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Structures and Monuments in Which Georgia Stone was Used

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  • Statues and Monuments Recognizing Georgia People and Events
  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone – Unknown Locations
    • Unknown location – the Oglesby Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 25.)

      “The memorial arch so popular as a theme for war monuments offers interesting possibilities for the cemetery memorial and one which has not been generally employed.  The fact that the supporting piers, the arch stone and cap are made of separate pieces contributes a welcome element of economy.  Moreover, arch forms afford the designer an opportunity to create imposing compositions without burdening the site with a heavy mass of stone.  The dimensions may be large but the opening gives a desirable relief and one which often preserves a beautiful vista beyond. 

      The surface enrichment of the ‘Oglesby’ memorial has been confined to panels save for the two sprays which seemingly break through the border at the spandrils of the arch.  The work suggests the effective qualities of Georgia Marble.  The dimensions are:  B base, 11-0x3-8x0-10; base, 9-3x2-1x1-0; piers, 1-4x1-4x4-4; arch stone, 4-10x2-4x1-2; cap, 5-10x2-2; vases, 1-10x1-10x1-6.  The work was erected by G. W. Grant, of Atlanta, Ga., and was executed by the Georgia Marble Finishing Works, Canton, Ga.”

      The Oglesby Memorial. “G. W. Grant, Atlanta, Ga., Contr.” (pp. 29) The Oglesby Memorial of Georgia marble, ca 1921
    • Unknown location – the Willis Brewer Memorial  (from “Types of the Year’s Best Cemetery Monuments:  Many Distinctive Types:  Development of Tablet and Cross Forms” (pdf), from The Monumental News, Vol. XXXIII, No. 1, January 1921, pp. 25-26.)

      “The ‘Willis Brewer’ memorial is a modern adaptation of an interesting type of tomb so common in the churchyards of England and frequently encountered in those old American cemeteries which contain monuments imported from England during the early years of our history.  In design they represent an evolution and fusion of the so-called table tomb and the earlier sarcophagi.  Several very elaborate interpretations of this form have been erected in America in the past few years and the Brewer, while somewhat less decorative, is admirably proportioned and representative of the type.  In the more ornate forms, the mouldings are treated with ornament and the balusters are given strength through the introduction of carvings.  The Brewer memorial was executed in Silver Grey Georgia Marble by the Georgia Marble Company for J. Thorburn, of Montgomery, Ala.  The B base is 12-4x0-11x8-0, the base is 9-8x1-0x5-4; die, 7-4x2-8x4-0; cap, 9-4x0-10x5-0; balusters, 0-6x2-8x0-6.  The ledgers are 8-0x0-8x3-6.

      The Willis Brewer Memorial. “J. Thorburn, Montgomery, Ala., Contr.” (pp. 28) The Willis Brewer Memorial of silver grey Georgia marble, ca. 1921
  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in Alabama
    • Anniston, Alabama – the City Bank and Trust Company (Excerpt from Examples of Bank Work in Georgia Marble (PDF), Georgia Marble Co., pp. 13.)
      City Bank and Trust Company, Anniston, Alabama. Harry N. Austin, Architect. City Bank and Trust Company, Anniston, Alabama
    • Birmingham, Alabama – the Birmingham Post Office (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Birmingham Post Office.

    • Birmingham, Alabama – the Birmingham Trust and Savings Company Building (Excerpt from Examples of Bank Work in Georgia Marble (PDF),Georgia Marble Co., pp. 21.)
      Birmingham Trust and Savings Company Building, Birmingham, Alabama. Miller & Martin, Architects. Birmingham Trust and Savings Company Building, Birmingham, Alabama
    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Caldwell Hotel – the Trimmings & Interior Finish, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 119. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used for the trimmings and the interior finish in the construction of the Caldwell Hotel prior to August 1894.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Oscar Wells Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Oscar Wells Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • Ensley, Alabama – the Bank of Ensley (Excerpt from Examples of Bank Work in Georgia Marble (PDF), Georgia Marble Co., pp. 12.)
      Bank of Ensley, Ensley, Alabama. Recently remodeled and enlarged. Warren, Knight & Davis, Architects. Bank of Ensley, Ensley, Alabama
    • Livingston, Alabama - the Confederate Monument located at the Sumter County Courthouse (history), presented by D. A. Bass-Frazier on her “Along the Old Federal Road” web site.

      The Confederate Monument was presented in 1909, and the monument is constructed of white Georgia marble. An Italian marble statue was placed at the top of the monument. According to this web site, the statue is of a Confederate soldier on picket duty. Marble posts and vases are situated at the entrance. (You can view a photograph of the Confederate Monument on the City of Livingston web site.)

    • Montgomery, Alabama - the First Baptist Church, 305 S. Perry Street (photograph and history), article entitled, “Growing in an Asphalt Garden -First Baptist Church pursues mission with $20 million expansion,” July 2004. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.montgomerychamber.com/publications/pdf/July%2004%20web%20archive.pdf>

      According to this article, the church was constructed of rough-hewn Georgia marble walls and red Italian tiles were used for the domed roof.

    • Vicksburg, Alabama - the 7-Mile Trek Alabama State Memorial. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.nps.gov/vick/scouts/7mile/7_alstm.htm>

      The base of the memorial was constructed from Weiblin grey granite from Elberton City Quarries, Inc., in Elberton, Georgia.

  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in Arkansas
    • Little Rock, Arkansas - the Scroggin Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Scroggin Mausoleum (no cemetery listed)

  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in California
    • Catalina Island - the Wrigley Memorial and Botanical Gardens (photograph and history).

      The monument was built 1933-34. Stone was quarried from Catalina Island and used in the foundation of the monument. Blue flagstone rock for the ramps and terraces originated from Little Harbor, Catalina Island. Marble quarried in Georgia was used inside the tower.

    • Hollywood, California - the Clark Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia Marble was used for the exquisite Clark Mausoleum, Hollywood Cemetery, Los Angeles, California.

      Georgia Marble was used for the exquisite Clark Mausoleum, Hollywood Cemetery, Los Angeles, California
      • Hollywood, California - Hollywood Cemetery - the Mausoleum for W. A. Clark, Jr., Esq. (From Yesterday, Today, and Forever: The Story of Georgia Marble, (PDF) by the Georgia Marble Company, Tate, Georgia. This photograph is used with the permission of the Georgia Marble Company.)
        Mausoleum for W. A. Clark, Jr., Esq., Hollywood Cemetery, Hollywood, California. Entire exterior (of the mausoleum is) of Georgia crystalline Marble, Robert D. Farquhar, Architect. Sculpture in front Pediment by Sherry Fr. Photograph by William M. Clark. Mausoleum for W. A. Clark, Jr., Esq., Hollywood Cemetery, Hollywood, California
    • Irvine, California - the McDonnell Plaza, Tower 17, presented on the Polycor/Georgia Marble Company web site. (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.polycor.com/html/en/mar_f_georgia_marble.htm>

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of Tower 17 at the McDonnell Plaza, according to this web site.

    • Los Angeles, California - the Hall of Records Building – the Marble Tiling, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 120. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used 20,000 feet of tiling in the construction of the Hall of Records building prior to August 1894.

    • Los Angeles, California - the Library Building – the Marble Tiling, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 120. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used 12,000 feet of tiling in the construction of the Library building prior to August 1894.

    • Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California – the Jewett Residence – the Lily Pool, Arbor, & Bowl  (from “Garden Furniture From Earliest Times, Marble Has Been the Favorite Material for Beautifying Formal Gardens,” in Through the Ages Magazine, July 1926)

      Statue (of Georgia marble) in Lily Pool in the garden of the Jewett residence, Pasadena, California. (pp. 22) This illustration on this and the opposite page shows a Lily Pool and its treatment in the garden of the Jewett residence, Pasadena, Calif., "Through the Ages," 7-1926
      This illustration on this and the (photo above) shows a Lily Pool and its treatment in the garden of the Jewett residence, Pasadena, California.  Georgia marble was used for the border, statuary, steps and elsewhere. (pp. 23) Statue in Lily Pool in the garden of the Jewett residence, Pasadena, Calif., "Through the Ages," 7-1926
      View of the Lily Pool in the Jewett residence at Pasadena, as seen from the porch of the house.” (pp. 24) View of the Lily Pool in the Jewett residence at Pasadena, Calif., "Through the Ages," 7-1926
      The circular arbor behind the pool on the Jewett residence at Pasadena, California” (pp. 25) The circular arbor behind the pool on the Jewett residence at Pasadena, Calif., "Through the Ages," 7-1926
      “Two of the unusual marble columns that support the superstructure of the circular arbor shown at the bottom of page 25 (pp. 27) Two of the unusual marble columns that support the superstructure of the circular arbor, Jewett resident, Pasadena, Calif., "Through the Ages," 7-1926
      Detail of the handsome carved bowl on the lawn of the Jewett residence, at Pasadena, California.  The marble is from Georgia.” (pp. 26) Detail of the handsome carved bowl on the lawn of the Jewett residence, at Pasadena, Calif.,"Through the Ages," 7-1926
    • San Francisco, California – the Caswell Cemetery Memorial (from The Story of Georgia Marble, no date of publication, pp. 21)
      Beautiful designs are more beautiful in Georgia Marble in San Francisco. Beautiful designs are more beautiful in Georgia Marble in San Francisco
    • San Francisco, California - the DeVaux Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the DeVaux Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • San Francisco, California - the Goldberg Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Goldberg Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • Stanford, Santa Clara County, California - Stanford University - the Georgia Granite Circle (photograph and description), from an article entitled, “Don't just take it for granite: Outdoor art abounds on campus,” by Theresa Johnston, in Stanford Report, January 28, 2004, Stanford University.

      The Georgia Granite Circle was created in 1990 and “consists of about 100 large chunks of white Georgia granite, all piled on the ground in a circle 16 feet in diameter.” The creators were Richard Long, a British land artist.

  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in Colorado
    • Denver Neighborhoods Walking Tour
    • Denver, Colorado - the Wahlgreen Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Wahlgreen Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • Denver, Colorado - the City and County Building located at 1437 Bannock Street (photograph and history), presented by the Denver Neighborhoods Walking Tour.

      The upper walls are Stone Mountain, Georgia, granite.

  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in Connecticut
    • Norton, Connecticut - the Trowbridge Residence (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Trowbridge residence.

  • Finished Products from Georgia Stone in Florida
    • Florida – the Hammond Mausoleum erected in Florida.  Blue “Oglesby” granite from the Oglesby granite quarries at Elberton, Georgia, was used in the construction of the Hammond mausoleum.  The following photograph is from Oglesby Blue Granite Mausoleum Catalog (PDF), Oglesby Granite Quarries, Elberton, Georgia, 1937.
      Mausoleum Erected in Florida…A combination of beautiful rustic and fine hammered surfaces make this mausoleum one of the finest tributes in Florida.” Hammond mausoleum in Florida, in Oglesby Blue Granite Mausoleum Catalog
    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Aetna Building, presented by Newspad.

      According to this web site, the stones used in the construction of the Aetna Building are as follows: a large quantity of Georgia marble, 30,000 cubic feet of Alabama limestone, and 3,420 cubic feet of pink marble from North Carolina.

    • Jacksonville, Florida – J. J. Green’s Residence, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 119. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used for the entire residence prior to August 1894.

    • Jacksonville, Florida – the Israel Putnam Building (The following information is from the section “Contracts and Building – Business Buildings, Theaters, Hotels, Society Halls, Etc.” in Stone: An Illustrated Magazine Devoted to Stone, Marble, Granite, Slate, Cement, Contracting and Building, Vol. XXIV, No..1, January, 1902, Stone Publishing Co., New York, pp. 84.)

      Jacksonville, Fla. – The contract for the stone work on the Israel Putnam building here has been awarded to the Ramsey, Brisben Stone Company, of Atlanta, Ga.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the U. S. Government Building, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 118. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used for the entire U.S. Government building prior to August 1894.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - W. S. Wear’s Residence – the Marble Trimmings, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 119. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used for the marble trimmings on W. S. Wear’s residence prior to August 1894.

    • Lake Wales, Florida – Bok Tower (from The Story of Georgia Marble, no date of publication, pp. 12)
      The magnificent Bok Tower at Lake Wales, Florida, is of pink Georgia Marble and coquina stone. The magnificent Bok Tower at Lake Wales, Florida, is of pink Georgia Marble and coquina stone in Lake Wales, Florida
      • Lake Wales/Mountain Lake, Florida - the Bok Carillon, or "Singing Tower" (From Yesterday, Today, and Forever: The Story of Georgia Marble, (PDF) by the Georgia Marble Company, Tate, Georgia. This material is used with the permission of the Georgia Marble Company.)
        The Bok Carillon, or “Singing Tower,” at Mountain Lake, Florida. Construction of Pink and Creole Georgia Marble, and Tan Coquina Rock. The carver herons on the pediment of this structure are 14 feet high, and are carved from solid blocks of Pink Georgia Marble. Milton B. Medary, architect, and Lee Lawrie, sculptor. Bok Carillon, or “Singing Tower,” at Mountain Lake, Florida
    • Sarasota, Florida - the Ringling Residence (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Ringling residence.

    • Sarasota, Florida - the Ringling Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Of Georgia Marble, the impressive Ringling Mausoleum, Sarasota, Florida, commemorates a well-known name.

      Of Georgia Marble, the impressive Ringling Mausoleum, Sarasota, Florida, commemorates a well-known name

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Ringling Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • Tampa, Florida - the Cuesta Mausoleum (from The Story of Georgia Marble, possibly published by the Georgia Marble Co., no date of publication.)

      Georgia marble was used in the construction of the Cuesta Mausoleum (no cemetery listed).

    • Tampa, Florida - the First National Bank Building – the Interior Finish, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 120. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)

      Georgia marble was used for the interior finish in the construction of the First National Bank building prior to August 1894.

    • Tampa, Florida – the Knight Mansion (in the book referred to as a) “Private Residence” in Tampa, Florida, from A Preliminary Report on the Marbles of Georgia, Bulletin No. 1, by S. W. McCallie, Assistant State Geologist, Geological Survey of Georgia, 2nd ed., 1907, pp. 104. (This book is available on Google Books – Full View Books.)
      Plate XXXVII. A private residence (the Knight Mansion) in Tampa, Florida, trimmed with white Georgia marble but and furnished by the Blue Ridge Marble Company, Nelson, Georgia. A private residence (the Knight Mansion) in Tampa, Florida, trimmed with white Georgia marble but and furnished by the Blue Ridge Marble Company, Nelson, Georgia (circa 1905)
      • Tampa, Florida – the Peter O. Knight Mansion once located on the corner of Azeele Street & Hyde Park Avenue - The following information was contributed by Maureen J. Patrick, President, Tampa Historical Society, Inc. (Below the text are photographs of the Knight mansion and cottage from the historical society.)

        “Peter Oliphant Knight was widely described as a ‘leading citizen’ in early Tampa and Hillsborough County, Florida. He arrived with new wife Lillie Frierson (of Ft. Myers ) in 1890, joined the up-and-coming middle class in Hyde Park, Tampa’s first suburb. There the couple built a heart pine Victorian ‘starter’ cottage at 245 Hyde Park Avenue. Peter Knight’s rise in early Tampa business and civic affairs was rapid and steep. With partners W.H. Kendrick and E.S. Douglas, he organized the city’s first electric streetcar line and founded Tampa Electric Company to provide power and light to the growing populace. As an attorney, he served as counsel to more than a score of Tampa businesses and corporations (including shipping concerns and cigar factories), and was a founding director of the Exchange National Bank.

        “Before long, the Knight family outgrew their little cottage at 245 Hyde Park Avenue. At the start of the twentieth century, the Knights moved just up the street to the corner of Azeele Street and Hyde Park Avenue, where they built a spacious Gothic Revival mansion, its red brick exterior walls set off by pristine Georgia marble. After the death of their parents, the Knight heirs sold the house to an elder care community, and in the 1980s it was torn down to accommodate commercial building on the site. Nothing remains of the original mansion but some brick and granite corner markers and granite low walls.

        “Thankfully, the Knights’ honeymoon cottage at 245 Hyde Park Avenue remains intact. It is now an Historic Landmark and was donated by the Knight descendants in the early 1970s to provide a home for Tampa Historical Society, Inc., which function it still serves.”

        Photograph of the Peter O. Knight mansion from a turn-of-the-century souvenir book on Tampa sights. Photograph of the Peter O. Knight mansion
        Photograph of the Peter O. Knight cottage, today the location of the Tampa Historical Society, Inc., located at 245 S. Hyde Park Avenue, Florida. Photograph of the Peter O. Knight cottage, today the location of the Tampa Historical Society, Inc., located at 245 S. Hyde Park Avenue, Florida.

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