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Quarries & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles

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  • Rice County, Kansas - Rice County Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Rice County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. “Building Stone, etc. - There is an abundance of lime and sandstone in the northeast and southwest corners of the county.”
  • Rice County, Kansas - Rice County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Rice County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Rice County, Kansas - Quarry in Stone Corral, south end of Little River (photograph)

    Quarry in Stone Corral, south end of Little RiverPhotograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.
    )

    The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Riley County, Kansas - Riley County Magnesian Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Riley County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - The county is well supplied with an excellent quality of magnesian limestone, in layers of from two to six inches in width." A fine limestone abounds in the hills near the city of Manhattan.
  • Riley County, Kansas - Riley County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Riley County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Rooks County, Kansas - Rooks County Magnesian Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Rooks County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Magnesian limestone is found in abundance throughout the county...."
  • Rooks County, Kansas - Rooks County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Rooks County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Rose Dome (near), Kansas - Limestone Quarry Near the Highway. On the description of a field trip presented on the GeoKansas section of the Kansas Geological Survey web site, a limestone quarry is described as being nearby "On the way to Buffalo, the highway makes a jog and passes over Rose Dome - a broad, gentle uplift formed by igneous intrusion below the surface. This has brought limestone in the Stanton Formation to the surface, and it is quarried near the highway."
  • Rush County, Kansas - Rush County Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Rush County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Plenty of lime and sandstone in all parts of the county...."
  • Rush County, Kansas - Rush County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Rush County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Russell County, Kansas - Russell County Limestone and Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Russell County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - The western part of the county has some limestone of fair quality. There is an abundance of excellent building stone, 6 to 9 inches in thickness, easy of access. It has been shipped east and west on the Kansas Pacific Railway for building purposes. There is an abundance of sandstone of poor quality...."
  • Russell County, Kansas - Russell County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Russell County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Russell County, Kansas - Fencepost Cutting (Limestone) (photograph)

    Fencepost Cutting (Limestone)Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Russell County, Kansas - Bluestem Stone Works & Quarry, presented by Randy Luallin. (The quotations below are used with permission.)

    Photographs of structures constructed of Kansas Limestone, often referred to as Post Rock, are available on the Bluestem Stone Works & Quarry main page and the section entitled, “More Photos.”

    The Product - Kansas Limestone – “Post Rock”

    “Kansas Post rock limestone is from north central Kansas a layer approximately 8 inches thick.  It is the former bottom of an ancient sea bed.  It is  thick sometimes stratified by a red iron layer.  It contains multiple fossils including sharks teeth and shells.  The...photos show the process of quarrying this amazing stone.  It is somewhat soft  when first exposed making it easy to work with and then hardens with time and exposure to the air.  It can be shaped and carved and works well as a building stone or fencepost as the early pioneers discovered.  You can purchase stone direct from the quarry or from abandoned buildings that are no longer being used.  An excellent way to recycle.”

  • Saline County, Kansas - Saline County Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Saline County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Good sandstone is found in all parts of the county...."
  • Saline County, Kansas - Saline County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Saline County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Scott County, Kansas - The Early History of Scott County - Quarries of building stones are found in certain sections of the county, including the white-, gray-, and cream-colored magnesian limestones. (This information is presented by Scott City. The text was taken from "Conquest of Southwest Kansas" by Leola Howard Blanchard.)
  • Scott County, Kansas - Scott County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Scott County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Sedgwick County, Kansas - Sedgwick County Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Sedgwick County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - There is a poor quality of limestone in many localities, but it is not used to any extent. There is one good quarry in Ninnescah township, reported to underlie two or three sections...."
  • Sedgwick County, Kansas - Sedgwick County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wedgwick County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Sedgwick County, Kansas - Wichita Stone Co. (photograph of stone blocks on truck)

    Wichita Stone Co.Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.


  • Seward County, Kansas - Seward County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Seward County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Shawnee County, Kansas - Shawnee County Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Shawnee County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc - Good limestone is found in abundance in all parts of the county...."
  • Shawnee County, Kansas - Shawnee County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Shawnee County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Shawnee Township, Cherokee County, Kansas - Flagstone Quarry on land owned by John Riley Burrows. (From History of Cherokee County Kansas and its representative citizens, ed. & comp. by Nathaniel Thompson Allison, 1904, transcribed by Kendall Wolin, student from USD 508, Baxter Springs Middle School, Baxter Springs, Kansas, 04-28-1997.) "On his property he has a good quarry of flagging sandstone, which he sells extensively. He furnished the stone for the walks, steps and porches of the Court House at Columbus."
  • Shawnee County, Kansas - Topeka Stone Co. (photograph)

    Topeka Stone Co.Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Sheridan County, Kansas - Sheridan County Magnesian Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Sheridan County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone. - There is building stone in abundance, which consists principally of magnesian limestone."
  • Sheridan County, Kansas - Sheridan County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Sheridan County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Sherman County, Kansas - Sherman County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Sherman County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Silverdale, Chase County, Kansas - H. J. Born Stone, Inc. (Limestone Quarries) (present-day company) Box 45, Silverdale, Kansas 67005; (316) 442-5750 (The following information is from Kansas Geological Survey, “Industrial Minerals - Chase County; Both Active and Abandoned Quarries.)

    Location of active limestone quarries of H. J. Born Stone Inc.:

    T19S, R6E, Sec. 12, SE, Long: -96.71329, Lat: 38.40963

    T19S, R7E, Sec. 7, S2, Long: -96.69942, Lat: 38.4099

    Location of abandoned limestone quarry of H. J. Born Stone Inc.:

    T19S, R6E, Sec. 13, S2, Long: -96.71799, Lat: 38.39518

  • Silverdale, Kansas - Silverdale Quarry Co. Sawed and Rough Stone.

    Silverdale Quarry Co. Sawed and Rough Stone(postcard photograph; published by Cornish Studio, Arkansas City, Kans.; early 1900s; unmailed.) The postcard is in three sections: Photograph of High School Building, Photograph of Citizens State Bank Building; and Silverdale Quarry Co., Sawed and Rough Stone.


  • Smith County, Kansas - Smith County Limestone and Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Smith County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Good limestone abounds in the southern and central parts of the county; in the northern part sandstone of an inferior quality is found...."
  • Smith County, Kansas - Smith County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Smith County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • St. Marys, Kansas - Bayer Stone Inc. - Also see photographs of Bayer Stone Inc. quarries in the following entries:

    Chase, Riley, and Pottawatomie Counties, Kansas – the Bayer Stone Cottonwood Quarry

    Pottawatomie County, Kansas – Bayer Co.

  • St. Marys, Kansas - the Bayer Stone Inc. (present-day company) (The following quotation is used with the permission of the Bayer Stone Inc.)

    "Bayer Stone, Inc. is your complete natural quarried limestone supplier. We not only quarry and fabricate domestic limestone.

    "Bayer Stone is a third generation company providing stability and flexibility in the building stone industry. Bayer produced its first project in 1937, and for over 60 years has provided building stone for projects across the United States and around the globe.

    "Bayer Stone quarries and fabricates Bottom Ledge Cottonwood, Top Ledge Cottonwood, Tuxedo Grey and Onaga limestones, quarried in Chase or Pottawatomie Counties in Kansas, in addition to fabricating Indiana Limestone. The most commonly applied stone finishes are: Honed, Sanded or Rubbed, Belt Sawn or Diamond Sawn, Split Face, Pitch Face, Sandblasted, Bush hammered and Polished."

    • Bayer Stone Inc. (Building Limestone) (present-day company), 120 N 6th Street, St. Marys, KS 66536 -1509; 785-437-2781. (The following information is from Kansas Geological Survey, “Industrial Minerals - Chase County; Both Active and Abandoned Quarries.)

      Location of active surface quarries of Bayer Stone Inc.:

      T19S, R8E, Sec. 22, NE, Long: -96.50641, Lat: 38.38779

      T19S, R8E, Sec. 36, N2, Long: -96.47372, Lat: 38.35841

    • Chase County, Kansas - Bayer Stone, Inc. - Abandoned Limestone Quarry (The following information is from Kansas Geological Survey, “Industrial Minerals - Chase County; Both Active and Abandoned Quarries.)

      Location of abandoned limestone quarries of Bayer Stone, Inc.:

      T18S, R7E, Sec. 29, NE, Long: -96.67591, Lat: 38.46049

      T18S, R7E, Sec. 29, SENE, Long: -96.67361, Lat: 38.45869

      T18S, R7E, Sec. 29, SENE, Long: -96.67361, Lat: 38.45869

  • Stafford County, Kansas - Stafford County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Stafford County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Stanton County, Kansas - Stanton County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Stanton County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Stevens County, Kansas - Stevens County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Stevens County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Strong, City, Chase County, Kansas - the Stone Industry (history) There were several men responsible for the growth and success of the stone industry in Strong City. Building the Chase County Courthouse at Cottonwood Falls in 1872 was the beginning of the industry. One of the best known was Charles and Barney Lantry's firm, which built stone bridges for the Santa Fe and other railroads. This firm brought in the first stone-crusher to the state and operated on Crusher Hill at Strong City. Large stone blocks, each weighing 13,000 pounds, were quarried at Strong City for use in the Capitol building in Topeka, Kansas. The area's stone was also used in building many private and public buildings in Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa, and Colorado.
  • Summerfield, Kansas - Rock Quarries. Rock from the quarries from east of town and west of town were used as foundations; and the jail is made of rock.
  • Sumner County, Kansas - Sumner County Limestone and Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Sumner County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Plenty of limestone in every township; sandstone less plenty in several localities...."
  • Sumner County, Kansas - Sumner County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Sumner County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Sylvan Grove (near), Kansas - the Vonada Stone Company and Quarry (present-day company) A self-driving tour of a small stone quarry is available through this company. The company works with post rock limestone. Also, there is a demonstration tour available to view how the stone is split and dressed and prepared for the stone masons.
  • Thomas County, Kansas - Thomas County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Thomas County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Topeka, Kansas, Chase County, Kansas - Higgins Stone Company (present-day company), T19S, R6E, Sec. 12, SWE2NE, Long: -96.71219, Lat: 38.41508 - Limestone Quarry (The following information is from Kansas Geological Survey, “Industrial Minerals - Chase County; Both Active and Abandoned Quarries.)

    Location of active limestone quarry of Higgins Stone Company:

    T19S, R6E, Sec. 12, SWE2NE, Long: -96.71219, Lat: 38.41508

  • Topeka, Kansas - J. T. Lardner Cut Stone Company Inc. - Also see: Chase County, Kansas - J. T. Lardner Cut Stone Company Inc. above for photographs.
  • Topeka, Kansas - J. T. Lardner Cut Stone Company Inc.(Building Limestone) (present-day company), 128 N Van Buren, Topeka, KS 66603 -3316, (785) 234-8634. (The following information is from Kansas Geological Survey, “Industrial Minerals - Chase County; Both Active and Abandoned Quarries.)

    Location of active surface quarry of J. T. Lardner Cut Stone Company, Inc.:

    T18S, R7E, Sec. 33, SW, Long: -96.66667, Lat: 38.43871

    T18S, R7E, Sec. 32, ALL, Long: -96.68057, Lat: 38.44228

  • Trego County, Kansas - Trego County Magnesian Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Trego County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Plenty of good building stone is found in the. county, principally white magnesian limestone; there is also hard limestone in good supply. There are also large deposits of sand and conglomerate rock and sand. Deposits of native lime are found, which makes good mortar without burning."
  • Trego County, Kansas - Trego County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Trego County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Wabaunsee County, Kansas - Wabaunsee County Limestone and Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Wabaunsee County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Blue and white limestone of superior quality is found in every township; some sandstone in Alma township...."
  • Wabaunesee County, Kansas - Wabaunesee County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wabaunesee County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Waldo (near), Russell County, Kansas – Limestone quarried by the Rothenberger Construction Company, of Osborne, Kansas, used in the construction of St. Joseph’s Church in Damar, Kansas. (The following quotation and photographs were contributed by and are used with the permission of Von Rothenberger, great grandson of Franklin A. Rothenberger.)

    “(I) Would like to clear up a longstanding error – ‘F. K.’ Rothenberger (in the entry below) is incorrect.  It should be ‘F. A.’ Rothenberger, for Franklin Antone Rothenberger, my great-grandfather.  He bid $5,000 to do the rock for the church; his five sons, from my grandfather Franklin LaVerne ‘Vern’ Rothenberger at age 21 down to Paul Rothenberger at age 11, served as his assistants.  The Rothenberger Construction Company started in business in Osborne KS in 1884, and this church was the first building that Great-Grandfather had ever built dealing with arches.  They quarried the stone near Waldo all winter and then spent the rest of the year at its construction in Damar (Kansas).

    “The construction company passed on to his son Franklin LaVerne Rothenberger, and then to his son David ‘Pete’ Rothenberger.  My father Waldon Rothenberger worked for Uncle Pete for many years.  The company ended when Pete died in 1979.  By then the estimate was that the company had finished around 15,000 stone and brick jobs, including sidewalks, curbs, foundations, homes, buildings, and everything in between.  But the family’s crowning achievement has always been St. Joseph’s Church. 

    “Von Rothenberger”

First level of St. Jopseh Church completed, Damar, KS (Von Rothenberger) Initial construction of St. Jopseh Church completed, Damar, KS (Von Rothenberger) Towers of St. Jopseh Church completed, Damar, KS (Von Rothenberger)

First level of church completed

Initial construction of church

Towers of church almost
completed

  • On the Blue Skyways web site for St. Joseph’s Church, the following information is provided about the history and building of St. Joseph’s church. The church was built in the Romanesque style and was completed in stages from 1913 to 1952. The architect was Mr. Brinkman of Emporia, Kansas; F. K.* Rothenberger was the stone mason for the building; and the carpenter was Cidney Browne. A quarry at Waldo in Russell County provided the limestone, and the parishioners donated their labor to construct the church building.

    (* “F. K. Rothenberger” should be “F. A. Rothenberger,” according to his great-grandson. See the entry above the Blue Skyways web site for the complete information.)

  • St. Joseph’s Church (photograph and history)

    St. Joseph's ChurchThe church was constructed of Fencepost Limestone. Photograph by Grace Muilenburg, KGS, March 1962. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/>. All Rights Reserved. Click here to view another photograph of St. Joseph's Church.


  • Wallace, Wallace County, Kansas - Fort Wallace, Kansas "1865-1882," presented by Larry and Carolyn Mix on their Santa Fe Trail Research web site.

    The construction of Fort Wallace was ordered on October 25, 1865. Excellent stone was locally quarried to use in the construction of the buildings. According to the "Typical Wage Schedule, 1866-1882," the quarry foreman was paid $50 per month and the quarrymen $45 per month."

    Fort Wallace was officially abandoned by the army on May 31, 1882. The soldiers buried at Fort Wallace were removed and reburied in the Fort Leavenworth cemetery in 1885-1886. The graves of the civilians and army scouts were not removed from the Fort Wallace post cemetery, and they remained buried at the old cemetery.

    The lumber and stone from the Fort Wallace buildings were salvaged by settlers in 1886. Fort Wallace reservation was opened to the homestead law of 1888 except for "the Union Pacific Railroad's right-of-way." The federal government gave the Fort Wallace post cemetery to the city of Wallace.

    • The Construction and Development of Fort Wallace, Kansas, 1865-1882, by R. Douglas Hurt, Spring, 1977 (Vol. 43, No. 1), pages 44 to 55, Transcribed by Tod Roberts; digitized with permission of the Kansas State Historical Society.
    • Fort Wallace, presented by Direct NIC. Little remains of Fort Wallace than marks on the ground. The site today is private property. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.wallace-ks.com/fort_wallace.htm>
  • Wallace, Kansas - Fort Wallace Cemetery - Soldiers Monument at Fort Wallace Cemetery (photograph)

    Soldiers Monument at Fort Wallace CemeteryThe monument was made from Ft. Hays Limestone. Photograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg, KGS, 1956. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved. The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.


  • Wallace County, Kansas - Wallace County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wallace County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Washington, Kansas – the Washington Marble and Granite Works, Washington, Kansas – J. G. Groody, Proprietor  (postcard photograph, No. A17865; postmarked April 10, 1912)  The transcription below was typed on the back of the postcard.
    Washington Marble and Granite Works, Washington, Kansas – J. G. Groody, Proprietor  (postcard photograph, postmarked April 10, 1912) Washington Marble and Granite Works, Washington, Kansas – J. G. Groody, Proprietor, 1912 postcard photo

    “April 10, 191.  We are better prepared than ever to fill all orders for Decoration Day.  We wish to call your attention to our unusually large stock of finished monuments.  Very respectfully, Washington Marble & Granite Works.  J.G. Groody, Prop.”

    • Washington, Kansas – the Washington Marble and Granite Works – Death of Proprietor, James G. Groody in 1927  (The following notice of death is from Design Hints for Memorial Craftsmen, Vol. 4, No. 2, August 1927, pp. 15.)

      Prominent Craftsman Passes Away

      “A telegram has been received from Richard Groody informing us of the death of his father James G. Groody, who was proprietor of the Washington Marble and Granite Works, Washington, Kansas.  Mr. Groody died Sunday afternoon August 28.  Further information will be given later.”

  • Washington County, Kansas - Washington County Limestone and Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Washington County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - There is an abundance of limestone and some sandstone in the eastern, northern and western tiers of townships...."
  • Washington County, Kansas - Washington County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Washington County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Wichita County, Kansas - Wichita County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wichita County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Wild Glen, Kansas - The Main Ledge (Limestone) in Wild Glen.

    The Main Ledge (Limestone) in Wild GlenPlate III. Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas - The Main Ledge (Limestone) in Wild Glen.


  • Wilson County, Kansas - Wilson County Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Wilson County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc.-Good lime and sandstone is well distributed over the county...."
  • Wilson County, Kansas - Wilson County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wilson County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Wilson County, Kansas - Little Bear Mountain Quarry (photograph)

    Little Bear Mountain QuarryPhotograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Wilson County, Kansas - Middleton Quarry (photograph)

    Middleton QuarryPhotograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.
    ) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Winfield, Kansas - 1888 Winfield City Directory, presented by Dr. William (Bill) Bottorff, President, and Research & Development of Austin Business Computers, Inc., on his home page, which includes many other historical links relating to Kansas history. (The following quotations are used with the permission of Dr. William Bottorff.)

    "The stone quarries, a short distance out of Winfield are the finest in the state, and it is safe to say that they are unexcelled, if indeed that are equaled in any of the states. The color of the stone from one of these quarries is a soft, gray blue, and of the other, a fine cream with just that dash of yellow which makes the buildings constructed of it appear as if touched with sunshine. The stone when it is first quarried is soft and very easily worked, but when exposed to the air it hardens and becomes thoroughly durable. Most of the buildings in Winfield are constructed of this limestone, and the streets are paved with it, which fact adds greatly to the beauty of the city."

    "Natural Resources

    "Exclusive of all the other considerations, Winfield has an inexhaustible mine of wealth in its magnesian limestone quarries. This alone is known as the "Famous Cowley County Limestone," and it has gained a wonderful reputation, both at home and abroad, for its superior qualities. The visitor notes with wonder and admiration the many magnificent building in Winfield built of this stone. The stone comes out in layers from four inches to two feet in thickness and any desirable width. Not to this city alone is its use restricted. The great majority of the public buildings and finest residences in Southern and Southwestern Kansas are being built of Winfield stone. As an additional evidence of its superior excellence and merit when submitted to the crucial test, the following is submitted: When the contract for the government building at Topeka, the capital of the state, was being let, samples of Cowley county stone were forwarded to Washington, along with many others from competing quarries all over the country. After undergoing the most practical and severe tests as to beauty and durabililty, etc., this stone was given a decided preference over all others, and to-day the building at Topeka stands a monumental structure of beauty and durability, built from stone shipped from Winfield quarries. This stone is also to be found in the flagging walks of the custom house in Kansas City, and in many other places equally conspicuous, where quality and durability were particularly wanted. It is known to be superior to all other stone, because of its color, its fineness of grain, the ease with which it can be worked (when first quarried it can readily be chiseled and sawed into any shape desired) and the rapidity with which it hardens and becomes impervious to weather when exposed to the atmosphere. There are to-day no less than eighty miles of sidewalk in the city of Winfield alone, built from this famous stone. This rapidly growing popularity has made the traffic from these quarries exceedingly valuable."

  • Winfield, Kansas - A bet on limestone that never paid off (1884) - "A Company Formed to Develop the Future Leading Industry of this Section - A New Quarry Opened and Switches Being Put In," Courier, January 31, 1884 (photograph and history)
  • Winfield, Kansas - Stone Quarry Articles from the Winfield Courier, Kansas (1880s) These articles are prepared by Mary Ann Wortman. For more information on "Cowley County History Resources," click here. (The following quotations are used with the permission of Dr. William Bottorff.)

    Winfield Courier, April 13, 1882.

    "But few of our people realize the magnitude of the stone business done at our quarries. We visited last week, in company with the Belle Plaine folks, the Schmidt quarries east of town. There are about twenty men at work there, part of them getting out the large rock for the government building at Topeka, others getting out flagging and smooth stone for sawing, and others at work dressing and sawing the stone into square blocks with cross-cut saws, just as men would work up saw-logs. A large number of teams are kept busy hauling the stone to the railroad and loading it for shipment away. Mr. Schmidt is now furnishing one hundred car loads for buildings in Wellington. Other towns are also making regular drafts on these quarries and the demand is increasing rapidly. What is most needed is a switch out to the quarries. If one was put in, stone could be furnished at about half the present cost."

    Winfield Courier, January 31, 1884.

    "STONE.

    "A Company Formed to Develop the Future Leading Industry of this Section.

    "A New Quarry Opened and Switches Being Put In.

    "The Facilities of the Company Unlimited to Supply Foreign or Local Orders.

    "It has always been the thought of good businessmen in Winfield, from the time the town started, that one of the most certain and enduring elements in the future wealth of the city, was the seams and layers of pure magnesian limestone that crops out at the surface at such convenient distances from the future great city of the Walnut Valley. Up to the time of the completion of the first railroad, the quarries were worked for local purposes. The stone worked easily and could be put into foundations and good buildings cheaper than any other material. About this time our magnificent system of sidewalks was commenced, which has made the city celebrated. Flagging twenty feet square, and the surface as smooth as if it were dressed, was taken out, and published the fame of the Winfield quarries."

    Winfield Courier, May 1, 1884.

    "Talk about building booms, but Winfield's boom beats the world. Men are so anxious and eager to build that they have been hauling stone from Moore's quarries at midnight, not even taking time to get the owner's consent. Mr. Moore will have to put a time lock on his stone quarry if the boom keeps up.

    Winfield Courier, May 1, 1884.

    "Mr. Chas. Schmidt has the switch into his quarries completed and is now loading rock direct from the quarry to the cars. He is shipping an immense amount of stone to Wellington and other suburban towns out west."

    Winfield Courier, July 3, 1884.

    "STONE. We have re-opened the quarries on the land northeast of Winfield and will furnish at the quarries the best Rubble stone from $2.00 to $2.50 per cord of one hundred and twenty-eight cubic feet, and will deliver anywhere in the corporate limits of Winfield for $4.50 per cord.

    "These quarries are closer and more conveniently situated than any of the Winfield quarries.

    "We will furnish cut stone of any kind, either blue or white, at low prices.

    "We invite a visit to our saw-mill and brickyard in the southwest part of Winfield.

    "J. E. CONKLIN, President."

    Winfield Courier, July 10, 1884.

    "AD. WANTED. 10 QUARRYMEN! WILL PAY Two Dollars Per Day For Good Workmen. Inquire at the Company's office at the Brick Yard, or at the Quarry north of Union Cemetery. J. E. CONKLIN, President W. S. B. & T. Co."

  • Woodson County, Kansas - Woodson County Sandstone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Woodson County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Stone abundant and well distributed; mainly sandstone, which is soft when taken out, but hardens by exposure, and makes an excellent building stone...."
  • Woodson County, Kansas - Woodson County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Woodson County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Woodson County, Kansas - Rose Dome Quarry (photograph)

    Rose Dome QuarryPhotograph courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved.

    (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photograph is from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

  • Woodson County, Kansas - Stanton Limestone Quarry near Rose Dome (photographs). Photographs courtesy of Grace Muilenburg. The source of this material is the Kansas Geological Survey web site at <http://www.kgs.ku.edu/kgs.html>. All Rights Reserved. (You can either view the photograph(s) on this web site or you can click on the caption name(s) to view them on the Kansas Geological Survey web site.) The following photographs are from the Kansas Geological Survey Photo Display System.

    Photograph captions:

    Stanton Limestone Quarry near Rose Dome Stanton Limestone Quarry near Rose Dome

    1. Stanton Limestone Quarry
    near Rose Dome

    2. Stanton Limestone Quarry
    near Rose Dome

  • Wyandotte County, Kansas - Wyandotte County Magnesian Limestone. From the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, First Biennial Report, Wyandotte County, 1878, presented by Tom and Carolyn Ward on their KSGenWeb Project web site. "Building Stone, etc. - Fine quarries of white magnesian limestone extend for five miles along the Kansas river - it is similar to the Cottonwood Falls stone; also, an excellent quality of blue limestone for building purposes. The abutments and piers of the Kansas Pacific Railway bridges built the present season near Wyandotte are constructed of this stone."
  • Wyandotte County, Kansas - Wyandotte County Industrial Mineral Producers (Active & Abandoned Quarries), Bibliography, Photos, Geologic Map, Bulletin: “Geology, Mineral Resources, and Ground-water Resources of Wyandotte County, Kansas,” & Other Resources. This information is presented by the Kansas Geological Survey. (Scroll down to the “Industrial Mineral Producers” section.)
  • Yates Center (north of), Kansas - Sandstone Quarry. The sandstone used in the foundation of the Woodson County Courthouse was quarried north of Yates Center. The building was constructed between 1900 and 1901. (This information is presented on the Kansas section of the LASR web site.)


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