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Structures and Monuments in Which Kansas Stone was Used
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  • Finished Products from Kansas Stone in Kansas (continued)

    • Fort Riley, Kansas – 1855 Territorial Capital at Fort Riley (photograph)

    • The building was constructed of Ft. Riley Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved. Click here for historical information and about visiting the Territorial Capital presented by the Kansas State Historical Society.

      1855 Territorial Capital at Ft. Riley

    • Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas“The new buildings at Fort Riley (ca late 1890s to early 1900s) (see Pl. VIII) show the character of these stones, as do also numerous private dwellings in Junction City and the surrounding region. The mid-Shale bed (No. 7) is also of fine quality in many parts of the district. At Fort Riley it is 3 feet thick; is known as the 'white ledge,' and is used for caps and sills. On Clarks Creek, at the mouth of Dry Creek, it is still thicker, and of fine quality. East of the district it is also of value, and beds lower than the numbered section are extensively quarried. The building stone of this district must, as population increases, be largely exported to the western part of the State as well as to the East.” (From The Geology of the Fort Riley Military Reservation and Vicinity, Kansas Bulletin 137, By Robert Hay, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1896.)

    • Plate VIII. Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas – Administration Building, Artillery Post, Fort Riley, Constructed of the magnesian limestone of the district.

      Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas - Administration Building

    • Fort Riley, Kansas – the Custer House (Bldg. #24 on Sheridan Avenue) (photograph and history) The house was constructed of native limestone. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)

    • Fort Riley (near), Kansas – Monument to Major Ogden near Fort Riley, Kansas. The monument is constructed of native limestone. (The information was taken from "William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, was first published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL, the chapter on Riley County, Kansas Collection Books)

    • Fort Riley, Kansas – the U. S. Calvary Museum (Bldg. #205, on Custer Avenue) (photograph and history) The present building was originally constructed in 1854 as used as the Post Hospital. The building was remodeled and the newer style can be seen in the rough "quarry faced" limestone compared with the original smooth "pasture" cut limestone. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)

    • Garden City, Kansas – the Buffalo Block (corner of Main and the north side of Grant) (also known as "Jones Marble Block") and the building to the west. (Scroll down to the “Buffalo Block” entry.)

      White stone quarried at Kendall, Kansas, was used in the construction of both of these buildings.

    • Garden City, Kansas – the Windsor Hotel. The hotel was built of native stone and brick. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)

    • Geary County, Kansas – Limestone Schoolhouse on K-18 (photograph) Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1961. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

    • Girard (about seven miles west of Girard), Crawford County, Kansas – St. Aloysius Church, Greenbush (photographs and history) After the destruction of the first church building by a storm in 1877, the second St. Aloysius Church, Greenbush, building was constructed of limestone quarried from a ledge of limestone outcropping along Hickory Creek. A stonemason from France, Xavier LaFouge, helped in the construction of this second building. The church was completed in 1881. About 1900 a larger church building was planned and the foundation was of limestone quarried from a ledge along Hickory creek and was dedicated in 1907.

    • Goodland, Kansas – the Goodland Arts Center Building (previously the Carnegie Library) . (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.) <http://www.goodlandnet.com/artcenter/>

      The Goodland Arts Center building was built in 1912 of stone, although the origin of the stone is not indicated.

    • Graham County, Kansas – Green Quartzite at Hill City Park (photograph) Photograph courtesy of John Charlton, KGS. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

    • Greensburg, Kansas – the Big Well (photograph and history) Stone to be used as the casing for the well was quarried at Medicine River, 12 miles south of Greensburg.

    • Halstead, Kansas – the Old Hardware Store (208 Main) This limestone building was constructed in 1879.

    • Hanston in Western Kansas A Limestone House from "The Autobiography Of An Unimportant Important Man," by Glenn Deal McMurry (1917 to Present) ( From Cow Chips through Computer Chips to Damaged Chips) (An excerpt from an uncompleted story by Glenn Deal McMurry, edited by Darlene McMurry) Common Copyright (C), 1995, presented by his son, Greg McMurry. (According to his son, the author of this story, Glenn Deal McMurry, died recently, 2003.)

      In "Life In Western Kansas (1932-1935) – (15-18 years), Chapter 3 Section A," there is a description of a stone house that they lived in and Glenn McMurry's thoughts of the house. I found his story very interesting, accompanied by many photographs. The following quote is used with the permission of the author's son, Greg McMurry.

      "The old rock house was interesting to me. The limestone rock used in building it had been quarried from the nearby hills many years ago. When the limestone rock was first uncovered, it was soft and easily cut into pieces of whatever sizes you needed. Within the rocks were thousands of seashells. That was fascinating to me, and I gained an appreciation of how the earth had changed over the eons of time. It must have taken a very long time to cause the water to recede, and/or the land to rise."

    • Hays, Ellis County, Kansas – the Ellis County Courthouse (photograph)

    • The Courthouse was constructed with Fencepost Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1963. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

      Ellis County Courthouse

    • Hays, Kansas – the First Methodist Church (photograph)

    • The church was constructed with Fencepost Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

      First Methodist Church, Hays

    • Hays, Kansas – the Fort Hays State University Buildings. The University has over 40 limestone-faced buildings. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.) <http://www.csupomona.edu/~nse/States/KANSAS.html>

      The source of the photographs below is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

      • Albertson Hall Addition (photograph)

      • The addition to Albertson Hall was constructed with Silverdale Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1965.

        Albertson Hall Addition

      • Albertson Hall Addition – Science Building (photograph)

      • According to the caption, Fencepost Limestone was used in the construction. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, May 1975.

        Albertson Hall Addition - Science Building

      • Fort Hays Limestone Building (photograph)

      • The building was constructed with Fort Hayes Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg.

        Fort Hays Limestone Building

      • Fort Hays State University Union (photograph) According to the Kansas Geological Survey web site, both Silverdale Limestone and Ft. Hays Limestone were used in the construction of the building. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, May 1975.

      • McCartney Hall (photograph)

      • Ft. Hays Limestone was used in the construction of the hall. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, May 1975.

        McCartney Hall

      • Picken Hall (photograph) This photograph is of a portion of the building, and it is noted on the web site that Fencepost Limestone was used in the construction. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, May 1975.

      • Sheridan Hall (photograph)

      • The building was constructed with Ft. Hays Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, May 1975.

        Sheridan Hall

    • Hodgeman County, Kansas – Post Rock on Mudge Ranch (photograph) Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1962. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

    • Hodgeman, Kansas – the Stone Kidderville Schoolhouse (photograph) Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1962. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

    • Hodgeman County, Kansas – the Stone Schoolhouse Home (photograph) Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1962.) The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved.

    • Holton, Kansas – the Jackson County Historical Museum. According to the Jackson County Tourism Council web site, the museum building has a "full basement and foundation of locally quarried limestone."

    • Holton, Kansas – the State Bank, presented by the Jackson County Tourism Council. The State Bank building was constructed of brick and native limestone in 1905.

    • Horton, Kansas – the Bureau of Indian Affairs Stone Building (a WPA project) Native stone was used to construct the original structure. The stone was quarried east of Horton. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)

    • Horton, Kansas – Civic Center – Main Building and Wall (Brown County Fairgrounds) The main building of the Civic Center and the stone wall in front were both constructed by the WPA in 1937 of native Kansas limestone. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)

    • Hutchinson (City of), Kansas

      • Building with Limestone. (The quotation below is used with permission of Todd Davis.) (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.
        <http://www.ci.hutchinson.ks.us/hutchinson_history/limestone.htm>
    • "Cut sandstone and limestone were hauled from eastern and northwestern Kansas for the construction of a number of buildings that still remain."

    • Independence and Neodesha, Kansas – Building Stone. “The building stone used at Independence and Neodesha is almost wholly sandstone. The West quarry, 2 miles north of Independence, has been in active operation for many years, has a large output, and supplies most of the stone for Independence and the surrounding country.The rock is remarkably fine and even grained, slightly micaceous, and of pale brownish-gray color with often a greenish tinge.The stone is easily quarried and dressed and is taken out in all sizes, the thicker blocks being used for foundation and building purposes and the thinner for sills, caps, steps, curbing, and paving. A number of handsome residences and churches are built of it, and in some of these it has been ornamentally cut, but the cutters report that owing to the fact that it is "plucky" in spots extra care is required in trimming it for fine work.." (From Economic Geology of the Independence Quadrangle, Kansas, Bulletin 296, by Frank C. Schrader and Erasmus Haworth, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1906.)

    • Iola, Kansas – the Old County Jail (photograph and history) The jail was built in 1869 of limestone. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.



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