. - Mr. Forbes is a thorough workman in his line, and may fitly be called a tombstone artist. He came to Missouri in 1871, from Illinois, his native State, taking up his residence and establishing his business in this city five years ago. He deals in all kinds of American and foreign granites and marbles, and is prepared to make any style of monument work on short notice. He employs three hands, and his patronage extends throughout this and adjoining counties. He occupies a room 12 x 32. Mr. F. saw much of the war as a member of the 5th. Wis. Battery. He guarantees perfect satisfaction in the character of the work done, and makes his prices to suit the time.”

  • Marionville, Missouri - T. J. Forbes’ Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Marshall, Missouri - the Marshall Area Sandstone Quarries (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “The only quarries in the vicinity of this city are owned by A. Olson and Joseph Dean of Marshall. They are both located in sandstone of Coal Measure age. Both were worked quite extensively at one time, but at present they have been almost abandoned. Most of the stone now used in Marshall is shipped from Napton where quarries have been opened in the Burlington limestone.”

  • Marshall (northwest of), Missouri - the Dean Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “The Dean quarry is located five miles northwest of the city. It is said to produce a very good grade of sandstone, although it has not been very active for several years, the distance from the railroad practically prohibiting extensive development.”

  • Marshall, Missouri - the Marshall Marble and Granite Works, J. A. Tipping, Proprietor (Excerpt from Historical and Descriptive Review of Missouri, Vol. 1. The Central and Southwestern Sections, Kansas City : Jno. Lethem, 1891, pp. 168.)

    “Marshall Marble and Granite Works, J. A. Tipping. - For twenty-one years, this important industry has been successfully prosecuted in this city. The value of $10,000 is to be seen here in marble and granite monuments, finely displayed in his spacious premises. They are of the most artistic design, bearing mute but powerful evidence of the skill and taste shown by Mr. Tipping the proprietor. Mr. Tipping is a native of Alabama but has made Saline County his home for thirty-three years. He is an I.O.O.F., K. of P. and Knight of Maccabee. Estimates furnished for iron fencing, flagging and tiling of marble and stone.”

  • Marshall (southeast of), Missouri - the Olson Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned and operated by A. Olson, is located about two miles southeast of Marshall. It consists of two openings, one on each side of a ravine, about thirty feet from the bottom. The south opening extends about 200 feet along the hillside and has a depth of about 20 feet. The stone is covered with from five to fifteen feet of very tough clay stripping. Underneath the clay occur a number of well stratified beds of sandstone from four to eight inches in thickness. The lowest bed in the quarry consists of seven feet of massive sandstone, which, at the time the quarry was inspected, was covered with stripping which had washed into the quarry. Directly above this, occurs four feet of the best stone in the quarry.

    “The sandstone in this opening is fine grained and frequently stained with iron oxide. It is soft and friable when first quarried, but hardens upon exposure to the atmosphere. Some of the stone contains small pockets of loose white sand which quickly weathers out, leaving a pitted surface. If the stone is to be cut and dressed, care should be taken to select that which is free from these pockets.

    The opening on the opposite of the ravine, although smaller, contains stone similar to that just described, but of a somewhat inferior quality.

    “This quarry has produced a large quantity of stone, most of which has been used for foundations, bridge abutments and culverts. The massive beds are well adapted to these uses and can be obtained in blocks of any desired dimensions. The stone from the upper beds has been used for caps, sills and door-steps. The abandonment of this quarry was chiefly due to the heavy stripping.”

  • Marshall, Missouri - J. A. Tipping’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Marshfield, Webster County, Missouri - Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    “The Second Magnesian limestone has been quarried near Marshfield, Webster county. The exposure shows one bed 33 inches in thickness of buff limestone. This appears to be durable stone, easy to quarry and to dress. It is covered with but little cap-rock, but the stripping would be slightly increased as the excavations would be extended into the hill. There are two good exposures a few hundred feet apart.”

  • Marshfield, Missouri - the McAdams & Amos Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Maryland Heights, Missouri - the Old Limestone Quarry at the Present-day Crystal Springs Quarry Golf Club (photographs and history - commercial web site)

    The Crystal Springs Quarry Golf Club was created from the site of an old limestone quarry.

  • Maryville, Missouri - the Boyer Bros. Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Maryville, Missouri - R. M. Simmons’ Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Maysville, Missouri - the J. C. Sparling Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry, which is owned by J. C. Sparling and operated by M. D. Sparling, is located in the N. E. ¼ of the S. E. ¼ of sec. 2, T. 58, R. 31 W., two miles southeast of the city. It has been operated three years and has a west face 250 feet long.

    “The following is a section of the quarry from top to bottom:

    1-6 ft. - Soil and clay stripping.

    1 ft. 2 in. - Fine grained, compact, buff colored limestone, containing calcite geodes.

    10 in. - Fine grained, buff colored limestone, splits into two beds. Weathers rapidly.

    6 in. - White shale.

    4 in. - Granular, soft, yellowish brown limestone, used for well rock.

    8 in. - Fine grained, fossiliferous, blue limestone, colored buff along bedding planes. Contains small calcite geodes.

    8 in. - Fine grained, fossiliferous, blue limestone, colored buff along bedding planes. Contains small calcite geodes.

    12 in. - Finely crystalline, dark blue limestone. Contains calcite geodes.

    8 in. - fine grained, blue limestone.

    “The major joints strike N. 10° W. and N.50° E. They are well defined and are from fourteen to twenty feet apart in one direction and ten to twelve feet apart in the other.

    “The stone in the lower portion of the quarry is solid and works well into coursing and ashlery. The buff stone immediately above the blue beds is a soft granular rock which disintegrates rapidly when exposed to the atmosphere. This stone is also quite argillaceous. It is used principally for well rock. The stone from the upper beds will not stand frost unless thoroughly seasoned.

    “The necessity for removing the soil, clay and buff colored stone adds greatly to the expense of working the blue stone. Hand tools are used in quarrying.”

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