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List of Quarries in Illinois & Quarry Links, Related Businesses,
Photographs and Articles

(The following list of Illinois quarries is not a complete list of all of the historical quarries in the state, only the ones I have been able to locate.  If you know of more historical quarries in Illinois, please contact me.  Peggy B. Perazzo )

  • Active Quarries in Illinois (present-day), listed on Superyellowpages.com.
  • Abingdon (near), Illinois - Stone Quarry  (postcard photographs; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois  (postcard photograph; early 1900s)

    Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois (postcard photograph; early 1900s)
    Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois, Cutler’s  (postcard photograph; early 1900s) Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois, Cutler’s (postcard photograph; early 1900s)
    Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s) Stone Quarry near Abingdon, Illinois (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s)
  • Albion, Illinois - Charles Saxe & D. W. Graham. The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. Charles Saxe, Albion, Ill., has bought out D. W. Graham and will continue the marble business alone.”

  • Alton, Illinois - Mississippi Lime Co. (Limestone Aggregates) (present-day company)
  • Anna, Illinois - Anna Quarries Inc. - Limestone Quarries  (present-day company which specializes in aggregates), 1000 Quarry Road, Anna, IL 62906; (618) 833-5121.
  • Anna-Jonesboro, Illinois - the Anna Quarries (color postcard photograph, #11290-B; published by Johnston Studio, 813 Broadway, Cape Girardeau, Mo.; Genuine Natural Color made by Dexter Press, Inc., West Nyack, N.Y.; unmailed)
    Greetings from Anna-Jonesboro, Ill. – Anna Quaries” (postcard photograph - See below for transcription of text on back of postcard) “Greetings from Anna-Jonesboro, Ill. – Anna Quaries” (postcard photo)

    The following is quoted from the postcard described above:

    Greetings from Anna-Jonesboro, Ill. - Anna Quarries adjacent to north city limits. Supplies steady payroll, has capacity of 3000 tons out-put of high grade industrial and agricultural lime-stone and hard-road stone. It is associated with the asphalt road-building plant adjoining. One of our steady industries and the many trucks that haul stone away also provide much local income.”

  • Argyle Hollow, Argyle Lake State Park, McDonough County, Illinois - Limestone Quarry.  In the section on the history of the Argyle Lake State Park, there is a brief mention that there was once mined for “coal, clay and limestone.”
  • Ashton, Lee County, Illinois - Stone Quarry.  This site is presented by the Lee County Historical Society.  Stone suitable for use in construction of building purposes was available near Ashton.  The best quarry was located north of Ashton.  The finest quarry is just north of the village of Ashton, which is said to be equal in quality to any in northern Illinois for building.
  • Batavia, Illinois - Limestone Quarries - Quarrying in Batavia  (history).  This historical overview of the local limestone quarrying industry is presented by the Batavia Historical Society.
  • Batavia, Illinois - Batavia Quarrying Industry, presented on the Batavia Historical Society web site.
  • Belvidere, Illinois – the Wright & Tripp Stone Quarry Co. (The following information is from the section “Limestone and Sandstone” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 64.)

    Wright & Tripp Stone Quarry Co.

    The Wright & Tripp Stone Quarry Co., of Belvidere, Ill., will install new machinery in its quarry in the spring.

  • Boskeydale, Jackson County, Illinois - Stone Quarries.  This site was presented by Jackson County, Illinois Trails Genealogy and History.  (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.iltrails.org/jackson/m16.htm>

    Makanda Township:  Stone quarries at Boskeydale were used to supply stone for the Illinois Central Railroad.  Many of the buildings in Illinois and the main building at the Southern Illinois Normal University were constructed with the stone quarried at Boskeydale.  Eventually, the quarries closed.

  • Bridgeport, Illinois - Hardscrabble Stone Quarry & Stearns' Quarry.  This site was created in cooperation with the Commission on Chicago Landmarks, Department of Planning and Development.  The quarry at Hardscrabble (Bridgeport today) opened in 1833 to provide stone to improve the Chicago harbor.  The name was later changed to Stearns' Quarry.
  • Bridgeview, Illinois - Prairie Material (Aggregates) (present-day company)
  • Buffalo Grove, Ogle County, Illinois – the Buffalo Grove Lime Kiln (Lime), presented on Wikipedia.

    • History of the Buffalo Grove Lime Kiln

      “After sitting idle for decades the Buffalo Grove Lime Kiln was acquired by the Polo Historical Society in 1985.  They began clearing trees, brush and debris around the kiln.  A restoration project began in 1992 at a cost of $10,000.  The lime kiln at Buffalo Grove has had a long history that dates back even further than the lime kiln that stands on the site today.”

  • Cairo, Illinois – the Zeran Marble and Granite Works (The following information is from the section “Stone Trade News” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No.1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 66.)

    The capital stock of the Zeran Marble and Granite Works of Cairo, Ill., has been increased to $25,000.

  • Cave in Rock, Illinois - the Cave-In-Rock Quarry (present-day company), located about 5 mile east of Cave in Rock, Illinois; (618) 289-3262. (In 1999 operated by Martin Marietta, Aggregates, 125 Augusta Place, Suite C, Paducah, KY 42003; (270) 554-0804.)
  • Charleston, Illinois – the Charleston Stone Company today part of Van Tarble and Sons Quarries (Aggregate/Agricultural Lime) (present-day company)
  • (from the web site)  “Founded in the mid 1930s by near Clarksville, Illinois in Central Illinois, the Van Tarble and Sons Quarries have grown to include The Charleston Stone Company Quarry in Charleston, Illinois and the Quality Lime Company Quarry in Marshall, Illinois.”

  • Chicago area, Illinois – Niagara Limestone, Nature Bulletin No. 282-A, November 11, 1967, Forest Preserve District of Cook County, Richard B. Ogilvie, President, Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation.

    (From the web site)  “Chicago stands at the crossroads of America -- the heart of the Middle West -- and one of the most important natural resources upon which it depends is the Niagara limestone beneath it….”

  • “Years ago, these quarries supplied blocks of limestone for the buildings and sidewalks of this region. Miles and miles of such blocks protect our lake front. Today, crushed limestone is used in making the concrete that goes into the construction of buildings, streets, sidewalks and highways….”

  • Chicago Area, Illinois - Quarrying Stone Cutting, and Brick Making (in the Chicago Area), presented on the Encyclopedia of Chicago web site.
  • Chicago, Illinois – Opposed to Sky Scrapers in Chicago (The following information is from the section “Stone Trade Notes” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 68.)

Opposed to Sky Scrapers in Chicago

    A committee of the Common Council of Chicago reported to a recent meeting in favor of the granting of special permits for the erection of three sixteen -story structures and one fourteen -story building. The Council, by a vote of 35 to 30, refused to grant the permits and unless further relief is obtained the buildings will be limited to 132 feet, or not to exceed ten stories in height. One of the proposed buildings was the First National bank, another for the Tribune Company, and another for the Hartford Deposit Company. One of the reasons given by the aldermen for their action was that the outlying business was damaged and prices of property lowered by the congestion of business downtown.

  • Chicago, Illinois – A. H. Andrews & Co. (Manufacturer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 506.)

    A. H. Andrews & Co.

    Established in 1865

    215 Wabash Avenue, Chicago

    Owners and Exclusive Mf’rs. of the justly celebrated All Steel Indestructible Andrews Perforated Steel Seats. Chairs - Enameled any desired color, or galvanized and Plated Bronze, Nickel, Brass, Antique Copper, Silver or Gold highly polished. Settees of Steel or Wood all lengths, and many styles. We furnished 3000 Lawn settees for the World’s Fair Grounds. Ours being the best to be found. We solicit correspondence touching Park, Garden, Lawn or Cemetery requirements, feeling confident of pleasing the most critical dealer or consumer. Illustrated catalogue free.

  • Chicago, Illinois – A. S. Sherman (Stone Works) The following excerpt is from History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. Ending with the year 1857, by A. T. Andreas, Chicago: A. T. Andreas, Publisher, 1884. (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    See: “John Shumer & Co.” below.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Albert J. Ward Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp 172.)

    “New Companies – Albert J. Ward Co., Fullerton Ave. Bridge, Chicago; $25,000; to quarry, cut, sell and manufacture stone, etc.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – American Art Bronze Foundry – Jules Berchem, Proprietor  (from Manufacturing and Wholesale Industries of Chicago, Josiah Seymour Currey, Vol. 3, Chicago: Thomas B. Poole Co., 1918, pp. 197-198, available on Google Books)

    Jules Berchem, proprietor of the American Art Bronze Foundry, Chicago, Illinois (circa 1918)

    Jules Berchem, proprietor of the American Art Bronze Foundry, Chicago, Illinois (circa 1918)

    American Art Bronze Foundry

    “It is specifically gratifying to be able to present in this publication a brief review of this noteworthy institution, which is the only one of its kind in Chicago and one of very few in the United States.  Its founder and owner, Jules Berchem, has been able through his technical skill and fine appreciation, to make large and enduring contribution to art advancement in the country of his adoption and in his finely equipped bronze foundry are to be found the best provisions and facilities for the casting of the best types of life-size and colossal statuary, busts, tablets, bas-reliefs, etc.  In different parts of the Union are to be found magnificent pieces of bronze sculpture that attest the ability and splendid workmanship of Mr. Berchem in his special field of art production, and he has gained the highest commendation and the definite support of leading American sculptors and architects, prominent among the latter being the distinguished Chicago sculptor, Loredo Taft.  Among the many important monuments cast by the American Art Bronze Foundry – and all of United States standard bronze – may be mentioned the following, many of these being among the largest in the United States:  Ferguson Fountain of the Great Lakes, a beautiful and gigantic bronze group placed near the south façade of the Chicago Art Institute; Illinois monument at Anderson, Georgia; figures and embellishments of the great Soldiers’ & Sailors’ Monument in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana; naval monument at Vicksburg, Mississippi; ‘Defense of the Flag’ group, Chickamauga, Tennessee; Kosciusko monument, Chicago; equestrian statue of St. Louis, at St. Louis, Missouri; the great lions at the entrance of the Chicago Art Institute; New Jersey soldiers’ and sailors’ monument, Jersey City, New Jersey; Wichita, Kansas and Princeton, Illinois; the Kosciusko monument in the city of Washington, D.C.; the statue of Justice (in silver) for the state of Montana.

    “The American Art Bronze Foundry, at 4921-31 West Lake street, Chicago, represents the admirable results achieved by its honored founder and owner, who initiated operations in Chicago upon a modest scale, in the year 1886, and whose reputation in his field of art enterprise as become not only national but also international, – and that without the expenditure of any fund for advertising exploitation.  Of the career of Mr. Berchem brief review is given in the following context.

    Jules Berchem

    “Jules Berchem was born in the city of Paris, France, on the 9th of December, 1856, and is a son of Gean Berchem, who was a piano manufacturer by vocation.  The education of Mr. Berchem has been principally that gained through personal application and through practical experience, as his youthful advantages were very limited.  He attended school in his native city until he was nine years old and then was indentured or apprenticed to learn the trade or profession of art moulding.  In his native city he eventually became recognized as a master in his profession, and there he continued his activities until 1885, when he came to the United States and found employment at his art in New York City.  Eighteen months later, in 1886, he came to Chicago.  His capitalistic resources were extremely limited but his ability in his profession attracted the attention of a generous member of the Chicago fire department, and this appreciative friend insisted that Mr. Berchem should engage in business for himself, his faith in the young artist being such that he volunteered to take from his savings a sufficient amount of money to enable Mr. Berchem to begin operations.  Accepting this kindly proffer, Mr. Berchem opened a small art foundry at 42 Michigan street, and his first order was for the casting of a statue of Schuyler Colfax, who had been vice-president of the United States during the first term of President Grant.  This statue was erected on the grounds of monument circle surrounding the magnificent soldiers’ and sailors’ monument in the capital city of Indiana.  So perfect was his work in the casting of this large figure that Mr. Berchem’s business began forthwith to expand, and his next important order was for the casting of statues of the police officers killed in the memorable Haymarket riot in Chicago, the monument being erected on the site of this historic Chicago conflict.  At the time of the World’s Columbian Exposition, in Chicago, in 1893, Mr. Berchem had opportunity for augmenting his professional reputation by the production of a masterpiece, the celebrated statue of Justice which was cast in native silver for the state of Montana and made a part of the exhibition of that commonwealth at the exposition.  For this art product Mr. Berchem received not only honorable mention but also a diploma from the official board of the exposition.  His fame was further enhanced by his casting of the great bronze lions that adorn the entrance façade of the Chicago Art Institute, and since that time many and important have been his contributions to highest form of bronze art productions in America.

    “In his original location Mr. Berchem continued his operations until 1899, when he removed his foundry plant to Grand Crossing, from which suburban district he later removed to still larger quarters, at 486 West Fulton street.  At this location he remained until 1905, and in the meanwhile he had achieved work that insured the permanency and growth of his business, so that at his juncture he purchased a vacant tract of land at 4921-31 West Lake street, where he erected his present modern foundry and manufactory, the plant being up to the highest standard in equipment and general facilities and giving an aggregate floor space of thirty-two hundred square feet.  The buildings occupy only a portion of the appreciable ground space, but the remaining part of the site is used advantageously in connection with the business.  In connection with his enterprise Mr. Berchem retains a force of from twelve to fifteen assistants, and he is a recognized enthusiast in his profession and also in all things pertaining to fine art expression and achievement.  He is a life member of the Chicago Art Institute, is a Republican in his political allegiance and his religious faith is that of the Catholic church.

  • “In 1895, in Chicago, as solemnized the marriage of Mr. Berchem to Miss Jeanne Bridoux, who likewise was born in the city of Paris, France, and both have a wide circle of friends in Chicago.  Their only child, Alfred, was born while they were residing at Grand Crossing, the date of his nativity being November 28, 1896.  In addition to the advantages of the public and parochial schools in Chicago he took a four years’ preparatory course in the great Notre Dame University at South Bend, Indiana, and in the summer of 1916 he initiated his apprenticeship in the American Art Bronze Foundry, under the able and earnest preceptorship of his father.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – American Bronze Company  (“Art Bronze in America,” in The Monumental News, January 1893, pp. 29)
  • “David,” George T. Brewster, Sculptor (1893) C. J. Hull, R. H. Park, Sculptor (1893) Lincoln, L. W. Volk, Sculptor (1893)

    “David,” George T. Brewster, Sculptor (1893)

    C. J. Hull, R. H. Park, Sculptor (1893)

    Lincoln, L. W. Volk, Sculptor (1893)

    • Chicago, Illinois – American Bronze Co. (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 479.)

    American Bronze Co.

    Founders in Standard Copper Bronze.

    Estimates Furnished for Artistic Work on Application. No Catalogue.

    Office: 1411 Unity Building, Chicago. - Foundry: Grand Crossing, Ill.

    (Caption under picture of statue: “Indiana” erected at Indianapolis.)

  • Chicago, Illinois – American Spiral Pipe Works (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 118.)

    American Spiral Pipe Works, Box 485, Chicago, Ill.

    Taylor’s Spiral Riveted Pipe

    The pipe line shown in this picture is made up entirely of Taylor’s Spiral Riveted Pipe. It is installed at the plant of the New Inland Gravel Company at Hattiesburg, Miss. Taylor’s Spiral Riveted Pipe is light, strong, durable and easily installed. It is cut to exact lengths, fitted throughout the forged steel flanges or other connections and fittings as required. Send for our catalog and special net prices.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Art Cut Stone Corporation (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp 172.)

    “New Companies – Art Cut Stone Corporation, 4437-39 W. Division St., Chicago; to manufacture and deal in art cut stone; Otto E. Strobel, George F. Schreiber and F. B. Burlingame.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Barbee Wire & Ironworks (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 471.)

    Barbee Wire & Ironworks, 44-46 Dearborn Street, Chicago, Ill.

    (Photo caption under sketch of cemetery monument and fence: Represents a Cemetery Lot Enclosed with No. 220 Standard Fence.)

    Shows 1-inch Square Posts at Corners; two No. 242 Ornamental Posts, with No. 221 Gate. Top and middle rails 1 ½ x ½ inch steel channel, bottom rails 1 ¼ x 1 ¼ inch steel angle: pickets 7-16 inch round steel, placed three inches apart; line posts 1 ¼ x 3/8 in. bar steel; 30-in ground anchorage. (It may be used without “anchorage” or coping or stone foundation.)

    Prices On No. 220 Standard Fence.

    30-inch high…83 cents per foot.

    36-inch high…89 cents per foot.

    42-inch high…96 cents per foot.

    Gate or Corner Posts, one inch square…$2.00 extra.

    No. 242 Ornamental Gate or Corner Posts…4.50 extra.

    No. 221 Walk Gates, each…4.00 extra.

    This fence we consider our Standard or Best Fence for Cemeteries, Etc., it being neat, plain and substantial. Within the enclosure we show our Iron Fern Leaf Settee and chair; also Victoria Vase.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Bates Valve Bag Company (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 106.)

    Bates Valve Bag Company

    7334 South Chicago Ave., Chicago, Ill.

    110 Great Portland St., London, W1, England

    Bates Wire Ties Now Sell at Less Than Pre-War Basis

    Write for the new prices on Bates Wire Ties – they cost you less than string – actually priced lower than during the pre-war period. If you are using the Bates System of Tying, stock up at the new prices. If you haven’t adopted the Bates System yet – Send for this Free Trial Bates Bag Tying Outfit

    The Bates Free Trial Bag Tying Outfit, containing one Bates Spring Return Tying Tool and 20 each of 4, 4 ½, 5, 5 ½ and 6-inch Bates Wire Ties, will be sent you, on receipt of your signed agreement to try this Bag Tying Outfit on your work, and then, within 15 days, send $2.50 for the outfit or return the tool to us. These trial ties cost you nothing.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Beck & Bab (Pit & Quarry Equipment) (The following information is an advertisement in the “Used Equipment Bargains” section in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 97.)

    Beck & Babb, 29 So. La Salle Street, Chicago, Ill.

    For Sale or Rent

    Steam Shovels - Locomotives - Draglines - Tractor and Trailers

    The above list is constantly changing. No matter what your machinery requirements are, write us – we may have it.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Bruner & Lay, Manufacturers – Bruner & Lay Manufacturers of Marble, Stone, Granite and Bricklayers’ Tools Stone Jacks, Derricks, and Contractors’ Supplies, 570 West Polk Street, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Chicago, Illinois – C. E. Munger (Stone Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 17.)

    C. E. Munger, Wholesale Dealer in Italian & American Marble

    I shall keep constantly on hand a full assortment of Italian, Rutland, Sutherland Falls and Knox Monument Stock and Headstones. Also, Italian, Rutland and Knoxville Thin Stock. I have a large supply of Italian, Rutland and Sutherland Falls Turned Urns, at the same, or a very slight advance over Eastern prices. Thanking my patrons for past favors, I still hope for a continuance of the same. Send for Price List.

    Yard, Nos. 10, 12, 14 and 16 West Randolph Street,

    Office No. 16, Near Randolph Street Bridge, Chicago, ILL.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer − New Style Rock Work Cemetery Monumental Catalog,  1890s, 372-378 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts – 36 La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois −  Quarry, West Quincy, Mass. – Foreign Office Aberdeen, Scotland.
  • Front cover of "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s Inside front cover of "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s #CC1252 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    Front cover of "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    Inside front cover of "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    #CC1252 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    #CC1259 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s #CC1265 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s #CC1278 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    #CC1259 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    #CC1265 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    #CC1278 cemetery monument in "New Style Rock Work" cemetery monumental catalog, Charles Clements, Wholesale Granite Dealer, Boston Mass., 1890s

    • Chicago, Illinois – Chas. Clements & Co. (Granite and Statuary) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 465.)

      Chas. Clements & Co., 36 LaSalle Street, Chicago

    Chas. Clements,

    180 Tremont Street, Boston

    Have You Any Orders to Place For Granite and Statuary?

    If so, do not make a mistake by placing your orders before getting our prices. We are headquarters for BARRE, QUINCY, CONCORD, SCOTCH, SWEDE and PEARL GRANITE, and we are quoting very low prices. Try Us On Your Next Order.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Chas. H. Gall (Monument Designs) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, July 1895, Vol. 7, No. 7, pp. 434.  The same advertisement was published in the August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, edition of The Monumental News, pp. 498.)
    Advertisement by Charles H. Gall, Monument Designs, "The Monumental News," July 1895

    Advertisement by Charles H. Gall, Monument Designs, July 1895

    Chas. H. Gall, 1027 Graceland Ave., Chicago, Ill.

    Original and Practical Designs. A collection of designs costing $150 or more to be executed by hand, at a minimum cost, of popular and saleable styles retailing for less than $500 on 20 separate sheets, 14 x 21, with book of sizes (3 to each job) and wholesale and retail prices in four popular granites.

    Expressage paid when cash is sent with order. The cheapest and most practical Designs ever issued for the trade in general as evidenced by the many unsolicited testimonials received. Special Designs and Photographs for the trade. (Photo caption over picture of cemetery stone: Series No. 2.)

  • Chicago, Illinois – Chas. H. More & Co. (Quarriers, Cutters, and Polishers) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 495.)

    Chas. H. More & Co., Quarriers, Cutters and Polishers

    Of the celebrated Barre and other New England Granites. Also importers of Swedish and Scotch Granites and Italian Marble Statuary. Exclusively Wholesale. Our own Barre, Swedish and Labrador Stock.

    Main Office, Barre, VT.

    Foreign Office, 107 Union St., Aberdeen, Scotland.

    Western Office, 53 Dearborn St., Chicago, Ill.

    (Photo captions under two photographs in advertisement:

    Exterior View of Barre Plant

    Interior View of Plant at Montpelier.)

  • Chicago, Illinois – Chicago Electric Company (Electric Motors for Pit & Quarry Use) (The following information is an advertisement in the “Used Equipment Bargains” section in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 98.)

    Chicago Electric Company, 740 West Van Buren Street, Chicago, Illinois  

    In Stock – Cut Prices - Electric Motors

  • Chicago, Illinois – Chicago Perforating Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 106.)

    Chicago Perforating Co., 2445 West 24 th Place, Chicago, Ill., Tel. Canal 1459

    Perforated Metals and Screens of All Kinds

    Material In Stock – Prompt Shipment

  • Chicago, Illinois - Chicago Quarrying & Quarry Photos, presented on the Photographs from the Chicago Daily News, 1902-1933, web site. (Scroll down to “Quarries” and “Quarrying.”)
  • Chicago, Ohio – Chicago Rustic Monument Co./ F. O. Cross & Co. (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 18.)

    Chicago Rustic Monument Co., 341 and 343 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, ILL.

    F. O. Cross & Co., Rustic Monumental Works, 341 Wabash Ave., Chicago, ILL.

    We desire to call your attention to our superior stock of Rustic Monuments, Cemetery fences and Vases, Corner Posts for Cemetery Lots, Hitching Posts, and Carriage Steps. Having had thirty years’ experience in Monument business, and seeing the necessity for a new departure, originated the Rustic Monuments. This class of work is superior to other styles of Monuments as it is a work of Art, and the material used is of the best Bedford Marble. Can furnish satisfactory references as to durability of stone. Photographs, $3.00 per dozen. Send for trade prices, on board cars. Yours, very respectfully. F. O. Cross & Co.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Clapp, Norstrom & Riley Equipment Co. (Pit & Quarry Euipment) (The following information is an advertisement in the “Used Equipment Bargains” section in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 97.)

    Clapp, Norstrom & Riley Equipment Co., 12 and 14 So. Canal St., Chicago

    For Sale or Rent

    Owned By Us and Sold Under Absolute - Guarantee Subject To Trial In Service - Steam Shovels - Dragline - Excavators - Locomotives - Dump Cars - Miscellaneous

  • Chicago, Illinois – D. H. Dickinson (Stone Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 11 and 21.)

    D. H. Dickinson

    Wholesale Dealer in Italian & American Marble.

    310, 312, 314 and 316 North Water Street

    Office, 310, Chicago, Illinois

    Both Foreign and American Marble at the Lowest Market Prices. Orders promptly filled and satisfaction guaranteed. Send for price list.

    D. H. Dickinson

    Wholesale Marble Dealer,

    310 to 316 North Water Street, Chicago, Illinois

    Turning Lathes and Saws Running Day and Night!

    Orders Promptly Filled – Your Patronage Solicited.

    All Grades Guaranteed. Thanks for Past Favors.

    Finished Work Sold To The Trade Only.

    If Delivered in Chicago the Advance over Quarry Prices will be 60 cents per Cubic Foot, the same as on the Rough Stock. Would Recommend The Dark Blue & Mottled Smith As having No Superior For Monumental Purposes. They take a fine polish and never fail to give satisfaction. Though my stock on hand is always large, yet, when desired, marble, either in small or car-load lots, will be shipped from the East at Eastern prices and terms (freight to follow), and from any particular quarry from which the dealer, so ordering may have preferences.

    Rutland Marble A Specialty! Send In You Orders! Our Facilities Are Unequalled!

  • Chicago, Illinois – D. H. Dickinson (Marble Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 480.)

    D. H. Dickinson

    Wholesale Dealer in American and Italian Marble.

    558 to 570 N. Water St., Chicago, Ill.

    All marbles produced by the Marble Co.’s of Rutland, Vt. kept in large quantities. Both Foreign and American Marble at the Lowest Market Price. Orders promptly filled and satisfaction guaranteed. Facilities for supplying finished stock not surpassed. Send for price list.

  • Chicago, Illinois – D. H. Dickinson (Marble Dealer) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York.)

    D. H. Dickinson,  

    Wholesale Dealer in American and Italian Marble.

    558 to 570 North Water Street, Chicago, Ill.

    All Marbles Produced by the Marble Companies of Rutland, Vt.,

    kept in large quantities.

    Both Foreign and American Marbles at the Lowest Market Price. Orders promptly filled and satisfaction guaranteed. Facilities for supplying finished stock not surpassed. Send for price list.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the D. H. Ranck Pub. Company – the Ropp’s Commercial Calculator for Stone Dealers (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. iv.)

    The D. H. Ranck Pub. Co., 358 Dearborn St., Chicago

    Arithmetic for Stone Dealers.

    Calculations Made Easy, Errors Avoided, Time and Labor Saved by Ropp’s Commercial Calculator. The most useful, complete and practical work on Figures ever published. Specially useful to stone, marble, granite, and state dealers and quarrymen. Nearly every problem in business already figured out. Arithmetic made so plain by original short and simple methods, that a child can comprehend it. Worth its weight in gold to young and old. Nearly half a million copies sold. Accompanied by account book, silicate slate, pocket, etc. Bound in elegant leather, pocket size.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Davison Marble Company (from Manufacturing and Wholesale Industries of Chicago, Josiah Seymour Currey, Vol. 3, Chicago: Thomas B. Poole Co., 1918, pp. 6, available on Google Books)
  • “…(Albert L. Schultz) returned to Chicago and accepted the position of master mechanic for the Davison Marble Company, with which he continued six and one-half years, - or until the failure of the company, in 1895….”

  • Chicago, Illinois – E. C. Willison (Manufacturer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 500.)

    E. C. Willison,

    110 Boylston St., Boston. - Manhattan Bldg., Chicago.

    Aberdeen - So. Quincy - Montpelier.

We Manufacture Superior Quality of Granite and Statuary

    Our Prices we guarantee to be as low as any competition can name you on the same Quality work. Ask for our prices on your Quincy, Barre, Concord, New Westerly, Scotch, Swede, Etc. 1895 Design Book will be ready about July 10th, ask for Sample Sheet.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the E. C. Willison  (Advertisement from The Monumental News, Vol. 7, #11, November 1895, pp. 691)

    Statuary For Spring Delivery
    No. 135 - 5.0 high $100 net f.o.b. New York / No. 154 – 3.0 high $55 net f.o.b. New York / Above prices not good after Nov. 20, 1896. We Guarantee every Statue, in point of excellence, equal to any imported.  We quote these prices only to introduce ourselves as Importers of the Finest Quality Italian Statuary.  Don’t be late in ordering, or they will cost you more.

    E. C. Willison – 110 Boylston St., Boston – Manhattan Bldg., Chicago

    E.C. Willison, Statuary advertisement, Chicago, Il., "The Monumental News," Nov. 1895, p. 691
  • Chicago, Illinois – E. R. Klemm, Manufacturer of Stone Jacks, et al.  (from Manufacturing and Wholesale Industries of Chicago, Josiah Seymour Currey, Vol. 3, Chicago: Thomas B. Poole Co., 1918, pp. 7-10, available on Google Books)

    Emil R. Klemm

    “Technical skill, initiative and executive ability and progressive policies have been brought to bear by Mr. Klemm in the development and upbuilding of one of the substantial manufacturing industries of Chicago, and the business, which is now one of large volume, is owned and controlled exclusively by him, the same being conducted under the title of E. R. Klemm and the excellent equipped and thoroughly modern factory building now utilized was erected by; Mr. Klemm for the purpose to which it is applied, its location being at 1447-55 West Austin avenue.  Here have been established the headquarters of a very prosperous industry in the manufacturing of stone jacks, windlasses, hoisting crabs, pole-pullers, hand-power punches, shears for boilermakers and sheet-metal workers, etc., plate bending-rolls, pipe clamps, I-beam clamps, forged hangers, rods, stems, etc., besides many other special mechanical devices, including an improved type of crucible tongs.  Along these varied lines was developed the original industry but its province has been notably expanded in the manufacturing of the Klemm motor trucks, which are of the highest standard of workmanship, and which have stood the most severe tests….”

    “Emil R. Klemm, founder and owner of this important manufacturing business, was born in the ancient city of Magdeburg, Prussia, on the 19th of October, 1859, and is a son of the late William Klemm, who came from Germany to America with his family and established a home in Chicago in 1866.  William Klemm was a man of sterling character and was an ex-machinist and mechanical engineer.  He had the distinction of being the pioneer in the manufacturing of stone jacks in the United States, and he attained to success and influence as one of the representative general machinery manufacturers of Chicago…He retired from active business in 1906 and therefore continued his residence in Chicago until his death, in 1915, at the venerable age of eighty-three years….”

    “The first factory of the late William Klemm was situated in the alley between Madison and Monroe streets, about midway between Franklin street and Fifth avenue.  Here he initiated the manufacture of the first stone jacks ever made in the United states, and he had developed a prosperous business at the time when the historic Chicago fire of 1871 occurred, it having been his misfortune to have not only his factory but also his home entirely destroyed in this great conflagration.  After the fire he resumed operations, at first utilizing as his workshop a mere shed that was situated in Messinger’s stone yard, on Franklin street, near Van Buren street.  In 1877 he removed to the corner of Market and Van Buren streets and later he obtained more eligible accommodations at 126 South Jefferson street, where he employed fifteen mechanics and manufactured a general line of machinery in addition to the stone jacks.  In 1892 Mr. Klemm removed his factory to a site on Desplaines street, near Jackson boulevard, and later larger quarters were secured at the corner of Lake and Desplaines streets, where he continued operations until his retirement, in 1906.  In the latter years he employed in his factory an average force of about thirty mechanics, and from local limitations that trade was extended into the most diverse parts of the United States.  It is specially interesting to note that in manufacturing of stone jacks the name of Klemm has continued to be one of prominence from the time the first products of this order were turned out from the little factory of William Klemm until the present time, when the modern manufactory of the son, Emil R. Klemm, makes a specialty of manufacturing these valuable devices in varied types and in large numbers, the same being used in stone quarries, stone yards, bridge works, and in other places where heavy mechanical work is done….”

    “In 1883 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Klemm to Miss Angel Dienhart, who, like himself, was born in Germany but reared principally in the United States.  The five children of this union are William L., Frances, George R., Frank E., and Emil R., Jr.  The eldest son, William L., is a skilled mechanic and is actively associated with his father’s business, in the capacity of assistant superintendent.

    “Though, as previously stated, Emil R. Klemm is the virtual successor to the business of his father, it is to be recorded, that, with a financial reinforcement consisting of his own savings…he engaged in the manufacturing business in an independent way in the year 1892….”

  • “…In 1914 Mr. Klemm began the manufacturing of motor trucks, and this branch of the business promises to become one of major importance…Mr. Klemm is known as an expert and authority in fine machinery and its production, and from his facotry have been sent forth products for use in many of the large manufacturing plants of Chicago and other of the principal industrial centers of the Union.  The average annual sales now aggregate about one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Equipment Corporation of America (Pit & Quarry Equipment) (The following information is an advertisement in the “Used Equipment Bargains” section in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 98.)

    Equipment Corporation of America

    660 Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia – Phone, Spruce 5498

    1460 Lumber Exchange Bldg., Chicago, ILL., Phone, Randolph 6586

    860 Empire Bldg., Pittsburgh, Phone, Smithfield 1502  

    For Sale or Rent

    Cranes - Hoists - Clam Shell Buckets - Derricks - Draglines - Cars - Rail and Track - Locomotives - Steam Shovels

  • Chicago, Illinois - F. A. Purdy & J. Hutcheson, Sculptors, at 2205 South Park Ave. in Chicago  (The transcription below is from the company letterhead presented in Minnesota’s State Capitol: The Art and Politics of a Public, by Neil B. Thompson, Minnesota Historical Society Press, August 15, 1974, ISBN-10: 0873510852, ISBN-13: 978-0873510851, pp. 56.  The letterhead was on a letter from F. A. Purdy – J. Hutcheson to Cass Gilbert.) 

    F. A. Purdy & J. Hutcheson, Sculptors
    2205 South Park Ave., Chicago, Illinois
    Busts, Monuments, Altars, Tombs and Fonts in Bronze, Marble, Granite Stone Wood Plaster
    Modeling and Carving – Ornament In All Styles

    (In addition to the office in Chicago, the company was in operation in St. Paul, Minnesota, about 1900-1907.  If you have information on this company, please contact Victoria Woodcock (who is researching this firm) and me (Peggy B. Perazzo).  Whatever information or photographs that you can contribute will be presented here.)

  • Chicago, Illinois – F. C. Austin Manufacturing Co. (The following advertisement is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. XXXV.)

    F. C. Austin Mfg. Co., Chicago, Stone Crushers.

    The Austin Crusher embodies an entirely new principle, whereby weight is reduced, capacity increased, less power required and life of Crusher prolonged. WE claim (all things considered) to have the best crusher made, and court comparison. Capacity up to 300 tons per day.

    F. C. Austin Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill.

    Gentlemen: - We are running one of your No. 4 Crushers crushing ‘boulders’ very fine for top dressing on street work, and are turning out over eighteen tons per hour. We use a 14-horse power traction threshing engine, which furnishes ample power.

    Yours, etc. Henry Keefer, Hungtinton, Ind., May 30, 1895.

  • Chicago, Illinois – F. Wollmerath (Manufacturer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 520.)

    F. Wollmerath, Yards and Mills at 173-175 Clybourn Place, Chicago.

    Manufacturer of Rustic Monuments in Bedford Stone.

    Send Tracings for Estimates.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Foster & Hosler (Monumental Design Cases)  (from The Monumental News, Vol. 7, No. 7, July 1895, pp 437.  (Portion of the advertisement below – Click on the image of the ad to view the entire ad.)

    Foster & Hosler Monumental Design Cases advertisement, "The Monumental News," July 1895 Foster & Hosler Monumental Design Cases advertisement, "The Monumental News," July 1895

    Foster & Hosler Monumental Design Cases advertisement
    (July 1895)

     

    Monumental Design Cases

    “We desire to call the dealers attention to our various cuts of design Cases, which meet all requirements of the trade.  We are headquarters for cases, and have placed the prices so low that we defy all competitors…We carry in stock Design Cases, Standard Designs, Photos, Tools, Materials, Etc.

  • Foster & Hosler, 1320 Wabash Ave., Chicago, Ill.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Franklin T. Brodix (Successor to Brodix & Malone), Building Stone (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 132.)

    Franklin T. Brodix

    Successor to Brodix & Malone Building Stone

    Exclusive Western Agent for:

    T. R. Coughlan Co. - Mankato

    Plymouth Quarries, Inc. – Seam Face & Split Face Granite; Buff Mountain Sandstone

    Erie Blue Stone Ass’n. – New York Blue Stone

    Brainerd, Shaler & Hall Quarries Co. – Connecticut Brownstone

    Rowan County Freestone Co. – Kentucky Blue Stone

    Schneider Stone Co. – Wisconsin Limestone

    Briar Hill Stone Co. – St. Paul, Ind.

    Sales Agent and Secretary

    Star Stone Company, Quarrymen Indiana Oolitic Limestone

    112 West Adams Street, Chicago, Ill.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Fraser & Chalmers (The following advertisement is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxvi.)

    Fraser & Chalmers, Chicago, Ill.

    The Riedler Pump - Its Merits Recognized by the Anaconda Company

    To whose representatives we have just sold a Riedler Pump, capacity 500 gallons per minute against a head of 1,000 feet. Also Riedler pumps to W. S. Stratton, Independence Mine, Colorado, Montana Mining Co., and many others.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Frederick P. Bagley & Co. (Stone Dealer) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 480.)

    Frederick P. Bagley & Co.

    Wholesale Dealers in Marble

    Chicago.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Gates Iron Works (The following advertisement is from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxvi.)

    Gates Iron Works

    Dept. “Q.” 650 Elston Ave., Chicago, Ills., U.S.A.

    New York, 136 Liberty Street.

    London, E. C., 73 A Queen Victoria St.

    Butte, Montana.

    City of Mexico, 8 Calle de Gante.

    Gates Rock ad Ore Breaker

    Over 3000 in Use Throughout The World.

    Produces a more perfect cubiform material and a greater quantity in a given time per horse power used than any other crusher on earth.

    Capacities up to 150 tons per hour. Nine Different Sizes. We Have Built The Largest Stone Crushing Plants in Existence. General Mining Machinery of every description. If Desired We Will Take Entire Charge of Construction. We Manufacture Everything pertaining to Plants of this Character.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Geo. B. Carpenter & Co. – Wire Rope (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxiii.)

    Geo. B. Carpenter & Co., Established 1840

    Wire Rope, Tackle Blocks and Hoists. Manila Rope. Differential Chain Hoists. Hoisting Winches.

    Send for illustrated catalogue of cordage-blocks, etc., etc.

    202-208 S. Water St., Chicago.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Goodman Manufacturing Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 15.)

    Goodman Manufacturing Company, 48th to 49th Streets on Halsted, Chicago, Ill.

    Pittsburgh - New York – Birmingham - St. Louis – Cincinnati – Charleston, W. VA. – Seattle - Denver

    Electric Locomotives - Types: Storage Battery, Third Rail, Trolley - Unexcelled in Power, Efficiency, Durability - Send for Book 201Q

  • Chicago, Illinois – Gregory Electric Co. (Electrical Equipment for Pit & Quarry Use) (The following information is an advertisement in the “Used Equipment Bargains” section in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 98.)

    Gregory Electric Co., 16th and Lincoln Streets, Chicago, Illinois

    In business since 1893.

    Would you buy a second-hand electric motor at any price: If you knew it to be as good as new? Wire us your inquiries. Second-hand Electric Motors Bought, Sold and Exchanged.

  • Chicago, Illinois – H. H. Scoville & Co., - Stone and Mining Machinery (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxxix.)

    H. H. Scoville & Co., 250-252-254 South Clinton Street, Chicago.

    Stone and Mining Machinery Manufactured by H. H. Scoville & Co.,

    Traveling Cranes, Derricks, Derrick Powers, Planers, Lathes, Wire Rope and Fittings, Rubbing Beds, Stamp Mills, Concentrating Machinery, Smelting Machinery, Lixivating Machinery, Cyanide Machinery, Rock Breakers, Engines and Boilers,

    Telephone Main 4805.

  • Chicago, Illinois – H. W. Caldwell & Son Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 114.)

    H. W. Caldwell & Son Co.

    Link-Belt Company, Owner

    17th Street and Western Avenue, Chicago - 709 Main St., Dallas Texas

    299 Broadway, New York

    Caldwell

    Bucket Elevators, Belt Conveyors, Apron Conveyors, Screw Conveyors, Gears, Sprockets, Buckets, Chain, Bearings. Send for catalog No. 45

    - cost considerably less, do more work, operate at less expense and upkeep than any other similar equipment. Write us for a list of plants that are having success with our equipment and service. The Winona Sand and Gravel Company, Winona, Minn., whose plant is shown below, are getting splendid results from their two E & S shaker Screens, bought at different times.

  • Chicago, Illinois – The Harrington & King Perforating Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 115.)

    The Harrington & King Perforating Co., 638 N. Union Avenue, Chicago

    114 Liberty Street, New York

    Perforated Steel Screens of Every Description

    For Stone, Gravel, Sand, Cement And All Minerals

  • Chicago, Illinois – Hartman Manufacturing Co. (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 506.)

    Hartman Mfg. Co. - Hartman Steel Picket Fence.

    Stronger than Iron. Cheaper than Wood. Handsomer than either. All Steel. One solid structure, bolted together and anchored into the ground. Thousands of miles of it in use for Cemetery purposes and always approved.

    Gen’l. Western Sales Agency, 601-602 Manhattan Bldg., Chicago.

    Gen’l. Eastern Sales Agency, 277 Broadway, New York.

    Factories, Ellwood City, Penna.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Henry Struble Cut Stone Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 139.)

    Henry Struble Cut Stone Company, Producers and Fabricators of Cut Indiana Limestone

    Offices:

    689 Continental-Commercial Bank Bldg. - Chicago, Illinois – Bedford, Indiana

  • Chicago, Illinois – Illinois Stone & Lime Company (circa 1850’s) The following excerpt is from History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. Ending with the year 1857, by A. T. Andreas, Chicago: A. T. Andreas, Publisher, 1884. (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    “About eighteen miles southwest from Chicago, are situated the famous ‘Athens Quarries,’ near Lemont. In 1846 the stone was discovered by some workman while they were excavating for the Illinois & Michigan Canal, but was not then considered of superior quality. It was, at first, used merely for foundation stone. In 1852, however, the Merchant’s & Mechanic’s Bank of Chicago was faced with the Athens stone, the first used for this purpose in the city…Several large marble yards started up in Chicago during the year 1852, on the corner of State and Washington streets, established in the summer of 1853. John Shumer & Co., successors to A. S. Sherman, on Water Street, also were actively engaged in that business. The ‘Illinois Stone & Lime Company’ was organized in December, 1853, purchasing A.S. & O. Sherman’s interest in the quarry at Lemont, and also the lime kiln near Bridgeport. The organization consisted of W. S. Gurnee, president; M. C. Stearns, secretary and treasurer; A. S. & O. Sherman, superintendents. The reputation of the Athens stone extended until it became the favorite building material in the city. Professor Hitchcock while on a visit to Chicago, during the winter of 1855-56, examined and analyzed it, and called it ‘Athens Marble.’ Although really a magnesian limestone, it has since been known by that name.

    “In 1857 the amount of capital employed in the stone business of Chicago was fully $1,500,000. During that year the six thousand tons of Athens marble, shipped mostly from Chicago, found its way to all the important cities in the Northwest, and became a serious competitor in the market with the products of the Lockport quarries, in New York.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – James B. Seaverns (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 106 and 108.)

    James B. Seaverns, Peoples Gas Building, Chicago

    Install A Seaverns Clamshell Bin Gate on Your Bin and Notice How Quick and Easy It Cuts Off

    Pat. Apl. - Hundreds in use – All sizes. Manufactured by James B. Seaverns

    James B. Seaverns, Peoples Gas Building, Chicago

    Seaverns Balanced Shaking Screen

    For producing a fine, uniform grade of product, superior to that obtained by large revolving screens. Successfully adapted to stone quarries and screening plants, where clean and uniform separation is desired. Large capacity – minimum power consumption – low upkeep, together with sturdy construction, are the merits of this screen, which is daily growing in popularity.

    Manufactured by James B. Seaverns

  • Chicago, Illinois – John Shumer & Co. Stone Works (previously known as A. S. Sherman) (circa 1853) The following excerpt is from History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. Ending with the year 1857, by A. T. Andreas, Chicago: A. T. Andreas, Publisher, 1884. (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    “About eighteen miles southwest from Chicago, are situated the famous ‘Athens Quarries,’ near Lemont. In 1846 the stone was discovered by some workman while they were excavating for the Illinois & Michigan Canal, but was not then considered of superior quality…Several large marble yards started up in Chicago during the year 1852, on the corner of State and Washington streets, established in the summer of 1853. John Shumer & Co., successors to A. S. Sherman, on Water Street, also were actively engaged in that business….”

    “In 1857 the amount of capital employed in the stone business of Chicago was fully $1,500,000. During that year the six thousand tons of Athens marble, shipped mostly from Chicago, found its way to all the important cities in the Northwest, and became a serious competitor in the market with the products of the Lockport quarries, in New York.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Link-Belt Machinery Co. – Link-Belt Box Water Elevator (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxix.)

    Link-Belt Machinery Co.

    Engineers, founders, Machinists, Chicago, U.S.A.

    Manufacturers of the Link-Belt Box Water Elevator

    Of capacities from 300 to 4,000 gallons per minute.

    Most Economical Machine on Market for Quarrymen.

    Send for Circular Catalog of Elevating, conveying and Power Transmitting Machinery mailed on application.

  • Link-Belt Machinery Co. advertisement, Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, pp. xxix Link-Belt Machinery Co. advertisement, Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, pp. xxix
  • Chicago, Illinois – Macomber & Whyte Rope Co. (Wire Rope) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 65.)

    Macomber & Whyte Rope Co., 19-21 South Canal St., Chicago

    Wire Rope - “Monarch” For Strength and Durability - Crucible and Plough Steel. We carry in stock Galvanized Crucible Steel and Galvanized Iron Rope Guys. Send For Our New Catalogue.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Marble Yards located at the corner of State & Washington Streets (circa summer 1853) The following excerpt is from History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. Ending with the year 1857, by A. T. Andreas, Chicago: A. T. Andreas, Publisher, 1884. (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    “About eighteen miles southwest from Chicago, are situated the famous ‘Athens Quarries,’ near Lemont. In 1846 the stone was discovered by some workman while they were excavating for the Illinois & Michigan Canal, but was not then considered of superior quality. It was, at first, used merely for foundation stone. In 1852, however, the Merchant’s & Mechanic’s Bank of Chicago was faced with the Athens stone, the first used for this purpose in the city…Several large marble yards started up in Chicago during the year 1852, on the corner of State and Washington streets, established in the summer of 1853. John Shumer & Co., successors to A. S. Sherman, on Water Street, also were actively engaged in that business. The ‘Illinois Stone & Lime Company’ was organized in December, 1853, purchasing A.S. & O. Sherman’s interest in the quarry at Lemont, and also the lime kiln near Bridgeport. The organization consisted of W. S. Gurnee, president; M. C. Stearns, secretary and treasurer; A. S. & O. Sherman, superintendents. The reputation of the Athens stone extended until it became the favorite building material in the city. Professor Hitchcock while on a visit to Chicago, during the winter of 1855-56, examined and analyzed it, and called it ‘Athens Marble.’ Although really a magnesian limestone, it has since been known by that name.

    “In 1857 the amount of capital employed in the stone business of Chicago was fully $1,500,000. During that year the six thousand tons of Athens marble, shipped mostly from Chicago, found its way to all the important cities in the Northwest, and became a serious competitor in the market with the products of the Lockport quarries, in New York.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Marvin Electric Drill Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 65.)

    Marvin Electric Drill Company, Canastota, N.Y., U.S.A.

    Marvin Elecric Rock Drill - A Practical Percussion Drill! - No Packed Joints – No Valves – No Expert Labor

    Full Efficiency in Cold Weather or at High Altitudes

    No Experiment – We can refer you to customers who have used them for years in preference to all others. Write for Catalogue

  • Illinois, Chicago – John D. McGilvray Stone Company

    For a good summary of John Duff McGilvray’s occupation as a stone contractor, his stone companies, and his family, visit Barbara Lewellen’s detailed and informative web site, “Our Scottish Ancestors.” The web site presents the history of her McGilvray family and the many men in her family who worked as stone masons and stone contractors in Scotland; Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; and California, et al.  A lot of history and many wonderful photographs are presented on her web site.

    According to Lewellen’s web site, the McGilvray men first worked as “…stone masons, working in the quarries in the Tayside area near Dundee, Scotland.”  According to the “John Duff McGilvray & Marion Beaton” section of the web site, McGilvray family’s immigration from Scotland to Chicago, Illinois, circa 1870 is described.  In 1876 they moved on to Denver, Colorado, in 1876.  About 1892, John D. McGilvray moved his family to Palo Alto near San Francisco, California.
     

    Sections of the Lewellen’s web site that relate to John D. McGilvray’s stone businesses include:

    Another web site that provides some photos of the McGilvray Quarry is “McGilvray Quarry at Knowles,” presented by Ken Doig on the Madera County CAGenWeb Project web site:

    The McGilvray Quarry at Knowles, Raymond Granite Company 

    The following 1921 article published in San Francisco briefly describes John D. McGilvray’s early life and provides a full description of the history of his stone company and his goal to increase the use of California stone in building construction. 

    California’s Granites are Unsurpassed.  John D. McGilvray, Pioneer Stone Man, Develops Great Industry Here  “Company Builds Mausoleums for our Cemeteries:  Many of Finest Structures on Pacific Coast Erected by His Firm” (pdf), in the “Little Journeys to the Homes of Big Industries,” section of the San Francisco Chronicle, June 7, 1921, pp. 7. 

    “In 1897 he incorporated the McGilvray Stone Company for the purpose of popularizing the California product in building construction. Later in 1907, he reincorporated under the name of McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company, of which corporation he remained the head until his death in 1916.”  

    This article also states that John D. McGilvray was one of the main forces responsible for the increasing use of California stone in the state’s buildings:

    “This was the now promising stone industry.  Although a few experts and master stone men, like John D. McGilvray, founder of the great McGilvray-Raymond Granite Co., with a half dozen of the largest quarries in the country now in operation, knew of the wonderful possibilities of California stone on account of its superior qualities, yet it was not extensively used owing to ancient methods.

    “A few stone buildings had been created before this time, but the cost was almost prohibitive. McGilvray introduced modern methods of handling stone in building construction, which made it possible to use it in competition with other materials. By this means he constructed a market for California stone. He lived to see the day when his judgment was sustained by the almost universal acceptance of his opinion that California granite for qualities of durability and capacity to take a fine finish, whether hammered or polished, was unequaled anywhere in the world.”

    “After the great fire and earthquake of 1906 he had a clear demonstration of his contentions that California stone was the best building material for large buildings in the West….”  Some of the many stone buildings that John D. McGilvray’s company was involved in are listed in this article.  He’s famous for building the first “sky-scraper” in San Francisco for Claus Spreckels in 1898.

    After John D. McGilvray’s death in 1916, his sons continued operating the McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company:  John D. McGilvray, the eldest son, was president and general manager.  H. S. McGilvray was vice-president, and he was in charge of construction work in San Francisco.  A. B. McGilvray was treasurer, and he managed the “great granite quarry at Raymond” in Madera County.  W. S. McGilvray was in charge of the company’s operation in Los Angeles at 678 South Utah Street.  Malcolm McGilvray, the fifth son, was the assistant secretary for the company.

    The article goes on to describe the quarries that the McGilvray-Raymond Granite Company operated:

    The McGilvray sandstone quarry near Sites in Colusa County. 

    (If you’d like learn more about the history of this quarry and to view photographs of this quarry, you can visit the “Colusa County Quarry” section of our web site, and scroll down to the McGilvray quarry entries and photographs.)

    The Stanford / Goodrich (aka the Greystone) sandstone quarry at Greystone in Santa Clara County, California.  Sandstone from this quarry was used to build the outer quad of the Stanford University in Palo Alto.

    According to The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, published in 1906, the McGilvray Stone Company was located at Second and King Streets in San Francisco.  About 1916, McGilvray’s home office was located at 634 Townsend street in San Francisco, according to a 1916 California State Mining Bureau report.  McGilvray leased the quarry from from the heirs of Levi Goodrich.

    (If you’d like to view photographs of the Greystone quarry (aka the Stanford or Goodrich quarry), you can visit the “Santa Clara County Quarry” section of our web site, and scroll down to the Stanford/Greystone/Goodrich quarry entries and photographs.)

    The McGilvray granite quarry at Raymond/Knowles in Madera County, California. 

    (If you’d like to view photographs of the McGilvray granite quarry located at Raymond/Knowles area, you can visit the “Photo Tour of the Inactive McGilvray Quarry” section of our web site to view a photographic tour of the quarry and area.  If you wish to find historical information and photographs of the quarry, visit the “Madera County Quarries” section and scroll down to the McGilvray quarry entries.)

    The granite quarry at Lakeside in San Diego County, California.  (Granite from the Lakeside quarry in San Diego was sold as “Silver Gray” granite.)

    (You can visit the Lakeside-Foster area of the “San Diego County Quarry” section of our web site for information on the McGilvray granite quarry there.  We do not have much information yet or photographs of this quarry, but we hope to visit the area sometime this year.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

    The names of McGilvray’s of companies include: 

    In Denver:  the “John D. McGilvray and Company” & “John D. McGilvray and Company.”

    In California:  “McGilvray Stone Company,” McGilvray Stone Company; in 1907 he incorporated under the name of the McGilvray-Raymond Granite Co.; Raymond Granite Co.

  • Chicago, Illinois - the McMillan & Son (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, January 1898, Vol. XVI., No. 2, pp. 194)

    The Bielhen Foundry and Machine Company, of St. Joseph, Mo., write under recent date that they are just completing the erection of the third saw gang for W. WcMillan (sic - McMillan ?) & Son, of Chicago, put up in 1897. They were then making ready for shipment three gangs to R. Robertson & Co., Detroit, Mich., who have the contract for the stone and granite work of the new Wayne county court-house. They are also building a gang for the Butler-Ryan Company, of St. Paul, who have the contract for the new Minnesota capitol. Western stone-sawing machinery is making a record, and the Bielhen gang is becoming famous the world over.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Messenger’s Stone Yard on Franklin St. near Van Buren Street (circa 1871)  (from Manufacturing and Wholesale Industries of Chicago, Josiah Seymour Currey, Vol. 3, Chicago: Thomas B. Poole Co., 1918, pp. 7-10, available on Google Books)

    Emil R. Klemm

  • “…The first factory of the late William Klemm was situated in the alley between Madison and Monroe streets, about midway between Franklin street and Fifth avenue.  Here he initiated the manufacture of the first stone jacks ever made in the United states, and he had developed a prosperous business at the time when the historic Chicago fire of 1871 occurred, it having been his misfortune to have not only his factory but also his home entirely destroyed in this great conflagration.  After the fire he resumed operations, at first utilizing as his workshop a mere shed that was situated in Messinger’s stone yard, on Franklin street, near Van Buren street.  In 1877 he removed to the corner of Market and Van Buren streets and later he obtained more eligible accommodations at 126 South Jefferson street….”

  • Chicago, Illinois – The Monumental News (Monument Industry Newspaper) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 472 and 523.)

    The Monumental News, 334 Dearborn Street, Chicago.

    Cuts For Advertising Purposes.

    (Photo captions under the 4 monuments pictured: (1) Design For A Monument; (2) No. 16 - 50 C.; (3) No. 138 - 60 c.; (4) No. 45 - 75 C.)  

    Specimen Illustrations Reproduced from Designs in

    The Monumental News International Edition.

    Each design is illustrated on heavy plate paper 8 ¾ x 11 ¾ inches in Photogravure, half tone or etching. 60 plates issued during the year. Five mailed every month. The illustrations include monumental work of every description from American and Foreign cemeteries. Many of the illustrations are reproductions from original designs drawn expressly for The Monumental News.You can elevate the standard of monumental art by showing your customers illustrations of artistic work that is being introduced throughout the country. Hundreds of leading monument dealers have taken the International Edition for several years. These plate illustrations comprise the International Edition. They are mailed with the Regular Edition every month. Subscription $2.50 a year.

    R. J. Haight, Publisher, 334 Dearborn St., Chicago.

    Duplicates of these cuts are for sale to subscribers at $1 each.

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Mount Olive Monument Company  (from Manufacturing and Wholesale Industries of Chicago, Josiah Seymour Currey, Vol. 3, Chicago: Thomas B. Poole Co., 1918, pp. 258. Available on Google Books.)

    Mount Olive Monument Company

  • “In 1903 this company’s now large and substantial industrial enterprise was founded by N. Heldt Henriksen and Emanuel Henriksen and operations were initiated in yards and factory established at the corner of Clark and Irving Park boulevard.  The business, conducted upon the highest commercial principles and with marked ability and progressiveness, has signally prospered, and the main office and principal manufacturing plant were continued at the location noted until 1914, when the present plant, which had previously been operated as a branch of the original factory, was notably enlarged, to make provision for the centering of the entire business at this location – 3821-25 North Narragansett avenue.  Here the company utilized a ground area one hundred and fifty-three by one hundred and seventy-five feet in dimensions, and has been improved with modern industrial buildings erected by the company for its use.  The equipment of the extensive and well ordered plant includes the most modern type of stone cutting and polishing machinery, tools and other requisite accessories, and here employment is given to an average force of about ten expert sculptors and stone-cutters.  This is one of the leading institutions of the kind in Chicago and it is widely known for the superior designs and workmanship of its products, which include the more simple as well as the most elaborate and imposing specimens of monumental work.”

    Niels Heldt Henriksen

    “N. Heldt Henriksen, the founder of this important enterprise (Mount Olive Monument Company), had achieved national reputation as a sculptor and as a creator of the finest type of designs for monumental work, his talent having become noteworthy even in his boyhood, when he produced remarkable specimens of carving in wood and other material.  He was born at Aarhus, Denmark, on the 24th of January, 1869, a son of Heldt Henriksen, who was a farmer by vocation.  At the age of eighteen years Mr. Henriksen came to the United States and established his residence in Chicago, where he found employment as a stone carver, a work in which he had become specially skillful.  For a few years he held the position as carver and sculptor of the monument shops of Gall & Company, and he then determined to establish himself independently as an architectural stone-carver and contractor.  His first contract was for the production of the ornamental stone work of the city hall in Omaha, Nebraska, and he developed a substantial and prosperous contracting business, in connection with which he greatly enhanced his reputation as a professional artist in stone work.  He continued his activities as a contractor until he became associated with his brother Emanuel in founding the Mount Olive Monument Company, as noted in a preceding paragraph.  Of this company he continued the president until his death.  Among the many fine examples of the professional skill and artistry of Mr. Henriksen may be noted the great granite lions that adorn the façade of the E. J. Lehmann mausoleum, in Waldheim cemetery, Chicago; the state seal of Indiana as produced in Montello Granite and placed in the monument dedicatory of that state.  His ability as a sculptor led also to his receiving commissions for the carving of marble busts of various persons of distinction.  It is worthy of special note in this review that Niels Heldt Henriksen also designed and executed a statue of a bull buffalo and that the same has been pronounced by the highest authorities to be a wonderful and faithful reproduction.  Duplicates of this celebrated statue found a wide sale throughout the United States, and demands for the same still continue.  The size of the statue is eighteen by thirteen by seven inches, and on the design and product Mr. Henriksen was granted copyright (No. 53303, G. class) December 19, 1916, only a few days prior to his death.  He was engaged in designing and carving the artistic stone ornamentation that mark the front of the Hearst building in Chicago when he was stricken with pneumonia, the attack resulting in his death on the 29th of January, 1917.  Mr. Henriksen was a man of lofty ideals, fine mentality and noble character, – a sterling citizen who commanded unqualified popular esteem.  He was a charter member of Chicago Lodge, No. 18, Danish Brotherhood, this having been the first lodge chartered in the United States and he having thereafter shown most lively interest in the general development of the organization, which now has more than one thousand lodges in the United States.  His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church, of which his widow likewise is an earnest communicant.

    “Mr. Henriksen was happily married early in life and his widow still retains her residence in Chicago.  They became the parents of seven children, and the eldest son, Jens, is now vice-president of the Mount Olive Monument Company.  The younger son, Thorvald, has inherited much of his father’s talent as a sculptor and has perfected the same through study and practical experience gained under most auspicious conditions.  He has already achieved distinction as an artist and sculptor and he devotes much of his time and attention to the designing of the finer pieces of art sculpture that are manufactured by the Mount Olive Monument Company in the filling of its most important contracts.  His honored father is an active and valued member of the Chicago Art Institute, and was widely and favorably known in the representative art circles of the United States, his fraternal alliances having included membership in the Humboldt Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and the Hesperia Lodge No. 111, A. F.  A. M.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Nichols & Co. (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 12.)

    Nichols & Co., 202 Washington Boulevard, Chicago.

    Moyer’s Marble Drill. Price of Drill, $25.00. Send All Orders to Nichols & Co.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Nye Steam Pump and Machinery Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 119.)

    Nye Steam Pump and Machinery Co., 701-707 N. Western Ave., Chicago, Ill.

    Nye Steam Pumps

    Our hundreds of enthusiastic users are our best salesmen. We will gladly furnish you with a list of NYE users, who will tell you why they use Nye pumps. Write today.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Orton & Steinbrenner Co. (Locomotive Cranes) (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 35.)

    Orton & Steinbrenner Co., Maine Office – Chicago, Ill. – Factory – Huntington, Ind.

    O. S. Dependable Locomotives – Cranes

    Employment of Cranes by Contracts Insures Greater Production

    with Minimum Cost Greatly Increasing Profits

    Will insure such results. Designed and built to give continuous service with least maintenance cost.

    Catalog No. 18 sent on application

  • Chicago, Illinois – the Portage Entry Quarries Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. v.)

    The Portage Entry Quarries Co.  

    Every Architect who is not acquainted with Portage Red, Brown and Variegated Sandstones. Should send for samples at once to Portage Entry Quarries Co., Security Building, Madison and Fifth Ave., Chicago.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Portage Entry Quarries Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 4.)

    Portage Entry Quarries Co., 501-502 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., Chicago.

    Every Architect Who is not acquainted with

    Portage Red, Brown and Variegated Sandstones

    Should send for samples at once to Portage Entry Quarries Co.

    New York Office: No. 156 Fifth Avenue.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Producers’ Marble Company (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 17.)

    Chicago Branch, Producers’ Marble Company,

    Thomas A. Hall, Manager,

    REMOVED TO East End Michigan St., Chicago, ILL.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Raymond Bros. Impact Pulverizer Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 24.)

    Raymond Bros. Impact Pulverizer Co.

    1307 N. Branch St., Chicago, Ill.

    Eastern Office: 50 Church Street, New York City

    Western Office: 207 Boston Building, Denver

    A Raymond Roller Mill equipped with Air-Separation is giving the above results in one of the most modern up-to-date Acid Phosphate Plants recently built. The Mill is a complete unit which takes the rock from storage, grinds it and delivers finished uniform material dustlessly to a storage bin set high enough to discharge into the weighing hoppers by gravity. No screens, makeshift air-separators, elevators or conveyors are required. The uniform fineness of the rock means a constant quantity of acid and less acid per ton of fertilizer produced. An investigation of Raymond Roller Mills for your work will be well worth your time.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Robert W. Hunt & Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 108.)

    Robert W. Hunt & Co.

    Robert W. Hunt – Jno. J. Cone – D. W. McNaugher

    Inspection – Tests – Consultation

    Inspection of New and Second Hand Cars, Locomotives, Cranes, Dredges, Steam Shovels, Pumps, Engines and All Classes of Quarry Equipment.

    New York – Pittsburgh – Chicago – St. Louis – San Francisco

  • Chicago, Illinois – S. Casterline (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 14.)

    S. Casterline, 225 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, ILL.

    Rustic Monuments and Ornamental Stone Work

    Carved In The Best Bedford Marble By Skilled And Artistic Workmen. Designs Furnished to Order. - Correspondence Solicited.

  • Chicago, Illinois – S. G. Taylor Chain Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 120.)

    S. G. Taylor Chain Co., 138 So. Dearborn St., Chicago, Illinois

    Taylor – Mesaba

    Your powerful steam shovel is as dependable only as the chain with which it is equipped. Here, if anywhere, you need rugged strength and dependability. Let us show you why operators have been pinning their faith on Taylor Mesaba Chain for nearly fifty years. Sizes in stock for all shovels.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Sauerman Bros. (Excavating Equipment) (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 30.)

    Sauerman Bros., 312 S. Dearborn St., Chicago

    Take Your Excavating Problem to Sauerman

    Both our dragline cableway excavators and bottomless power scrapers have certain advantages in common, namely, they can be operated by one man, will work over a wide radius at one setting and combine digging and conveying at one operation. Describe your proposition and we will specify the type of outfit best adapted to your use.

    (Photo caption under top photograph: Sauerman Dragline Cableway Excavator is the most economical equipment for excavating deep deposits of gravel from wet or dry pits, streams or ponds, and conveying to screening plants.)

    (Photo caption under bottom photograph: Especially well adapted to working shallow deposits or excavating gravel from hillside and a good means for rehandling sand and gravel is a Sauerman Scraper System.)

  • Chicago (near), Illinois - “The Stone Industry in the Vicinity of Chicago, Illinois,” by William C. Alden, from Contributions to Economic Geology - 1902, Bulletin 213, United States Geological Survey, 1903.
  • Chicago, Illinois – the Sullivan Machinery Co. – Channelers and Gadders (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xxii.)

    Sullivan Machinery Co.,

    Main Office, 54-60 N. Clinton St., Chicago.

    Eastern Office & Works, Claremont, N.H. Sullivan

    Channelers and Gadders!

    The Sullivan Carriage Channeler used on Drainage Canal.

    55 Sullivan Channelers in use on Chicago Drainage Canal.

    80 Sullivan Channelers in use in Vermont Marble Quarries.

    27 Sulllivan Channelers in use in Southern Marble Quarries.

    20 Sullivan Channelers in use in Sandstone and Limestone Quarries.

    15 Sullivan Channelers in use in New York Marble Quarries.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Sullivan Machinery Company (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 69.)

    Sullivan Machinery Company, 135 Adams St., Chicago

    Rock Drills and Quarrying Machinery - Air Compressors - Types For All Possible Requirements

  • Chicago, Illinois – Sullivan Machinery Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 185.)

    Sullivan Machinery Co., 122 So. Michigan Ave., Chicago

    Sullivan Double Drum Electric Portable Hoist – A single Drum Hoist is Also Built

    A New Electric Hoist

    Sullivan engineers have designed a new portable hoist, electric motor driven. It is similar in power, size and adaptability to the Sullivan “Turbinair” Hoists which have become so popular and both single and double drum models are available.

    It’s All in the Drum

    Sullivan Electric Hoists have 6 ½ H.P. motor, mounted in a tight casing inside the drum. Reduction gears and bearings are enclosed and splash oiled. All you see is the drum and clutch and brake.You can hoist a ton vertically on single line, or pull a 50-ton car on level track. The double drum hoist is compact and easy to handle for two-rope jobs such as boom derricks, scraper loading or car handling. Ask for new Bulletin No. 1076E

  • Chicago, Illinois – Thayer and Chandler (Manufacturers) (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 479.)

    Thayer and Chandler, Sole Manufacturers, 46 Madison Street, Chicago.

    Fountain Air Brush

    Patented May 3, 1892. Send for Descriptive Catalogue.

    Used in Black and White and Color Work.

  • Chicago, Illinois – Thomas Elevator Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 121.)

    Thomas Elevator Co., 21 South Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, ILL.

    Thomas Hoists

    Steam and Electric – Single and Two-Speed Types

    Designed and built to meet every requirement of the Sand, Gravel and Stone Producer.

  • Chicago, Illinois – W. H. Chenoweth & Son Industrial Iron Works (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 12.)

    W. H. Chenoweth & Son, Industrial Iron Works, 76 & 78 W. Monroe St., Chicago, ILL.

    Manufacturers of All Kinds of Iron Fencing, Window Guards, Verandas, Cemetery Fences, Roof Cresting, Outside and Inside Stairways, Jail work and all Kinds of Architectural Iron Work. Estimates Furnished Promptly On all of the above class of work. Send for Cuts and Price List.

  • Chicago, Illinois – W. H. K. Bennett, M. E. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 29.)

    W. H. K. Bennett, M. E.

    Telephone Harrison 1385

    20 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago

    Swintek Traveling Suction Screen Nozzle loosens and agitates hardest deposits of sand and gravel. The screen opening in the chain prohibits oversize material to enter the suction pipe – provides a constant feed for the suction of the pump, thereby increasing the production of the pump, no clogging of pump runner. This cutter can be installed on any sand and gravel dredge, no special expensive boat construction required – made for 6” – 8” – 10” – 12” – 15” pumps. The increased pumping capacity will soon pay for this cutter. American Pumps manufactured by American Manganese Steel Company. Shell, side plates, runner made of manganese steel. Built for heavy duty and to resist abrasive wear of sand and gravel. Made in all sizes, 4” up to 15.”

  • Chicago, Illinois – Washburn & Moen Manufacturing Co. – Manufacturers of Wire Rope and Cable (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No.. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 586.)

    Washburn & Moen Manufacturing Co.

    Worcester, Mass. - New York City. – Chicago.

    Established 1831.

    Manufacturers of Wire Rope and Cable.

    Iron, Steel and Galvanized, for Hoisting and Guys. Fittings of All Kinds Attached to Ropes When Desired. Prompt Shipments from Stock. Chicago Office and Warehouse: 107 & 109 Lake Street.

  • Chicago, Illinois – The Webster Manufacturing Company (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 36.)

    The Webster Mfg. Company, 4500-4560 Cortland St., Chicago

    Factories – Tiffin, O., Michigan City, Ind. and Chicago Sales Offices in Principal Cities

    Webster Sand and Gravel Pit Equipment

    Whether in large or small gravel and sand pits, an efficient conveying and elevating system requires thorough engineering. Webster equipment is specified in sand and gravel operations of all sizes because it gives sustained, efficient service at the lowest possible cost. Webster engineers have accurate, scientific knowledge of material handling equipment and will be glad to design conveying and elevating equipment to meet your special requirements.
  • Chicago, Illinois – the Western Stone Co. (The following information is from the section “Stone Trade Notes” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 66.)

    The Western Stone Co., of Chicago, during 1901 earned $17,794, or.0079 per cent. on its stock. In 1900 the company lost $66,459 of its surplus. President Madden announced to the stockholders that a great deal of work had been done during the year of a preparatory nature, in anticipation of its future needs. The expenditure for this work, which is now completed, has been charged to the expense of production and amounts to $125,000.

  • Chicago, Illinois – The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company Salesroom  (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone:  An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. xii.)

    The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company.

    Yale Stylo-Chiselry.
    Memorial Tablets, Panels, Records, Grilles, Borders.
    Decorative and Art Metal Work of Every Description.

    A revival of the ancient art of incising metals, retaining all its beauty, possibilities and individuality, but accomplished by methods which have been developed during years of patient investigation and expensive experiment, whereby work of this kind can now be produced at a small fraction of the cost involved by any methods heretofore known.

    General Offices:  280 Broadway, New York City.
    Works:  Stamford, Conn. – Branford, Conn.

    Salesrooms:
    New York, 84-86 Chambers St. – Philadelphia, 1120 Market St.
    Buffalo, Builders’ Exchange – Chicago, 151-154 Wabash-Ave.
    Boston, 224 Franklin-St. – San Francisco, Mills Building.

    • Chicago, Illinois – the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company Salesroom  (1896 Advertisement in The Monumental News, Vol. 8, #3, March 1896, pp. 195)
  • The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co. Chain Block Advertisement (The Monumental News, March 1896)

    The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co. Chain Block Advertisement (The Monumental News, March 1896)

    Chain Blocks of Paralleled Efficiency
    Write for 28-Page Illustrated Catalogue, giving full explanation of picture here shown.

  • The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Co.
    Salesrooms:
    New York 84-86 Chambers Street – Chicago, 152-154 Wabash Avenue
    Philadelphia, 1120 Market Street – Boston, 224 Franklin Street
    Buffalo, Builders’ Exchange – San Francisco, Mills Building
    General Offices:  289 Broadway, New York – Works:  Stamford, Conn., Branford, Conn.

  • Chicago Heights, Illinois – American Manganese Steel Co. (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 32 and back cover.)

    American Manganese Steel Co.

    General Offices, Chicago Heights, Ill.

    Foundries: Chicago Heights – Newcastle - Oakland

    Amsco Missabe Type Dipper with Vanderhoef Front (Patented)

    Here is the newest type of Missabe Dipper with Vanderhoef front – Amsco steel throughout. It is the best design ever developed, for the construction enables it to withstand extremely hard service and it will give you a maximum yardage at minimum cost. The base portions of the teeth are cast integrally, making the front far stronger and more rigid than ever before developed. In addition to this rigidity, the tooth ribs act as protecting runners or guards on the outside of the front, saving the exposed surface from wear and lengthening the life and service of the entire casting. The shape and reversible design of the points lessens the cost of the points very materially. We carry a complete line of patterns for all capacities.

American Manganese Steel Co.

    General Sales Offices: 389 East Fourteenth St., Chicago Heights, Ill.

    Plants: Chicago Heights – New Castle - Oakland

    The name “Amsco” on a dredging pump means satisfactory service and each of the things that go to make that service satisfactory. It means construction throughout of manganese steel and consequently the highest wear-resisting qualities. It means steady production of a larger quantity of solids at the lowest cost. It means profit. At the plant of W. H. Spicer, Marseilles, Ill., an eight inch Amsco pump is delivering gravel and sand in a manner that shows clearly the advantages of Amsco “all-manganese steel” construction. Mr. Spicer states that it has given the most satisfactory kind of service since the first day it was installed. You, too, will find the Amsco to be a more desirable pump for your work. Let us show you why.

    (Photo caption under photograph: Amsco Pump in the plant of W. H. Spicer, Marseilles, Ill.)

  • Chicago Suburbs, Illinois - Thornton Limestone Quarry - “Thornton Quarry Rocks ISGS staff,” from GeoNews Online by the Illinois State Geological Survey, July 1997.
  • Clarksville, Illinois – the Van Tarble and Sons Quarries (present-day company)

    (from the web site)  “Founded in the mid 1930s by near Clarksville, Illinois in Central Illinois, the Van Tarble and Sons Quarries have grown to include The Charleston Stone Company Quarry in Charleston, Illinois and the Quality Lime Company Quarry in Marshall, Illinois.

  • “Since opening in the mid 1930s the Van Tarble and Sons Quarries have strived to meet central Illinois limestone production needs. The quarries are proud to offer consumers a wide variety of aggregate products, from agricultural lime to the largest of landscaping boulders.”

  • Colona, Illinois – the Colona Stone Co. Plant and Quarries (The following information is from the “Notes From Quarry and Shop” section in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Frank W. Hoyt, Publisher, New York, pp. 572.)

    “The Colona Stone Co., of Colona, Ill., announce that they intend to enlarge their plant at their Colona quarries this coming spring.”

  • Colona, Illinois - Sandstone Quarry, Colona, Ill. (postcard photograph, #3; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Sandstone Quarry, Colona, Ill.” (postcard photograph, #3) “Sandstone Quarry, Colona, Ill.” (postcard photograph, #3)
  • Cordova, Illinois – old Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)
  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Cordova, Illinois – Wynkoop and Webster Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The following excerpt is from The History of Cordova, Illinois, by Bruce E. Marshall, English 102 (Mr. Keeley), March 17, 1960, presented by the Cordova District Library

    “In 1875 the lime kiln operated by Wynkoop and Webster was a thriving industry in Cordova.  For a number of years it furnished employment for many men around Cordova.  Wesley Black and Wilbur Bruner, both deceased, were the last two men to draw lime from the kiln.  This kiln was one of the five located around this vicinity, and it is the only one still standing today.   It is located on the southwest corner of the Jim Durbin farm or directly behind the Cordova cemetery…The lime kiln is some thirty feet high with a ramp built across from the tip of the hill to the top of the kiln over which the rock was wheeled and dumped into the kiln.  The gigantic ovens baked the rock until it was changed into chunks of lime which were processed and used in plaster.  Pine slabs were shipped in to feed the fire in the ovens….”  

    “Between 1850 and 1870 Cordova became a large shipping point between Moline and Savanna…Lime from the lime kilns around Cordova was also shipped from this warehouse.  With the coming of the railroad, river traffic ceased to remain the main means of transportation….”

  • “In 1885 the village had…two lime kilns….”

  • Darien, Illinois – Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve – Limestone Quarries.  This site is presented by the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County.  This site notes that there are several old quarries scattered throughout the Preserve.  (The following quote was taken from this site and is used with their permission. The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available. You can visit the DuPage Forest Preserve District of DuPage County for more information on the area. The map entitled, Waterfall Glen Forest Preserve Map (pdf), shows the location of “Quarry Ponds.”)
    <http://www.dupageforest.com/PRESERVES/waterfallglen.html>
    “Lumbering and quarrying were major industries at Waterfall Glen.  From 1860 through the 1880s, Sawmill Creek was the site of the Ward Brothers' sawmill. Elsewhere, quarrymen were busy plying their trade at three active quarries under the direction of builder and quarry owner Edwin Walker. Walker's quarries were known for their quality Lemont Limestone, or Athens Marble. The stone was a much-used construction material at the time. One of the most notable of Walker's projects was the Chicago Water Tower, built from his own limestone quarried at Waterfall Glen.”
  • Dundee, Illinois – Walter Haertel (Monument Dealer) (Excerpts from “Motor Truck in the Monument Business: What Retail Monument Dealers Think of the Efficiency of Motor Transportation for Memorial Work,” article in Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 32-33d.

    “A short time ago Granite Marble & Bronze sent out a questionnaire to thousands of retail monument dealers throughout the country for information regarding the part the motor truck plays in the retail monument business….”

    “Of course, the real interest in connection with this digest is in quoting what the dealers have to say about the subject, for the sayings are many and various….”

    Walter Haertel, Dundee, Ill.:

    “‘I use a 1 ½-ton Little Giant and one-ton Ford-Dearborn and a Ford runabout. These are great time and money-savers. I have had the Ford-Dearborn for three and one-half years and it is in pretty good condition. I believe it will take another three years for the Little Giant to pay for itself. No monument man should be without a little Ford with a box on back.’”

  • DuPage Township, Will County, Illinois - “Western Stone Company (Keepataw Site),” by Karen Poulson, Archaeological Research, Inc. [PDF]

    This report thoroughly details the Keepataw site and the Western Stone Company, company president Martin B. Madden, and the limestone quarrying and processing that took place in the early 1900s in DuPage Township, Will County, Illinois, where the Keepataw site is located, and the quarry workers. At the time of the report, the owner was “Forest Preserve District of Will County.”

    The following companies and quarries were also named in the report: G. A. Cossens & Co.; Oak Hill Quarry; Daggett’s quarry; Singer and Talcott Stone Co. quarry; Excelsior and Riordan Stone Company; the Steel quarry; the Davidson quarry; the Werner quarry; the Kronmeyer quarry, the Nobes quarry; Joliet area quarries; Joliet Stone Co.; Lemont area quarries; Chicago Building Stone Co.; Excelsior Stone Co.; the Chicago & Lemont Stone Co.; the Corneau Stone Co.; the Bodenschatz & Earnshaw Stone Co.; the Lockport Stone Co.; Enterprise Stone Co.; Chicago Building Stone Company trust, Crescent Stone Co. of Joliet. (There may have ben some companies or quarry names that I missed, but this is the bulk of them.) It is also mentioned that there may have been lime kilns on the property.

    • Western Stone Company Incorporation Papers, dated September 17, 1889, at the Archives of the Illinois Secretary of State.
  • Dupo, Illinois - the Columbia Quarry (present-day aggregate quarry) The Columbia Quarry Company operates limestone aggregate quarries located in Midwestern Illinois, adjacent to metro St. Louis. 
  • Elmhurst, Illinois - the Lombard Area Quarries - This information was presented on the DuPage County Historical Museum web site. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.dupageco.org/museum/generic.cfm?doc_id=229>

    In the industry section of the web site, it is noted that stone from the Lombard and Elmhurst provided stone for the brick and tile works.

  • Franklin Grove (near), Illinois – “Brown’s Quarry, Franklin Creek” (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed) 
  • Brown’s Quarry, Franklin Creek” near Franklin Grove, Illinois (postcard photograph) “Brown’s Quarry, Franklin Creek” near Franklin Grove, Illinois (postcard photograph)
  • Fulton, Illinois - Limestone Quarry changed to the present-day Heritage Canyon.  From the mid-1800s to 1954 limestone was quarried in the location known today as Heritage Canyon.  In 1954 the quarry was abandoned, and the area became very rundown.  In 1967 the quarry was purchased and the area was preserved as much as possible.  Today the area is a twelve-acre wooded structured nature walk, and this site gives further information about the history of Heritage Canyon and information as to how to visit the area today. (The above information was obtained from the City of Fulton, Illinois, web site.)
  • Galena, Illinois – the Hahn Quarry Products, Inc. Quarry (Limestone) (present-day company), 3913 West Guilford Road, Galena, Illinois.
  • (from the web site)  “Welcome to the Hahn Quarry Products, Inc. website.  We quarry and shape Galena Stone* dolomitic limestone (CaMg(CO3)2 + traces) for buildings and landscapes. Inside our site you will find scores of photo examples of our stone installed on actual buildings and in real landscapes. You stone geeks can find more information about our stone at the Stone Facts section of our website.”

  • Godfrey (north of), Illinois - the C. M. Lohr Limestone Quarry (present-day company)
  • Golden, Illinois – the Golden Marble & Granite Works, J. M. Wallace, Proprietor  (postcard photograph, No. 518, “Photoette” post card; Made by C. U. Williams, Bloomington, Illinois; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Golden Marble & Granite Works, J. M. Wallace, Proprietor (postcard photograph) Golden Marble & Granite Works, J. M. Wallace, Proprietor (postcard photograph)
  • Grafton, Illinois - the Grafton Quarry Co. Office (from Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, September 1892, Vol. V., No. IV)

    Directory of Stone, Marble and Granite Producers:

    Sandstone: “Grafton Quarry Co., Grafton, Ill., and St. Louis, Mo.”

  • Grafton, Jersey County, Illinois - Grafton Stone Quarries.     This information was taken from the History of Jersey County, Illinois, Atlas Map of Jersey County, Illinois, 1872. 

    Grafton is situated on the Mississippi River.  This was the location of the well-known “Grafton Stone Quarries.”

  • Griggsville Landing, Illinois – old Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)

    The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Hanover, Illinois - Hanover’s Natural Resources - Limestone Quarries. This site is presented by ComPortOne.  There are many limestone quarries in the area, and the nearest major quarry is located north of Hanover outside Elsizabeth.
  • Hardin County, Illinois – the Southern Illinois Limestone Company Quarry (Limestone)  (1925 reference on mindat.org web site)

  • Henry, Illinois – the Henry Granite and Marble Co. (From Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, “Notes From Quarry and Shop” section, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 88.)
  • “The Henry Granite and Marble Co., Henry, Ill., composed of Messrs. Devore, Fisher & Wright, are contemplating leaving Henry and going to Moline where there is apparently a much larger field.”

  • Illinois - the Vulcan Materials Company (present-day company) Using the Site Map/Search for this company site, you will find a listing of Vulcan Materials Company quarry sites, including those in Illinois. The company is reportedly the “largest producer of construction aggregates in the United States.”
  • Illinois (central) - Material Services Corp. - Aggregate Quarries in Central Illinois (present-day company)
  • Illinois (central) - Tuscola Quarry, photograph presented by the Illinois State Geological Survey (photograph)
  • Johnson County, Illinois - the Cypress Quarry Company Limestone Aggregate Quarry (present-day company). This quarry was mentioned in “The Mineral Industry of Illinois,” presented by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Office of Mines and Minerals.
  • Joliet, Illinois - J. G. Mott Granite Co. The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Removals. J. G. Mott Granite Co. have removed from Joliet to Pontiac, Ill.”

  • Joliet, Illinois - Joliet-Lemont Limestone:  Preservation of an Historic Building Material.  This booklet is available through the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois.
  • Joliet, Will County, Illinois - Building Stone Quarries (Limestone)  The information below was obtained from the Will County Illinois USGenWeb web site, Ted Cash, Co-Coordinator. The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.
    <http://www.rootsweb.com/~ilwill/>

    An entry on the 1854 United States Gazetteer presented on previous Will County, Illinois, web site noted that near Joliet, the county seat, there were quarries that produced building stone during that time period (1854).

  • Joliet, Illinois – Joliet Area Stone Quarries in Rural Historic Structural Survey of Channahon Township, Will County, Illinois, April 2009 (pdf), for Will County Land Use Department and Will County Historic Preservation Commission Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.  (Topics include pp. I-47-I-55:  “Local Limestone,” “Joliet Limestone,” “Quarries in Lemont,” and “Development of Limestone Industry”)
  • Joliet, Illinois – Joliet Steam Granite Works, G. A. Haley & Co.  (1909 company letterhead)

    Joliet Steam Granite Works
    G. A. Haley & Co.
    Joliet, Illinois

  • Joliet, Illinois – Limestone Quarry near Joliet Penitentiary (Photograph on the Encyclopedia of Chicago)

    (photo caption)  “Prisoners from the Illinois state penitentiary in Joliet worked in the limestone quarries located next to the prison (seen in the background of this photograph, likely taken around the turn of the twentieth century).

  • Photographer: Unknown
    Source: Chicago Historical Society (ICHi-37939)

  • Joliet, Illinois – Illinois State Penitentiary – “Crusher Plant, stone quarry, Looking South, Joliet, Illinois. Preparing crushed stone for public roads
    Crusher Plant, Stone Quarry, looking south, Joliet, Illinois. Preparing crushed stone for public roads” (postcard photograph) Joliet, Illinois - Crusher Plant
  • Joliet, Illinois – Illinois State Penitentiary – “Quarry of Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet, Ill.”  (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Quarry of Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet, Ill.” (postcard photograph) “Quarry of Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet, Ill.” (postcard photograph)
  • Joliet, Illinois – Illinois State Penitentiary – “Stone Quarry, looking south, Illinois State Penitentiary – Preparing Crushed Stone for Public Roads, Crusher Plant”  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Stone Quarry, looking south, Illinois State Penitentiary - Preparing Crushed Stone for Public Roads, Crusher Plant” (postcard photograph) “Stone Quarry, looking south, Illinois State Penitentiary - Preparing Crushed Stone for Public Roads, Crusher Plant” (postcard photograph)
  • Joliet, Illinois – “Illinois State Penitentiary – Showing Deputy’s Office and Visitors going through Institution”  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • “Illinois State Penitentiary – Showing Deputy’s Office and Visitors going through Institution” (colorized postcard photograph) “Illinois State Penitentiary – Showing Deputy’s Office and Visitors going through Institution” (colorized postcard photograph)
  • Joliet, Illinois - Limestone Quarries near Joliet (history). The following information is information presented by Legends of America. The web site states that the limestone quarried at Romeoville was used in the construction of the Idaho Statehouse. This site states that due to the local limestone quarries, Joliet was also called “Stone City.”
  • Joliet, Will County, Illinois - Limestone Quarries - “Our Builders and Quarrymen, No. 1” from The Land Owner Vol 1, No 3 (March 1873) - William Alexander Steel.  This material is available on a site regarding William Alexander Steel (born 1836 Blairsville, Pennsylvania - 1879 in Joliet, Illinois).  The site is presented by Warren Steel. The excerpt of the book begins:  “It will be interesting, to our readers to learn something of the men who have dug the material from its bed, fashioned it so deftly, and sent it to take its place in the classic facades that grace our principal streets. We cannot, therefore, more appropriately inaugurate our sketches of the great quarrymen than by presenting the accompanying portrait of one of the largest and most successful stone men in the world - Hon. W. A. Steel, of Joliet, Ill.”
  • Joliet, Illinois - Brandon Road Quarry  (now filled with water)
  • Kane County, Illinois - Harold Hall Building Stone Quarry Beach - Batavia Township, Kane County, Illinois.  The following material is from the Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois (Edited by Newton Bateman, LL.D. and Paul Selby, A.M.) and History of Kane County Edited by Gen. John S. Wilcox. Chicago; Munsell Publishing Company, 1904.  If you wish more information or if you would like to see photographs of the quarry as it is today, click here.  The site you will reach is presented by the Batavia Park District web site.
    “Township 39, covering the half townships of Batavia and Geneva, has ever been in all its material aspects and resources, as attractive and desirable as can well be imagined. The soil is deep and very fertile; prairie and woodland could not be more conveniently alternated; the beautiful river, frequently widening to encompass many picturesque islands, holds its course almost due southward across its center; many charming spring brooks wind their way through its highly cultivated and thoroughly improved farms; and its artistic suburban lawns extending to the outflowing stream, and exhaustless quarries of the finest building stone in this part of the State, are found in many places along its banks.”
  • Kankakee, Illinois - Haigh Quarry. 

    This under water dive web site is presented by Paul's Scuba Diving Web Page.  Today the quarry is filled with water.  This web site describes the  Haigh Quarry as an old quarry with depths of 25 to 30 feet deep at the north end of the quarry.  The remainder of the quarry is from 50 to 60 feet deep with the southeast corner with a depth of 85 feet.  If you would like to visit this quarry, the site gives directions.

  • La Salle, Illinois – the Marquette Manufacturing Co. (The following information is from the section “Limes and Cements” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 78.)

    The Marquette Manufacturing Co., of La Salle, Illinois, has been organized, with a capital stock of $150,000. directors: N. W. Duncan, James H. Eckels, Michael F. Mahoney, Frank P. O’Connor and F. G. Dickinson.

  • Lake Forest, Illinois – The Great North of Scotland Granite Polishing Co. (The following advertisement is from The Reporter: Devoted To The Interests of Marble and Granite Workers, Vol. XVII, No. 6, published by Nichols & Co., Chicago, Illinois, June, 1884, pp. 11.)

    Scotch Granite.

    The Great North of Scotland Granite Polishing Co.

    Monuments, Headstones, Columns, &c. Designs and Prices furnished on application

    All orders promptly filled.

    James Anderson, Agent, Lake Forest, ILL.

  • Lemont (near), Illinois – the “Athens Marble” Quarries (Magnesian Limestone) – The following excerpt is from History of Chicago. From the Earliest Period to the Present Time. In Three Volumes. Vol. I. Ending with the year 1857, by A. T. Andreas, Chicago: A. T. Andreas, Publisher, 1884. (This book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    “About eighteen miles southwest from Chicago, are situated the famous ‘Athens Quarries,’ near Lemont. In 1846 the stone was discovered by some workman while they were excavating for the Illinois & Michigan Canal, but was not then considered of superior quality. It was, at first, used merely for foundation stone. In 1852, however, the Merchant’s & Mechanic’s Bank of Chicago was faced with the Athens stone, the first used for this purpose in the city. F. C. Sherman and William B. Ogden then used it in their buildings, next to the Sherman House, and on the corner of Lake and Clark streets. Several large marble yards started up in Chicago during the year 1852, on the corner of State and Washington streets, established in the summer of 1853. John Shumer & Co., successors to A. S. Sherman, on Water Street, also were actively engaged in that business. The ‘Illinois Stone & Lime Company’ was organized in December, 1853, purchasing A.S. & O. Sherman’s interest in the quarry at Lemont, and also the lime kiln near Bridgeport. The organization consisted of W. S. Gurnee, president; M. C. Stearns, secretary and treasurer; A. S. & O. Sherman, superintendents. The reputation of the Athens stone extended until it became the favorite building material in the city. Professor Hitchcock while on a visit to Chicago, during the winter of 1855-56, examined and analyzed it, and called it ‘Athens Marble.’ Although really a magnesian limestone, it has since been known by that name.

    “In 1857 the amount of capital employed in the stone business of Chicago was fully $1,500,000. During that year the six thousand tons of Athens marble, shipped mostly from Chicago, found its way to all the important cities in the Northwest, and became a serious competitor in the market with the products of the Lockport quarries, in New York.

  • Lemont, Illinois – “Drainage Canal at Lemont, Ill.  Loading Boats with Building Stone”  (postcard photograph contributed by one of the visitors to our web site; early 1900s)
  • Drainage Canal at Lemont, Ill. Loading Boats with Building Stone” (postcard photograph) “Drainage Canal at Lemont, Ill. Loading Boats with Building Stone” (postcard photograph)
  • Lemont, Illinois – Lemont Area Stone Quarries in Rural Historic Structural Survey of Channahon Township, Will County, Illinois, April 2009 (pdf), for Will County Land Use Department and Will County Historic Preservation Commission Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.  (topics include pp. I-47-I-55:  “Local Limestone,” “Joliet Limestone,” “Quarries in Lemont,” and “Development of Limestone Industry”)
  • Lemont, Illinois - the Heritage Quarries Recreation Area, Lemont, Illinois. The Heritage Quarries Recreation Area adds an additional 3.8 mile trail extension to the existing Illinois & Michigan Canal trails. You can read more about the Heritage Quarries Recreation Area in the Village of Lemont brochure [PDF].
  • Lemont, Cook County, Illinois - Brier’s Quarry (Limestone), presented by the Lemont Area Historical Society in the “Historical Pictures” section (history and photographs)
  • Lemont, Cook County, Illinois - Brown Quarry (Limestone), presented by the Lemont Area Historical Society in the “Historical Pictures” section (history and photographs)
  • Lemont, Illinois - Joliet-Lemont Limestone:  Preservation of an Historic Building Material.  This booklet is available through the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois.
  • Lemont, Cook County, Illinois - Quarry Shovel and Gravel Loading Facility, presented by the Lemont Area Historical Society in the “Historical Pictures” section (history and photographs)
  • Lemont, Cook County, Illinois - Western Quarry #1 (Limestone), presented by the Lemont Area Historical Society in the “Historical Pictures” section (history and photographs)
  • Lemont, Illinois – Historic Lemont

  • History of Lemont (once known as Athens, Illinois)
  • “Lemont’s first settlers arrived in 1833.  The town, then called Athens, began its development along the site of the Illinois & Michigan Canal that flows through the town.  The canal, begun in 1836 and completed in 1848, linked the Illinois River and Lake Michigan to make a direct waterway to the Mississippi River.  Almost all the early town pioneers came to work on the canal, either as contract holders or laborers.  The contractors were mostly from New England or the Ohio border towns.  The unskilled laborers were the newly immigrated Irish, German, Scandinavians, along with French and English Canadians who came looking for a new life, fleeing poverty and political persecution.…”

    “While digging the canal, an exceptionally fine grade of dolomite limestone was discovered near the surface.  This discovery led to the development of the stone quarries.  During the period from about 1850 to 1900 this stone, known as Joliet-Lemont limestone and locally as Athens Marble, became one of the chief building materials used in many landmark buildings both locally and in the surrounding area….”

    “The quarry industry, like the canal before, attracted more immigrant groups, mainly from southern and south central Europe:  Poland, Bohemia, Czechoslovakia, Austria and Italy.  Work was hard and the pay low.  Lemont made pages of labor history with the struggles between the quarry workers and the owners.  In 1885, the Illinois Militia was ordered to Lemont to break a strike….”

  • Limestone, Peoria County, Illinois – Limestone Township History (& Quarries), from The History of Peoria County, Illinois, 1880, page 602-603, submitted by Janine Crandell on Illinois Ancestors Presents Peoria County.  (“the township was named Limestone, because of the almost inexhaustible quarries of that stone that exist in the north part of the township.”  Quarries mentioned in this article include:  “Secord’s limekilns and stone quarry and “Mr. Secord calls the ‘North Quarry.’”)
  • Lincoln, Illinois – John Meyer – Marble Workers (From Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XII, No. 1, December, 1895, “Notes From Quarry and Shop” section, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 86.)
  • “The marble works of John Meyer, Lincoln, Ill., were closed by the sheriff on executions in favor of the German American National Bank. Liabilities about $1,000. Assets about 1,000.”

  • Lisle, Illinois - Stone Quarries - “A History of the Town of Lisle, ” Excerpts from A History of the County of Du Page, Illinois, 1857.  This site is presented by the Du Page County, Illinois, History and Genealogy site (a Chicago and Northern Illinois History site), owned by Pat Sabin, and the following quote is from the above-noted book, and the quote is used with Ms. Sabin's permission.
    “Several stone quarries have been opened in this town, from which stone is obtained for lime burning and for building purposes.  The Naperville and Oswego plank road was laid through the central part of this town.  The projectors of this road thought to facilitate the communication between Oswego, Naperville and Chicago, and thereby retain the travel which would otherwise be drawn to the railroad which was being built at the same time.”
  • Lockport, Illinois – Historic Lockport – Nearby Cream-Colored Dolomite Limestone Quarries.  This site is presented by the City of Lockport. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.  Historical information on Lockport is available in their “Historic Downtown Lockport” and the “Illinois and Michigan Canal” sections of their web site.)

    Many of the buildings of Lockport are built with this stone.  Mule-towed barges transported the stone to construct the Water Tower, churches and houses in Chicago.

  • Lombard, Illinois - the Lombard Area Quarries, on DuPage County Historical Museum web site. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.dupageco.org/museum/generic.cfm?doc_id=229>

    In the industry section of the web site, it is noted that stone from the Lombard and Elmhurst provided stone for the brick and tile works.

  • Macomb, Illinois – the American Mausoleum Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XLVI, No. 3, March, 1925, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp 172.)

    “New Companies – The American Mausoleum Co. of Macomb, Ill., $60,000; W. E. Dudman, George E. Bayne and P. E. Elting. To build mausoleums and sell crypts in same.”

  • Macomb, Illinois - Richter & Doland (partnership dissolution) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. The partnership heretofore existing between Chas. S. Richter and Orrin D. Doland has been dissolved. Chas. A. Richter will continue the business at Springfield, Ill., and Mr. Doland will continue the branch at Macomb Ill., having bought same of the firm of Richter & Doland.”  

  • Maeystown, Illinois – a Periodic Vertical Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)
  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Marshall, Illinois – the Quality Lime Company Quarry (Limestone & Lime) today a part of Van Tarble and Sons Quarries (present-day company)

    (from the web site)  “Founded in the mid 1930s by near Clarksville, Illinois in Central Illinois, the Van Tarble and Sons Quarries have grown to include The Charleston Stone Company Quarry in Charleston, Illinois and the Quality Lime Company Quarry in Marshall, Illinois.”

  • McCook, Illinois - the McCook-Hodgkins Quarry, presented on the Encyclopedia of Chicago web site.

    According to this article, this quarry and others began operation in the 1880s. The people who worked the quarries were mainly Eastern European immigrants. Stone from these quarries were shipped “on the Illinois & Michigan Canal and later on the Sanitary and Ship Canal.” The article describes the acreage and production of crushed stone that the McCook-Hodgkins Quarry generated. Use the link above to read the detailed article about McCook, Illinois, and the quarries and the people who worked in the quarries.

  • McCook (southwest of) (a western suburbs of Chicago), Illinois – McCook Limestone Quarry (circa 1967) (From Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 26.)

    “U. S. 66. – Half a mile southwest of McCook, in the western suburbs of Chicago, is the McCook limestone quarry that produces stone for concrete aggregate and highway construction. With a capacity of 1,500 tons per hour, and some of the largest and most modern equipment in the Midwest, the quarry is worth a long look as you drive by.”

  • Menard, Illinois – Quarry, Meynard, Ill.  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)

  • Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph) Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph)
  • Menard, Illinois – Rock Crusher, Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill.  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)

  • Rock Crusher, Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph) Rock Crusher, Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph)
  • Menard, Illinois – Quarry, Menard, Ill.  (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)

  • Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph) Quarry, Penitentiary, Menard, Ill. (colorized postcard photograph)
  • Mermet Springs, Illinois – Mermet Springs Quarry in Southern Illinois. 

    This quarry is an 8.5-acre spring-fed stone quarry.   The quarry has 100 foot walls and wooded hills encompassing nearly half of its perimeter.  The sheer walls are not only on the top but can be followed to depths of 120 feet.  This quarry is devoted to diving and dive training. 

  • Millstone Bluff, Illinois - Millstone Quarry.  This site was presented by the Saline County Tourism Board.  (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <
    http://www.shawneetourism.com/scenic.php>

    Millstone Bluff is on the National Historical Registry.  The name came about as the pioneer mills dug the stone for millstones from a small quarry on the Millstone Bluff hill.  You can learn more about Millstone Bluff on the Southernmost Illinois History web site.

  • Mt. Carroll, Illinois - Mt. Carroll Quarry - an Aggregate Quarry of Wendling Quarries, Inc.
  • Mt. Morris, Illinois - Avey's Quarry at Pine Creek(postcard photograph, #1G940' Genuine photograph; C. R. Childs, Photographer, Post cards, Chicago; dated June 14, 1915.)
    Avey's Quarry at Pine Creek in Mt. Morris, Illinois #16940. Genuine Photograph, C. R. Childs, Photograph Post Cards, Chicago Avey's Quarry at Pine Creek
  • Naperville, Illinois – “Old Bridge at Quarry, Naperville, Ill.”  (postcard photograph, No. 38; early 1900s unmailed)
  • Old Bridge at Quarry, Naperville, Ill.” (postcard photograph, #38) “Old Bridge at Quarry, Naperville, Ill.” (postcard photograph, #38)
  • Naplate, Illinois - Sandstone Quarries.  At the stop at Naplate on field trips to the La Salle Anticline - 1993 to 2001, by Ellin Beltz, she notes that there are deep quarry pits visible where sandstone was extracted for the use in the glass making industry and the cemeteries.
  • Nauvoo, Illinois - Nauvoo White Limestone Quarry  (photograph and history).  Stone quarried from the Nauvoo Limestone Quarry was used in the construction of the Nauvoo Illinois Temple in Nauvoo, Illinois. (The link from which this information was obtained in no longer available. This site was presented by JP&G Enterprises.)
    <http://www.cyber-odyssey.com/il/nauvoo/mormon_temple/temple2.htm>
  • North Chicago, Illinois – McKinney-Harrington Company (The following information is an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 113.)

    McKinney-Harrington Company, North Chicago, Illinois

    Portable Overlapping Steel Bucket Elevator

    For handling sand, gravel, crushed stone, bulk lime, coke, ashes, as well as coal. It is designed for easy moving from one job to another, operates effectively from one position over a considerable area and may be adjusted to many angles up and down. Can be used to unload dump bottom cars from door of box car or overside of gondola car. For cuts, further particulars and prices, write: McKinney-Harrington Company, North Chicago, Illinois.

  • Oglesby, Illinois – Tramway at Cement Works in Oglesby, Illinois (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 73.)

    A. Leschen & Sons Rope Co. of St. Louis, MO.

    Branch Offices:

    92 Centre Street, New York, N.Y.

    137 East Lake St., Chicago, Ill.

    85 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal.

    (The photograph caption on this advertisement reads:

    Leschen Co.’s Tramway at Cement Works, Oglesby, Ills.)

  • Ottawa, La Salle, County, Illinois - Buffalo Rock State Park - St. Peter Sandstone in an Old Rock Quarry. To view photographs of the quarry, visit the “Field trips to the La Salle Anticline - 1993 to 2001,” by Ellin Beltz.
  • Ottawa (western edge of), Illinois - the Ottawa Silica Company Sand Facility (circa 1967) (From Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 26.)

    “U.S. 5. - At the western edge of Ottawa is the Ottawa Silica Company silica sand facility - the Nation’s largest - located in the middle of the world-famous St. Peter Sandstone deposits. Here, in a thousand acre tract, are open pits 125 feet deep and 3,000 feet across. The material is processed in two plants at the site, and most of it is shipped by rail to points all over the United States. A wide variety of uses for silica sand have been found. A few uses are: glass manufacture, steel and foundry uses, building refractory brick, sand blasting, oil-well fracturing, abrasives, stone sawing, marble carving, filtration and chemical uses. Plants and pits may be viewed from the highway.”

  • Ottawa, La Salle County, Illinois - Young & Lavell (formerly Parker, Young & Lavell) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. Young & Lavell succeed the firm of Parker, Young & Lavell at Ottawa, Ill.”

  • Paxton, Illinois - Groetzinger & Fitzsimmons (Monument Business) The following information is from The Monumental News, “Trades Notes” section, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 502.

    “The corn crop in the vicinity of Paxton, Ill., never was more promising than at the present time, said Mr. N. Groetzinger, of Groetzinger & Fitzsimmons of that place, while in Chicago last month. Mr. Groetzinger embarked in the monumental business at Paxton less than two years ago and is establishing a very successful trade in monumental and building work. The firm has just completed a contract for about 5000 feet of stone flagging in the business part of the town. The sidewalk is sixteen feet wide and is laid in Bedford flags 8-ox5-oxo-4 sawed on two sides. The walks are a credit to the town and to the contractors and are proving to be of mutual benefit to all concerned.”

  • Peoria, Illinois – the Peoria Steam Marble Works Mantel Parlors (Advertisement) The following text was taken from a Victorian trade card:

    Peoria Steam Marble Works Mantel Parlors

    Marble, Wood & Slate Mantels, Tiles, Grates, Mantel Trimmings of every description

    H. A. Farley, Dept. Manager

    No. 203 S. Jefferson Ave., Peoria, Illinois

  • Peoria, Illinois – Peoria Steam Marble Works (Business Card) 

    Peoria Steam Marble Works, Peoria, Illinois, early business card (front) Peoria Steam Marble Works, Peoria, Illinois, early business card (back)

    (front of card)

    (back of card)

    (Below is a transcription of both sides of the business card shown above.)

Peoria Steam Marble Works
Mantel Parlors
Marble, Wood and Slate Mantels, Tile, Grates and Mantel Trimmings of every description
No. 420 Main Street, Peoria, Ills. – H. A. Farley, Dept. Manager.

(other side of card)
Henry Sandmeyer, Sr., Pres’t. – Chas. H. Isele, Vice Pres’t.
Geo. Ebeling, Sec’y and Treas.

Peoria Steam Marble Works
Manufacturers of Marble Mantels, Wainscoting, Floor Tile, and Marble Work of Every Description.
Also Sawed or Cut Stone, for cemetery or building purposes, of any variety of material.

Office and Mills:
1800 to 1814 – N. Adams St., Peoria, Ills.

  • Pittsburg, Pennsylvania – West Leechburg Steel & Tin Plate Co. (Steel Sawblades) (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 65.)

    West Leechburg Steel & Tin Plate Co., Pittsburg. Penna.

    Steel Saw Blades - Stone and Marble Saws Carefully Straightened and Cut Square and True.

    Prompt Shipment. Ordinary Sizes Constantly on hand. - Inquiries Solicited.

  • Polo (near), Ogle County, Illinois – old Limestone Quarry & pieces of an old Lime Kiln (Limestone & Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)
  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Pontiac, Illinois – the J. G. Mott Granite Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine, Vol. XI, No. 6, November, 1895, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. vii.)

    The J. G. Mott Granite Co.  

    Polished Granite Columns, of Red or Gray Granite.

    Manufactured By J. G. Mott Granite Co., Pontiac, Ill.

    Our Lathes turn out Columns of any dimensions not exceeding four feet in diameter and twenty feet in length. Mention STONE when writing for prices.

  • Pontiac, Illinois - J. G. Mott Granite Co. The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Removals. J. G. Mott Granite Co. have removed from Joliet to Pontiac, Ill.”

  • Pontiac, Illinois – J. G. Mott Granite Co. (The following information is from an advertisement in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 5.)

    J. G. Mott Granite Co., Pontiac, Ills.

    Polished Granite Columns of Red or Gray Granite.

    Manufactured by…J. G. Mott Granite Co., Pontiac, Ills.

    Our Lathes turn out Columns of any dimensions not exceeding four feet in diameter and twenty feet in length. Mention STONE when writing for prices.

  • Pontiac, Illinois – Pontiac Granite Co. Monument Yard (color postcard photograph, No. 3831B; L.L. Cook Co.; L.L. Cook Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin; mid-1900s; unmailed)
  • Pontiac Granite Co. Monument Yard, Pontiac, Illinois (color postcard photograph, #3831B) Pontiac Granite Co. Monument Yard, Pontiac, Illinois (color postcard photograph, #3831B)
  • Port Byron, Illinois – old Vertical Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)
  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Port Byron, Illinois - Silurian Dolomite in Port Byron, Illinois: A Comparison of Two Local Quarries,” by Beth Johnson, Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois.
  • Rochelle, Illinois – Braiden’s Stone Quarry (colorized postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Braiden’s Stone Quarry,” Rochelle, Illinois (postcard photograph) “Braiden’s Stone Quarry,” Rochelle, Illinois (postcard photograph)
  • Rochelle, Illinois – Old Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.  (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Old Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.” (postcard photograph) “Old Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.” (postcard photograph)
  • Rochelle, Illinois – “The Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.” (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • The Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.” (postcard photograph) “The Quarry, Rochelle, Ill.” (postcard photograph)
  • Rochelle, Illinois – the Geo. D. Whitcomb Company (Whitcomb Gasoline Locomotive) (The following information is from an advertisement in Pit and Quarry: Sand – Gravel – Stone, magazine, December 1921, pp. 10.)

    Geo. D. Whitcomb Company, Rochelle, Illinois

    There is a Whitcomb Gasoline Locomotive built for every service

    Mining – Quarrying – Road Building - Let Us Work Out Your Problem

    Sizes 3 to 25 Tons

  • Rockford, Illinois - Abandoned Quarries along Trail in Southern Trail, Rock Cut State Park, presented on the Illinois Bike Trail Information web site. (Scroll down to entry.) This entry indicates that the abandoned quarries found along this trail were operated by the railroads.
  • Rockford, Illinois – Air Brush Manufacturing Co. (The following advertisement is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 480.)

    The Air Brush Mfg. Co., 145 Nassau St., Rockford, Ill.

    The Air Brush Mfg. Co. are doing business at the old stand making and selling the best Art Tool in use. Applies color by jet of air, enabling artist to do the best work and save time. No designing outfit complete without it. Description and Prices Free. (Caption under logo: Air Brush Trade Mark - Registered.)

  • Romeoville, Illinois - Quarries.  This site is presented by the village of Romeoville.  In their “History” section, it is noted that from the 1830s to the early 1900s, quarries and farms were the mainstay of the economy of Romeoville.
  • Savanna (near), Illinois – Stone Quarry near Savanna, Ill.  (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Stone Quary near Savanna, Ill.” (postcard photograph) “Stone Quary near Savanna, Ill.” (postcard photograph)
  • South Elgin, Illinois - the Fox River Stone Company - Reclaimed Limestone Quarry (present-day company) Photographs of the quarry available on the Mineral Information Institute web site.
  • Springfield, Illinois - Richter & Doland (partnership dissolution) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Trade Changes. The partnership heretofore existing between Chas. S. Richter and Orrin D. Doland has been dissolved. Chas. A. Richter will continue the business at Springfield, Ill., and Mr. Doland will continue the branch at Macomb Ill., having bought same of the firm of Richter & Doland.”

  • Stark County, Illinois - Building Stone.  This material is presented on the Stark County, Illinois, GenWeb Project page, Lori L. Laird, County Coordinator.  Valley Township History, Compliments of Auten & Auten, Bankers, Princeville, Ill., and Monica, Ill., November, 1906, Partly taken from “History of Stark County” (M. A. Leeson & Co., Chicago 1887), Submitted by Lori L. Laird.  (The following quote is used with the permission of Lori L. Laird.)
    “All of the building stone in this region was procured at this time from what is now Fred Streitmatter's 'Chase eighty,' a half mile south in Akron Township. Philander Chase needed considerable stone, and not wishing to take from this quarry without knowing to whom the land belonged, hunted up the owners and bought the eighty-acre tract in question. Having thus assured himself of a supply of building material, which was scarce in those days, he built his residence, that now owned by John Nickolls, of this material.  In 1854 he gave forty acres of land to the Episcopalian church, and with money donated in different localities and the East, started to build the stone church which stands yet, near the southeast corner of Section 31. This building was never finished because of lack of encouragement, and partly because Mr. Chase realizing the need of good schools for his children, moved about that time to Wyoming.”
  • Sterling, Illinois – the Northwestern Stone Quarry (The following information is from the section “Quarrying” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No. 1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 59.)

    Northwestern Stone Quarry

    A. C. Stanley, R. L. Leitch and A. S. Goodell have purchased the interests of H. A. Neer and John Grady, in the Northwestern Stone Quarry, at Sterling, Illinois. The new proprietors have begun operations.

  • Sullivan, Illinois – Moultrie County Marble Works – Fred Sona, Proprietor   (Business Card, established in 1876)

    Fred Sona, Proprietor of the Moultrie County Marble Works, Sullivan Illinois (business card) Fred Sona, Proprietor of the Moultrie County Marble Works, Sullivan Illinois (business card)

    Fred Sona,
    Proprietor of the Moultrie County Marble Works
    East Side of Square, Sullivan, Ill.
    Dealer in Monuments, Corner Stones and Burial Vaults

    Established 1876 – Our Motto:  Good Lettering

  • Sumner, Illinois – the H. M. Wagner Marble Works (postcard photographic image contributed by one of the visitors to our web site; early 1900s; unmailed)
  • Sumner Marble Works of H. M. Wagner, Sumner, Illinois, 1900”  (postcard photographic image contributed by one of the visitors to our web site) H. M. Wagner Marble Works, Sumner, Illinois (postcard photographic image)
  • Sycamore, Illinois - Elmer Larson, LLC., Sycamore, Illinois (present-day company) (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.elmerlarsonllc.com/columns.html>
    • Elmer Larson, LLC, Company History

      (From the web site) “…Elmer Larson began the company over sixty-five years ago, by operating mobile crushing plants that went to job sites, located limestone and/or gravel deposits nearby, and then processed the material for use on the project. Sears Quarry began the operation in the late 1940’s….”

    • Sycamore, Illinois - the Elmer Larson Quarry - “The Geology of the Elmer Larson Quarry” (Limestone), 15622 Barber Greene Road, Sycamore, Illinois, presented by Northern Illinois University. (photographs and history)
  • Thornton, Illinois - Thornton Quarry
    • History of Thornton and Thornton Quarry in the digital article “Sometimes There Just Aren't Enough Rocks,” by Dan Veronie, Thornwood High School, South Holland, Illinois, History/April 2000, presented on the Illinois Periodicals Online (IPO) web site, Illinois Parks and Recreation. Photographs presented on this page include the Thornton plant where the rock is processed and the quarry pits at Thornton.
    • The Silurian Reef at Thornton, Illinois, by Donald G. Mikulic, presented by the Geological Society of American.
    • “Silurian Reef at Thornton, Illinois” - The Virtual Reef.  (present-day company) (The link is no longer available.)
      <http://www.mpm.edu/reef/thornton-front.html8>
      This site is presented by the Milwaukee Public Museum, Inc. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  This site includes many photographs.  Thornton Quarry is operated by the Material Service Corporation, which produces aggregates and other stone products.  The Thornton Quarry is actually three large quarries connected by tunnels.  If you would like to learn more about the Material Service Corporation, today the leading producer of aggregate materials in the Chicago area, and the company history, click here.
    • Thornton (near Chicago), Illinois - Thornton Limestone Quarry (Material Service, Division of General Dynamics Corp. in 1967) (From Mining and Mineral Operations in the United States: A Visitor’s Guide, by Staff, Bureau of Mines, Area Mineral Resource Offices, U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 1967, pp. 26.)

      “Interstate 80-294. - The Thornton Quarry of the Material Service, Division of General Dynamics Corp., in the town of Thornton, near Chicago, was the largest producing limestone quarry in Illinois in 1964, and the largest commercial quarry in the Nation. The quarry produces limestone for use in the manufacture of dead-burned dolomite and lime, and for use as road-stone, concrete aggregate, and agricultural lime. Interstate 294 crosses and divides the quarry into two sections.”

    • Thornton Limestone Quarry – “Thornton Quarry Rocks ISGS staff from GeoNews Online by the Illinois State Geological Survey, July 1997.
    • Thornton Quarry, by Carly Herweck Brookwood Junior High School, Glenwood, 2002.
    • Thornton Quarry Field Trips - 1993 to 2001, by Ellin Beltz
    • Virtual Silurian Reef: Silurian Reef at Thornton, Illinois (history and photographs), presented by the Milwaukee Public Museum, Inc.
  • Union County, Illinois - the Jonesboro Quarry Company Limestone Aggregate Quarry (present-day company). This quarry was mentioned in “The Mineral Industry of Illinois,” presented by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Office of Mines and Minerals.
  • Urbana, Illinois – C. N. Clark, Co. (Monument Dealer) (Excerpts from “Motor Truck in the Monument Business: What Retail Monument Dealers Think of the Efficiency of Motor Transportation for Memorial Work,” article in Granite Marble & Bronze, Vol. XXXI, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 32-33d.)

    “A short time ago Granite Marble & Bronze sent out a questionnaire to thousands of retail monument dealers throughout the country for information regarding the part the motor truck plays in the retail monument business….”

    “Of course, the real interest in connection with this digest is in quoting what the dealers have to say about the subject, for the sayings are many and various….”

    C. N. Clark, Co., Urbana, Ill.:

    “‘The motor truck, in our estimation, has advanced the retail monument business at least 50 per cent. We have a Nash two-ton truck, and with them can do twice as much work as with teams. We use solid tires because we think they are better and surer.’”

  • Valley City, Pike County, Illinois – the Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln (Lime), presented on Wikipedia.

    The History of the Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln

  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of the best-preserved periodic lime kilns found in the U.S. state of Illinois. When it was built is unknown but it has been established that it is likely it was constructed in the mid-1850s.  Local traditions hold that the Griggsville Landing kiln was used by English stonemason William Hobson.  It is said Hobson used the kiln in conjunction with the construction of homes, barns and stone arch bridges in the area during the 19th century.”

  • Valmeyer, Illinois - Abandoned Limestone Quarry.  This is a report on the town of Valmeyer by the Village Administrator.  There is a small section that indicates that there was an “abandoned limestone quarry near the new town.”  No further description is given. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.sustainable.doe.gov/freshstart/case/valmeyer.htm>
  • Village of Valmeyer, Monroe County, Illinois - Former Limestone Quarry, from The Mineral Industry of Illinois, 2002, presented by the Illinois State Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey (with map). (U. S. Geological Survey Minerals Yearbook) [PDF]
  • The underground limestone quarry/mine which was located in the Village of Valmeyer, south of St. Louis, “was converted into a business complex with nearly $3.5 million in grants from State and Federal sources.”

  • Villa Ridge, Illinois - D. L. Winans / Kurzdorfer & Co. (sale) The following information is from The Monumental News, August, 1895, Vol. 7, No. 8, Chicago, Illinois, pp. 521.

    “Sold Out. The stock of the late D. L. Winans of Villa Ridge, Ill., has been bought by Kurzdorfer & Co. of Cairo.”

  • Wedron, Illinois - Stone Quarry at Wedron, Illinois  (postcard photograph; early 1900s; unmailed)

  • Stone Quarry (?) at Wedron, Illinois (postcard photograph) Stone Quarry (?) at Wedron, Illinois (postcard photograph)
  • Will County, Illinois – old Limestone Quarry & pieces of an old Lime Kiln (Lime)  (The quotation below is from the “Other Lime Kilns” section of the “Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln” article on Wikipedia.)
  • “The Griggsville Landing Lime Kiln is one of only a few old lime kilns preserved across the state of Illinois. Some examples can be found in such places as, Maeystown, where a periodic vertical kiln remains, Kankakee River State Park in Will County, where pieces of an old lime kiln lie in an old limestone quarry. Other kilns can be found in Ogle County, near Polo, where a stone kiln remains, a poorly preserved vertical kiln in Port Byron and a well-preserved kiln in Cordova, Illinois.”

  • Wilmington, Illinois - John Augustine, Marble Worker and Carver - Monuments and Tombstones (late 1800s) (To view the photographs of cemetery stones patterns that John Augustine made available to his customers, see: John Augustine, Marble Worker and Carver - Monuments and Tombstones in the Illinois state “Stone Carvers/Stone Cutters/Monument Dealers in Illinois” section.)

    Business card reads:

    “John Augustine, Marble Worker and Carver - Monuments and Tombstones, I respectfully solicit a share of your patronage, Wilmington Illinois”

  • Wilmington, Illinois - Summers & Schiffmann (business card)

    Walt Summers - Alex. Schiffman

    Summers & Schiffman,

    Dealers in Foreign and American Marble and Granite Monuments,

    And Every Variety of Stone Work including Caps, Sills, Flagging and Water Table,

    Corner of Jackson & Main Sts.

    Wilmington, Illinois

    Presented by Alex. Schiffman

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