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List of Quarries in Indiana & Quarry Links, Photographs and Articles

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  • Orange County, Indiana - Tombstones created from Whetstone quarried in Orange County, Indiana, by the Indiana Geological Society on the Indiana University web site. (The following quotation is used with permission of the Indiana Geological Survey. The article can be read in its entirety at the link below.)

    The following is from a news release by Hal S. Kibbey, Indiana University News Bureau, updated by Richard L. Powell, Indiana Geological Survey, a research affiliate and retired geologist.

    Indiana Geological Survey Asks For HelpFrom Hoosier Residents In Locating Tombstones

    “BLOOMINGTON, Ind. – The Indiana Geological Survey (IGS) is asking for help from Hoosier residents in a statewide project to locate gravestones made of whetstone. In the pre-Civil War era, Indiana’s whetstone-quarrying district in Orange County produced commercial-grade gravestones. These whetstones were one of Indiana's first commercial products, but the tombstone industry was largely unknown until IGS geologists were requested by an archaeologist to identify the rock which was used to make tombstones found in Albion, Ill.

    “In the 1800s, Indiana was a major producer of whetstones, which were stones used to sharpen a variety of implements. This mining industry was centered in Orange County, where well-sorted, uniformly cemented siltstone is common. At the peak of the industry in the late 1800s, annual production was about 300,000 pounds, and it was once stated that ‘a Hoosier household without an Indiana whetstone was no Hoosier Household at all.’

    “Most commercial whetstones produced were transported from the quarries in ox-drawn wagons to White River or Lost River. Flatboats, keelboats or barges then floated the stones down these rivers and eventually to the Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi rivers. In some cases they were shipped on to New Orleans and overseas from there. Production persisted into the late 1980s, when the last quarry closed.

    “‘The stones are characterized by a distinctive layering, which allows for easy identification of their origin in Orange County, unlike most other stones used during this period,’ said former IGS geologist Erik Kvale.

    “‘Geological investigations have shown that these whetstone beds were deposited on an ancient silty tidal flat and that the thickness of each siltstone layer can be directly equated to the daily, and sometimes semi-daily, rise and fall of ancient tides on that tidal flat,’ Kvale said. ‘These ancient recordings are so exact that it is possible to determine, among other things, the phase of the moon during the time the layers were deposited. So significant is this discovery that these Indiana deposits are now known internationally in the geological community.’

    “Strata seen in the Orange County whetstone quarries are the same as the whetstone headstones found in many cemeteries in the region. They are composed of finely layered siltstone, with the thickness of each layer measured in millimeters. What is unique about these deposits is the organization of the layers into couplets consisting of a thick layer and a thinner layer. These couplets show a cycle of progressive thickening and thinning.

    “‘This pattern of progressive thickening and thinning of the layers is absolutely diagnostic of the whetstone beds and allows us to positively identify this stone when we find it in cemeteries,’ Kvale said.

    “Erik Kvale, Richard Powell, geologist and IGS research affiliate, and Michael McNerney, an archaeologist from Illinois, attempted to map the distribution of these gravestones. They were initially assisted by a grant from the Indiana Historical Society.

    “Whetstone gravestones are among the oldest preserved in the southern part of the state, and the graves of several historically important Hoosiers from the early 1800s, such as Col. Francis Vigo and Robert Buntin, are marked with these monuments.

    “‘Despite the age of these stones, most of the whetstone gravestones are so durable that the lettering and scroll work look as though they were carved yesterday rather than 150 to 180 years ago,’ Kvale said.

    “More than 1800 whetstone grave markers have been found in just over 200 pioneer cemeteries in southwestern Indiana and southeastern Illinois along the Wabash River. About 1,000 cemeteries have been examined to date. The distribution of these gravestones is not completely known, but they may be present along the lower Ohio and Mississippi rivers and parallel the other commercial trade routes of early Indiana, such as the Wabash-Erie Canal network and the National and Michigan roads.

    “More than 90 of the grave markers were signed by the engraver or dealer. About 70 other markers have been attributed to a few engravers owing to their particular lettering styles. The lettering is similar to fonts used by newspapers, books and handbills prior to the pre-Civil War era.”

  • Orange County, Indiana - "Gravestones of Whetstone Attract Geologists' Attention," from the Times-Mail, Bedford, Indiana, May 21, 1999.  Commercial-grade gravestones were produced in the pre-Civil War era in Orange County, Indiana.  These were called "whetstone tombstones."  They were the first commercial products, which was virtually unknown until fairly recently. (The above information was found in an article at the URL above.  The link is no longer available.)
    <http://www.tmnews.com/stories/1999/05/21/Orange_County_Tombstones> 
  • Parke County, Indiana - the Building Stone in Parke County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 116.)

    Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone, which forms high cliffs on Big Raccoon, Little Raccoon and Sugar creeks, may be quarried in blocks of any required dimensions, and will make a handsome and durable building stone. At Mansfield, on Big Raccoon creek, this rock is a beautiful reddish-brown color, closely resembling in appearance the brown sandstone of which the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, D.C., is built. It has been used in the construction of abutments to the bridge which crosses the creek at Mansfield, where it has been exposed to the weather for several years, and gives evidence of being a durable stone.

    “A similar colored sandstone, from the conglomerate bluff on the Little Racoon (sic) creek, was used in the foundation of the largest bank building in Rockville, and is very highly spoken of as a building stone.”

  • Perrysville (near), Vermillion County, Indiana - the Limekiln “just above Perrysville” (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 159.)

    “Exactly the same section occurs on Rock creek, in Warren county, where the beds lie directly, and apparently conformably, upon a set of shaly sandstones, which are continuous with the conglomerate sandstone of Williamsport only becoming more purely quartzose and more solid as we descend the section....”

    “The old limekiln just above Perrysville, on the bank of the river, was dug in the soft clay shale of the base of the foregoing section, and shows no disturbance of the layers; yet within fifteen feet of this kiln we find a small quarry of sandstone, which extends from the base to the top of the bluff, cutting off even the limestone....”

  • Perrysville & Covington (between), Vermillion County, Indiana - the Sandstone Quarrying between Perrysville & Covington (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 172-173.)

    Building Materials.

    “Of stone suitable for building purposes there is no lack....”

    “From the upper beds of the Millstone grit small quantities of rock have been quarried, between Perryville (sic) and Covington. Some of these contain sufficient mica to make it probable that they will prove suitable for furnace hearths. When furnaces shall be established in the county, it will be worth while to test these fairly before going further for hearthstone. Some portions of the Hanging Rock sandstone also appear suitable for this use.”

  • Plymouth, Indiana – Miller Monuments, Inc. – Monuments .. For The Ages (pdf), Miller Monuments, Incorporated, Plymouth & Elkhart, Indiana, No date of publication.
    Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages, Miller Monuments, Indiana

    Front cover of Monuments..For The Ages

    “Symbols and Their Meaning” section of Monuments..For The Ages

    One of the pages from Monuments.. For The Ages

  • Portland, Fountain County, Indiana - Sandstone Quarries at Portland (Sandstone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 129.)

    Building-Stone. - The conglomerate sandstone in this county furnishes an abundance of good freestone for building purposes. In color it ranges from whitish-gray to a brownish-red.

    “Quarries of this stone have been opened near Attica, on the Toledo, Wabash and Western railroad, in Logan township, and afford a coarse-grained, grayish-brown, durable sandstone, that can be quarried in blocks from one to four feet or more in thickness, and of any required length and width. Other quarries have also been opened at Portland, on the Wabash and Erie Canal, where a stone similar to that from Attica is obtained.”

  • Posey Township, Franklin County, Indiana - the Posey Area Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 192-195.)

    Building Materials.

    “Stone, known usually as the ‘blue Cincinnati limestone,’ is abundant everywhere, and is the surface-rock, as has been said elsewhere, in the southeastern third of the county. It is a valuable and very durable stone, but, unfortunately, there are but few strata, of sufficient firmness to work well, which exceed six inches in thickness. The thinner layers are used in walling cellars, and all other rough work where beauty is not essential. Many of the thicker strata are so shelly, and composed of broken corals and fossil shells, that they are not suited to ordinary stonework. Every stone which is sufficiently firm to bear hammer-dressing, may be relied upon as being sufficiently durable for any description of masonry. The thin strata are extensively used for flagging the sidewalks in the town, and have proved to be durable, and will, no doubt, outlast several successive pavements of brick....”

    “The most valuable building-stone in the county, or probably in the State, is found in Laurel and Posey townships. It is of the same character, and belongs to the same formation as the Dayton stone so extensively used in Cincinnati and other places, and the same as that found at Greensburg and St. Paul. This group has generally been referred to the Niagara series, and probably correctly so, but I am of opinion that the upper strata, at least, belong to the Devonian formation. The few fossils I have been able to find in them (the upper members) are referable, in my opinion, to that group. Let this be as it may, the rocks are without doubt of great value as a building material, and when they come to be generally known will be extensively used....”

  • Putnamville, Putnam County, Indiana – Oolitic Limestone Quarry (Oolitic Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    “Another excellent limestone is that found at Putnamville, in Putnam county.  It is a close-grained hard, siliceous limestone, occurring in layers varying from 5 to 22 inches in thickness.  It contains about 66 per cent of carbonate of lime and 27 ½ per cent of insoluble silicates, and very little magnesia.  It is a very strong and durable stone; weight per cubic foot, 166.36 pounds, with a  crushing strength of 11,750 pounds per cubic inch, and ratio of absorption, 1 : 170.”

  • Salem, Indiana – the Salem Stone and Lime Company Oolitic Limestone Quarries  (Oolitic Limestone)  (From “A Specimen Quarry of Oolitic Limestone, Region of Indiana,” The Manufacturer and Builder, November 1887, pp. 252)

    “Our illustrations represent views of the largest of the numerous quarries operated in this region – namely, that of the Salem Stone and Lime Company, of Louisville, Ky., which is located about one and a half miles West from Salem, on the line of the Louisville, New Albany & Chicago Railroad.  In connection with its quarrying operations, the company is also engaged largely in the manufacture of lime, having in operation three large lime kilns, with a capacity of several car loads per day.  The purity of the oolitic limestone of this region, and its unlimited supply favor the cheap production of lime of the very best quality.

    "Oolitic Limestone Quarry at Salem, Indiana." "Manufacturer and Builder," Nov. 1887. "Salem (Ind.) quarry yards, mills and kilns, and cars loaded with monoliths for the Georgia State Capitol." "Manufacturer and Builder," Nov. 1887.

    Oolitic Limestone Quarry at Salem, Indiana

    “Salem (Ind.) quarry yards, mills and kilns, and cars loaded with monoliths for the Georgia State Capitol”

    “We glean from the latest report of the State Geologist of Indiana, the following facts respecting the extent of the operations of the Salem Stone & Lime Company, whose quarries are depicted in our engravings.  The company employs a force of about one hundred and fifty men, and the capacity of its works will be appreciated from the statement that the work of quarrying is done almost exclusively with the aid of machinery of the latest and most approved kind, steam channelers, steam drills, steam saws, steam planes and polishers, steam travelers – immense machines for transporting the huge blocks of stone from one point to another – and steam derricks or cranes, are all in use here, and the large force of men employed is occupied almost exclusively in operating the machinery.  A geological section at the quarry where the principal operations are carried on is as follows:

    Geological section of the Salem Stone & Lime Co. Quarry, from "Manufacturer and Builder," Nov. 1887

    Geological section of the Salem Stone & Lime Co. Quarry, from "Manufacturer and Builder,"
    Nov. 1887

    “As to its quality, and the quantity accessible, the following facts will be of interest:  The gray quarry stone above named is a solid structure, thirty feet in thickness, without seam or parting of any kind, and with only an occasional water-worn fissure.  The color is uniformly a light gray, the only exception being an occasional slight bluish tinge to a small portion of the of the stone.  The stone at this quarry is a fine sample of that embraced in an area of 200 square miles extending over nearly the whole of the western half of the county.  It may be quarried in blocks of any dimension, and the color and texture are the same all the way through.”

  • Sand Creek (on), Decatur County, Indiana – Greenburg, or Flat Rock Stone Quarries  (Magnesian Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    Greenburg, or Flat Rock, Stone. – This is a light-colored, close-grained, magnesian limestone, belonging, geologically, to the Niagara group, which underlies the Hamilton.  It is extensively quarried at various localities in Dearborn county, but principally in the vicinity of Greenburg, on San Creek, and St. Paul, on Flat Rock Creek, in Decatur county.  The crop is from 20 to 30 feet thick, the layers varying in thickness from 4 inches to 2 feet.  Flagging may be obtained of this stone in flags 50 by 200 feet, and from 6 to 7 inches thick, without break or flaw, and which will not vary one inch in thickness over the entire surface.  Stone 22 inches thick may be had of equal superfices, if it were possible to handle such masses.  An analysis of samples from the Greensburg Stone Company’s quarries gave as its composition 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 10 per cent of carbonate of magnesia, 6 percent of insoluble silicates, 6 ½ per cent of oxide of iron and alumina, and about 2 percent of chlorides of the alkalies.  Gen. Gilmore gives the weight of a cubic foot as 169.98 pounds; the crushing strength of one cubic inch as 16,875 pounds; and ratio of absorption, 1 : 117.”

  • Sellersburg, Indiana - Liter’s of Indiana Cooper Lane Quarry (Limestone Aggregates) (present-day company) (The link that described the Cooper Lane Quarry is no longer available.)
    <http://www.litersquarry.com/cooper.htm>
  • Sellersburg, Clark County, Indiana - the Sellersburg Stone Quarry & Mill (present-day company) (information from MinDat.org)
  • South Bend, Indiana – L. B. Slaughter & Co. (Monument Dealer) (Excerpts from “Motor Truck in the Monument Business: What Retail Monument Dealers Think of the Efficiency of Motor Transportation for Memorial Work,” article in Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 32-33d.

    “A short time ago Granite Marble & Bronze sent out a questionnaire to thousands of retail monument dealers throughout the country for information regarding the part the motor truck plays in the retail monument business….”

    “Of course, the real interest in connection with this digest is in quoting what the dealers have to say about the subject, for the sayings are many and various….”

    L. B. Slaughter & Co., South Bend, Ind. (Indiana), use this Stewart 2-ton truck for deliveries. Repairs have been a very small item on this truck. L. B. Slaughter & Co., South Bend, Ind. (Indiana), use this Stewart 2-ton truck for deliveries
    • South Bend, Indiana – Slaughter (L. B.) & Co.

      (See: L. B. Slaughter & Co. (Monument Dealer) )

  • Southern part of Indiana – the Crafton Stone Company (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, “Notes From Quarry and Shop” section, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 74.)

    “The Crafton Stone Company is branching out and have lately secured 330 acres more of stone land in the south part of the county for which $35,375 was paid by the company, making altogether about 1,500 acres owned or controlled by this company. Early in the spring it is the intention to open a number of quarries. The company has much to do with securing John R. Walsh’s consent to build the new railroad. – Bloomington ( Ind.) World.

  • Spencer (near), Indiana – the State House Quarry (The following information is from the “To Sell. To Buy. To Exchange” section in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, the “Slate and Pencil” section, Frank W. Hoyt, Publisher, New York, pp. xvii.)

    “For Sale – State House Quarry, near Spencer, Ind., with 276 acres of the best oolitic limestone land including the celebrated McCormick scenery and water power. Becaese (sic) the stone from this quarry stood the best test of all the quarries in Indiana it was selected for the state house. Here is a bonanza for the right party. Address Sanatarium, Denkewalter Springs, Spencer, Ind. ”

    • Spencer (near), Indiana - Old State House Quarry at McCormick's Creek State Park. In the Nature Center there is a diorama of the Old State House Quarry and other subjects such as Indiana limestone.  By using Hiking Trail Number Three, you can view the Old State House Quarry.  Between 1878 and 1880 limestone from this quarried was used in the construction of the Indiana State Capitol building.  (You can view a map of the park through the "Indiana's State Parks and Reservoirs Maps" site.)
  • Springville, Illinois - Sieboldt Quarry, Rogers Group (present-day company)
  • St. Paul, Decatur County, Indiana – Greenburg, or Flat Rock Stone Quarries  (Magnesian Limestone)  (From “The Building Stones of Indiana,” in The Manufacturer and Builder, Vol. 17, Issue No. 4, April 1885, pp. 82-83)

    Greenburg, or Flat Rock, Stone. – This is a light-colored, close-grained, magnesian limestone, belonging, geologically, to the Niagara group, which underlies the Hamilton.  It is extensively quarried at various localities in Dearborn county, but principally in the vicinity of Greenburg, on San Creek, and St. Paul, on Flat Rock Creek, in Decatur county.  The crop is from 20 to 30 feet thick, the layers varying in thickness from 4 inches to 2 feet.  Flagging may be obtained of this stone in flags 50 by 200 feet, and from 6 to 7 inches thick, without break or flaw, and which will not vary one inch in thickness over the entire surface.  Stone 22 inches thick may be had of equal superfices, if it were possible to handle such masses.  An analysis of samples from the Greensburg Stone Company’s quarries gave as its composition 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 74.2 per cent carbonate of lime, with approximately 10 per cent of carbonate of magnesia, 6 percent of insoluble silicates, 6 ½ per cent of oxide of iron and alumina, and about 2 percent of chlorides of the alkalies.  Gen. Gilmore gives the weight of a cubic foot as 169.98 pounds; the crushing strength of one cubic inch as 16,875 pounds; and ratio of absorption, 1 : 117.”

  • St. Paul, Indiana -  Hidden Paradise Campground and Rock Park (quarry is filled with water now)
  • Stinesville, Indiana - Big Creek Quarry (Buff Indiana Limestone), Big Creek, LLC. (present-day company)
  • Stinesville, Indiana - Limestone Quarry south of Stinesville - StinesvilleMemories Richard Gilbert opened the first limestone quarry of Indiana in 1827.  The quarry was located three quarters of a mile south of Stinesville on the banks of Jack's Defeat Creek.  Limestone from the quarry was used to construct the court houses in Lafayette, Lebanon, and Terre Haute.  It was also used to create the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in Indianapolis. (This link is no longer available.) <http://www.kiva.net/~rbaldwin/stines.htm>     
  • Stinesville, Indiana - Hoadley's Quarry, Stinesville, Ind. 
    (postcard photograph; dated November 7, 1911.) Stinesville, Indiana - Hoadley's Quarry, Stinesville, Ind.
  • Stonington, Indiana- Stone Quarry and Derrick.
    (postcard photograph, postmark May 28, 1913.)  Stonington, Indiana, a former industrial center, does not appear on all present-day maps.  The area lies south of Stonington Road and east of Hog Man Road.  The Stonington Church and cemetery are reportedly in this area today. Stone Quarry and Derrick
  • Vermillion County, Indiana - the Building Stone in Vermillion County (excerpt from First Annual Report of the Geological Survey of Indiana, Made During the Year 1869, by E. T. Cox, State Geologist, Assisted by Prof. Frank H. Bradley, Dr. Rufus Haymond, and Dr. G. M. Levette, Indianapolis: 1869, pp. 172-173.)

    Building Materials.

    “Of stone suitable for building purposes there is no lack. Some of the more heavily bedded, slightly ferruginous sandstone layers of the sandy shales between coals No. 7 and No. 6 have been quarried, on a small scale, along the hill between Clinton and the mouth of Brouillet’s creek. The heavy bedded sandstone, which commonly lies from ten to thirty feet above coal No. 4, has yielded more stone for building purposes than any other bed in the county. Along the Little Vermillion, just below White’s Mill, it generally varies from four to nine feet in thickness, and is a fine building stone, but some of the accompanying layers, though looking quite solid in the quarry, will not resist the disintegrating action of the weather, and must be rejected. From this layer considerable rock has been quarried, along the Big Vermillion, below Eugene; on Tipton branch, south of Eugene, along the Little Vermillion, as just stated; and in the bluffs east of Highland. At the latter place the face of the quarry, twenty feet thick, shows well as viewed from the river. Among the shaly sandstones just below the quarry rock we frequently meet with large, thin flagstones, often showing ripple-marks. At all the quarries we find the stone containing more or less plant remains, of the genera Lepidodendron, Sigillaria, Syringodendron, Calamites, Cordaites, etc.

    “From the upper beds of the Millstone grit small quantities of rock have been quarried, between Perryville (sic) and Covington. Some of these contain sufficient mica to make it probable that they will prove suitable for furnace hearths. When furnaces shall be established in the county, it will be worth while to test these fairly before going further for hearthstone. Some portions of the Hanging Rock sandstone also appear suitable for this use.

    “The limestone at Perrysville is not suited for building purposes, since its argillaceous character renders it peculiarly liable to be broken up by the frost, as is plainly shown along its outcrop. It would make a valuable lime for agricultural purposes. Another thick seam of limestone is the one described as existing on Fall branch, just below the Horseshoe of the Little Vermillion, which appears to be a pretty solid rock; but its position and thinness prevent its being of much practical value. Still another occurs above coal No. 7, above the Horseshoe, and the same remarks will apply equally well to this as to the previous one. At two or three points, as at Perrysville, lime was formerly burnt for masons’ use, but the stone used was found loose in the wash if the ‘boulder clay.’ The lime now used in this county is entirely imported.

    “Of black bituminous calcareous shales, such as have been used for ‘patent roofing,’ there seems to be no limit to the amount, occurring, as they do, constantly above No. 3, generally above ‘No. 4,’ abundantly covering ‘No. 5,’ forming a considerable part of the roof of No. 6, and the roof of ‘No. 8,’ so far as seen....”

  • Vincennes, Indiana – Brock Monument Co. (Monument Dealer) (Excerpts from “Motor Truck in the Monument Business: What Retail Monument Dealers Think of the Efficiency of Motor Transportation for Memorial Work,” article in Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 32-33d.

    “A short time ago Granite Marble & Bronze sent out a questionnaire to thousands of retail monument dealers throughout the country for information regarding the part the motor truck plays in the retail monument business….”

    “Of course, the real interest in connection with this digest is in quoting what the dealers have to say about the subject, for the sayings are many and various….”

    Brock Monument Co., Vincennes, Ind.:

    “‘We operate a Dodge with Truxton and haul up to three tons on it. It is very satisfactory and costs much less than we expected. The driver is usually the largest expense item. Any good reliable truck will do the work if the driver understands his business. It is ten times harder to select a competent driver than it is to select a truck. The dealer should take into consideration the loads to be carried, the distance, kind of roads, etc., before selecting his truck.

    “‘We keep an expense account of manufacturing, selling and setting separate, but it would take a lot of time to get the exact expenses of oil, gasoline, tires, etc., on the setting, loads hauled, distances, etc., and then the information would not be applicable unless the dealer had a good setter to take care of the truck.’”

  • Waldron, Indiana - Blue Springs Quarry (today a dive site) (photograph) 545 E. Hendricks Street, Shelbyville, IN 46176; (317) 398-2277 or (317) 402-0504. )

    Blue Springs Quarry closed until further notice effective June 10, 2011, due to contractual litigation.

    According to this web site, today the quarry is 60 feet deep and is open to divers. Blue Springs Scuba Diving is located 32 miles east of downtown Indianapolis, Indiana.

  • Williams (near), Indiana – W. F. Mitchell Stone Quarry (The following information is from the section “Limestone and Sandstone” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 64.)

    W. F. Mitchell, of Williams, Indiana, is working to develop a ledge of lithographic stone near that place. The stone is of the blue variety and very dense. Considerable lithographic stone has been found in Lawrence County, but it has not been sufficiently free from flaws to be marketable.

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