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Tuolumne County – List of Stone Quarries, Etc. Continued *

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

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  • Sonora (north of), Tuolumne County, California – G. Bordoli and Bros. Marble Quarry (Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    G. Bordoli and Bros. quarry is about a mile north of Sonora close to the Columbia road. Several years ago this was worked in a small way, the pure white marble being crushed in a rockbreaker to about 1-inch size for use in terrazzo. No production has been reported recently (circa 1947).”

    • Sonora, Tuolumne County, California – G. Bordoli and Brothers Quarry (Marble) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      G. Bordoli and Brothers quarry is about 1 mile north of Sonora near the Columbia road. In the 1920’s a deposit of white marble was worked here in a small way to make terrazzo.”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Childress Ranch Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Childress Ranch is owned by O. D. Childress, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. This is in secs. 20 and 29, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., M.D., 5 miles by road south of Sonora. It is a little northwest of Murphy Bros. ranch where a sample was taken…and the limestone is undoubtedly of the same quality. The deposit may be traced for a width of 650 feet from east to west across the ranch near the line between sections 20 and 29 and for a quarter of a mile in length. The land has an elevation of about 1600 feet but the deposit is too nearly flat to permit opening a pit to any depth without pumping and hoisting.”

    • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Childress Ranch (Marble) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Childress Ranch in secs. 20 and 29, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., is owned by O. D. Childress, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. It is 5 miles by road south of Sonora. The deposit may be traced for a width of 650 feet from east to west near the line between sections 20 and 29 and for a quarter of a mile in length. It is at an elevation of 1600 feet, and does not rise above the flat land around it. No work has been done.”

  • Sonora (north of), Tuolumne County, California – Dr. F. T. Davis (Talc Deposit) (from The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Dr. F. T. Davis, Box 413 Sonora, owner. In Sec. 32, T. 34 N., R. 15 E., M. D. M., 9 miles north of Sonora, is an outcrop of a greenish-white talc. nearly 200 feet in width.”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Dunning Ranch Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Dunning Ranch is owned by Harry C. and Ariel J. Dunning, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. It is in sec. 20, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., M.D., 4½ miles south of Sonora by road. It contains the north end of the large deposit described and sampled on the Murphy, Musante, and Mayhall ranches. This place was not visited, but the size and quality of deposit and the conditions under which it could be worked are believed to be similar to those on the Childress and Murphy ranches. It is about 1 mile north of where a sample was taken for analysis on the Murphy Ranch, and the limestone should be close to that sample in chemical composition.”

    • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Dunning Ranch (Marble) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Dunning Ranch is assessed to Harry C. and Ariel J. Dunning, R. F. D. 1, Sonora. It is in sec. 20, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., 4 ½ miles south of Sonora by road. This land contains the north end of the large deposit described under Murphy, Mayhall, et al. It was undeveloped at the time of the last report.*

      (Page 77 footnote 16: Logan, C. A., Limestone in California: California Jour. Mines and Geology, vol. 43, p. 344, 1947.)

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – John W. Jackson & Jessie B. Jackson Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Jackson, John W. and Jessie B. Jackson, R.F.D. 1, Sonora, own 15 acres in the NW ¼ NE ¼ sec. 27, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., 5 miles by road south of Sonora, which contain a small part of the deposit described (post) under Mayhall, Murphy, and Musante. Because of the small tonnage and the fact it lies flat, it is not likely to prove of commercial value.”

  • Sonora (about 8 miles from), Tuolumne County, California – Mayhall Ranch Limestone/Marble Deposits (Limestone/Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mayhall Ranch is owned by Wm. E. and Jennie Mayhall, P.O. Box 659, Sonora. This ranch covers parts of secs. 26, 27, 32, 34, and 35, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., 8 miles more or less from either Sonora or Jamestown by good roads. The elevation varies from 1560 to 2040 feet.

    “The widest part of the large deposit crosses this ranch from west to east for about a mile and a half. On the west property line the deposit is almost certainly 2100 feet wide from north to south, but no drilling or other prospecting has been done to determine its depth. Farther east it is wider but there the topography is not favorable for cheap large-scale operation as there has been considerable transverse erosion. The part of the deposit on this ranch would yield over 500,000 tons per foot in depth. As indicated by the analyses below, the character of the stone would vary from high-calcium, low-magnesium limestone to a stone approaching a pure dolomite. It would take extensive sampling, beyond the scope of this report, to determine the extent of the different beds. Samples T3 and T4 were taken at the west property-line as a particularly favorable and extensive outcrop there is exposed continuously for about 900 feet in width, north to south, and through 150 feet vertical range. Blanket Creek has eroded its valley here on the southern side of the limestone so that some 1200 feet in width of the stone has been reduced to the valley level, is partly soil covered and could not be properly sampled. An examination of the 900-foot outcrop before sampling revealed a sufficiently marked variation to suggest the advisability of sampling two sections separately. Sample T3 represents a width of 600 foot of rather coarsely crystalline, but firm, even-textured gray to white stone on the north side. Sample T4 represents a width of 300 feet of finely granular, ‘sugary’ and rather friable stone directly in contact with the 600-foot section on its south side. Samples were taken by breaking fresh chips 2 inches by 3 inches or larger, as nearly as practicable at 3 foot intervals across the widths named. The marked differences in the analyses of these samples (shown below) indicates that selection of a desired grade might be feasible. These samples were taken along the line between sections 33 and 34 and apply also to the adjoining Giacomo Musante Ranch, on the west.

    “Another sample, T5, was taken across 700 feet near the line between sections 26 and 35 close to the east line of the Mayhall property, where the beds of limestone are more mixed, including a layer 21 feet thick of pure white, fine-grained marble. Here, near the junction of the county road from Jamestown with Sonora and Wards Ferry road, the deposit begins to break into several strands extending east and fingering out in steeper and less accessible country with a poor road. This road junction is 10 miles from Sonora.”

    Analyses by Abbot A. Hanks, Inc., November 13, 1943

    Insoluble, (Sample TE) 0.54 percent; (Sample T4) 2.28 percent; (Sample T5) 1.43 percent
    Ferric and aluminic oxides, (Sample TE) 0.57 percent; (Sample T4) 0.91 percent; (Sample T5) 0.44 percent
    Calcium carbonate, (Sample TE) 95.76 percent; (Sample T4) 60.77 percent; (Sample T5) 80.49 percent
    Magnesium carbonate, (Sample TE) 2.84 percent; (Sample T4) 35.46 percent; (Sample T5) 17.38 percent
    • Sonora (about 8 miles from), Tuolumne County, California – Mayhall Ranch (Marble Quarry) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Mayhall Ranch, assessed to William E. and Jennie Mayhall, P. O. Box 659, Sonora, covers parts of secs. 26, 27, 32, 34 and 35, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., 8 miles, more or less, from Sonora or Jamestown by good roads. The elevation ranges from 1560 to 2040 feet.

      “On the west property line of this ranch, where it joins the Musante land the writer cut samples across a width of 900 feet in the large deposit of limestone which extends for 1 ½ miles eastward across the ranch. These samples…indicated a 600-foot width of rather coarsely crystalline, firm, even-textured gray to white, high-calcium limestone on the north…and 300 feet of finely granular ‘sugary’ magnesian limestone, almost a dolomite in composition, on the south…These samples were taken along the line between sections 33 and 34 and apply also to the Musante land….”

      “At this place, the total width of limestone is probably 2100 feet, but much of it is covered by alluvium in the valley of Blanket Creek. The deposit has not been prospected or developed.”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – McCormick Estate (Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    McCormick Estate: Address c/o Frank A. McPherson, Sonora. This is near the center of sec. 7, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., 2 miles south of Sonora on a good road.

    “Although the soil covering conceals much of the deposit except where it was exposed by early-day placer mining, the limestone is believed to extend from north to south across the land for half a mile. The sample analyzed below is from a width of 87 feet of a section believed to be 117 feet wide. Backs of 125 feet could be obtained from the level of Sullivan Creek which passes near the north end of the property. An old mine adit, reported 1550 feet long, is said to be entirely in limestone.”

    Analysis by Abbot A. Hanks, Inc., November 1943

    Insoluble, 0.91 percent
    Ferric and aluminic oxides, 0.61 percent
    Calcium carbonate, 90.79 percent
    Magnesium carbonate, 7.36 percent
    • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – McCormick Estate (Marble Quarry) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      McCormick Estate, c/o Frank A. McPherson, Sonora, owns land 2 miles south of Sonora near the center of sec. 7, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., on which limestone outcrops. Although soil conceals much of the deposit, except where it was exposed by early-day placer mining, the limestone probably extends for half a mile from north to south across this land, with a width of over 100 feet. Backs of 125 feet could be obtained from the level of Sullivan Creek near the north end….”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – McPherson Ranch Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    McPherson Ranch property is assessed to Winnie McPherson, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. This 83-acre holding in secs. 7 and 18, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., adjoins on the south the McCormick Estate land…and contains the southern end of the deposit described thereunder. The limestone is undoubtedly continuous for nearly half a mile in length on this land, although partly covered by soil. Near the south end, the deposit is about 300 feet wide. The composition is doubtless similar to that shown in the McCormick analysis. Sonora railroad station is 2 ¾ miles north by road.”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Murphy Bros. Ranch Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Murphy Bros. Ranch is assessed to Albert, George, and Charles Murphy, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. This holding of several hundred acres in secs. 20, 21, 28, and 29, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., extends from the Sonora-Algerine road 5 miles south of Sonora, to the Musante Ranch. The large limestone deposit extends from Curtis Creek for 11 miles eastward into the steep canyon of Tuolumne River. From Curtis Creek, through the Murphy land, the limestone has been eroded to the general level of the nearly flat country and is partly covered by soil. Here the outcrops of limestone are each usually only a few square feet in area, seldom over 1 foot high and may be as much as 20 to 40 feet apart, so that hand sampling is unsatisfactory. Possibilities for open-pit mining would be limited. Because of the soil cover, the width of the deposit and any variations in character can not be noted definitely. In appearance the limestone outcrops are white to light gray, high grade, firm textured and fine to medium crystalline. The analysis of a sample taken across a width of 540 feet and about 700 feet south of the road mentioned, on the Murphy land, shows it is very similar to the 600-foot section sampled on the Mayhall property.

    Analysis by Abbot A. Hanks, Inc., November 1943:

    Insoluble, 0.46 percent
    Ferric and aluminic oxides, 0.13 percent
    Calcium carbonate, 95.41 percent
    Magnesium carbonate, 3.93 percent

    “Although the road from this property to Jamestown is slightly longer than that to Sonora, grades on it are easier.”

    • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Murphy Brothers Ranch (Marble Quarry) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Murphy Brothers Ranch is assessed to Albert, George, and Charles Murphy, R.F.D. 1, Sonora. It contains several hundred acres in secs. 20, 21, 28 and 29, T. 1N., R. 15 E., extending from the Sonora-Algerine road 5 miles south of Sonora to the Musante Ranch. Southward from Curtis Creek, through the Murphy land, the limestone has been eroded to the general level and is partly covered by soil. The limestone outcrops are each usually only a few square feet in area, seldom over 1 foot high, and may be as much as 20 to 40 feet apart. The land surface is too nearly flat to give drainage for a pit or quarry. No work has been done. The exposed limestone is white to light gray, firm textured, fine to medium crystalline and of good quality….”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Pacific Lime and Plaster Company(Limestone, Lime & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part I. “The Counties of Amador County, Calaveras County, Tuolumne County,” by W. B. Tucker, Field Assistant, San Francisco, California, July, 1915, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 2-172.)

    Pacific Lime and Plaster Company. This plant is situated 1 mile south of Sonora, in a belt of crystalline limestone in Calaveras formation, in Sec. 1, T. 1 N., R. 14 E. The holdings of the company comprise 180 acres. The limestone is being quarried from two large open cuts. The broken material is trammed or hoisted to five kilns, where lime is burned with oil. The capacity of the kilns is 20 tons each per twenty-four hours. The product of this plant consists of lime, limestone grits for chicken feed, and ground limestone for glassworks and agricultural hydrate for soils. The output is 225 barrels of lime per twenty-four hours. Thirty-five men are employed. Pacific Lime and Plaster Company, 807 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, owner. W. O. Badgley, general manager.”

    (For information on the succeeding company and quarries at this location after Pacific Lime and Plaster Company: See: Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – U. S. Lime Products Corporation below.)

  • Sonora, Tuolumne County, California – the Phoenix Lake Granite Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Phoenix Lake Granite Quarry, in Sec. 23, T. 2 N., R. 15 E.; J. M. Phillips, general manager, Builders’ Exchange, 26 Jessie street, San Francisco. The quarry is located at the head of Phoenix Lake, about 7 miles northeast of Sonora. The granite is hauled by wagon to a siding of the Sierra Railway Company, about 2 miles above Sonora. The stone is a very fine-grained granite, a sprinkling of small crystals of biotite giving it a gray color.”

    • Sonora (northeast of), Tuolumne County, California – Phoenix Lake Granite Company’s Quarry (Granite) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Phoenix Lake Granite Company’s quarry was in sec. 23, T. 2 N., R. 15 E., M. D., 6 miles northeast of Sonora.”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Sierra Lime and Cement Works (Cement Plant & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part I. “The Counties of Amador County, Calaveras County, Tuolumne County,” by W. B. Tucker, Field Assistant, San Francisco, California, July, 1915, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 2-172.)

    Sierra Lime and Cement Works. Situated 1 ½ miles south of Sonora, on ridge northwest of Sullivan Creek. The plant consists of three kilns of 20 tons capacity each. Idle. California Lime and Hydrate Company, 831 Monadnock Building, San Francisco, owner. W. A. Brown, president.”

  • Sonora-Columbia Highway, Tuolumne County, California – Sonora Marble Aggregates Company (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Sonora Marble Aggregates Company, 356 Church Street, San Francisco, operate a plant built in 1947 at Shaws Flat in Sec. 23, T. 2 N., R. 14 E., about half a mile west of the Sonora-Columbia highway. It is a limited partnership with L. C. Sundberg as manager. The company owns 21 acres patented, and leases the August Engler limestone property of 19.97 acres in SW ¼ NE ¼ sec. 23. It also owns the mining claims and leases lands in three counties from which stones of seven colors are obtained. Fifteen men are employed.

    “The principal products are terrazzo aggregates and aggregates for built-up roofing in place of pea gravel, but there is some sale of by-products dust, etc. The plant is in a large area of hard magnesian limestone and marble, ranging in color from white to dark gray, where Walter S. McLean formerly operated. Surface workings and hand labor supply this limestone nearby. A yellow marble is obtained near Vallecito. Green and black serpentine are also used.

    “The principal items of equipment for crushing, sizing, and sacking the stone are housed in a large building. Crude rock, up to 1-man size, is hauled to the plant by trucks in buckets of about 36 cubic feet capacity and fed by hand to a 36-inch jaw crusher. Further crushing is done by a set of 32-inch rolls in closed circuit with a Link Belt 3- by 8-foot scalping screen, from which sand and dust are drawn off. Belt conveyors connect the crushing units on the lower floor with the scalping screen on the upper floor, and take through sizes from the scalper to a six-deck Rotex sizing screen. The five-compartment finish bin with electric stacker supplies finished products for sacking through chutes on the lower floor. Products sizes are from ½-inch to 16-mesh for pre-cast terrazzo and 3/8-inch to 1/8-inch for terrazzo laid in place. Roofing aggregate ranges from 1/8-inch to 3/8-inch. Part of the by-product finds is used in oxychloride cement. Shipments are made as far as Los Angeles.”

    • Sonora, Tuolumne County, California – Sonora Marble Aggregates Co. (Limestone) (Excerpt from “California Mineral Commodities in 1951,” California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) Sonora Marble Aggregates Co. (industrial limestone); (Address) 356 Church St., San Francisco ; (Location) Sonora.

  • Sonora, Tuolumne County, California – Schist Quarries (Schist) (From Geologic Guidebook Along Highway 49 – Sierran Gold Belt: The Mother Lode Country, Bulletin 141, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, 1949. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    “…Most of the evidences of the early town are concealed on the main streets by the practice of facing buildings with stucco, vitreous brick and other new materials but the same buildings viewed from side streets and alleyways reveal abundant evidence of early architecture.

    “As the visitor enters Sonora from Jamestown, a number of quarries in the schist bedrock can be seen along the right side of Highway 49. These are the sources of the town’s favorite stone building material. Across the road to the west shoring and retaining walls made of dry-laid flat schist slabs channel the stream of Woods Creek….”

    “The building now (circa 1948) known as the Opera Hall Garage was once the theater for Sonora…The hillside behind the opera house was quarried to provide the building material….”

  • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – U. S. Lime Products Corporation Limestone Deposits and Lime Plant (Limestone & Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (For the history of the company and its quarries prior to 1947, see:

     Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – Pacific Lime and Plaster Company above.)

    U. S. Lime Products Corporation, main office 85 Second Street, San Francisco. The lime plant and lime deposit 1 mile south of Sonora in sec. 1, T. 1 N., R. 14 E., have been operated many years by this company and its predecessor, Pacific Lime & Plaster Company. Recently some changes have been made in management, and the marble property formerly belonging to Columbia Marble of Columbia, 131 acres in sec. 34, T. 3 N., R. 14 E., 3 miles northwest of Columbia, has been purchased.

    “The property south of Sonora covers 4000 feet along the deposit which extends southward from Columbia through the county seat, terminating about a mile south of Sullivan Creek. This is the site of the lime plant. Limestone high in calcium and low in magnesium content is produced by underground mining, using the room and pillar system. Most of the stone is handled by Eimco-Finlay loaders, and a conveyor belt has been installed recently to deliver stone from the shaft to the crushing plant. Mining has reached a depth of 315 feet. The deposit lies between walls of Calaveras (Mississipian) (sic) rocks and is cut by several dikes. For the most part, it is solid, coarsely crystalline white and light gray limestone with a small percentage of magnesia and very little silica, alumina, and iron oxide.

    “The stone mined from the recently-purchased land near Columbia is the dolomitic marble quarried from the old pit of Columbia Marble Company. This is much higher in magnesium carbonate than the stone south of Sonoma, and is commonly called dolomite. It is hauled 8 miles in trucks to the plant. All of the marble-sawing equipment once used by the former operators has been removed from this land.

    “Part of the 13 vertical kilns of the old plant have been used recently for burning dolomite. Little change is reported in their operation since the last report (Logan, C. A. 28).* They are lined with three courses of fire-brick and have a capacity of approximately 100 tons of lime a day.

    (* Clarence A. Logan, Sacramento Field Division, “Tuolumne County,” California Division of Mines and Mining, Report 24, pp. 3-53, illus., 1928.)

    “A new rotary kiln, 6 by 120 feet, has been installed for burning high-calcium lime (circa 1947). This is lined with Stockton firebrick 9 inches thick at the firing end and 6 inches at the cooler end. This brick is said to last 1 ½ years in the hot zone. The limestone is in this kiln about 6 hours and maximum kiln temperature is 2400° to 2800° F. The kiln is fitted with a Western Precipitation Company multi-cone dust collector and the main tall stack has been sealed off. Lime production capacity is somewhat curtailed because of the tendency of the stone to decrepitate, requiring care in regulating heat and speed. Fuel oil is used.

    “Besides serving the steel trade with lime, three sizes of quicklime, 16-mesh, ¼-inch, and 5/8-inch, are screened. The hydrate plant produces three grades of lime hydrate, the best being marketed under the trade-name Sierra Superfine hydrate, the second as Sierra, and the third for agricultural use. A Raymond high-side roller mill is used to grind both lime and limestone. A poultry-grit plant, with elevator and shaking screens, produces turkey and chicken grits of different sizes, and chicken flour.

    “Great difficulty has been experienced in getting and holding a crew of men in competition with other industries which were allowed greater wage ceilings. As a result the plant has not been able to operate at full capacity.”

    Plate 36-B. Part of Rotary Kiln, and Dust Condenser – U. S. Lime Products Company, Sonora, Tuolumne County Part of Rotary Kiln, and Dust Condenser
    • Sonora (south of), Tuolumne County, California – U. S. Lime Products Corporation (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      U. S. Lime Products Corporation, 57 Post Street, San Francisco. The lime plant and lime deposit 1 mile south of Sonora in sec. 1, T. 1 N., R. 14 E., have been operated many years by this company and its predecessor, Pacific Lime and Plaster Company. Recently some changes have been made in management, and the marble property formerly belonging to Columbia Marble Company, 131 acres in sec. 34, T. 3 N., R. 14 E., 3 miles northwest of Columbia has been purchased.

      “The property south of Sonora covers 4000 feet along the deposit which extends southward from Columbia through the county seat, terminating about a mile south of Sullivan Creek. This is the site of the lime plant. Limestone high in calcium and low in magnesium content is produced by underground mining, using the room and pillar system. Most of the stone is handled by Eimco-Finlay loaders, and a conveyor belt has been installed recently to deliver stone from the shaft to the crushing plant. Mining has reached a depth of 315 feet. The deposit lies between walls of Calaveras (Mississipian) (sic) rocks and is cut by several dikes. For the most part, it is solid, coarsely crystalline white and light-gray limestone with a small amount of magnesia and very little silica, alumina, and iron oxide.

      “The stone mined from the recently purchased land near Columbia is the magnesian marble quarried from the old pit of Columbia Marble Company. This is much higher in magnesium carbonate than the stone south of Sonora, and is commonly called dolomite. It is hauled 8 miles in trucks to the plant. All of the marble-sawing equipment once used by the former operators has been removed from this land.

      “Some of the 13 vertical kilns of the old plant have been used recently for burning dolomite. Little change is reported in their operation since 1928. They are lined with three courses of firebrick and have a capacity of approximately 100 tons of lime a day.

      “A new rotary kiln, 6 by 120 feet, has been installed for burning high-calcium lime. This is lined with Stockton firebrick 9 inches thick at the firing end and 6 inches at the cooler end. This brick is said to last 1 ½ years in the hot zone. The limestone is in this kiln about 6 hours and maximum kiln temperature is 2400° to 2800° F. The kiln is fitted with a Western Precipitation Company multi-cone dust collector and the main tall stack has been sealed off. Lime production capacity is somewhat curtailed because of the tendency of the stone to decrepitate, requiring care in regulating heat and speed. Fuel oil is used.

      “Besides serving the steel trade with lime, the company screens three sizes of quicklime, 16-mesh, ¼-inch, and 5/8-inch. The hydrate plant produces three grades of lime hydrate, the best being marketed under the tradename of Sierra Superfine hydrate, the second as Sierra, and the third for agricultural use. A Raymond high-side roller mill is used to grind both lime and limestone. A poultry-grit plant, with elevator and shaking screens, produces turkey and chicken grits of different sizes, and chicken flour.”

    • Sonora, Tuolumne County, California – U. S. Lime Products Corp. (Lime & Limestone) (Excerpt from “California Mineral Commodities in 1951,” California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) U. S. Lime Products Corp. (producers of burnt lime, industrial limestone, and agricultural lime); (Address) 175 S. Alvarado St., Los Angeles 4; (Location) Sonora.

  • Tuolumne County, California – Sonora Granite Company (“Granite”) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Tuolumne County, California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 1949, pp. 47-83. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Sonora Granite Company shipped a few carloads of the ‘granite’ from the Rablen Ranch in sec. 14, T. 1 N., R. 15 E., M. D., 3 miles from the Sierra Railway.”

  • Tuolumne County, California – Table Mountain Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Table Mountain Quarry; Operator: George Reed, Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 548, Sonora, CA 95370, Tuolumne County ; Phone: (209) 984-5202; Latitude: 37.90, Longitude: -120.52, and Mine location number: Map No. 885; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Tuttletown, Tuolumne County, California – Schist Quarry (From Geologic Guidebook Along Highway 49 – Sierran Gold Belt: The Mother Lode Country, Bulletin 141, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, 1949. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    “The very well preserved and neatly built stone building which stands in Tuttletown was a store, built by W. Swerer in 1852, and patronized by Mark Twain during his sojourn at Jackass Hill. It is made of quarried and dressed blocks of Calaveras schist (Fig. 54). A schist quarry can be seen on the north side of the highway a half mile west of the store. Tuttletown was first settled by a group of Mormon prospectors in 1848 and then named Mormon Camp.”

  • Vine Springs & Vine Springs District, Tuolumne County, California – Marble Exposures (circa 1864/1865)  The following excerpt is from Transactions of the California State Agricultural Society During the Year 1864-65, pp. 251. (Sac: O.M. Clayes, State Printers, 1866)

    “MARBLE QUARRIES. (TUOLUMNE COUNTY) Marble quarries are numerous and of good quality in this district. There are in and near Columbia, four. In Vine Springs is an extensive quarry on a immense ledge, of fine and good quality for almost any of the purposes to which marble is applied. The second is in Vine Springs District; a pure white marble, susceptible of high polish, suitable for statuary, and is an extensive ledge. The third is in Matelot Gulch, Columbia; is pink and black Egyptian, mixed - will take a high polish, and may be wrought to ornamental uses, for lamp stands, mantelpieces for fireplaces, and other ornamental uses, and is an extensive quarry. The fourth is on Knapp’s Ranch, Columbia; white marble, with blue veins, and valuable for general purposes to which marble is applied.”

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