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Geology Resources - Iowa

  • Geologic Map of Iowa (1907), Samuel Calvin, State Geologist, from the Fifteenth Annual Report of the Indiana State Geologist, Volume XVII, Iowa Geological Society, Des Moines, Iowa, 1906.
    The map reads as follows:
    "A Geological Map of Iowa showing commercial quarries, lime kilns and Portland Cement plants in Iowa"Map is dated 1907. (Size is 220KB.)
    A Geological Map of Iowa showing commercial quarries, lime kilns and Portland Cement plants in Iowa
  • Iowa State Geological Survey, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • Stone-related publications offered by the Iowa State Geological Survey from A Guidebook to Mining In America:  Volume 2:  East (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and farther East), by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000.
    • The Minerals of Iowa (ES-2, 88p.)
    • Iowa Geology, " An annual non-technical publication, is probably the best of it's kind.  Best of all, back issues are free!.Various other publications cover individual mineral resources."
    • Iowa's Minerals:  Their Occurrence, Origins, Industries, and Lore," by Paul Garvin.
  • Geological Society of Iowa
    • Geological Society of Iowa - Guidebooks.  Following are a few examples of the guidebooks that pertain to Iowa stone quarries:
      • Underburden - Overburden: An examination of Paleozoic and Quaternary Strata at the Conklin Quarry near Iowa City, 1984, GSI-41,  Bunker, B.J. and Hallberg, G.R., 81 pp. 
      • An Excursion to the Historic Gilmore City Quarries, 1989, GSI-50, Woodson, F.J., 41 pp.  (This entry includes a PDF version with a section entitled:  "A Short History of the Quarry Industry at Gilmore City," by Frederick J. Woodson, Department of Geology, University of Iowa.)
      • Virtual Field Trips
    • The Natural History of  Maquoketa Caves State Park, Jackson County, Iowa, GSI 2001 Fall Field Trip.  This field trip includes photographs of the Hurstville Lime Kilns and the Hurstville Quarry that provided the dolostone for the kilns.  The stone quarry was located directly behind the lime kilns on the east side of the North Fork of the Maquoketa River. (The link from which the above information was obtained is no longer available. You can order this booklet from the Iowa Geological Survey – List of Publications.
      <http://www.igsb.uiowa.edu/gsi/fall.01_trip/ftfall.htm>
  • Iowa State Minerals Information (USGS)
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • Minerals of Iowa, by Jean Cutler Prior - Adapted from Iowa Geology 1994, No. 19, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • Geologic Sources of Historic Stone Architecture in Iowa, by Brian J. Witzke.  Adapted from Iowa Geology 1996, No. 21, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • Geology of Iowa:  Iowa's Earth History Shaped by Ice, Wind, Rivers, and Ancient Seas, by Jean Cutler Prior. Adapted from Iowa Geology 1997, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • Geology of the Loess Hills, Iowa (USGS)
  • Iowa Limestone Producers Association
  • Lithograph City - Limestone, by Bill J. Bunker.  Adapted from Iowa Geology 1991, No. 16, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.  This site includes photographs of the Lewis Quarry and the Gable Quarry, both southwest of Osage, Mitchell County, Iowa.
  • National Geologic Map Database, presented by the United States Geologic Survey.
  • U. S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet on Iowa
  • Chalk Cliff - Chalk Cliff on the Sioux river, Plymouth County, Plate LXI.   (From Iowa Geological Survey, Vol. XVII, Fifteenth Annual Report of the Iowa State Geologist, 1906.)
    Chalk Cliff on the Sioux river, Plymouth County. Chalk Cliff on the Sioux river, Plymouth County
  • Forbes Limestone - Exposure of the Forbes limestone near Hawleyville, Page County, Fig. 44.   (From Iowa Geological Survey, Vol. XVII, Fifteenth Annual Report of the Iowa State Geologist, 1906.)
    Exposure of the Forbes limestone near Hawleyville, Page County. Exposure of the Forbes limestone near Hawleyville, Page County

Research Resources - Iowa


The Iowa Stone Industry


Printed & Online Sources

Google Book Search: You can use Google Book Search to search for specific subjects in thousands of books available through the Google Book Search - both books under copyright and in the public domain. Hundreds of books are added regularly, so check back if you do not find books on the subject for which you are seeking information. Some of the books published prior to 1923 are available in their entirety and can be downloaded to you computer for your personal use.

  • Detail Carving for the Iowa’s Soldiers’ Monument,” presented in Charles H. More & Co. advertisements in 1894, Barre, Vermont.  Published in three parts in The Monumental News, July 1894, August 1894, & September 1894
  • Model of the top capital on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument (1894) Reproduction rom the model of the “more or less conventional style of carving shown on the original plans have been changed by the eminent artist Carl Rohlsmith….” (on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument) (1894)

    Model of the top capital on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument

    Reproduction from the model of the “more or less conventional style of carving shown on the original plans have been changed by the eminent artist Carl Rohlsmith….” (on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument)

    Model of the columns of the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument (1894) Section of pediment design (on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument) (1894)

    Model of the columns of the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument

    Section of pediment design (on the Iowa State Soldiers’ Monument)

  • Eleventh Annual Report of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories, Embracing Idaho and Wyoming, Being a report of progress of the exploration for the year 1877, by F. V. Hayden, United States Geologist, United States Geological Survey, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1879.
  • Geologic Sources of Historic Stone Architecture in Iowa, Iowa Department of Natural Resources.
  • A Guidebook to Mining In America:  Volume 2:  East (Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and farther East), by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000," available at Stonerose Publishing Company.
  • Iowa - Geological Survey, Vol. XVII, Annual Report, 1906 With Accompanying Papers. Published for Iowa Geological Survey, Des Moines, Iowa: 1907. Samuel, Calvin, Ph. D., State Geologist. (Chapter on Mineral Production in Iowa for 1906, by S. W. Beyer.)
  • Iowa State Penitentiary Prison Cemetery, Fort Madison, Lee County, Iowa,” by Darie M. Hind Posz, in Association for Gravestone Quarterly, Vol. 31, No. 3, Summer, 2007, pp. 6-8.
  • A Location Guide for Rockhounds, (PDF) Collected by Robert C. Beste, PG, St. Louis, Missouri: Hobbitt Press, 2nd ed., December 1996, 148 pp. (Includes chapters on “Mineral Locations by State,” “Appendix and Glossary,” and “Bibliography.”)
  • Nineteenth Century Mortuary Styles,” by Jason Holm.
  • "Notes on Iowa Building Stones," by H. F. Baine, in Sixteenth Annual Report, Part 4, United States Geological Survey, Washington, D. C., Government Printing Office, 1895, pp. 500-503.
  • The Palimpsest: Quarrying in Iowa, by Charles S. Gwynne and William J. Petersen, published monthly by the State Historical Society of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, May 1957.
  • Physical Properties of Typical American Rocks, by John H. Griffith, publisher: Ames, Iowa., Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1937.
  • Portland Cement Materials Near Dubuque, Iowa,” by Ernest F. Burchard, Contributions to Economic Geology, Bulletin 315, United States Geological Survey, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1907, pp. 225-231. (This book is available on Google Book Search – Full View Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)
  • The Remarkable Crosses of Charles Andera,” by Loren N. Horton, in Markers XIV, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1997. (Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, USA)
  • Surficial Geologic Map of The Greater Omaha Area, Nebraska and Iowa, by Ralph R. Shroba, Theodore R. Brandt, and Jeffrey C. Blossom, Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-2391, U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey. [PDF]
  • The Technology of Marble Quarrying, U. S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 106, by Oliver Bowles, Washington: Government Printing Office, 1916.
  • Tributes in Stone and Lapidary Lapses: Commemorating Black People in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century America,” by Angelika Krüger-Kahloula, in Markers VI: pp. 32-100, Association for Gravestone Studies. (Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, USA)

Stone Carvers, Stone Cutters, etc., in Iowa

  • Charles Andera - “The Remarkable Crosses of Charles Andera,” by Loren N. Horton, in Markers XIV, Association for Gravestone Studies, 1997. (Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, USA)

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