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Siskiyou County – List of Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Berryvale (south of), Siskiyou County, California – Griffin Onyx Quarries (Onyx) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    Griffin Onyx Quarries are situated 6 miles south of Berryvale. Specimens in the State Mining Bureau are 7355 and 8969.

    “Bibl.: Bull. 37, p. 112.”

  • Cottonwood Mountains, Siskiyou County, California – G. K. Crowley and K. Caldwell (Talc Exposure) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "G. K. Crowley and K. Caldwell, Eugene, Or., and others, owners, in Sec. 3, T. 48 N., R. 8 W. In the Cottonwood Mountains is a body of ochreous-colored talc 30 feet wide. It has been to some extent excavated on the top of the divide between Beaver Creek and Bumblebee Creek, and can be traced southeast to the latter. It has no grit. Its light ochreous color is due to iron, which, however, does not interfere with its refractory character."

  • Craggy Mountain, Siskiyou County, California – Granite Deposit on Craggy Mountain (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    "The greater portion of the granite in Siskiyou County is too much shattered to be used for monument or building purposes. There is a large body of granite, however, on Craggy Mountain, T. 41 N., R. 8 W., from which some good building blocks have been obtained. Another deposit, southeast of Etna on Mill Creek in Sec. 1, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., contains some fine-grained stone that has been used for monument work. A similar grade of granite is found in the southwest and southeast corners of T. 40 N., R. 8 and 9 W.

    "Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 54."

  • Etna (near), Siskiyou County, California – the Alex. Parker, Jr., Quarry (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Alex. Parker, Jr., Etna, owner. In Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W. This marble quarry was formerly worked. The elevation is 4025 feet. The belt is from 100 to 150 feet wide. The marble is heavily bedded; in places it is perfectly white and fine-grained; in other places it carries dark gray veins, with seams of diabase. Some of the marble is pink-colored, carries some iron pyrite, has inclusions of diabase, and is very coarsely crystalline. The workings are not very extensive, but if pushed away from the diabase intrusions will probably, owing to the heavy bedding, show fine bodies of workable marble."

    • Siskiyou County, California – A. Parker, Jr. – Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      "Parker, in Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., near Etna. Owned by A. Parker, Jr.; belt from 100 to 200 feet wide at elevation of 4000 feet; marble heavily bedded, in places being perfectly white and fine-grained, while in other places it is pink-colored and very coarsely crystalline; worked to a limited extent.

      "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 107."

      (Also see: Siskiyou County, California – J. Conners (Talc Exposure) below.)

  • Etna (southeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Granite Quarrying (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    "The greater portion of the granite in Siskiyou County is too much shattered to be used for monument or building purposes. There is a large body of granite, however, on Craggy Mountain, T. 41 N., R. 8 W., from which some good building blocks have been obtained. Another deposit, southeast of Etna on Mill Creek in Sec. 1, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., contains some fine-grained stone that has been used for monument work. A similar grade of granite is found in the southwest and southeast corners of T. 40 N., R. 8 and 9 W.

    "Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 54."

  • Etna Mills (west of), Siskiyou County, California – Marble Belt Along Slope of Salmon Mountains (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    "A belt of marble runs from a short distance west of Etna Mills, in a northwest direction along the eastern slope of the Salmon Mountains, forming, farther north, part of the Marble Mountains, and in the Grider Mountains showing north of the Klamath River on Thompson Creek, and running farther north into Oregon.

    Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632; Bull. No. 38, pp. 107-108."

  • Etna Mills (3 miles from), Siskiyou County, California – Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "…One large marble deposit is 3 miles from Etna Mills, on the Sawyers Bar road."

  • Farmington (near), Siskiyou County, California – the Farmington Limestone Quarry (Limestone & Kiln) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Farmington Quarry, in Sec. 7, T. 40 N., R, 8 W.; S. Farmington, Callahan, owner.

    "The limestone was burned in a rock kiln. The lime was used in the neighborhood and marketed as far as Yreka (over 40 miles distant) and in Trinity County. It is claimed to have been of very good quality. The kiln has not been used since the fall of 1903.

    "The limestone is of a very dark bluish-gray color, and is traversed by a great number of thin veins of calcite; it is very even and fine-grained. The general trend of the limestone belt is nearly north and south; it is about 200 feet wide, and cut by several dikes of basic igneous rock, not over 10 feet wide, having a similar strike, which, however, have not altered the limestone."

  • Fort Jones (north of), Siskiyou County, California – A. H. Luce - Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    "Luce, in Sec. 41, T. 41 N., R. 8 W., in the Deadwood mining district, 3 miles north of Fort Jones. Owner, A. H. Luce; comprises 160 acres, patented, located in 1907; dike in schist, 300 feet wide and can be traced for 1500 feet, and is of good quality, taking a fine polish and easily worked; only small amount extracted from shallow cuts. Idle at present (circa 1913)."

  • Gazelle (west of) Siskiyou County, California – Electro Lime and Chemical Company, Inc. Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Electro Lime and Chemical Company, Inc., C. J. Montag, president, 536 Southeast Sixth Avenue, Portland 14, Oregon, is working a limestone deposit on the Sisto Mazzuchi land, 3 miles west of Gazelle. Limestone is hauled to Gazelle, where a crushing and screening plant was put in operation in 1947. Shipments of 200 tons of agricultural limestone were being made daily, and 125 tons of 'carbide rock' was being sent out weekly late in 1947."

    • Gazelle (near), Siskiyou County, California – Electro Lime and Chemical Corporation (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Mines and Mineral Resources of Siskiyou County," by J. C. O'Brien, District Mining Engineer, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 43, No. 4, October 1947, pp. 412-461. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Electro Lime and Chemical Corporation, C. J. Montag, president, Dr. L. Underdahl, vice-president, P. M. Sherlund, treasurer, and G. R. Bethel, secretary, have offices at 536 Southeast Sixth Avenue, Portland, Oregon. The limestone is mined from a deposit in secs. 4, 5, and 8, T. 42 N., R. 6 W., M.D., owned by Sisto Mazzuchi of Gazelle. It is drilled by two men using jackhammers on wagon-drill mountings. Holes are spaced at 5-foot intervals, drilled 20 feet vertically, loaded with 40-percent dynamite, and blasted. The broken limestone is loaded onto dump trucks with a 1-cubic-yard Lorain shovel and hauled 3 miles to the crushing and screening plant at Gazelle. There it is dumped into a 20-ton-capacity wooden bin from a ramp and fed into a 24- by 36-inch jaw crusher by a 30-inch Lipman feeder. The jaw crusher discharges minus 3-inch material onto a 24-inch conveyor belt 70 feet long which delivers it to a 3- by 10-foot Pioneer double-deck vibrating screen driven by a 7 ½-horsepower motor. Material over 1 ½-inches and under ½-inch is delivered to a 3XC-type Grundler hammer mill driven by a 220-horsepower diesel engine. The 1 ½- to ½-inch size goes to a bin for sale as 'carbide rock'. The hammer-mill product is raised 28 feet with a bucket elevator to a 4- by 12-foot, 3-deck Seco vibrating screen fitted with 8-mesh screens. The oversize is stockpiled. The undersize is classed as agricultural limestone and is weighed by an 'OK' weighing machine into paper bags holding 100 pounds each, or is loaded in bulk on cars or trucks for shipment. Material sold for agricultural limestone is specified as 100 percent minus 8-mesh, 50 percent minue-50 mesh, and 35 percent minus 100[mesh. It has a minimum of 95 percent CaCO3 and a maximum of 1 percent MgCO3. Material from half an inch to 1 ½ inches in size is classed as 'carbide rock' and is used in the manufacture of calcium carbide.

      "Four men were employed at the quarry and seven men at the mill under George E. Bethel, superintendent, in May 1947. Production was at the rate of 150 tons per 8-hour day."

    • Gazelle (near), Siskiyou County, California – the Electro Lime and Chemical Company Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (From "Geology of Limestone near Gazelle, Siskiyou County, California Journal of Mines and Geology, vol. 45, No. 4, October 1949, Centennial Issue, State of California Division of Mines. (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Development of the limestone reserves near Gazelle has been sporadic; only four small excavations have been worked at various times during periods of exploitation. Of the four limestone quarries, only the two in the eastern half of the area were in production during November 1947. These two quarries, located on the knoll of limestone 1,500 feet north of North Branch, are operated by the Electro Lime and Chemical Company of Gazelle. During 1947 the company was reported to be shipping about 200 tons of agricultural limestone per day, 125 tons of carbide rock per week and approximately 400 tones of rock per year for the manufacture of paper. In October 1948 the Electro Lime and Chemical Company quarries were temporarily closed down; however, stockpiled agricultural limestone was being shipped…."

  • Gazelle, Siskiyou County, California - Ideal Quarry (Marble)

    See: Mt. Shasta, Siskiyou County, California – Ideal Quarry (Marble) below.

  • Gazelle (west of), Siskiyou County, California – Mount Shasta Lime Company Limestone Deposits & Lime Kiln (Limestone & Kiln) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Mount Shasta Lime Company holdings include 460 acres in patented and about 300 acres in unpatented claims in sec. 7, T. 42 N., R. 6 W., sec. 12, T. 42 N., R. 7 W., M. D., and others nearby. Jason Chastain, Gazelle, began work here about 1925 and he and H. A. Craig have held the claims since. A vertical kiln with a capacity of 7 tons, burning wood fuel, was erected and small tonnages of lime were produced; but no sales of lime have been reported since 1930. The deposits are 4 to 5 miles by road from Gazelle.

    "In 1945, M. C. Lininger & Sons, Medford, Oregon, operated the property and shipped limestone for use in beet-sugar refining. No production was reported in 1946. The material is a high-calcium limestone with very little magnesia or iron oxide, as indicated by the following analyses made by Abbot A. Hanks, Inc., furnished through the courtesy of C. J. Montag & Sons, 317 Railway Exchange Building, Portland, Oregon."

    Lab. No. 70038, (SiO2) 1.17; (Fe2O3) 0.10; (Al2O3) 0.48; (CaO) 54.63; (MgO) trace; (P) .008; (Ignition loss) 43.07
    Lab. No. 70039, (SiO2) 0.63; (Fe2O3) 0.09; (Al2O3) 0.31; (CaO) 54.92; (MgO) 0.01; (P) 007; (Ignition loss) 43.32

    • Gazelle (west of), Siskiyou County, California – Mt. Shasta Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Mines and Mineral Resources of Siskiyou County," by J. C. O'Brien, District Mining Engineer, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 43, No. 4, October 1947, pp. 412-461. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Mt. Shasta limestone deposit is located about 4 miles west of Gazelle in sec. 12, T. 42 N., R. 7 W., M.D. It is on patented land owned by E. M. Greenwood. It was leased and operated by M. C. Lininger and Sons, Medford, Oregon, in 1945. The limestone was broken in benches by drilling vertical holes about 20 feet deep spaced 5 feet apart, and blasting with 40-percent dynamite. The broken limestone was loaded into dump trucks with a three-fourths-cubic-yard Northwest power shovel. It was crushed in a 24- by 36-inch Telesmith jaw crusher and screened with a Symons vibrating screen having 2-inch and 6-inch screens. About 1200 tons of hard blue limestone between 2 and 6 inches in size was shipped each week on a 25,000-ton contract. It was used by a sugar refinery. Material under 2 inches in size was stockpiled. (Averill 35, pp. 331, 332.)

  • Greenview (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    "Two limestone deposits, one northeast of Greenview and the other southwest of Callahan, have been worked and the material has been converted into lime.

    "Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, pp. 92-93."

  • Happy Camp (north of), Siskiyou County, California – A. E. Heighway / F. A. Brusse – Vesuvianite Quarry (Vesuvianite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Vesuvianite. In Sec. 12, T. 18 N., R. 6 E., H. M. On the north side of the south fork of Indian Creek; A. E. Heighway, 52 Nassau street, New York, owner. Some work has been done on large boulders of a hard stone, varying from olive to almost grass-green. This rock was at first supposed to be jade, but proved upon analysis to be a form of vesuvianite, called by Mr. G. F. Kunz californite. It takes a fine polish, and can be used for ornamental work. (See American Journal of Science, 4th Series, Vol. XIV, 1903. Bulletin No. 37, California State Mining Bureau.) These boulders lie in serpentine, dipping northwesterly into the mountain. Whether the vesuvianite occurs as a bed in the serpentine, or only as boulders, is as yet undetermined. Large boulders are found in the creek bed."

    • Happy Camp (north of), Siskiyou County, California – F. A. Brusse – (Vesuvianite AKA californite) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      "Vesuvianite is found on the South Fork of Indian Creek, 12 miles north of Happy Camp, on land owned by Dr. A. E. Heighway; discovered in 1901; outcrops for 300 feet along the hillside, above the creek, and large masses have fallen into the bed of the creek below. It is a hard and handsome stone, olive to green in color, and takes a fine polish. The associated rock is serpentine; the rich translucent green color, fine-grained sub-splintery fracture and brilliant luster, when polished, strongly suggest jade, and many have called it by that name; deposit has not been worked. This variety of vesuviante is also known as californite. F. H. Dakin of San Francisco also has claims covering portions of the deposit."

      "Brusse, in Sec. 34, T. 17 N., R. 7 E., in the Happy Camp mining district, 3 miles north of Happy Camp on Indian Creek. Owned by F. A. Brusse; discovered in 1899; not in place, but pieces of flat weighing several pounds found along the creek; associated with serpentine; resembles the Heighway mineral."

  • Happy Camp (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Marble Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 8, T. 17 N., R. 8 E., H., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

    • Happy Camp (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California - Thompson Creek Marble Deposit (Marble/Schist/Serpentine) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      "Thompson Creek, in Sec. 8, T. 17 N., R. 8 E., H. M., in the Happy Camp mining district, 8 ½ miles northeast of Happy Camp on Thompson Creek. Owner, J. C. Wood; comprises 40 acres, located in 1890; large massive beds in schist and serpentine, few open cuts, so that extent of marble deposit not determined; it is hard and takes a good polish; the crystals are large, white and translucent. Idle (circa 1913).

      Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632."

  • Happy Camp (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Thompson Creek Marble Deposit (Marble/Schist/Serpentine)

    (Thompson Creek Marble Deposit - See Happy Camp (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Marble Deposit above.)

  • Henley (near), Siskiyou County, California – D. C. Earhart (Sandstone Quarry) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "D. C. Earhart, Hornbrook, owns a quarry in Sec. 20, T. 47 N., R. 6 W., near Henley, on the Henley sandstone."

  • Henley (behind), Siskiyou County, California – Robert Rangeley’s Sandstone Quarry (circa 1887) (Sandstone) – Excerpts from California “Building Stone” (pdf), in the Seventh Annual Report of the State Mineralogist.  For the Year Ending October 1, 1887, California State Mining bureau, Sacramento:  State Office, J. D. Young, Supt. State Printing, 1888, pp. 210-211.  (See the pdf version of the transcription above for detailed information on the Henley Sandstone.)

    Henley Sandstone.

    “...The Henley sandstone is a moderately fine-grained, light bluish-gray stone, showing to the unaided eye, dark gray and whitish quartz granules, with numerous black and few white mica scales, held together by a slight argillaceous and calcareous cement....”

    Occurrence. – The owner of the quarry, Mr. Robert Rangeley, of Henley, Siskiyou County, states that the sandstone beds are behind the town of Henley, and within one mile of Hornbroke Station on the California and Oregon Railroad; that the supply is inexhaustible, and that the stone was used in the construction of the abutments for the railroad bridge over the Klamath River.”

  • Henley (near), Siskiyou County, California – Southern Pacific Railroad Company (Sandstone Quarry) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Southern Pacific Railroad Company has several quarry openings on the Henley sandstone in Sec. 29, T. 47 N., R. 6 W., near Henley. It uses the stone principally for bridge abutments. The quarries are worked by plug-and-feather work. The sandstone breaks in large square blocks, some weighing over 5 tons. In a quarry on Rock Creek, a parting of shale about 1 foot thick is found in the sandstone. The sandstone was used in the Horn and Jones buildings, Hornbrook, built in 1888, and shows no signs of weathering."

    • Henley (near), Siskiyou County, California – Southern Pacific Railroad Company (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. "The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity," by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      "Southern Pacific Railroad Company owns several quarries in Sec. 29, T. 47 N., R. 6 W., near Hornbrook; stone breaks in large blocks, some weighing 4 to 5 tons; quarries worked by plug and feather method; sandstone used in construction of Jones & Horn buildings in Hornbrook, built in 1888 and shows no signs of weathering.

      "Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 140."

    • Henley (near), Siskiyou County, California – Southern Pacific Company (Sandstone) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Siskiyou County,” by J. C. O’Brien, District Mining Engineer, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 43, No. 4, October 1947, pp. 412-461. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Southern Pacific Company has quarried considerable sandstone in sec. 29, T. 47 N., R. 6 W., M.D., near Hornbrook. This stone has been used for railroad culverts and for some buildings in Hornbrook. (Averill 35, p. 337.)

  • Klamath River (north of), Siskiyou County, California – the W. Quigley Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “Quigley Quarry, in Sec. 2, T. 46 N., R. 9 W.; W. Quigley, Walker P. O., owner. North of the Klamath River a bluff of limestone about 50 feet high rises above the surrounding serpentine, from which in former years some lime was burned.”

  • Little Shasta River (north bank of), Siskiyou County, California – S. F. Terwilligen (Rhyolite Quarry) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “In Sec. 16, T. 45 N., R. 4 W.; S. F. Terwilligen, Little Shasta P. O., owner. On the north bank of Little Shasta River, for a distance of about a hundred yards, a brick-red rhyolite rock is exposed; in places it is light bluish gray. The rock has been quarried and used in Yreka for building purposes. This quarry is about 12 miles from Montague, on the Southern Pacific Railroad.

    “About half a mile up the river there is a large bluff of the same material, of a grayish-green color.”

  • Little Shasta River (north bank of), Siskiyou County, California – S. F. Terwilligen - Tuff Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “In Sec. 17, T. 45 N., R. 4 W.; S. F. Terwilligen, Little Shasta, P. O., owner. On the north bank of Little Shasta River there is a considerable area of similar rock (similar to the tuff quarried from the tuff quarry of E. C. Hart located 7 to 8 miles from Montague, a station on the Southern Pacific Railroad), only somewhat finer grained. It can be trimmed easily and takes a fine polish. This same belt runs north to the Klamath River near the mouth of Bogus Creek, where it has been used by the Klamath Lake Railroad in its bridge abutments.”

  • Marble Mountain, Siskiyou County, California – Marble Mountain Limestone and Marble Deposits (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Marble Mountain , in Secs. 16, 19, 20, and 21, T. 43 N., R. 12 E., H. M.; a very large body of marble is in this belt. It is very circumstantially described by Mr. T. A. Reynolds in his history of Siskiyou County, pages 36 and following. The limestone is metamorphosed, producing all varieties and colors of marble, but principally pure white marble.”

    East side of Marble Mountain , Siskiyou County Ill. No. 43. East side of Marble Mountain , Siskiyou County.
    West slope of Marble Mountain , Siskiyou County Ill. No. 44. West slope of Marble Mountain , Siskiyou County.
    • Marble Mountain, Siskiyou County, California – Marble Belt (Limestone/Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      Marble Mountain, a very large belt in Secs. 16, 19, 20 and 21, T. 43 N., R. 10 W., M.D.M., is a noted landmark; the limestone is metamorphosed, producing all varieties and colors of marble, but principally pure white. (See photo No. 5.)

      Photo No. 5. Marble Mountain, Siskiyou County. Marble Mountain , Siskiyou County
  • Montague, Siskiyou County, California – E. C. Hart - Tuff Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “In sec. 10, T. 44 N., R. 5 W.; E. C. Hart. Roselawn P. O., owner. A prominent bluff of tuff, rising from 30 to 40 feet above the surrounding country, has been quarried and used in Yreka for building purposes. The rock is light yellowish, with narrow bands of light brown and white colors, rather coarse-grained. When fresh it is not very hard and can be easily dressed, but on long exposure to the air the outer coating becomes very hard. This quarry is from 7 to 8 miles by wagon road from Montague, a station on the Southern Pacific Railroad.”

  • Mt. Shasta, Siskiyou County, California – Ideal Quarry (Marble), owned and operated by Art Horvath (The quarry is located near Gazelle.)
  • Oak Bar Mining District, Siskiyou County, California – Barton & Barham Marble Quarry.

    (Barton & Barham Marble Quarry - See: Oak Bar Mining District, Siskiyou County, California, below.)

  • Oak Bar (southeast of) Siskiyou County, California – Limestone / Marble Exposure (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “Very close to and southeast of Oak Bar, in Secs. 7 and 18, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., on the ridge to the south of the Klamath River, is a small exposure of limestone. The marble is fine-grained, with dark gray seams. No work has been on done on this deposit.”

    • Oak Bar Mining District, Siskiyou County, California – Barton & Barham Marble Quarry (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      Barton & Barham, in Sec. 18, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., in the Oak Bar mining district; owned by Barton et al.; comprises 160 acres, located in 1913; massive deposit in schist; no work done on claims; marble is of the clouded variety, showing black streaks and probably of no commercial value.

      “Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632.”

  • Oro Fino Mountains, Siskiyou County, California – the Oro Fino Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “Oro Fino Quarry, in Sec. 19, T. 43 N., R. 9 W.; L. C. Wilson, Etna, owner. A small detached exposure of limestone, about 200 feet wide, having a length of about a quarter of a mile on its east and west strike. The limestone lies in the basic igneous rocks of which the Oro Fino Mountains consist, and is altered into a very fine and even-grained pure limerock of a very light gray color. It is rather thinly bedded and dips nearly vertical. This rock is burned in a small rock kiln, producing a good quality of lime, used in Scott Valley and in Yreka. The kiln was used in the fall of 1904. Harris Brothers of Greenview have a ten years’ lease on the property.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – J. Conners (Talc Exposure) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    J. Conners , Etna, owner. In Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., a short cut above the ditch of the Etna Development Company shows a narrow belt of serpentine, in which a deposit of talc is found, very pure and without any grit.”

    (J. Connors - Also see: Etna (near), Siskiyou County , California – A. Parker, Jr. above.)

  • Siskiyou County, California – the Greenhorn Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “Greenhorn Quarry, in the southwestern part of T. 45 N., R. 7 W.; L. E. Gilbert, Yreka, owner. A ridge of limestone, on the north side of the Greenhorn, from which lime was burned occasionally, and used in Yreka. The last lime was burned in 1902.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – Hathaway Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Hathaway limestone quarry (formerly Wurst and Majors) in sec. 9, T. 41 N., R. 8 W., M. D., last reported production in 1929. The limestone was ground and sold for local agricultural use. The outcrop covers about 2 acres, in McConnahue Gulch.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – E. Hunt (Soapstone Deposit) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “E. Hunt , Fort Jones, owner. In Sec. 12, T. 42 N., R. 9 W. The soapstone is found in schist interstratified with beds of limestone from 1 to 3 inches wide.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone and/or Marble Deposit & Old Lime Kiln (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 24, T. 40 N., R. 9 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked. There was an old lime kiln on the property about 1947.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit & Old Lime Kiln (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 17, T. 43 N., R. 9 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked. There was an old lime kiln on the property about 1947.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 13, 24, T. 47 N., R. 8 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at W. ½ T. 41 N., R. 8 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Secs. 27, 34, T. 42 N., R. 8 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Secs. 35, 36, T. 43 N., R. 8 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Secs. 1, 12, 13, 14, T. 42 N., R. 7 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at N.W. ¼ T. 42 N., R. 7 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Limestone Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Secs. 6, 7, T. 42 N., R. 6 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Marble Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 18, T. 46 N., R. 9 W., M.D., there is a marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Marble Deposit (unnamed) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Located at Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., M.D., there is a limestone and/or marble deposit that has been mentioned in previous report(s) of the Division of Mines. As of 1947 the deposit was most likely not worked.

  • Siskiyou County, California – McLaughlin Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: McLaughlin Quarry; Operator: Tschopp Excavating; Address & County: P. O. Box 685, Fort Jones, CA 96032, Siskiyou County; Phone: (916) 468-2947; Latitude: 41.61, Longitude: -122.86, and Mine location number: Map No. 774; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Siskiyou County, California – Marble Exposure from Etna to Sawyer’s Bar (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “R. McDaniels, Etna, owner. In Sec. 6, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., M. D. M., on the road from Etna to Sawyer’s Bar, is exposed marble similar to that described in Sec. 32, T. 42 N., R. 9 W., hereinbelow (the Alex. Parker, Jr., Marble Quarry), except that there are more numerous seams of diabase through the marble, and the pure white marble does not occur in such large bodies.”

    • Siskiyou County, California - McDaniels (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      McDaniels, in Sec. 6, T. 41 N., R. 9 W., M.D.M., on road from Etna to Sawyer’s Bar. Owned by R. McDaniels of Etna; seams of diabase through the marble and body of pure white marble much smaller than in the Parker deposit.

      “Bibl.: Report XIII, p. 632; Bull. No. 38, p. 107.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – J. C. Woods (Marble / Limestone Exposure) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “J. C. Woods, Woods P. O., owner. In the northern part of T. 17 N., R. 8 E., on the east side of Thompson Creek, about 900 feet above the creek, and opposite the head of the Minetta Ditch, is a cropping of rather fine-grained marble, having apparently formed the rim of a watercourse. No work has been done on this deposit to determine the extent of the limestone.”

  • Siskiyou County, California – A. Robertson (Soapstone Deposit) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    “A. Robertson, Fort Jones, owner. In Sec. 1, T. 42 N., R. 9 W. Soapstone is shown by shallow diggings on the top of a serpentine hill. The workings are insufficient to show either the extent or the character of the soapstone.

  • Siskiyou County, California – G. B. Russell (Sandstone Quarries) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    G. B. Russell, Yreka, owns a quarry in Sec. 7, T. 45 N., R 6 W. The stone is a fine-grained, bluish-gray sandstone. It is used for building and monument work and for flagstones; it resists weathering very well, showing no deterioration after an exposure of over forty years.

    “Mr. Russell has two quarries in Sec. 30, T. 45 N., R. 6 W. In the quarry on the west side of the ridge the coarser-grained tawny sandstone is cleared off to reach the underlying fine-grained gray sandstone, which is similar to the Henley sandstone. The overlying sandstone cuts in blocks up to 8 feet long, and from 12 to 18 inches wide. In the quarry on the east side of the ridge the sandstone is very hard. It is worked by plugs and feathers, and breaks in blocks and rifts with the grain almost equal to lumber."

  • Yreka (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Antone or Weeks Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Siskiyou County,” by J. C. O’Brien, District Mining Engineer, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 43, No. 4, October 1947, pp. 412-461. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Antone or Weeks quarry is 2 miles northeast of Yreka. The sandstone was quarried in layers from 6 inches to 8 feet thick and was used for building in Yreka. (Averill 35, p. 337.)

    • Yreka (northeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Antone, formerly known as the Weeks Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      Antone, formerly known as the Weeks Quarry, in Sec. 2, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., 2 miles northeast of Yreka. Owned by Mrs. G. Antone; comprises 160 acres, patented, at an elevation of 2700 feet; occurs in stratified layers from 6 inches to 8 feet thick, and these sheets are pried from the deposit by hand; very little blasting needed; equipment at quarry consists of derrick of 2400 pounds capacity and mining tools; three men employed; stone of good quality, and has been used since 1860; new high school and other buildings in Yreka constructed with this stone; also used for tombstones; leased to J. P. Russell.”

  • Yreka (near), Siskiyou County, California – Fioch Brothers (Sandstone Quarry) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Fioch Brothers, Yreka, own a quarry in Sec. 13, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., near Yreka, where considerable stone has been taken out. The face of the quarry shows massive sandstone, nearly horizontal, dipping slightly east. The upper bed is at least 8 feet thick, and coarse-grained. Only very few niggerheads occur and the sandstone is very uniform in texture, of a tawny color. Underlying this, but without any parting, is a bed of dark gray sandstone, under which shows again tawny sandstone, which forms the present floor of the quarry.”

    • Yreka (near), Siskiyou County, California – Fiock Bros. Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

      Fiock Bros. Quarry, in Sec. 13, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., near Yreka; considerable stone removed; face of the quarry shows massive sandstone, nearly horizontal, dipping slightly east; upper bed is 10 feet thick, coarse grained; of a very uniform texture, and tawny in color.

      “Bibl.: Bull. No. 38, p. 140.”

    • Yreka (near), Siskiyou County, California – Fiock Brothers Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from “Mines and Mineral Resources of Siskiyou County,” by J. C. O’Brien, District Mining Engineer, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 43, No. 4, October 1947, pp. 412-461. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Fiock Brothers quarry is in sec. 13, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., M.D., near Yreka. The stone is coarse grained, even textured, and tawny in color. (Averill 35, p. 337).

  • Yreka (southeast of), Siskiyou County, California – Steel Quarry (Macadam) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part VI. “The Counties of Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity,” by G. Chester Brown, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 746-925.)

    Steele Quarry, in Sec. 27, T. 45 N., R. 7 W., ¾ mile southeast of Yreka. Owned by J. M. Steele; comprises 100 acres, located in 1896; deposit just being opened up and its extent not determined as yet; plant consists of a crusher, operated by gasoline, cars, mining tools; five men are employed; rock used on streets in Yreka.”

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