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Quarries in Missouri & Quarry Links, Photographs, and Articles
Jefferson thru Kahoka

  • Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri – the Jefferson City Quarry (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    Jefferson City Quarry. - The greater part of the quarry product is used at present by the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company for the construction of bridges; the small fragments are used for ballast, and small slabs are sold to citizens of Jefferson City for ordinary building purposes.

    “The following is a section at this quarry:

    1. Soil and clay - 6 feet.

    2. Unevenly-bedded limestone and chert, in thin beds, suitable for ballast only - 12 feet.

    3. Fine-grained homogeneous rock, in even thin layers, locally called ‘cotton rock’ - 4 feet.

    4. Gray limestone with numerous small cells filled with white powder - 2 feet.

    5. Chert beds - 2 feet 6 inches.

    6. Drab, evenly-bedded limestone, also called cotton rock - 9 feet.

    7. gray, hard, cellular limestone, generally preferred for bridge construction - 10 feet.

    “No. 6 is similar to the rock which was used in the construction of the state-house, which was erected about forty years ago. It is occasionally slightly discolored with stains of iron, of which minute globules and specks are seen, apparently changed from pyrites. The layers from this rock are of quite uniform thickness, many of the 4- and 6-inch layers making a very handsome paving stone. It has been quite extensively used in Jefferson city, where it has been termed cotton rock, by which name it is also known in other localities of this state. The prevailing color of this rock is drab, but in some localities it has a bluish tint, and is liable to disintegrate rapidly on exposure to the action of frost. Some of the drab layers also readily disintegrate on exposure to the weather. The best of the material needs to be quarried early enough in the season to allow the quarry water to become dried out before the stone is exposed to the action of frost.

    “No. 7 is a harder rock, and is not well adapted for cut work, though a very desirable material for heavy bridge construction, for which little dressing is necessary, and for which the qualities most desirable are those of strength and durability. The rocks at Jefferson City may all be referred to the Calciferous sand-rock group, known in Missouri as the Second Magnesian limestone series. Fossils are very rarely found. A section of 200 feet may be seen at Jefferson, and only a lingual is found in the upper beds; the other beds abound in fucoids. Lime manufactured from some of the layers possesses hydraulic properties.”

  • Jefferson City Area, Missouri – the Jefferson City Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “Jefferson City.

    “All of the stone quarried in this vicinity belongs to what is known as the Jefferson City (Second Magnesian) limestone. This formation consists of two divisions, an upper which is chiefly cotton rock and a lower which is thickly bedded, pitted limestone. The cotton rock occurs in clean cut, well defined beds, which are easily quarried. It is fine grained, impure, light gray to buff colored, dolomitic limestone, which is easy to cut and dress, and looks well when placed in a wall. It has been used very extensively in Jefferson City and can be seen in the wall surrounding the penitentiary, in the retaining walls around the Governor’s mansion and in many of the buildings.

    Plate XIII. - Fig. 1. Cotton rock, penitentiary wall, Jefferson City, Mo. Plate XIII. - Fig. 1. Cotton rock, penitentiary wall, Jefferson City, Missouri (circa 1904)
    Plate XII - Fig. 2. Portion of a cotton rock quarry, Jefferson City, Mo. Plate XII - Fig. 2. Portion of a cotton rock quarry, Jefferson City, Missouri (circa 1904)

    “The pitted dolomite occurs in thicker beds than the cotton rock contains irregular cavities filled or lined with fine sugary quartz. It has been used in a number of important buildings, although it is not quarried at present (circa 1904), except for the manufacture of quick lime. A three-foot bed occurs with the cotton rock in nearly all the quarries.

    “The quarries located in this vicinity are owned and operated by John Dietz, John Kieselbach, Mueller & Geisler, The City, The State, Jacob Schmidt, Hagner and Lumis and L. D. Gordon. The stone in the last two is being used exclusively for the manufacture of quick lime and will be described in a subsequent report on ‘Lime and Cement.’”

  • Jefferson City (east of), Missouri - the Dietz Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located one and one-half miles east of the city and consists of three openings, none of which are being operated.

    “The north opening has a face about 50 feet long and consists of seven beds, aggregating eight and a half feet in thickness. The following is a description of these beds from top to bottom:

    15 in. }

    16 in. } This stone is a dark gray, pitted magnesian limestone. When freshly quarried,

    12 in. } it has a spotted appearance due to small cavities filled with white, sugary

    15 in. } quartz, which weathers out upon exposure leaving a rough, hackly surface.

    12 in. }

    18 in. }

    14 in. }

    “A number of these beds can be split into thinner layers. Quarrying has not extended very far into the hill and the bedding planes are free and open. Rectangular blocks of almost any dimensions can be obtained.

    “In a second opening, located in a small ravine northeast of the house, the cotton rock overlying the heavy pitted dolomite is quarried exclusively. It varies from gray to a buff color and occurs in well stratified beds containing short tight seams. The lower beds also contain irregular joints having a dip of 10° to 20°. This opening has not been worked very extensively.

    “The third opening, located just north of the south road, has been developed more extensively than either of the other two. It has a face about 125 feet long. The following is a description of the beds from the top to the bottom.

    2 to 4 ft. - Chert and clay stripping.

    1 ft., 2 in. - Fine grained, light gray limestone.

    2 ft. 6 in. - Light gray limestone. Can be split into three beds.

    6 in. }

    8 in. } Well defined beds of fine grained, gray limestone.

    8 in. }

    1 ft., 6 in. - Fine grained, dark gray limestone. This is a pitted bed containing cavities filled with white sugary quartz.

    6 in. to 1 ft., 6 in. - Broken cherty limestone.

    2 ft. - Fine grained, bluish gray limestone, containing brown spots of iron oxide. Can be split into two 12 inch beds.

    1 ft. - Light buff colored limestone, containing numerous cavities.

    1 ft., 3 in. - Blue, finely stratified limestone, weathered to a buff color along the bedding planes.

    2 ft., 10 in. - Fine grained, gray limestone, containing streaks of brown iron oxide along the stratification planes. Occurs in beds from four to eight inches in thickness.

    “The stone from this opening is chiefly a cotton rock similar to that in the other quarries. The joints are irregular and break the stone into blocks of uncertain dimensions. The beds dip gently in all directions from the middle of the opening.”

  • Jefferson City, Missouri - the Jefferson City Limestone Quarry at the foot of Madison Street (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “In connection with the workhouse, the city operates a small quarry at the foot of Madison street adjacent to the tracks of the Missouri Pacific railroad. The following is a description of the beds from the top to the bottom of the quarry:

    10 ft. - Red clay stripping.

    10 to 12 ft. - Fine grained, light gray limestone, in beds from two to eight inches in thickness. The stone in the upper two feet is very shelly. Contains numerous vertical joints which break the stone into small blocks.

    1 ft., 8 in. - Fine grained, gray limestone, containing small cavities.

    1 ft., 2 in. - Two beds of limestone, very similar to that above.

    1 ft., 6 in. to 2 ft. - Dark gray, pitted, magnesian limestone. Contains irregular cavities filled with siliceous material.

    1 ft., 6 in. - Gray, oolitic limestone, containing considerable chert

    1 ft., 2 in. to 2 ft. - Dark gray, cherty limestone, containing numerous joints.

    5 ft., 8 in. - Fine grained, gray limestone, containing spots and streaks of iron oxide. Consists of four beds of equal thickness.

    “Short vertical joints break the stone into small blocks. A small amount of stone is broken by hand to be used in repairing the macadamized streets. When used alone it is too soft for macadam.”

  • Jefferson City, Missouri - the Kieselbach Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located near the southern limits of the city, in the N.E. ¼ of the S.E. ¼ of sec. 18, T. 44, R. 11 W. It has a north face fifty feet long and twenty-four feet in height and has been worked into the hill about thirty feet. The stone is all cotton rock, which occurs in beds from four to twelve inches in thickness. In the lower part of the quarry, the stone has a light blue color, while above it varies from a grayish buff to a light gray.

    “The major joints strike N. 64° E. and N. and S. Short discontinuous joints occur throughout the individual beds, breaking the stone into small blocks. Sills and foundation stone can be produced at this quarry.

    Laboratory Examination:

    Physical Tests. - Two-inch cubes of both the cotton rock and pitted dolomite were tested in the laboratory with the following results:

    Cotton Rock:

    Specific Gravity - 2.776

    Porosity - 9.248 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption - 3.66.

    Weight per cubic foot - 157.5 lbs.

    Transverse strength - 2468.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Tensile strength - 862.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Crushing strength - 15,964.7 lbs. per sq. in. on bed.

    16,899. lbs. per sq. in. on edge.

    Pitted Dolomite:

    Specific Gravity - 2.80.

    Porosity - 10.317%

    Ratio of Absorption - 4.058%

    Weight per cubic foot - 157.0 lbs.

    Tensile strength - 727 lbs. per sq. in.

    Crushing strength - 11,950 lbs. per sq. in. on bed.

    10.148 lbs. per sq. in.

    Crushing strength of samples subjected to freezing test - 11,962 lbs. per sq. in.

    “From the above tests it will be seen that the frozen samples of cotton rock tested on an average of 819.7 pounds per square inch less than the fresh samples, while the strength of the frozen and fresh samples of pitted dolomite were about the same.”

  • Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri - the H. W. Kolkmyer Quarry (Limestone) (from Report on The Building Stones of The United States, and Statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880, by George W. Hawes, Curator of the Department of Mineralogy and Lithology at the National Museum, and by F. W. Sperr and Thomas C. Kelly, Joint production of the Census Office and the National Museum, 1883)

    The following information was taken from the table entitled, “Table IV. Tables indicating the Amount and Kinds of Rock in the Different States”: The H. W. Kolkmyer Quarry, Jefferson City, Cole County, Limestone/Limestone, color: light drab; quarry opened in 1876.

  • Jefferson City (south of), Missouri - the Mueller & Geisler Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located one and one-half miles south of the city. It is situated at the base of a hill and has a north face 300 feet long. The following is a description of the beds from top to bottom:

    2 to 4 ft. - Clay stripping.

    4 ft. - Grayish white cotton rock. Is used for ashler blocks and foundations.

    2 ft. - Siliceous, magnesian limestone. This bed can be split into three 8-inch layers at the west end of the quarry and into five thin beds at the east end.

    1 ft., 6 in. - Dark gray, flinty limestone.

    10 ft. - Fine grained, light gray cotton rock, in beds from four to ten inches in thickness. The stone in the lower beds has a blue color.

    “The cotton rock is used in buildings in Jefferson City. The siliceous limestone has a pleasing light gray color when first quarried, but becomes much darker when exposed to the atmosphere. It is the lightest color pitted dolomite observed in any of the quarries in this vicinity.

    Laboratory Examination.

    Physical Tests. - Two-inch cubes of both cotton rock and pitted dolomite from this quarry were examined in the laboratory with the following results:

    Cotton Rock:

    Specific Gravity - 2.783.

    Porosity - 8.574 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption - 3.370.

    Weight per cubic foot - 153.8 lbs.

    Tensile strength - 970.75 lbs. per sq. in.

    Transverse strength - 2.949.2 lbs. per sq. in. on bed.

    Crushing strength - 16.348 lbs. per sq. in. on edge.

    Crushing strength of samples subjected to freezing test - 15.680.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Pitted Dolomite:

    Specific Gravity - 2.779.

    Porosity - 8.312 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption - 3.262.

    Weight per cubic foot 154.1 lbs.

    Transverse strength - 1228.8 lbs. per sq. in.

    Tensile strength - 498.5 lbs. per sq. in.

    Crushing strength - 11.141. lbs. per sq. in. on bed.

    Crushing strength of samples subjected to freezing test - 9.640 lbs. per sq. in.

    “These tests indicate that the cotton rock lost through the freezing test an average of 991.8 pounds per square inch. The pitted dolomite lost an average of 1501 pounds per square inch.”

  • Jefferson City, Missouri - the Schmidt Limestone Quarry (Dolomite Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located just south of Atchison street near Lincoln Institute. It was opened in 1902 and has been worked intermittently since that time.

    “The face of the quarry consists of two twenty-four inch beds of pitted dolomite belonging to the Jefferson City (Second Magnesian) limestone. It has a mottled color due to small irregular pockets containing fine granular quartz.

    “To the north, the face of the quarry increases to ten feet in height, the additional beds consisting of pitted dolomite containing considerable flint.

    “The stone is used to some extent for caps, sills and coursing. Formerly the State operated a quarry at a higher level on the same hill.”

  • Jefferson City, Missouri - the State Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    East of the penitentiary, the State owns a quarry which is worked by the convicts. This quarry has a west face 325 feet long and fourteen feet high. The stone is a well stratified cotton rock, which is covered with a very heavy stripping. This quarry is not worked very extensively.

    The State operates another quarry west of the National cemetery. It has a face 1,000 feet long, being the largest in this vicinity. It has not been operated for some time.

    “The stone is typical cotton rock and occurs in well stratified beds from four to sixteen inches in thickness. The bedding planes are smooth and the beds are a very convenient size for quarrying without machinery. A bed of pitted dolomite similar to that previously described occurs near the middle of the face.

    “Short discontinuous joints occur in all parts of the quarry. They are confined to either one or a few successive beds. Some of these joints are inclined, especially in the lower beds. Some of those observed had the following strike and dip:

    Strike: N. 35° W. - Dip: S.W. 32°

    Strike: N. 55° W. - Dip: S.W. 23°

    Strike: N. 55° E.

    Strike: N. 80° E.

    “The beds dip gently from the middle of the quarry toward both ends.

    A third quarry operated by the State, known as the ‘State Quarry,’ is located about one mile east of the city. It is situated upon a hill and has south and west faces aggregating 300 feet in length and 17 feet in height.

    “The stone is typical cotton rock, having a blue color at the bottom and a gray or buff tint near the surface. The beds are from four to twenty inches in thickness.

    “The stone has been used in and about the State buildings at Jefferson City. At present the quarry is not operating.”

  • Jefferson County, Missouri - the Ranken Quarry

    The Ranken Quarry was added to the National Register of Places in 1974 (#74001079). The land covers 220 acres, and “Period of Significance (was) 1000-2999 BC, 1000 AD-999 BC, 500-999 BC, 499-0 BC, 499-0 AD, 1000-500 AD, 1499-1000 AD, 1749-1500 AD.” (“Address Restricted, Times Beach”)

  • Jefferson City, Missouri - Victor Zuber’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Johnson County, Missouri - the Sandstones of Johnson County, from “Notes on The Clays and Building Stones of Certain Western Central Counties Tributary to Kansas City,” by G. E. Ladd, Assistant Geologist, in Bulletin No. 5, Geological Survey of Missouri, Jefferson City, July 1891, pp. 46-86.

    Johnson County. - Formations represented.

    “The formations of Johnson county include the Quaternary deposits, and the Lower and Middle Coal Measures. The Quaternary deposits consist of the usual Loess, soil, alluvium and residuary clays. The Lower Coal Measures, generally speaking, occupy the eastern part of the county, and the Middle Coal Measures the central and western parts.

    The Building Stones and The Stone Industry (of Johnson County, Missouri ). - The Warrensburg sandstone.

    “The building stones of Johnson county having a commercial value are sandstones. These are widely developed, and are known as the Warrensburg and the Carbon Hill sandstones. The former is, by far, the best known sandstone in the State, and it has enjoyed a wide sale for years, being used in many large public and private buildings. The demand for it has, however, fallen off lately. This sandstone formation is a hundred feet or more thick. It varies from gray to brown, but, as used, is generally of a gray color, which is of uniform, handsome appearance. It is often calcareous, highly micaceous, and quite friable. It contains, frequently, large nodular masses of siliceous iron ore, and pockets of bitumen, and of argillaceous matter.

    The Carbon Hill sandstone,

    “The Carbon Hills sandstone occurs in the Lower Coal Measures. It is from five to eight feet in thickness, and is well marked throughout the county. Its color is buff and brown. It is soft and easily worked. It has been quarried only for local uses, such as foundations, bridge abutments and so forth.”

  • Joplin, Missouri - the J. & Son Holt Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Joplin, Missouri - the John Jackson Mine (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)
    Plate XLV. Chat Pile, John Jackson Mine, Joplin, Mo. Material for Railroad Ballast, Macadam and Artificial Stone. Chat Pile, John Jackson Mine, Joplin, Missouri (circa 1904)
    Plate XLVI. Chat Piles. Fig. 1. Loading by hand. Chat Piles - Loading by hand, John Jackson Mine, Joplin, Missouri (circa 1904)
    Plate XLVI. Chat Piles. Fig. 2. Loading by steam shovel. Chat Piles - Loading by steam shovel, John Jackson Mine, Joplin, Missouri (circa 1904)
  • Joplin (southwest of), Missouri - the Joplin Marble Quarries Company Quarry (Marble) (from Stone Magazine, June 1925, Vol. XLVI, No. 6, pp. 365)

    Open Marble Quarry Near Joplin

    “The Joplin Marble Quarries Company has been organized and plans perfected for the development of an eighty acre tract, known as the Resenhausen land, southwest of Joplin, Mo. Thomas Pennington will be in charge of the quarry development and C. H. Carter will be sales manager. Stockholders in the new company include George N. Spiva, E. A. Bliedung, Frank Childress, August Junge, Cowgill Blair, Harry Blair, William Houk, J. G. Starr, P. C. Pate, F. C. Ralston, Charles Christian and H. H. McNeal. The quarry site is on a bluff south of Shoal Creek. Arrangements have been made to test the ledge and stone, and a railroad spur will be run into the property at once.”

    • Joplin, Missouri - the Joplin Marble Quarries Co. (from Stone Magazine, September 1925, Vol. XLVI, No. 9, pp. 556)

      New Companies: “Joplin Marble Quarries Co., Joplin, Mo., $150,000; T. C. Pennington and C. H. Carter of Carthage, Mo. Company has eighty acres under option and plans developments.”

  • Joplin (near), Missouri - the Joplin Marble Quarries Company Quarry (from Stone Magazine, November 1926, Vol. XLVII, No. 11, pp. 683 & 684)

    A New Missouri Marble

    “The Joplin Marble Quarries Company of Joplin, Missouri, has opened a large deposit of marble near that city and is preparing to market a new marble for interior work under the trade name of ‘Lafayette Mauve.’ A plant has been erected for the sawing and finishing of the blocks, the machinery being installed by the Carthage Foundry & Machine Works of Carthage, Mo.”

    Trade Notes

    “The Carthage Foundry & Machine Works, Carthage, Missouri, is furnishing and installing six gang saws in the new marble plant of the Joplin Marble Quarries Company, Joplin, Mo. These saws were specially designed for the sawing of marble for interior work. The Carthage Foundry & Machine Works also will furnish the polishing machines, rubbing beds, sand feeds, etc., for the new finishing plant to be erected by the company.”

  • Joplin, Missouri - the Shoal Creek Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located in the S.E. ¼ of the S.E. ¼ of sec. 29. T. 27, R. 33 W. At this place the Mississippian limestone outcrops for about a fourth of a mile along the escarpment formed by Shoal creek. The hill is precipitous and rises to a height of 150 feet above the flood plain of the stream. At several horizons near the top of the hill, the limestone forms almost vertical cliffs.

    “The summit of the hill is covered with a thin stripping of soil, underneath which occurs fifty feet of rather thinly bedded limestone. None of the beds observed in this portion of the outcrops fifteen inches in thickness and most of them are much thinner. Directly underneath this thinly bedded limestone occurs the most important ledge, which, at the place examined, has a thickness of nine feet. It shows suture joints, which, from the weathered surface, appear to be very tight. The greatest thickness in this ledge, free from these parting planes, are found by measurement to be thirty inches. Near the top of this nine-foot ledge there are occasional pockets of chalk and chert.

    “Below this ledge occurs fifteen feet of thinly bedded limestone, underneath which is a second ledge three feet in thickness resembling in every respect the nine-foot ledge above described. Underneath this bed occurs twenty-five feet of what appears to be thinly bedded limestone. Underneath this is a three-foot ledge of what appears to be solid limestone.

    “Up to the present time (circa 1904) this quarry has not been very extensively developed. The stone has only been used to a limited extent to supply the local market. It is said to be 99 per cent. calcium carbonate, and it is thought that it could be used successfully in the manufacture of quick lime, although there has been no practical demonstration of its suitability for this purpose. It is suitable for furnace flux and might be used as one of the constituents in the manufacture of Portland cement.

    “The nine-foot ledge is coarse grained and fossiliferous at the bottom and dense and compact near the top. the stone has a very pleasing gray color which is uniform throughout all parts of the ledge. Iron sulphide, in any form, was not detected in any part of the exposure.

    Laboratory Examination.

    Physical tests.-Two-inch cubes of limestone from this quarry were tested in the laboratory with the following results:

    Specific Gravity - 2.671

    Porosity - 1.129 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption -.423

    Weight per cubic foot - 165.1 lbs.

    Transverse strength - 1350.

    Crushing Strength - 11,870. lbs. per sq. in.

    Crushing Strength of samples subjected to freezing test - 8,111. lbs. per sq. in.

    “The samples used in these tests were not very carefully prepared and therefore the strength tests are thought to be somewhat lower than they should be. The wide difference between the strength of the fresh and frozen samples may be in a large measure attributable to this fact.”

  • Joplin, Newton County, Missouri - the Shoal Creek Quarry of the Joplin Marble Quarries Company (from Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946. Used with permission of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.)

    “The quarry which formerly was operated by this company is located on the south bluff of Shoal Creek near Grand Falls in the SE ¼, SE ¼, Sec. 29, T. 27 N., R. 33 W., in Newton County. It had not been in operation for several years prior to 1941. The quarry is located high on the river-bluff, and the stone was lowered to the river-bottom whence a spur track leads to the processing plant on the north side of the river. The plant was in turn served by the Grand Falls branch of the Missouri Pacific Railroad.

    “The quarry had been opened in limestone beds of the Keokuk formation of Mississippian age. Stratigraphically, the top of the beds quarried lies approximately 30 feet below the Short Creek oolite which outcrops near the hilltop immediately north of the quarry. This relative position indicates that the Joplin Marble Quarry beds are at an horizon which is about 100 feet lower than the beds worked at the Carthage marble quarry. The Joplin quarry and the marble quarry at Phenix lie at approximately the same vertical distance below the Short Creek oolite.

    “A few samples of polished stone from the quarry were examined. The marble is of a medium dark gray color, stylolitic, coarsely crinoidal to rather fine-grained, with appreciable variations in texture. In general appearance, the polished marble resembles the Phenix stone and, like that stone, is somewhat darker than the product of the Carthage quarries. The limestone beds in the quarry are flat lying and contain some chert in nodular form. Beds quarried at this location prior to 1904 have been described in some detail in a previous report (1, pp. 142-143).

    “Marble from this quarry has been used for exterior work in the Missouri State Highway Building at Jefferson City; in the Connor Hotel building at Joplin, Mo. ; and at Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas. Interior installations of this stone include the Connor Hotel at Joplin, the Bank of New York, New York Athletic Club, and Fuller Building, New York City.”

  • Joplin, Missouri - the Sullivan Machinery Company Branch Office (Advertisement) (from Granite, Marble & Bronze Magazine, September 1906, Vol. XVI, No. 9, pp. 20)
    A corner of the Sandstone quarries of the Ohio Quarries Co., Amherst, Ohio. All the stone is channeled by 16 Sullivan class “Y” direct acting Channelers. An account of this great Sandstone property is given in the August Mine and Quarry. Sullivan Machinery Co. Branch Office, Joplin, Missouri, Sept. 1906 advertisement

    Stone Channelers, Rock Drills - Plug Drills - Air Compressors

    Sullivan Machinery Co., Railway Exchange, Chicago, U.S.A.

    Claremont, N.H. - New York - Pittsburg - Knoxville - St. Louis - Joplin, Mo.

    Railway Exchange - Denver - Salt Lake - El Paso - Butte - San Francisco - Paris, France

  • Joplin, Missouri - the Sullivan Machinery Company (Advertisement) (from Granite, Marble & Bronze Magazine, January 1907, Vol. XVII, No. 1, pp. 20)

    Stone Channelers - Rock Drills - Plug Drills - Air Compressors

    Sullivan Machinery Co., Railway Exchange, Chicago, U.S.A.

    Claremont, N.H. - New York - Pittsburg - Knoxville - St. Louis - Joplin, Mo. - Denver - Salt Lake - El Paso - Butte - San Francisco - Paris, France

  • Joplin, Missouri - Sullivan Machinery Co. Branch Office - “The Beginnings of a Great New Hampshire Industry,” by George B. Upham, The Granite Monthly: New Hampshire State Magazine, Vol. 53, No. 4, April 1921, pp. 141-149.

    “The Sullivan Machinery Company now has offices in Boston, New York, Pittsburgh, Knoxville, St. Louis, Cleveland, Duluth, Dallas, Joplin, Denver, Spokane, El Paso, Salt Lake, Toronto, Vancouver, Mexico City, Santiago in Chile, and Lima in Peru.  In the old world it maintains headquarters at London and Paris and before the war had a flourishing branch in Petrograd.  A branch has been maintained for many years in Sydney, Australia, and the company’s representatives are selling Sullivan mining machinery in Japan, India, the Federated Malay States, and South Africa.

    ”Sullivan machinery for excavating rock in mines, tunnels and quarries, for compressing air, for prospecting for minerals, and for mining coal is found in every part of the world where these industries are carried on.  This article tells of the small, yet interesting beginnings of this New Hampshire Industry.”

    (The names used for this company include: “D. A. Clay & Co.,” “Claremont Machine Works,” “J. P. Upham & Co.,” and lastly, the “Sullivan Machinery Company.”)

  • Kahoka, Missouri - the Kahoka Area Sandstone Quarries (Sandstone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “Three quarries are operated intermittently in the vicinity of this place to supply the local demand for building stone. These quarries are owned respectively by Mr. Sm. Casey, Mr. Story and Fulton & Creger.”

  • Kahoka, Missouri - the G. F. Boone Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Kahoka, Missouri - the Butler & Humphre Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Kahoka (north of), Missouri - the Casey Sandstone & Limestone Quarry (Sandstone & Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located about two and one-half miles north of Kahoka, in the S.E. ¼ of the N.W. ¼ of sec. 9, T. 65, R. 8 W. It was opened about 1859 and has been worked intermittently since that time.

    “The quarry has an east face of 150 feet and a north face of 60 feet. The north face, sixty feet high, consists chiefly of sandstone with several feet of limestone at the bottom. The following is a description of the beds in this part of the quarry from top to bottom:

    6-10 ft. - Clay stripping.

    5 ft. - Medium grained, white sandstone, in beds from ten to twelve inches in thickness. The stone in the upper bed is very hard.

    2 ft. 6 in. - Light gray sandstone. Can be split into two layers.

    3 ft. 3 in. - Light gray, sandy limestone. Can be split into layers six inches in thickness.

    1 ft. 7 in. - Limestone containing dark colored chert nodules. This stone is difficult to work.

    “The sandstone is easy to quarry and breaks easily with a sledge or plugs and feathers. Good stone of almost any desired thickness can be obtained. Besides being used for foundations, it has been quarried for sills, caps, curbing and flagging. Monument bases of a light gray color can be obtained from this stone. The limestone bed at the base of the quarry is too thick for foundations and is difficult to split into sizes suitable for other purposes.

    “The major joints strike N. 44° E. and east and west. The stone is cross-bedded at the west end. The bedding planes are not persistent throughout the quarry.

    Laboratory Examination.

    Physical tests. - Two-inch cubes of stone from this quarry were examined in the laboratory with the following results:

    Specific Gravity - 2.622

    Porosity - 6.754 per cent.

    Ratio of Absorption - 2.762

    Weight per cubic foot - 154.7 lbs.

    Crushing Strength

    { 11,260 lbs. per sq. in., on bed.

    { 9,694 lbs. per sq. in., on edge.

    Crushing Strength of samples subjected to freezing test - 11,786.2 lbs. per sq. in.

    “From the above tests we see that the frozen samples had an average crushing strength of 526.2 pounds per square inch more than those that were fresh, which shows that the stone is very little injured by alternate freezing and thawing.”

  • Kahoka, Missouri - P. N. Dixon’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Kahoka, Missouri - the Fulton & Creger Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (The following information is from The Quarrying Industry of Missouri, by E. R. Buckley, Director and State Geologist, and H. A. Buehler, Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Vol. II, 2nd Series, 1904.)

    “This quarry is located in the S.W. ¼ of sec. 9, T. 65, R. 7 W. It is situated at the top of a bluff on the south side of the Fox river and has a face 60 feet long. The stone consists of a three foot six-inch bed of gray limestone, a one-foot bed of shelly limestone and four feet five inches of dark colored limestone. The uppermost bed breaks into small polygonal blocks, while that below has numerous bedding planes, along which it can be split into thin layers, none of which exceed eight inches in thickness. The quarry is covered with from six to eight feet of clay.”

  • Kahoka, Missouri - Charles McCulah’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)
  • Kahoka, Missouri - W. T. McKee’s Quarry (listed in The Mine, Quarry and Metallurgical Record of the United States, Canada, and Mexico, The Mine and Quarry News Bureau, Chicago, Ill., 1897)

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