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Geology Resources - Idaho


Research Resources - Idaho


The Idaho Stone Industry

  • 1882 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry in 1882 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1882, J. S. Powell, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1883. Excerpts from the chapters on 1) "Structural Materials" and 2) "The Useful Minerals of the United States."
  • 1883 and 1884 - The Idaho Stone Industry, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Years 1883 and 1884 (PDF images of sections), Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1885.
  • 1885 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry in 1885 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1885 (PDF images of sections), David T. Day, Geologist, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1887. Excerpt from the chapter on "Structural Materials," by H. S. Sproull.
  • 1886 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1886 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1886 (PDF images of sections), David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1887. Excerpts from the chapter on "Structural Materials," by William C. Day.
    • The Idaho Sandstone Industry in the Mid-1890s
      • Idaho.-The output of sandstone in Idaho exceeded that of the census year, but the industry does not yet cut much of a figure. The produce is confined to Ada County.
    • The Idaho Limestone Industry in the Mid-1890s
      • Idaho.-A little limestone was converted into $5,315 worth of lime in Kootenai, Bingham, Alturas, and Fremont counties.
  • 1887 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1887, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1887 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1888
  • 1888 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1888, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1888 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1890
  • 1889 and 1890 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1889, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1889 and 1890 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1892
  • 1891 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1891, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1891 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1893
  • 1892 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1892, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1892 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1893
  • 1893 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1893, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1893 (PDF images of sections), J. W. Powell, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining Statistics and Technology, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1894
  • 1894 - Idaho Stone Industry in 1894 (transcription), Excepts from the Sixteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey, Part IV.-Mineral Resources of the United States, 1894, Nonmetallic Products (PDF images of sections). Chapter on "Stone," by William C. Day. (Click here if you wish to read the entire chapter on "Stone.")
  • 1895 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1895, Excerpts from Seventeenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part III. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1895, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1896.
  • 1896 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1896, Excerpts from Eighteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part V. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1896, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1897.
  • 1897 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1897, Excerpts from Nineteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part V. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1896, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1898.
  • 1898 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1898, Excerpts from Twentieth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part VI. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1898, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal and Coke. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1899.
  • 1899 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1899, Excerpts from Twenty-first Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey (PDF images of sections), Part VI. Mineral Resources of the United States, 1899, Nonmetallic Products, Except Coal and Coke. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1901.
  • 1900 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1900, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1900 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining and Mineral Resources, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1901
  • 1901 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1901, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1901 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, David T. Day, Chief of Division of Mining and Mineral Resources, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1902
  • 1902 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1902, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1902 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1904.
  • 1903 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1903, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1903 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1904.
  • 1904 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1904, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1904 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1905.
  • 1905 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1905, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1905 (PDF images of sections), Charles D. Walcott, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1906.
  • 1906 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1906, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States - Calendar Year 1906 (PDF images of sections), George Otis Smith, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1907.
  • 1907 - The Idaho Stone and Building Industry, 1907, Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1907 (PDF images of sections), Part II.  Nonmetallic Products, George Otis Smith, Director, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey,  Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1908.
  • 1908 - The Idaho Stone Industry, 1908 (transcription), Excerpts from Mineral Resources of the United States, Calendar Year 1908, Part II - Nonmetallic Products (PDF images of sections), Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1909. Excerpts from the book are from the chapter on "Stone," by A. T. Coons.
  • 1994 through 2006– The Mineral Industry of Idaho – United States Geological Survey (1994 through 2006)(Scroll down to the “Publications” section.)
  • Map - Custer and Lemhi Counties, Idaho - Outline Map of Custer and Lemhi Counties, Idaho, showing quarries and prospects at which stone was examined.
    Figure 28. (From Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used As Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley, Idaho, Bulletin 811-E, 1929.) Outline Map of Custer and Lemhi Counties, Idaho
  • Idaho and Western Montana - “Inventory of Mines and Mining-Related Facilities in Idaho and Western Montana Active from 1997 Through 2000,” by Gregory T. Spanski, Open File Report 01-129. “This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.” 2001, U. S Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey. [PDF]
  • Idaho Economic Census - Mining - 1997, issued May 2000, Geographic Area Series, presented by the U. S. Census Bureau, Department of Conservation [PDF]
  • Idaho - “Mining and Exploration in Idaho, 2002,” by Virginia S. Gillerman and Earl H. Bennett, Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
  • “Idaho Mining and Exploration, 2003,” Virginia S. Gillerman and Earl H. Bennett, Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
  • “Idaho Mining and Exploration, 2004,” Virginia S. Gillerman, Earl H. Bennett, and Michael J. Weaver, Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
  • “Idaho Mining and Geology,” Prepared by Virginia S. Gillerman, GeoNote 40, Idaho Geological Survey [PDF]
  • Idaho Mining Association
  • Idaho Quartzite (photograph and history), presented on the Digital Atlas of Idaho web site.

    Quartzite, a metamorphic rock, is quarried in Idaho in the City of Rocks area. It is known under the trade name of “Oakley Stone.” The quarries from which it originates are located on the west flank of Middle Mountain.

  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1994, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production In Idaho (Table 1), pp. 77.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 1993, By Use (Table 2), pp. 78.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 3), pp. 79.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1995, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production In Idaho (Table 1), pp. 1.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers In 1994, By Use (Table 2), pp. 3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 3), pp. 4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 1994, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 4.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1996, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 1995, By Use (Table 2), pp. 4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 3), pp. 4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold Or Used in 1995, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1997, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers In 1996, By Use (Table 3), pp. 5.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand And Gravel Sold or Used In 1996, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 6.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1998, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 1997, By Use (Table 3), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers In 1997, By Use and District (Table 4), pp. 14.5.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 1997, By Major Use Category (Table 5), pp. 14.5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 1999, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production In Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers In 1998, By Use (Table 3), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used In 1998, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 14.5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 2000, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 1999, By Use (Table 3), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 1999, By Major Use Category (Table 4, pp. 14.5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 2001, U. S. Geological Survey Minerals Yearbook 2001, Idaho Geological Survey and the U. S. Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Idaho Minerals - Major Producing Areas (Map)
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 2000, By Use (Table 3) on pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 2000, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 14.5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 2002, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Idaho Minerals - Major Producing Areas (Map)
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 2001, By Use (Table 3), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 2001, By Major Use Category (Table 4), pp. 14.5.
  • Mineral Industry of Idaho, 2003, U. S. Geological Survey and Idaho Geological Survey. [PDF]
    • Idaho Minerals - Major Producing Areas (Map)
    • Nonfuel Raw Mineral Production in Idaho (Table 1), pp. 14.3.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used, By Kind (Table 2), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Crushed Stone Sold or Used By Producers in 2002, By Use (Table 3), pp. 14.4.
    • Idaho: Construction Sand and Gravel Sold or Used in 2002, By Major Use (Table 4), pp. 14.5.
  • Digital Atlas of Idaho
  • Digital Atlas of Idaho

  • Digital Mines of Idaho, presented by DigitalAtlas.
  • Digital Database of Selected Aggregate and Related Resources in Ada, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, Gem, and Owyhee Counties, Southwestern Idaho (1934-2003), Open-File Report 2004-1067, P. R. Moyle, J. C. Wallis, J. D. Bliss, and K. S. Bolm, 2004, U. S. Geological Survey.
  • Dimension Stone in Idaho - Travertine Quarries. Travertine quarries were in production about 1994 in Idaho. Idaho Travertine, Inc. of Idaho Falls was operating two travertine quarries in southeast Idaho about 1994. The main deposit was at Swann Valley, Idaho, which is a boulder quarry. (From Industrial Minerals and Rocks, senior editor, Donald D. Carr; associate editors, A. Frank Alsobrook, [et al.] 6th ed., Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Littleton, Colorado, 1994, pg. 28.) This book is presented on the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) web site.
  • "Dimension Stone," Principal Deposits of Industrial Minerals of Idaho, T. R. Neumann, Bureau of Mines Special Report, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1991.
  • A Guidebook to Mining In America: Volume 1: West (The Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and farther West), by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000," available at Stonerose Publishing Company.
  • Idaho Mines, presented by Digital Atlas.
  • Idaho Mining Association

  • The Northwest Mining Association

    (from the web site) “Northwest Mining Association (NWMA) is a 113-year-old, 1,800 member non-profit, non-partisan trade association founded in Spokane, Washington during the early years of the Coeur d’Alene Mining District. We were soon supporting the mining industry throughout the states of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, the provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, and the Yukon and Northwest Territories.”

  • Table Rock Sandstone Graces Boise. (This information is no longer available on this web site.)
    <http://www.idahostatesman.com/discover/living/statecapitol.htm>

    Table Rock sandstone was quarried in the Boise foothills at Table Rock for use in the construction of the Idaho State Capitol. This sandstone was also used in the construction of over a hundred homes and several buildings in Boise. Reportedly, the sandstone is evenly grained, dense, and uniform like limestone.

  • Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley - Idaho: Bulletin 811-E, by Charles H. Behre, Jr., United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1929. The link in this entry takes you to an excerpt from the above book on the building stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley area of Idaho. There are photographs included.
  • Who Owns the West? - Who Owns Idaho?, presented by the Environmental Working Group on their Who Owns the West? web site.

Printed and Online Sources

  • Google Book Search: You can use Google Book Search to search for specific subjects in thousands of books available through the Google Book Search - both books under copyright and in the public domain. Hundreds of books are added regularly, so check back if you do not find books on the subject for which you are seeking information.
  • Bayhorse Area, Custer County, Idaho S-99-8 (Mining History), prepared by the Idaho Geological Survey in the Mine History section.
  • Building Idaho: An Architectural History, by Jennifer Eastman Attebury, University of Idaho Press, Moscow, Idaho, 1991.
  • Custer Area, Custer County, Idaho S-99-7 (Mining History), prepared by the Idaho Geological Survey in the Mine History section.
  • A Geologic Reconnaissance in Northern Idaho and Northwestern Montana, Bulletin 384, by F. C. Calkins, United States Geological Survey, Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1909, 112 pp.
  • A Guidebook to Mining In America: Volume 1: West (The Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and farther West), by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000, available at Stonerose Publishing Company.
  • Idaho: A Student’s Guide to Localized History, by Merle W. Wells, Teacher’s College, Columbia University, Bureau of Publication, New York, 1965, 28 pp. (Localized history series)
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • Mineral and Water Resources of Idaho, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology Special Report 1, 1964, 335 pp.
  • Mining History of South Central Idaho, by Clyde P. Ross, Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology Pamphlet 131, 1963, 29 pp.
  • The National Register of Historic Places in Idaho (booklet), compiled by Belinda Davis and Ann Swanson, Idaho Historical Society [PDF].
  • Natural Resources of Idaho, by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1965, 72 pp.
  • Roadside Geology of Idaho, by David Alt and Donald W. Hyndman, Mountain Press Publishing Company, Incorporated, September 1989. Paperback, 403 pp., ISBN: 0878422196.
  • Rocks, Rails & Trails: The Geology, Geography, & History of Eastern Idaho, by Paul Karl Link and E. Chilton Phoenix, Idaho State University Press, Pocatello, Idaho, 1994, 194 pp
  • Rush to Idaho, Bulletin 19, by Merle W. Wells, Idaho Bureau of Mines and Geology, Moscow, Idaho, 1961, 57 pp.
  • The Technology of Marble Quarrying, U. S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 106, by Oliver Bowles, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1916.
  • Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley - Idaho: Bulletin 811-E, by Charles H. Behre, Jr., United States Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1929.

Structures and Monuments in Which Idaho Stone was Used

  • Finished Products from Idaho Stone in Colorado
  • Finished Products from Idaho Stone in Idaho
    • Boise, Idaho - the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial (photographs and history) The below information was originally obtained from the “Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial” section of the Idaho Rights Education Center web site. The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available. You can read more about the memorial in the travel article entitled, “Idaho Remembers Anne,” by Tim Tugend on the JewishJournal.com web site.
      <http://www.idaho-humanrights.org/Memorial/memorial.html>

      It is stated in the article, “Land Matters,” from December’s Landscape Architecture Magazine, that the engraved tablets that are a part of the memorial are made of Idaho sandstone.

    • Boise, Idaho - the Belgravia Building in Old Boise. The following information was from Mortimer’s web site. (The link from which the information below was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.mortimersidaho.com/boiserestaurant/2restaurant.shtml>

      The Belgravia Building was constructed of sandstone quarried from nearby Table Rock in 1904. It was originally the first apartment building in Boise, but today the building houses an art gallery, offices, salons, and Mortimer’s Restaurant.

    • Boise, Idaho - Kathryn Albertson Park (photographs). The following information was obtained from the City of Boise web site.

      The site indicates that Boise sandstone was used throughout the park except for the inlaid floor of The Rookery, which are “small, reddish granite stones imported from Germany.” Sandstone was also used in the sandstone fountains, The Eirie, and the stone benches.

    • Boise, Idaho - Sandstone Buildings in Old Boise.

      According to Yahoo Travel, there is a collection of sandstone buildings in Old Boise that date from the late 1800s.

    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the old Assay Office at 210 Main Street (history) (The link below from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.idahostatesman.com/discover/living/statecapitol.htm>

      Table Rock sandstone, quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of the old Assay office. Please click on the title of this entry to go to the Idaho State Historical Society web site which presents the some photographs and the history of the Assay Office.

    • Boise, Idaho - the Boise Depot.

      The Boise Depot was constructed with Boise Sandstone from the original quarry at the Old Penitentiary. Click here to see a photograph and historical information on the Boise Depot. (The above link is presented on the Great Railroad Stations web site by John C. Dahl.)

    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the Boise Children's Home (The link from which the information below was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.idahoheritage.org/slideshow.php3?idnum=12>

      Table Rock sandstone quarried on Table Rock, east of Boise, was used in the construction of the Boise Children's Home. (This link is presented on the Independent School District of Boise City web site.)

    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the Bown House This link was presented on the Independent School District of Boise City web site. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.sd01.k12.id.us/schools/riverside/rivbown.html>

      Joseph and Temperance Bown built their two-story sandstone house near their log house in 1879. The sandstone blocks used in the Bown House "were hauled from Table Rock Quarry, located north of the house across the Boise River. The house is built in classic Italian style, with 20 inch sandstone walls."

    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - Idaho State Penitentiary, presented by the Idaho Historical Society. (photographs and history). The State Penitentiary was constructed with hand-cut Idaho sandstone.
      • Picture Gallery
    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - St. John's Cathedral (history). Table Rock Sandstone, quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of St. John's Cathedral. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.idahostatesman.com/discover/living/statecapitol.htm>
    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - St. Michael's Cathedral. Table Rock Sandstone, quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of St. Michael's Cathedral. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.smec.org/smec/history.html>
    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the State Capitol (photographs and history). Most of the external construction material was sandstone from a quarry on Table Rock, east of Boise, which the state purchased for use in building the capitol building. For the interior, four types of marble were used: Red marble from Georgia, gray from Alaska, green from Vermont, and the black marble is from Italy. (The link from which the above information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www2.state.id.us/gov/fyi/tour/>
      • Boise, Idaho - the State Capitol, Boise, Idaho (colorized postcard photograph, #325; Photo by Wesley Andrews Co., Portland, Oregon; 7A-H61; "C. T. Art - Colortone" Reg. U. S. Pat. Office; early 1900s; unmailed.) Sandstone quarried at the state-owned Tablerock east of Boise, was used in the facing of the outside walls. Convict labor was used to quarry and transport the sandstone blocks. Some of these blocks weighed as much as ten tons. The Shape of the sandstone blocks on the first floor was built to resemble logs in order to give the appearance of a log cabin.
    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - Temple Ahavath Beth Israel at 11th and State Street (history). Table Rock sandstone, quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of the Temple. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.) <http://www.idahostatesman.com/discover/living/statecapitol.htm>
    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the Union Block Building at 714 W. Idaho Street. Table Rock sandstone, quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of the Union Block Building. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.idahostatesman.com/discover/living/statecapitol.htm>
    • Boise, Idaho - the State Capitol, Boise, Idaho. Sandstone quarried at the state-owned Tablerock east of Boise, was used in the facing of the outside walls. Convict labor was used to quarry and transport the sandstone blocks. Some of these blocks weighed as much as ten tons. The Shape of the sandstone blocks on the first floor was built to resemble logs in order to give the appearance of a log cabin.
      (colorized postcard photograph, #325; Photo by Wesley Andrews Co., Portland, Oregon; 7A-H61; "C. T. Art - Colortone" Reg. U. S. Pat. Office; early 1900s; unmailed.) Colorized postcard showing the Idaho State Capitol in the early 1900's
    • Boise, Idaho - the U. S. Post Office/Federal Building, 304 North Eighth Street, Boise, Indiana.. The following information was taken from “Historic Federal Buildings” section of the U. S. General Services web site.

      Federal Building/U.S. Post Office, 304 North Eighth Street, Boise, ID 83702
      Architect: Taylor, James Knox, Sup. Architect
      Constructed: 1898 - 1905; Nat'l Register ID #: 76000663; GSA Building #: ID0002ZZ

      Plans for the building were accepted in 1901, and the style is given as Second Renaissance Revival style. Construction by Campbell and Company of Boise began in 1902 and by 1905 the building was partially completed. Boise Sandstone was used for the basement and first floor as cladding, and the upper floors were of terra cotta. Jellison Brothers supplied the Boise Sandstone from a nearby quarry.

    • Caldwell, Idaho - Albertson College of Idaho in Caldwell - Strahorn Hall (photograph and) (history)

      Sandstone from Table Rock Sandstone Quarry near Boise, Idaho, was used in the construction of Strahorn Hall.

    • Challis, Custer County, Idaho - Earthquake Rocks Idaho (in 1983) (history) (From the Post Register October 28, 1983, Idaho Falls, Idaho). (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.seis.utah.edu/NEHRP_HTM/1983bora/n1983bo3.htm>

      The upper story of one of the oldest buildings in Challis on Main Street collapsed after an earthquake killing several. The Challis Maintenance Supervisor said that the rocks were from an old rock quarry in Challis dug to build many of the town's first buildings.

    • Challis, Idaho - These photographs come from Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley, Idaho,Bulletin 311-E, 1929.
      A. Schoolhouse, Chalis Idaho. This building, erected in 1922, is of rough-dressed white tuff from the quarry at Challis. Schoolhouse, Chalis Idaho
      B. Corner of McGowan's Store, Challis. This view illustrates the use of Chisel-dressed tuff from Challis. The rock shows weathering where permeated by capillary rise of water from the ground. Corner of McGowan's Store, Challis
    • Franklin, Idaho - Sandstone Quarry northeast of Franklin. Stone from this quarry was used in the construction of the LDS Temple in Logan, Utah, for the water tables, caps, and window ledges.
    • Idaho Falls, Booneville County, Idaho - First Presbyterian Church. The four columns used here were quarried from the Boise sandstone quarry and transported over 300 miles of unpaved roads. The columns were the largest ever taken from the quarry.
    • Jerome County, Idaho - the Jacob B. Van Wagener Barn (photograph) included in The National Register of Historic Places in Idaho (booklet), compiled by Belinda Davis and Ann Swanson, Idaho Historical Society [PDF]. Lava rock construction was used in building the barn. This barn was listed in Lava Rock Structures of Central Idaho.
    • Moscow, Idaho - University of Idaho Buildings. The following information is from the University of Idaho Special Collections web site.

      The New Administration Building, located in the center of the main quadrangle. Construction of the new Administration Building began in 1907, completed in 1909. According to the description, the building was constructed in the Gothic style, with “red brick facing with buff colored Boise sandstone trim.” Additions to the building were made in later years.

      Brink Hall, located at Line Street and Idaho Avenue. Boise Sandstone was used for the trim on the building. (The building was originally named the Willis Sweet Hall, and later called the Faculty Office Complex East. It was renamed Carol Ryrie Brink Hall in the early 1980s.)

    • Paris, Bear Lake County, Idaho - the Paris LDS Tabernacle (information) The Mormon Tabernacle was built of red sandstone quarried at Indian Creek on the east side of Bear Lake. The sandstone was snow-sledded 18 miles from the quarry. (Click on the above site and scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the word "Paris" to see a photograph of the tabernacle.)
    • Pocatello, Idaho - Stone Aircraft Hangar & Teaching Building, Idaho State University Campus (photographs and history) The following information was obtain from Bruce Railsback’s web site Buildings and Building Stone.

      According to Bruce Railsback, Idaho sandstone quarried from the mountains above Pocatello was mainly used in the construction of the stone aircraft hanger. The building was originally constructed by the WPA in the late 1930s as a hangar. Today it is used as a teaching building.

    • Preston, Franklin County, Idaho - the Matthias Cowley House (photograph) is included in The National Register of Historic Places in Idaho (booklet), compiled by Belinda Davis and Ann Swanson, Idaho Historical Society [PDF]. The house was constructed of locally quarried sandstone.
    • Preston, Idaho - Oneida State Academy (photographs and history) The information is presented in an article entitled, “Moving a Century Old 1650-ton Stone Building,” by Kelly Hart, Greenhomebuilding.com E-zine #17, February 10, 2004.

      According to this article, the Oneida State Academy was constructed from locally quarried sandstone in 1890. The building was moved from its original location to the City Park.

    • Salmon City, Lemhi County, Idaho - the Lemhi County Courthouse. Sandstone for the Lemhi County Courthouse was obtained from two quarries. The first quarry was "3 miles southwest of the bridge across the River at Salmon, on the road toward the Randolph ranch..." The second quarry was located "about three-quarters of a mile farther south along the same road...The road is about 80 feet from the face (in 1929)." (From Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley, Idaho, 1929)
    • Salmon City, Lemhi County, Idaho - the old Episcopal Church (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.rootsweb.com/~idlemhi/salmon.htm>

      The old Episcopal Church was built in 1903 by Frank Pollard and William O'Connell from stone quarried in the old Shoup quarry west of Salmon. These masons later built the Catholic Church in 1908 from the same stone.

      A. Episcopal Church, Salmon, Idaho - Built of Tertiary sandstone quarried southwest of Salmon. The darkest blocks expose rusted joint faces. (from Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley, Idaho,Bulletin 311-E, 1929.) Episcopal Church, Salmon, Idaho
    • Episcopal Church Photograph, Picture by Debra Landreth Foster, on the City-Data.com web site.
    • Salmon City, Lemhi County, Idaho - Residences on "the Bar." Sandstone for the residences on "the Bar" was obtained from two quarries. The first quarry was "3 miles southwest of the bridge across the River at Salmon, on the road toward the Randolph ranch..." The second quarry was located "about three-quarters of a mile farther south along the same road...The road is about 80 feet from the face (in 1929)." (from Tertiary Volcanic Tuffs and Sandstones Used as Building Stones in the Upper Salmon River Valley, Idaho, 1929)
  • Finished Products from Idaho Stone in Utah
    • Franklin, Idaho - Sandstone Quarry northeast of Franklin. Sandstone from a quarry northeast of Franklin, Idaho, was used in the construction of the LDS Temple in Logan, Utah, for the water tables, caps, and window ledges.
  • Finished Products from Idaho Stone in the State of Washington
    • Spokane, Washington - the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist (history and photograph) The sandstone used on the interior of the cathedral was from Boise, Idaho, while the sandstone used on the exterior was cut at Walker-Wilkerson in the Tacoma, Washington, area. The cathedral was completed in 1929. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.spokane.anglican.org/cathedral.html>
    • Spokane, Washington - St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral, East 127 Twelfth. The following information is from Cornerstones of Spokane: A guidebook to the building stones of downtown Spokane. Text and map are from: McKelvey, G. E.; Bunning, Bonnie B.; Burnet, F. William; Hamilton, Mike; Swanson, Byron, 1981, Cornerstones of Spokane - A guidebook to the building stones of downtown Spokane: Northwest, Mining Association, pp. 10.

      According to this article, the following stones were used in the construction of the cathedral: The exterior of the cathedral is of “grey to tan Walker-Wilkeson Sandstone from sites near Wilkeson not far from Tacoma, Washington.” “Idaho Sandstone” quarried near Boise, Idaho, was used for the Narthex, Nave, Crossing, and Trancepts. Salem limestone quarried from Bedford, Indiana, was used for the All Saints Chapel, Channel, and Sanctuary Recedes at the high altar.

  • Finished Products from Idaho Stone in Washington D.C
    • Washington, D.C. - the Idaho Memorial Stone contributed to the Washington Monument (photograph and history), presented by the National Park Service. The information below is from the National Park Service files and is presented with a photograph of the contributed Idaho stone.

      The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones in placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Idaho Memorial Stone can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

      The Idaho Memorial Stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 5.

      The Washington Monument web site has recently been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument.

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

      The following information relating to the Idaho Memorial Stone can be viewed along with the details in the WAMO Stones Section 5.

      Name: Idaho

      Level: 400-ft.

      Donor: State of Idaho

      Dates: 1928/1928

      Original materials: limestone, lead frame, bronze rosettes

      Dimensions: 2' x 4'

      Sculptor/Carver: Tourtellote and Hummel, Architects

      Original inscription: Idaho MCMXXVIII

      Documented material history:

      • 1928: “The block was shipped from the Bunker Hill Smelter, in Kellogg, Idaho with a bill of lading included on May 7, 1928.... A memorial from the State of Idaho was placed in the wall of the monument at the 400-foot landing on December 12, 1928....” [“Annual Report Director Public Buildings and Parks,” 1929, p. 59; MLK.]

      Additional documented material information: “Designed by Tourtellote and Hummel, Architects, Boise, Idaho, appointed by the Governor. The work was done in part at the Bunker Hill Smelter, Kellogg, Idaho.” [MR]

      Images:

      • 1957 Allen photograph

      • 1974 photograph

      • 1980 photograph

      • 2000 NPS slides

       


Stone Carvers, Stone Cutters, etc., in Idaho

(None available at this time.)

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