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Structures and Monuments in Which Indiana Stone was Used

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  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in New York

    • Brooklyn, New York – the Brooklyn Museum (from Memories of Summer: When Baseball Was an Art, and Writing about It a Game, by Roger Kahn, University of Nebraska Press, March 1, 2004, 290 pp., ISBN 0803278128, pp. 22, excerpt of Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the neoclassical building.

    • Brooklyn, New York - the Brooklyn Public Library Central Library, from An Architectural Guidebook to Brooklyn, by Francis Morrone, Gibbs Smith, July 12, 2001, 482 pp., ISBN 1586850474, pp. 440, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the central library was designed by architects Alfred Morton Githens and Francis Keally, although the foundation designed by the original architect, Raymond F. Almirall, whose plan was set aside for those of Githens and Keally. Indiana limestone was the principal building material used for the exterior of the central library.

    • Brooklyn (Flatbush), New York - St. Marks Methodist-Episcopal Church, from Flatbush (Brooklyn, New York), by Nedda C. Aubray, Arcadia Publishing, Nov. 1, 2003, 128 pp., ISBN 0738524530, pp. 130, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the church building was completed in 1906 and was built with a gray granite façade trimmed in Indiana limestone.

    • Brooklyn, New York – the Franklin Trust Company Building (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Franklin Trust Company building.

    • Buffalo, New York – the Avery Building (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Avery building.

    • Buffalo, New York - the Darwin D. Martin House (from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House: Architecture as Portraiture, by Jac, Quinan, Princeton Architectural Press, Dec. 1, 2004, 248 pp., ISBN 1568984197, pp. 113, Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, the “birdhouses” located on top of the conservatory of the Martin House were carved from Indiana limestone.

    • Cortland, New York – the C. F. Wickwire Residence (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of C. F. Wickwire.

    • Ellis Island, New York - the Some Ellis Island Buidings & Building Trim - Indiana Limestone (photograph of the Flatiron Building in Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of some of the Ellis Island buildings and building trim.

    • Geneva, New York - the Scandling Center - the Hobart/William Smith Dining Hall (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 84)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Scandling Center.

    • Hyde Park, New York – William K. Vanderbilt Mansion – “The Bedford Stone Quarries,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884.

      “Within the past decade, however, the industry has been powerfully revived, and the reputation of the Bedford stone has been fully established.  Within this period it has been employed in some of the most costly and imposing structures in America, in the Court House at Chicago, the State House at Indianapolis, the government buildings at Frankfort, Ky., and at New Orleans, the Olympic theater at St. Louis, the Nevada flats in New York, in the piers of the bridges across the Ohio at Henderson and New Albany, and elsewhere.  The Wm. K. Vanderbilt mansion in this city is also built of this stone….”

      • Hyde Park, New York - the Vanderbilt Mansion, from Hudson, by Arthur G. Adams, SUNY Press, Jan. 1, 1981, 424 pp., ISBN 0873954068, pp. 231, excerpt from Google Book Search http://books.google.com/)

        According to this excerpt, the 54-room Vanderbilt Mansion was designed by McKim, Mead, and White in the Renaissance style. The mansion was constructed of Indiana limestone.

      • The Vanderbilt Mansion at Dowling College Web site (photographs and history)
    • Ithaca, New York - the Cornell University - the Albert R. Mann Library Addition, information from The Manifest: The Albert R. Mann Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 2, Spring/Summer 1997, pp. 3. [PDF]

      According to this issue of the newsletter, Indiana limestone was used to clad the addition to the Albert R. Mann Library.

    • Kingston, New York - the U. S. Post Office, 500 Broadway, from Kingston, by Edwin Millard Ford, Arcadia Publishing, Nov. 1, 2004, 128 pp., ISBN 0738536814, pp. 46, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone and New Hampshire granite were used in the construction of the post office building. The building was demolished, although the date of demolition is not included. (A photograph of the post office building is included.)

    • Long Island, New York - Killingsworth - George D. Pratt House, from Aia Archectirual Guide to Nassau and Suffolk Counties, Long Island, by American Institute of Architects, Courier Dover Publications, Sept. 21, 1992, 176 pp., ISBN 0486269469, pp. 14, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the Killingsworth house was designed by Trowbridge and Ackerman for George D. Pratt. The mansion was designed in the Tudor Revival style, and “blue-gray, seam-faced Massachusetts granite” was used in the construction of the mansion with Indiana limestone used for the trim.

    • Mount Vernon, New York – the Eastchester Savings Bank  (from “Beauty in Suburban Bank,” in Stone, July 1925, pp. 419)

      Beauty in Suburban Bank

    • “Of the numerous new suburban bank buildings erected within the last year one that is attracting much attention and favorable comment is the new Eastchester Savings Bank at Mt. Vernon, New York, just outside New York City.  The corner site gave the architects, Holmes & Winslow an opportunity to utilize the side street face for decorative effects in cut and carved stone and also to provide ample light through five high arched windows.  Buff Indiana Limestone furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company was used for the entire exterior.  The cut stone contractor was A. T. Petrillo of Mt. Vernon, N. Y.  A photographic engraving of the building appeared in the June number of Stone.  A photographic engraving of the building appeared in the June number of Stone.”

    • New York City, New York – Commercial Building northwest corner of 41st Street & Madison Avenue (from “Activity in the Indiana Limestone Field,” in Stone, Vol. XLI, No. 6, June 1920, pp. 277-279)
    • “Block of stone from an old building being recut. Indiana limestone from a twenty-one-years-old residence dressed for use in a new commercial building.” (from “Activity in the Indiana Limestone Field,” in Stone, Vol. XLI, No. 6, June 1920, pp. 277-279) “Blocks of recut stone. Indiana limestone taken from an old building and prepared for use in a new building.” (from “Activity in the Indiana Limestone Field,” in Stone, Vol. XLI, No. 6, June 1920, pp. 277-279)

      “Block of stone from an old building being recut.  Indiana limestone from a twenty-one-years-old residence dressed for use in a new commercial building.”

      “Blocks of recut stone.  Indiana limestone taken from an old building and prepared for use in a new building.”

    • New York City, New York - the 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue Hotel, an “apartment hotel” (from Inez: The Life and Times of Inez Milholland, by Linda J Lumsden, Indiana University Press, June 1, 2004, 265 pp., ISBN 0253344182, pp. 39, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, the grand portico and Italian Renaissance façade of the hotel was constructed of Indiana limestone.

    • New York City, New York – 68th Street School (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the 68th Street school.

    • New York City, New York – 93rd Street School  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the the 93rd Street school.

    • New York City, New York – the American Fine Arts Society Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the American Fine Arts Society building.

    • New York City, New York – Apartment House at 72nd St. between 8th and 9th Avenue  (pre-1900)   (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the apartment building constructed before 1900, which was located at 72nd Street between 8th and 9th Avenue.

    • New York City, New York – Apartment Entrance at 956 Fifth Avenue at 77th Street  (from “The Entrance Beautiful Assured by Use of Natural Stone,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVII, No. 10, October 1926, pp. 604.)
      “Ornate Entrance of Apartments at 956 Fifth Avenue at 77th Street.  The Material is Indiana Limestone.  Architect:  Nathan Korn.” Ornate Entrance of Apartments at 956 Fifth Avenue at 77th Street
    • New York City, New York – the Bank of North America Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Bank of North America building.

    • New York City, New York – the Broadway Railroad Power Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Broadway Railroad Power building.

    • New York City, New York – the John Sherman Hoyt Residence  (from “Building in War Times” (World War I), in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1917. 

    • Residence of John Sherman Hoyt, New York – Corner of 79th Street and Park Avenue. Architects:  Howell & Stokes, New York.  Built of stone from Chestnut Hill, Pa. Trimming of Buff Indiana limestone.  Cut by J. J. Spurr & Son, Harrison, N.J.”  (pp. 358) “Residence of John Sherman Hoyt, New York – Corner of 79th Street and Park Avenue. Built of stone from Chestnut Hill, Pa. Triming of Buff Indiana limestone...” ("Stone" magazine, July 1917)
    • New York City, New York – the Camden Block  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Camden Block.

    • New York City, New York – Cathedral Chapel – the Interior  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 32.
      Interior of the Cathedral Chapel of the Queen of All Saints, New York City; Reiley & Steinback, Architects.  Nearly everything you see (except pews and chandeliers) is of Indiana Limestone.” Interior of the Cathedral Chapel of the Queen of All Saints, New York City, ca. 1920
    • New York City, New York– the Cathedral High School  (“Natural Stone Meets Requirements Demanded In Modern College Architecture,” from Stone, Vol. XLIX, No. 2, February 1928, pp. 97-98)

    • Page 97 of the article, “Natural Stone Meets Requirements Demanded In Modern College Architecture,” from Stone, February 1928 Page 98 of the article, “Natural Stone Meets Requirements Demanded In Modern College Architecture,” from Stone, February 1928 A side entrance of Cathedral High School, 50th Street & Lexington Avenue, New York City

      Page 97 of the article, “Natural Stone Meets Requirements Demanded In Modern College Architecture,” from Stone, February 1928, pp. 97-98.

      Page 98 of the article, “Natural Stone Meets Requirements Demanded In Modern College Architecture,” from Stone, February 1928, pp. 97-98.

      “A side entrance of Cathedral High School, 50th Street & Lexington Avenue, New York City, showing an Architectural detail in carved Indiana Limestone to conform with its surroundings. Architect: Robert J. Reilly.”

    • New York City, New York – the College of Pharmacy at W. 68th Street (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the College of Pharmacy located at W. 68th Street.

    • New York City, New York – the Colonial Club  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Colonial Club.

    • New York City, New York – the Decker Bros.  (Pianos) Building (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Decker Bros. building.

    • New York City, New York – the Deevers Mansion  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)
      [Photo 1] [ Photo 2]

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Deevers Mansion.

    • New York City, New York – the Wm. H. DeForrest Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of William H. DeForrest.

    • New York City, New York – the Delaware and Lackawanna Building  (pre-1900)    (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)
    • New York City, New York – the Dugro Hotel  (pre-1900)    (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Dugro Hotel.

    • New York City, New York – the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank  (pre-1900)    (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank.

    • New York City, New York – the Empire State Building (1931) - Oolitic Limestone from Oolitic, Indiana  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.) 

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Empire State building.

      (For further information on Oolitic, Indiana, limestone, click here and choose “History of Oolitic.”)

    • New York, New York - the Equitable Tower West Building (photograph and diagrams) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 99)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Equitable Tower West in New York.

    • New York City, New York - the Flatiron Building - Indiana Limestone (photograph of the Flatiron Building in Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985)

      According to the author, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Flatiron building in New York City.

    • New York City, New York – the Fleishmann Yeast Company Laboratory Building  (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 683)

    • Laboratory building erected for the Fleishmann Yeast Company in New York City, constructed of Standard Buff Indiana Limestone.  Architect:  A. B. Heaton.” Laboratory building erected for the Fleishmann Yeast Company in New York City, from Stone, November 1925, pp. 683
    • New York City, New York – the German Line Insurance Co. Building  (pre-1900)    (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the German Line Insurance Company building.

    • New York City, New York – the Graham Apartments  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Graham Apartment building.

    • New York City, New York – the Graham House  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Graham House.

    • New York City, New York – Grand Central Terminal Group  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 18-19.
      Bird’s eye view of the new Grand Central Terminal Group, New York City (New York Central Lines); Warren and Wetmore, Architects.  This is one of the greatest building projects of modern times, and the terminal is of Indiana Limestone.  ‘Biltmore,’ the famous residence of Mr. George W. Vanderbilt, a director of this railroad, is also of Indiana Limestone, and it is said that the intimate knowledge of Mr. Vanderbilt thus gained of the virtues of this stone had much to do with his selection for the great terminal.” Bird’s eye view of the new Grand Central Terminal Group, New York City (New York Central Lines), ca. 1920s
    • New York City, New York – the Harlem Library  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Harlem Library building.

    • New York City, New York - the Harvard Club, 27 W44, between. Fifth and Sixth Avenues. The following information is from New York: 15 Walking Tours, by Gerard R. Wolfe, McGraw-Hill Professional, Mar 25, 2003, 476 pp., ISBN: 0071411852, pp. 341, from Google Book Search) You can view photographs and more history of the Harvard Club on the nyc-architecture.com web site.

      According to this book, the Harvard Club was designed by Charles Follen McKim in the Neo-Georgian style, and it was completed in 1894. The exterior of the building was done in red Harvard trick and Indiana limestone trim.

    • New York City, New York – the Havemyer Building (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Havemyer building.

    • New York City, New York – the Hoffman Residence (5th Avenue, between 77th and 78th Sts.) (pre-1900) (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Hoffman residence on Fifth Avenue between 77th and 78th streets.

    • New York City, New York – the Hoffman Residence (72nd St.) (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Hoffman residence on 72nd Street.

    • New York City, New York – the Holland House  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Holland Housebuilding.

    • New York City, New York - the Hotel Pennsylvania, from New York’s Pennsylvania Stations, by Hillary Ballon, W. W. Norton & Company, May 1, 2002, 256 pp., ISBN 0393730786, pp. 91, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used to face the exterior of Hotel Pennsylvania.

    • New York City, New York – the Huntington Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Huntington residence.

    • New York City, New York – the Lamb and Rich Block  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Lamb and Rich block.

    • New York City, New York – the Lincoln Building (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Lincoln building.

    • New York City, New York – London & Lancashire Ins. Co. Building  (pre-1900)  Bedford Oolitic Limestone, Indiana  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the London and Lancanshire Insurance Company building.

    • New York City, New York – the MacMillan Building, 64 Fifth Avenue  (from “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31-32)  Articles also included on the second page are:  “Artistic Brochure on Stone” entitled, “Stone, Ten Thousand Years Ago and Now”; “Burns Statue Unveiled” (at Quincy, Massachusetts); & “Beautiful Mausoleum in Granite,” the John E. Andrus mausoleum in Kensico Cemetery.)

    • First page of “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31. Second page of “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 32. MacMillan Building, 64 Fifth Avenue, New York City, from “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 32.

      First page of “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31.

      Second page of “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 32.

      “The new MacMillan Building, 64 Fifth Avenue, New York City, awarded second prize by the Fifth Avenue Association.  Exterior of Buff Indiana Limestone furnished by the Consolidated Stone Company.  Cut Stone Contractors; Edwin Shuttleworth Co., Long Island City.  Architects:  Carerre and Hastings.”

    • New York City, New York – the Mail and Express Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Mail and Express building.

    • New York City, New York – the Majestic Hotel  (pre 1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Majestic Hotel.

    • New York City, New York – the Mercantile Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Mercantile building.

    • New York City, New York - Mills House No. 1, Washington Square, Grenwich Village, Bleecker Street (from Around Washington Square: An Illustrated History of Greenwich Village, by Luther S. Harris, Johns Hopkins University Press, Sept. 1, 2003, 354 pp., ISBN 080187341X, pp. 134m excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of Mills House No. 1, which was designed by Ernest Flagg, architect.

    • New York City, New York - the Mount Morris Park Historic District - 131 West 122nd Street House ( from The Rough Guide to New York City, by Jack Holland and Martin Dunford, Rough Guides, April 1, 2002, 544 pp., ISBN 185828869X, pp. 224, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the house located at 131 West 122nd Street is a Romanesque Revival-style house for which Indiana limestone was used as the facing.

    • New York City, New York - the Museum of Art - Indiana Limestone (photograph of the Flatiron Building in Stone Country, in the “Works” section, text by Scott R. Sanders and photographs by Jeffrey A. Wolin, Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 1985)
    • New York City, New York – the Mutual Life Insurance Building (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. iii.)

      The Mutual Life Insurance Building was constructed of Bedford Limestone from Bedford, Indiana.

    • New York City, New York – the Mutual Reserve Fund Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Mutual Reserve Fund building.

    • New York – the Nevada Flats – “The Bedford Stone Quarries,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 16, No. 12, December 1884.

      “Within the past decade, however, the industry has been powerfully revived, and the reputation of the Bedford stone has been fully established.  Within this period it has been employed in some of the most costly and imposing structures in America, in the Court House at Chicago, the State House at Indianapolis, the government buildings at Frankfort, Ky., and at New Orleans, the Olympic theater at St. Louis, the Nevada flats in New York, in the piers of the bridges across the Ohio at Henderson and New Albany, and elsewhere.  The Wm. K. Vanderbilt mansion in this city is also built of this stone….”

    • New York City, New York – the New York “Times” Building (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the New York Times building.

      • The New York Times Building constructed in 1913 (from The Trust: The Private and Powerful Family Behind the New York Times, by Susan E. Tifft and Alex S. Jones, Back Bay, Sept. 20, 20000, 928 pp., ISBN 0316836311, pp. 70, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to the excerpt of this book, the twenty-five-story New York Times building included 3 floors of Indiana limestone.

    • New York City, New York - the Olympia Theater on 42 nd Street (from Down 42nd Street: Sex, Money, Culture, and Politics at the Crossroads of the World, by Marc Eliot, Warner Books, Nov. 1, 2002, 336 pp., ISBN 0446679933, pp. 76, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used for the exterior of the Olympia Theater building, which was built by Oscar Hammerstein.

    • New York City, New York – the Postal Telegraph & Cable Co. Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.).

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Postal Telegraph and Cable Company building.

    • New York City, New York – the John T. Pratt Residence  (Photograph from “Stone-Quarry Investigations,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, July 1917, although the photograph does not appear to be related to the article.)

      Residence of John T. Pratt, New York – At 9 and 11 East Sixty-first Street.  Architect:  Charles A. Platt, New York.  Cut stone contractors:  George Brown & Co., Newark.  Built of Buff Indiana limestone.” Residence of John T. Pratt, New York – At 9 and 11 East Sixty-first Street, New York City, NY (1917)
    • New York City, New York – the Ridge Street School  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Ridge Street School.

    • New York City, New York - Riverside Church in theMorningside Heights Section of New York City (Morningside Heights: A History of Its Architecture and Development, by Andrew S. Dolkart, Columbia University Press, Feb. 22, 2001, 544 pp., ISBN 023107851X, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to an excerpt from this book, Indiana limestone was used for the facing on the exterior of the church.

    • New York City, New York - Rockefeller Center Buildings (from The Historical Atlas of New York City: A Visual Celebration of Nearly 40-Years of New York, by Eric Homberger and Alice Hudson, Owl Books, May 15, 1998, 192 pp., ISBN 0805060049, from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, the largest buildings that comprise Rockefeller Center are clad in pale gray Indiana limestone.

      • RCA Building - GE Building ( from The Architecture Traveler: A Guide to 250 Key 20 th-Century American Buildings, by Sydney Leblanc, W. W. Norton & Company, Aug. 30, 2000, 276 pp., ISBN 0393730506, pp. 66, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, gray Indiana limestone was used to clad the RCA/GE building. The building is considered the centerpiece of Rockefeller Center.

    • New York City, New York - the Sakes Building on Fifth Avenue (from Stone Magazine, October 1924, Vol. XLV, No. 10, pp. 600)

      Marble and Limestone in New Fifth Avenue Department Store Building

      “In its further encroachment of Fifth Avenue, business, that is fast taking over this one-time thoroughfare of homes and fashion, has not sought to mar the reputation of the famous avenue with cheaply constructed buildings, but rather to replace the brown stone fronts of the stately old residences with new and modern buildings, many of them of skyscraper proportions and virtually all of stone exterior and decorated with granite and marble and stone. The newest of big commercial buildings to be erected on Fifth Avenue is that designed especially for department store uses and but recently occupied by Sakes & Company. Indiana Limestone from the quarries of the Indiana Quarries Company and St. Genieve (sic) Golden Vein marble from Missouri were selected for the exterior of the three lower floors of the building, the former also being used for trim throughout the exterior of the structure, that occupies the block between forty-ninth and Fiftieth Streets on the east side of the avenue. The main entrance, as seen in the accompanying engraving, is of carved St. Genieve (sic) Golden Vein marble furnished by Tompkins-Kiel Marble Company, as are the panels between the main show windows. The lintel above the door is a single block of this marble. The other illustration shows the fluted Indiana Limestone engaged pilasters and balusters and the carved work above. This store building, one of the most modern in America, was designed by Starrett & Van Vleck, architects. William Bradley & Son were the cut stone and marble contractors.”

      (Photo caption, pp. 600) Section of New Saks Building, Fifth Avenue, New York City, showing detail of stone work, marble entrance and panels. Starrett & Van Vleck, architects.

      (Photo caption, pp. 600) Main entrance, New Saks Building, of St. Genieve (sic) Golden Vein Marble, Lintel being of a Single Block. Starrett & Van Vleck, architects.

    • New York City, New York – the Savoy  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Savoy.

    • New York City, New York – the I. Sherwood Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of I. Sherwood.

    • New York City, New York - St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church (from Oil Man: The Story of Frank Phillips & the Birth Phillips Petroleum, by Michael Wallace, St. Martin’s Press, May 15, 1995, ISBN 0312131356, pp. 175, Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, gray Indiana limestone was used in the construction of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, which was designed in the Byzantine style.

    • New York City, New York – the Steinway Hall, 109-111-113, West 57th Street  (from Stone, July 1925, pp. 418)
    • Steinway Hall, 109-111-113 West 57th Street, New York City.  Exterior of No. 1 Buff and No. 1 Gray Indiana Limestone furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company.  Architects:  Warren & Wetmore.” Steinway Hall, 109-111-113 West 57th Street, New York City (from “Stone,” July 1925, pp. 418)
      Detail of Entrance of Steinway Hall, New York City.  Plain Surface Treatment of Buff and Gray Indiana Limestone relieved by ornate arched and pillared center window with entrance doorways on either side.  Architects:  Warren & Wetmore.” Detail of Entrance of Steinway Hall, New York City, from “Stone,” July 1925, pp. 418
      • New York City, New York – Steinway Hall, 109 West Fifty-Seventh Street  (from “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31-32.  Articles also included on the second page are:  “Artistic Brochure on Stone” entitled, “Stone, Ten Thousand Years Ago and Now”; “Burns Statue Unveiled” (at Quincy, Massachusetts); & “Beautiful Mausoleum in Granite,” the John E. Andrus mausoleum in Kensico Cemetery.)
      First page of the article, “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31. Second page of the article, “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 32. Steinway Hall, 109 West Fifty-Seventh Street, New York City. (from “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31-32.

      First page of the article, “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 31.

      Second page of the article, “Stone Buildings Win Awards,” in Stone, Vol. XLVII, No. 1, January 1926, pp. 32.

      “Steinway Hall, 109 West Fifty-Seventh Street, New York City, awarded First Prize for new buildings erected during 1925 in the Fifth Avenue section.  Exterior of Buff and Gray Indiana Limestone furnished by the Indiana Quarries Company.  Architects:  Warren and Wetmore.”

    • New York City, New York – the Stokes Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Stokes building.

    • New York City, New York – Trinity Building  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 4.
      Trinity Building, New York City; Francis H. Kimball, Architect.  Often referred to as the great Fire Wall of  lower New York.  Indiana Limestone from sidewalk to skyline, like many of the greatest and most beautiful office buildings in New York, Chicago and other large cities.” Trinity Building, New York City, N.Y., ca. 1920
    • New York City, New York – the Western Union Telegraph Co. Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Western Union Telegraph Comany building.

    • New York City, New York – the Wilkes Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Wilkes building.

    • New York City, New York – the Smith Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Smith building.

    • New York City, New York - the Cornelius J. Vanderbilt Mansion on Fifth Avenue. The following information is from from “The Collection of Building and Ornamental Stones In The U. S. National Museum: A Hand-book and Catalogue,” By George P. Merrill, Curator, Department Lithology and Physical Geology, in Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, pp. 398.

      “Few of the limestones at present quarried in the United States exceed in reputation and beauty the fine-grained oolitic stone of sub-Carboniferous age from the vicinity of Bedford, in this State, and popularly known as ‘Bedford limestones.’ The rock is of fine and even texture, and is composed of small rounded concretionary grains of about the size of a grain of mustard seed compactly cemented together by crystalline lime or calcite. The stone is soft, but tenacious (specimens having borne a pressure of 12,000 pounds per square inch), and works readily in every direction. It is therefore a great favorite for carved work, and is used more extensively for this purpose than any other of our limestones. No better example of the adaptability of the stone for this purpose can be given than the elegant mansion of Mr. C. J. Vanderbilt, on Fifth avenue, in New York City. Unfortunately, as is usually the case with light limestones, this stains badly in cities where there is a great amount of manufacturing, as is only too well illustrated in the case referred to.”

    • New York City, New York – the Wm. K. Vanderbilt Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of William K. Vanderbilt.

    • Ogdensburg, New York – St. Mary's Cathedral presented by Walsh Brothers, Incorporated (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.walshbrothers.com/portfolio/?nv=category&catid=6>

      The exterior of the cathedral was constructed of granite quarried near Weymouth and Higham, Massachusetts.  The trim was constructed of Indiana limestone.

    • Poughkeepsie, New York - Vassar College
      • Taylor Hall, from Alma Mater: Design and Experience in the Women’s Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the 1930s, by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, University of Massachusetts Press, 2nd ed., Nov. 1, 1993, 448 pp., ISBN 0870238698, pp. 221, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, Taylor Hall was constructed of light brown granite and Indiana limestone.

      • Vassar College Library - the Frederick Ferris Thompson Memorial Library, from Vassar College, New York, by Maryann Bruno, Arcadia Publishing, March 14, 2001, 128 pp., ISBN 0738504548, pp. 40, excerpt from Google Book Search)

        According to this excerpt, the library was designed in the Gothic Perpendicular style by Allen and Collens, a Boston, Massachusetts firm. The library was completed in 1905, and Germantown granite was used for the exterior, and Indiana limestone was used for the interior.

    • Rochester, New York - the University of Rochester Library Building & Main Lobby/Foyer. The following information is from Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science, Vol. 25, edited by Allen Kent, Harold Lancour, and Joe E. Daly, Marcel Dekker, Inc., July 1, 1978, 480 pp., ISBN: 0824720253, pp. 458, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this book, Indiana limestone was used for the “central part of the front façade and all of the trim,” in addition to the walls of the main lobby or foyer.

    • Scarboro, New York – the Elliot F. Shepard Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Elliot F. Shepard.

    • Staten Island, New York - the Staten Island Savings Bank (from The Architecture of Delano & Aldrich, by Peter Pennoyer and Anne Walker, W. W. Norton & Company, Jan. 1, 2002, 160 pp., ISBN 0393730875, pp. 62, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt from this book, Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the “Italian Renaissance-inspired building.” (A photograph of the bank is included.)

    • Troy, New York – the Building of the Northeastern Science Foundation at 15 Third Street   (from The Stone Faces of Troy by Don Rittner.) 

      Indiana Salem Limestone from the Bloomington/Bedford area was used to clad the building.

    • Utica, New York – Passenger Station – Clock – Surround of Indiana Limestone  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana.
      Carved Indiana Limestone surrounding clock on Utica, N. Y., Passenger Station; Stem & Sellheimer, Architects.  It is fourteen feet, seven inches long, twelve feet, six inches high, and a man could stand erect in the opening which contains the clock.  The inscription if, of course, imaginary but much to the point.” Carved Indiana Limestone surrounding clock, Passenger Station, Utica, N.Y., ca. 1920
  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in North Carolina
    • Asheville, North Carolina - the Biltmore House (from frommer’s The Carolinas and Georgia,, by Darwin Porter and Danforth Prince, frommer’s, March 24, 2003, 512 pp., ISBN 0764567535, pp. 132, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to the excerpt of this book, tons of Indiana limestone transported by a special railroad spur to the house were used in the construction of the Biltmore House. George Washington Vanderbilt employed Richard Morris Hunt to design the Biltmore House, which is designed as a French Renaissance chateau. Construction began in 1890, and was completed in December 1895.

    • Asheville, North Carolina – the Cornelius Vanderbilt Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Cornelius Vanderbilt.

    • Chapel Hill, North Carolina - the University of North Carolina - South Building Memorial Bell Tower, from Light on the Hill, by William D. Snider, UNC Press, Aug. 30, 2004, 215 pp., ISBN 0807855715, pp. 195, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the 167-foot tall monument was built of red brick and Indiana limestone. The bell tower was dedicated in November 26, 1931.

    • Charlotte, North Carolina – the U. S. Court House & Post Office  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Court House.

    • Durham, North Carolina – Duke University - the trim on West Campus.  (Indiana Limestone)
    • Raleigh, North Carolina - the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science, presented on the natural-stone.com web site.

      According to this web site, the stone work on the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science building includes the following: thermal Green County Granite, variegated Indiana Limestone, and Georgia white marble. Limestone and granite were used for th exterior landscape features.

  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in North Dakota

    • Bismarck, North Dakota – the North Dakota State Capitol (photograph and history)  The capitol building, completed in 1981, includes Indiana limestone, Montana Yellowstone, Belgian marble, and Tennessee marble.
  • Finished Products from Indiana Stone in Ohio

    • Avondale, Ohio – the School House  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the School House.

    • Avondale, Ohio – the Witherling Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Witherling building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Armstrong Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Armstrong building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Auskamp Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Auskamp building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Belvedere Apartments – Entrance Detail  (from “The Entrance Beautiful Assured by Use of Natural Stone,” in Stone, An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVII, No. 10, October 1926, pp. 603.)
      Entrance Detail of the New Belvedere Apartments, Cincinnati, in Which Indiana Limestone Was Used Exclusively.  Architect:  C. H. Ferber.” “Entrance Detail of the New Belvedere Apartments, Cincinnati, Ohio, circa 1926
    • Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati University – Beecher Hall. To the left and right of the steps at Beecher Hall Dayton limestone had been used, and the steps themselves were built with Indiana limestone. (The link from which this information was obtained (below) is no longer available.  It was a field trip taken by members of the Geology Department.)
      <http://www.uc.edu/geology/courses/ 108/1998/1/Wheatley1.html>

      In another article about Beecher Hall, entitled, “Goodbye, Beecher, Bridge,” from the University of Cincinnati Horizons Magazine dated, January 2001, we find that Beecher Hall was demolished in July 2001. There is a photograph in the hall included in the article of the demolition.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, University – the circle just behind the Administration building.    (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.uc.edu/geology/courses/108/1998/1/Wheatley1.html>

      The majority of the rocks in the wall were gray Cincinnati limestone.  Some white Dayton limestone and some Indiana limestone were used.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, University – the Geo-Physics building.   (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.uc.edu/geology/courses/108/1998/1/Wheatley1.html>

      The rock wall on the left, facing the Geo-Physics building, was built with Indiana Limestone.  The doorway to the building was built with two different constructions of Indiana limestone.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Entrance to Tangeman Center – the Pillars. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)

      Indiana limestone was used to create the two pillars from solid blocks of stone.  Italian travertine was used at the entrance to the hallway by the Gallery and on the doorway to the left.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – Cincinnati, University – Tangeman University Center (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)  <http://jacross.homestead.com/UCpage3.html>

      Information on this web site indicated that the archway was made of Indiana limestone. 

      • Tangeman University Center – Stones Used in the Construction Noted on a Field Trip  elow one of the windows the group noted the use of Indiana limestone.  The south wall was composed mostly of Buena Vista sandstone.  Cincinnati limestone was used for the rock wall at the very bottom.  The writer also noted that the first window on the southeast corner was constructed of Buena Vista sandstone “as was the window just to the left.”  A third window was reportedly constructed of Indiana limestone.  Buena Vista sandstone had been used around the front of the building and had been sculpted into pillars piece by piece.(The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.  It was a field trip taken by members of the Geology Department.)
        <http://www.uc.edu/geology/ courses/108/1998/1/Wheatley1.html>
    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Court House  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Court House.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Dennison Hotel  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Dennison Hotel.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Fleishman Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Fleishman building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio the George A. Smith Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the George A. building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Residence of Mr. Hurlbert (and 60 others)  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of Mr. Hurlbert and sixty other homes in Cinncinnati built prior to 1900.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Joseph Smith Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Joseph Smith building.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio - the Proctor and Gamble Headquarters Buildings (photograph) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 80)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the Proctor and Gamble headquarters buildings.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – Public Schools (6) (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of six public schools in Cincinnati built prior to 1900.

    • Cincinnati, Ohio – the Smith's Office Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Smith's office building.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – the Amasa Stone Chapel  (photographs and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series. 

      The limestone used to clad the exterior of the chapel was quarried in South Central Indiana.  Indiana limestone was also used in the interior as entranceways, window frames, columns, piers and arches.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – Calvary Cemetery – the Mullally Celtic Cross Monument  (from The Monumental News, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, January 1906, pp. 30)

      A Stone Cutter’s Tribute to His Son.

      “The handsome Celtic cross shown in the illustration…(is) the tribute of a stone cutter to his son.  It was cut by M. J. Mullally, of Cleveland, O., a member of the executive board of the Stone Cutters’ Union and stands over the grave of his son in Calvary Cemetery in that city.

      “It is executed in Bedford buff stone….”

      “Bedford Stone Cross, Calvary Cemetery, Cleveland.” “Bedford Stone Cross, Calvary Cemetery, Cleveland.” (from The Monumental News, Vol. XVIII, No. 1, January 1906, pp. 30)
    • Cleveland, Ohio – the Church of the Covenant Presbyterian Church  (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series.  The exterior of the church is constructed with Indiana Limestone.  In the interior of the church Indiana limestone was used for interior walls, piers, etc.  Red Levanto marble, quarried in Eastern Liguria, Italy, was used in a central diamond-shaped inlay.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – the East Mount Zion Baptist Church  (photographs and history)   Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series.   The exterior of the church is constructed mostly with green serpentinite, which was quarried in the Westchester area of Chester County, southeastern Pennsylvania.  Indiana limestone was used as trim around some of the windows, while most of the trim was constructed with Berea Sandstone from Northeastern Ohio.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – Epworth-Euclid United Methodist Church (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series.   Plymouth granite, quarried in New England, was used for the exterior facing of the church.  Some of the trim is of Indiana limestone.  Euclid bluestone or Berea Sandstone are used around the outside of the church.  In addition to green slate, gray and pink Tennessee “marble,” quarried in eastern Tennessee, was used in the interior of the church.  Gray Tennessee marble with inlays was used for the steps and platform of the chancel.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – the Jacob's Field Building (The link from which the following information is no longer available.)
      <http://www.nlcs.k12.in.us/oljrhi/history.htm>

      Oolitic Limestone from Oolitic, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Jacob’s Field building.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – St. Colman Roman Catholic Church (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      Indiana limestone was use to face the exterior of the church. 

    • Cleveland, Ohio – St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic Church  (history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      The exterior stone of the church is Indiana limestone.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – St. Ignatius of Antioch Roman Catholic Church  (history)   Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      Bedford limestone was used on the exterior of the church in addition to other types of stone.  The pillars of the church were created from light bluish-gray granite, which is Lake Placid blue granite, quarried in Jay, New York. 

    • Cleveland, Ohio – St. John's Roman Catholic Cathedral (Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist)  (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      Most of the exterior of the Cathedral is constructed with light brown, Tennessee Crab Orchard stone, which was quarried near Crab Orchard, Tennessee.  Indiana limestone was used for the trim.  The roof is constructed of vari-colored slate from Bangor, Maine.  Many types of stone are used in the interior of the Cathedral.  Please see the above site for a detailed description.

    • Cleveland, Ohio – the Temple (Temple Tifereth Israel)  (history)   Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      Indiana limestone was used to construct the exterior of the temple.

    • Cleveland Heights, Ohio – the Church of the Saviour United Methodist Church  (photographs and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series. 

      The exterior of the church is clad with granite quarried at Weymouth, Massachusetts.  Two kinds of Indiana limestone were used (“Old gothic” and “selected”) for the trim and the upper portion of the bell tower.  The cornerstone is also constructed of Indiana limestone.  Jerusalem limestone was quarried from the Jerusalem quarries known as King Solomon's quarries.  Slate quarried in western Vermont was used for the roof.  In the church grounds either Berea Sandstone or Euclid bluestone are used as sandstone flagstone.  Indiana limestone was used on the interior.  White, gray-veined Carrara marble from Italy was used for the Baptismal font.  Stone from around the world was used in the window-like stone mural of a cross.  (Please see the above web site for a detailed description of the origin of the stone used in the mural.)

    • Cleveland Heights, Ohio – St. Ann Roman Catholic Church (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      Indiana limestone was used to face most of the church.  The six large columns at the main entrance and steps are also of Indiana limestone.

    • Columbus, Ohio – Crest View School Building – Door Lintel  (from Indiana Limestone:  The Aristocrat of Building Materials (pdf), Vol. 1, June 1920, Sixth Edition, Indiana Limestone Quarrymen’s Association, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 30.
      Top:  Door lintel.  Fourteen feet long, four feet high:  Crest View School Building, Columbus, Ohio, D. Riebel Architect.  Center:  Fireplace in the University Club, Chicago; Holabird and Roche Architects.  Sides:  Life size statues for a church. Door lintel at the Crest View School Building, Columbus, Ohio, ca. 1920
    • Columbus, Ohio - Ohio State University - Main Library Addition (photograph and diagrams) (from Indiana Limestone Handbook, 19th edition, Indiana Limestone Institute of America, Inc., Bedford, Indiana, pp. 95)

      Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the construction of the Main Library Addition.

    • Defiance, Ohio – the Citizens Opera House  (pre1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Citizens Opera House.

    • Defiance, Ohio - the High School  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the High School.

    • East Cleveland, Ohio – Windermere Methodist Church (Windermere Methodist Episcopal)  (history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      Hummelstown brownstone, a reddish brown sandstone (quarried in the Hummelstown area of Pennsylvania) was the original stone used for the construction of the church.  (Another source claimed the stone came from Berlin Heights (state unknown) or Holyoke, Massachusetts.  Indiana limestone was used for the steps at the main entrance.  Sandstone, probably Berea Sandstone, was used for the platforms at the top of the stairs.

    • Fostoria, Ohio - the Emerine Building, at Main Street and Tiffin Street (photograph and history). The following information is from Fostoria, Ohio, Vol. II, by Nate Krupp, Arcadia Publishing, 2002, 128 pp., ISBN: 0738520055, pp. 23, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this book, the Emerine building was constructed in 1892 of Indiana sandstone. Later the building was also known as the First National Bank building. The Emerine building was demolished in 1948. The S. S. Kresge building was constructed on the original site of the Emerine building. (A photograph of the building is included.)

    • Hamilton County, Ohio – the Hamilton County Courthouse  (history)  This information is taken from an article entitled "The History of the Cincinnati Law Library Association," by Charles E. Kallendorf, Jr.  The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available, although you can read the article on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.
      <http://www.hamilton-co.org/cinlawlib/about/history.html>

      Dedicated in 1919, the Courthouse was constructed of New Hampshire granite and Bedford limestone.

    • Lakewood, Ohio – St. James Roman Catholic Church  (history)   Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      Indiana limestone was used for the exterior of the church.  Rainbow Granite was used for the large columns.  This granite (Morton Gneiss) is a banded, variegated, pink, light greenish gray, and black stone, which was quarried in the Morton, Minnesota area.  Pink Tennessee marble capped with Berea Sandstone were used for the ramp.  Many different types of stones are used in the interior of the church.

    • Latty, Ohio - Latty Apostolic Church (The link on the & Cut Stone Inc., web site from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      < http://www.indystone.com/photogallery2.html >

      According to the & Cut Stone, Inc. web site, Indiana limestone was used in building the Latty Apostolic Church.

    • Mercer County, Ohio – Mercer County Courthouse  (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available, although you can view it on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.)
      <http://www.grandlake.net/go/attractions.shtml>

      The courthouse was built with gray Bedford limestone.

    • Norwalk, Ohio – Woodlawn Cemetery – the Titus Mausoleum   (from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 676)

    • The Titus Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery, Norwalk, Ohio, constructed of large blocks of Indiana Limestone, showing availability of this stone for memorials and mausoleums.” Titus Mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery, Norwalk, Ohio, from Stone, Vol. XLVI, No. 11, November 1925, pp. 676
    • Oberlin, Ohio - Oberlin College - the Graduate School of Theology Buildings, f rom Cass Gilbert, Life and Work: Architect of the Public Domain, edited by Barbara S. Christen and Steven Flanders, W. W. Norton & Company, Nov. 1, 2001, 320 pp., ISBN 0393730654, pp. 216, excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, the theological quadrangle includes a chapel, library, classrooms, dining hall and dormitories. Indiana limestone was used in the construction of the central Romanesque tower, chapel, and classroom wings.

    • Parma, Ohio – the Bethany Lutheran Church  (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site.

      The Urban Center's Sacred Landmarks Series.  According to this site, the facing on the church is a dolomitic limestone, which is either Lannon stone (quarried in the Lannon area of Waukesha County Wisconsin) or a stone similar to it.  Indiana limestone was also used in the interior as entranceways, window frames, columns, piers and arches.

    • Perrysburg, Ohio – the Citizens Bank Building, presented on the Historic Perrysburg web site.   (photograph and history).  This web site is presented by Historic Perrysburg, Inc. 

      Indiana limestone was used as the facade on the facade on the front and south elevations.

    • Portsmouth, Ohio – the U. S. Post Office  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the U. S. Post Office.

    • Put In Bay, South Bass Island, Ohio - the Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, from Put in Bay Perrys Monument, by Jeff Kissell, Arcadia Publishing, Dec. 1, 2001, ISBN 0738518972, pp. 125, Appendix II. Facts and Specifications of Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial, About the Photographer (G. Otto Herbster), excerpt from Google Book Search)

      According to this excerpt, Indiana limestone was used for the domed walls and ceilings of the memorial rotunda. Tennessee white marble and Italian black marble were used for the floor of the rotunda. The memorial was designed by Joseph Freelander and Alexander Seymour, Jr., of New York City. The memorial was started in 1912 and completed in 1915.

    • Sydney, Ohio – the W. C. H. Goode Residence  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the residence of W. C. H. Goode.

    • Toledo, Ohio – the Business Blocks  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Business blocks.

    • Toledo, Ohio – Calvary Cemetery – the Mausoleum (The following information is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, advertisement for The Consolidated Stone Company, Bedford, Indiana, pp. 128.)

      The Mausoleum in Calvary Cemetery, Toledo, Ohio, was built of Consolidated Select Dark Hollow Gray Indiana Limestone. The Consolidated Stone Company, Bedford, Indiana. The architect was A. De Curtins, Toledo, Ohio.

    • University Heights, Ohio – Gesu Roman Catholic Church  (photograph and history)  Presented on the Guide To Stones Used for Houses of Worship in Northeastern Ohio web site. 

      For the exterior two types of Indiana Limestone were used:  gray Indiana limestone and Indiana Oolitic limestone.  Following are some of the stones used in the interior:  light beige-colored Roman travertine from Italy; chips of Giallo Siena marble, a golden yellow marble with dark veining, from Italy.  Giallo Sienna marble was also used for the statue of the statue of the Christ Child and other areas.  Other statues are created of a white marble from Italy called Bianco marble.  Another marble from Italy, Giallo Siena Unito marble, a brecciated, slightly lighter marble than Giallo Siena was also used.

    • Van Wert, Ohio – the Cook Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Cook building.

    • Van Wert, Ohio – the fromfield & Grenewald's Building  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the fromfield and Grenewald building.

    • Van Wert, Ohio – the Van Wert County Jail  (pre-1900)  (from A Glimpse of the Celebrated Stone Quarries at Bedford, Indiana.)

      Bedford Oolitic Limestone quarried at Bedford, Indiana, was used in the construction of the Van Wert County Jail.

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