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Home > Search > Site Map > California > CA - Quarry Links and Photographs > Santa Cruz County > List of Stone Quarries

Santa Cruz County – List of Stone Quarries, Etc. (Continued) *

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

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  • Santa Cruz County Limestone Industry History: Lime Kiln Legacies: The History of the Lime Industry in Santa Cruz County (Book), by Frank A Perry, Robert W. Piwarzyk, Michael D. Luther, Alverda Orlando, Allan Molho, and Sierra L. Perry, Forward by Kenneth Jensen. The book is available from the Museum of Art and History, Santa Cruz, California. (The contents of the book are described as: “Over 125 illustrations - some never before published, Lime Kiln Legacies includes: The Story of the Cowell, Holmes, I,X.L. and 23 other lime companies, Walking tour of a lime manufacturing site, Geologic History, The life of the lime workers, and more!”)
  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, California - Economic Development of the City of Santa Cruz 1850-1950, by Susan Lehmann, presented by Santa Cruz Public Libraries, California. (Scroll down to the section on “Lime and Cement.”
  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – W. A. Caplatzi (Limestone Quarry & Screening Plant) (From California Mineral Production for 1919, Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, 1920, pp. 119.)
    Limestone quarry with crushing and screening plant of W. A. Caplatzi, at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County. Limestone quarry was crushing and screening plant of W. A. Caplatzi
    • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Pacific Limestone Products Company (formerly the Caplatzi Quarry) (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Pacific Limestone Products Company was organized in 1922 and has been in operation since as a producer of limestone for a variety of uses. The main office, quarry, and plant are at the end of Spring Street, Santa Cruz.."

      "...When the company was organized it took over the Caplatzi quarry which had been supplying limestone for fertilizer, poultry food, flux, etc...."

    • Caplatzi Limestone Quarry & Screening Plant:

      Also see: Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California - Pacific Limestone Products Company below.

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – the City Street Improvement Company Quarries (Quarry Photograph ca early 1900s) The following photographs are from the Twenty-Second Annual Report, Part 1, U. S. Geological Survey. (The date of publication is unknown.) (You will find more photographs of these quarries under their individual entries.)
    General View of Quarries of City Street Improvement Company, Santa Cruz District, California .
    (1. Last Chance; 2. Thurber; 3. The Hole; 4. Old; 5. Point; 6. Rattlesnake.)
    General View of Quarries of City Street Improvement Company
  • Santa Cruz (northwest of), Santa Cruz County, California – the De Dero Quarry (Limestone and Lime) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "De Dero Quarry, L. de Dero, Santa Cruz P. O., owner. This quarry lies about 10 miles northwest of Santa Cruz and consists of two openings, one covering a half acre of more and another closely adjoining on the north less than half as large. The stone has been quarried to a depth ranging from 8 to 20 feet on the front to 40 or 50 feet on the back face. It is overlaid by from 2 to 6 feet of brown adobe. The limestone is much shattered, and occurs in small dimensions only. There are numerous cavities, some filled with clay and some lined with calcite. The lower part of the quarry face shows an irregular bed of impure sericite schist, interlaminated with the limestone in places, and at the south end of the quarry changing into a hard blue quartzite. There is a rock-crusher at the quarry, and the stone is used for macadam and concrete."

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Cruz County, California – the Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company Quarries and Lime Kilns (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company, 211 Drumm street, San Francisco. The limekilns are located on the north side of the wagon road about one half mile west of Thurber's. There are three pot-kilns in use, in which the lime is burned with wood, and another stone kiln which is not in use. The lime is packed in barrels at the kilns and hauled by wagon to Santa Cruz, where it is shipped by rail or steamer.

    "Limestone was formerly quarried at the kilns, but at present most of the stone is hauled from a large quarry about half a mile up the cañon. This quarry, covering an acre or more, has a face of about 150 feet. There is a tramway from the quarry to the kilns, but for some reason this has been abandoned and the stone is hauled to the kilns by wagon.

    "Besides the large quarry, there are numerous smaller quarry openings along the sides of the cañon, from which large quantities of limestone have been removed. The stone outcrops in the walls of the cañon in many places for more than half a mile above the quarries. It would appear from the outcrop in this cañon and at the quarries southeast and west, that a large part of this great peneplain is underlaid by crystalline limestone. As the adobe covers the surface everywhere except at the quarries and the outcrops along the cañon walls, the total extent of the limestone beds was not determined, but the quarries and outcrop clearly show several very heavy limestone beds, with a general dip to the northwest and separated by beds of schist and granite.

    "The same company has other kilns and quarries in a cañon about 2 miles west of these above mentioned, and about 3 ½ miles from Santa Cruz. There are three large quarry openings, one of which has been abandoned, and several smaller openings. There are three large pot-kilns in use, in which the lime is burned with wood cut from the neighboring hills. The barrels are made in a cooper shop at the kilns, and the lime is barreled and hauled by wagon to Santa Cruz for shipment. The large quarry opening has a face of about 150 feet of comparatively pure, coarsely crystalline, white and blue limestone, overlaid by a few feet of dark brown adobe, which has washed down the numerous cracks, staining the surface of the stone. The next opening immediately adjoining the above mentioned on the west has a face of about 50 feet, and contains several pockets of clay. The next large opening west has been abandoned and the lower level filled with water and waste material. In the cañon walls in the vicinity of these quarries are large exposures of limestone that have not been worked. The beds are very extensive, and are admirably exposed for quarrying by the deep cañon that has been cut down into them. The strata have a dip west of north, and the underlying rocks are exposed down the cañon."

    Ill. No. 32. H. Cowell & Co.'s Limestone Quarry, 3 ½ miles northwest of Santa Cruz. H. Cowell & Co.'s Limestone Quarry
    • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company (circa 1943) – “Lime,” by Henry G. Hubbard (From: Hubbard, Henry G. Mines and “Mineral Resources of Santa Cruz County,” California Journal of Mines and Geology, January 1943, California Division of Mines and Geology, pp. 43-44.)
    • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Company (Limestone, Marble, & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Henry Cowell Lime & Cement Company is now (circa 1947) the only lime producer in the county. The main office is at 2 Market Street, San Francisco. Henry Cowell, founder of the company, and well known as owner and operator of limestone deposits and lime kilns in other parts of the state, operated in Santa Cruz County as a member of the firm of Davis & Cowell in the eighties, at the pioneer lime plant which had been established in 1851 by I. E. Davis and A. P. Jordan, about a mile northwest of Santa Cruz. He later formed the company bearing his name and extended his limestone holdings northward. The largest deposit of limestone known in the district, according to Eckel (33),* is located near the Cowell Home Ranch and contains 200 acres. Other smaller deposits are near it.

      (* Edwin C. Eckel, "Limestone Deposits of the San Francisco Region," California Division of Mines Report 29, pp. 348-361, illus., 1933.)

      "The quarry worked in late years is 2 miles northwest of Santa Cruz and 1.9 miles by road from Rincon, a railroad station where the lime plant now used is situated. However, over the long period of operation, a number of quarries have been opened from 1 mile to 3 ½ miles from Santa Cruz, and the I.X.L. quarries 2 ½ miles west of Felton were also operated but have been idle since 1919. At the latter place, the limestone occurs on a point at the junction of two canyons, and dips nearly vertically. Backs of about 400 feet were available and one quarry face was 200 feet high and 300 feet wide. The stone is coarsely crystalline and considerably shattered.

      "In recent quarrying (2 miles northwest of Santa Cruz), jackhammers with detachable bits have been used for drilling and black powder and dynamite for blasting. Limestone is trucked to the kilns at Rincon. The limestone usually has an overburden of a few feet of clay. The size of quarries varies, the larger having a face over 100 feet high and an area of several acres.

      "Pot kilns were used at both the upper and lower quarries, and at the I.X.L. quarry. Wood was used for fuel, and 4 ½ to 5 days were required to burn a charge. Three such kilns at the I.X.L. works produced 1600 to 1700 barrels of lime a week. The combined capacity of six kilns at the quarries 1 and 2 miles northwest of Santa Cruz was 2500 to 3000 barrels of lime a week, during the dry season. Later four Standard 34-foot continuous kilns were built at Rincon on the railroad. These were satisfactory for burning dense fine-grained limestone, but not for the coarsely crystalline stone. They required sorting of rock for character and size of feed, adding to expense. They fell into disuse and three pot kilns were built at Rincon to handle all the limestone. Each kiln has a capacity of 1600 barrels. Fuel oil with steam atomization is used for firing, with four burners and four draw doors on each kiln. From 4 to 4 ½ days is required for burning, 36 to 48 hours for cooling and 2 to 3 days for drawing the lime, the last depending on the number of men available. During the war, with labor scarce and expensive, the crew of men was greatly reduced, and only 15 men were employed at the quarry and lime plant. Lime barrels are made at the plant."

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California - Historical Marble Quarries/Lime Industry once located on the University of California, Santa Cruz, Campus - “Campus site to be on National Register of Historic Places,” By Sally Morgan, Santa Cruz News/Events, May 5, 2007. (Use the above link to read the entire article which includes photographs and further links for reading.)

    “The State Historical Resources Commission on May 3 granted approval for listing UCSC’s Cowell Lime Works Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places.”

    “The historic district, which was nominated by UCSC, is an area of about 30 acres around the main entrance of the campus on either side of Coolidge Drive. The district includes historic buildings and lime production features and related support facilities that date to the latter half of the 19th and early 20th centuries...”

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Friends of the Cowell Lime Works (A few of the web site sections are listed below.)
    • From the “About Us” section of the web site:

      “The Friends work to restore and preserve the old lime kilns and historic buildings of the Cowell Lime Works Historic District through fundraising, coordinating volunteers, and soliciting donations of materials. The Friends bring the site’s rich history to life through tours and other educational programs.

      “The District encompasses some 30 acres at the main entrance to the University of California, Santa Cruz. The district includes four lime kilns, the cookhouse, cooperage, hay barn, Cardiff House, worker cabins, and many other buildings and structures from the 19th century. In 2007 the district was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.”

    • History of the Cowell Lime Works
    • News of the Cowell Lime Work

      August 8 & 9, 2009 - Inaugural Conference on Lime and Lime Kilns in California History

      “Friends of the Cowell Limeworks Historic District is proud to host the first-ever conference on the history of lime and lime making in California. Profits from the conference will benefit restoration projects in the Historic District, at one time the site of California’s largest lime works. The conference is open to anyone interested in California history.”

    • Cowell Lime Works Tour Brochure (This section includes a downloadable tour brochure in PDF)
    • Cowell Lime Works Historic District:

      “A history and tour of the Historic District at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Lime was manufactured here in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

    • “The District includes four lime kilns, the cooperage (where barrels were made), the hay barn, cookhouse, limeworker cabins, Cardiff house, and many other historic structures.”

    • Henry Cowell Sesquicentennial in October 2015 – 150 Years in Santa Cruz (1865-2015), the Friends of the Cowell Lime Works, University of California Santa Cruz

      “It was 150 years ago, in 1865, that Henry Cowell bought a half interest in the lime-making business in Santa Cruz.  The Friends are organizing a special commemorative event in October.  More details to come soon.

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Cowell Home Ranch, 1790’s to 1947 (Lime and Limestone) - Excerpt from the Application for Federal Historic Registration of the Cowell Home Ranch in Santa Cruz by David Eselius (submitted circa January 2003). Also see: Santa Cruz, California – University of California at Santa Cruz Campus (UCSC). (The following quotations are used with the permission of the author, David Eselius. Note: June 2016: The links to the following section are no longer available, although I am attempting to reach the author. If anyone has knowledge of David Eselius or the above application, please contact me. Thank you. Peggy B. Perazzo)
    • Below the following quotations you will find a list of some of the very intersting and informative links to David Eselius’ web site: Cultural Landscape Report of Historical Cowell Home Ranch.

      Statements concerning Cowell Home Ranch Santa Cruz, by David Eselius:

      “...Santa Cruz's remaining lime industry historic resources include: 12,000 +/- public acres, five each single-pot lime-kilns, four each three-pot lime-kilns, one each two-pot lime-kiln, one each continuous lime-kiln, one each pit lime-kiln, quarries, roads, trails, tramways, oral histories, and a large collection of unique ranch/lime production buildings. The lands and kilns of 'Cowell Home Ranch' lime production history dates to the founding of Mission Santa Cruz in 1791. Lime production occurred within the 'Cowell Home Ranch' boundaries from the 1790's to 1947. The lime production period of greatest interest is 1880.

      “...Within this Historic Registration application, all sited historical resources are California State or local government property. The historic fabric is located within green belts, watershed, parks, and a university. The historic fabric of registration occupies only a portion of this space. Most of the resources are removed from close proximity to current structures.

      “...In 1865 Jordan was ill and sold his share of ‘Davis & Jordan Lime Company’ to Henry Cowell. The company was renamed ‘Davis & Cowell Lime Company.’ In 1871 Henry Cowell started to invest in Contra Costa County. Later, the Mt. Diablo area was to become a large lime and cement manufacturing area for the Cowell corporations.

      “...In Santa Cruz, by 1880, Davis & Cowell owned one of the largest lime production companies on the West Coast, producing approximately 60% of San Francisco's total lime supply. During the same time, Santa Cruz as a whole produced over 90% of San Francisco's supply of lime, half of California's total production (Langenbach 1988: 8).”

    • Cowell Home Ranch (photographs and history), Cultural Landscape Report of Historical Cowell Home Ranch, by David Eselius.
    • Rancho Rincon Upper Two Kilns circa 1791 to circa 1850
    • Rancho Rincon Upper Four Kilns circa 1850 to circa 1855
    • Cowell Ranch House Lime Production 1853-1920, Ranching to 1961
    • Samuel Adams Lime Production Area 1858 to circa 1920
    • Circa 1865 Santa Cruz County Economic Resources
    • IXL 1900 to 1919 Originally Developed 1874
    • Rincon Station Lime Production Area 1906 to 1947
    • Laguna Creek Lime Production Area
    • Non-Santa Cruz California Cowell Locations (According to the Cultural Landscape Report of Historical Cowell Home Ranch, the Cowell family holdings ranged "from as far north as Canada (Texada Island, BC), down along the coast as far south as San Luis Obispo" and as far north as Canada (Texada Island, BC). The holdings are reported to be within California fifteen counties.
    • Cowell Family and S. H. Cowell Foundation
    • Selected Archeological and Cultural Bibliographical References
    • Heritage Tourism
  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Henry Cowell Lime Company (located on the campus of the University of California - Santa Cruz Campus) (The following is an excerpt from A Guidebook to Mining In America: Volume 1: West (The Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and farther West), by John R. Park, Stonerose Publishing Co., Miami, Florida, April, 2000," available at Stone Publishing Company. The following quotation is used with permission of the author, John R. Park. If you are interested in a copy of this book, it is available on amazon.com.)

    "Cowell Lime Company on campus of Univ. of California, Santa Cruz. Public information office: 307 Church Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060-3811; (4108) 427-3663, 429-4008...."

    "Barns, repair shops, and lime kilns of the Cowell Lime Company, and also the mansion of Henry Cowell, are clustered near the main entrance of the Campus, serving as the admissions office and various other functions.

    "In keeping with political correctness (which may well be the official State motto), the lime kilns are not mentioned in the printed tour of the campus which includes information on all other historic structures, and the kilns themselves, although less than a dozen feet from the main access road, and unavoidably visible, are in no way marked. The information booth attendant I asked about the lime kilns professed no knowledge of them, even though the kilns are clearly visible from the booth, only a few hundred feet away. For the lime kilns, park in the admissions building (Cook House) parking lot.

    "Other Cowell Lime Company kilns may be seen at...Fall Creek State Park."

  • Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz County, California – Henry Cowell Upper Marble Quarry, today located at the amphitheater of the University of California, Santa Cruz.  (The following photograph is entitled, “Part of one of several limestone quarries on campus. U.C.S.C.,”  On the back of the postcard is printed the following: University of California, Santa Cruz.  Photograph by Ansel Adams.)
  • Part of one of several limestone quarries on campus. U.C.S.C.” (postcard photograph) Today the upper quarry is located at the amphitheater on the U.C. Santa Cruz campus.) “Part of one of several limestone quarries on campus. U.C.S.C.” (postcard photograph) Today the upper quarry is located at the amphitheater on the U.C. Santa Cruz campus.)
  • Santa Cruz, California – University of California at Santa Cruz Campus (UCSC)
    • (University of California, Santa Cruz) Campus Guide, 1973 (and map) - This online campus guide provides information on the limestone quarries and kilns on the University of California, Santa Cruz Campus.
    • Henry Cowell Lime Company – Photographs of the Upper Quarry & Lower Quarry Area (now the Amphitheater, the Lower Quarry, and the Lime Kilns on the University of California, Santa Cruz Campus). There are also photographs below of pieces of marble used as landscaping near some of the buildings on the campus. (I took these photographs in the summer of 2003 when we were shown these various marble quarrying areas by my husband Pat's cousin and his wife, Larry and Cheryl Perazzo. Peggy B. Perazzo)
    • Henry Cowell Ranch Buildings and Kilns Photographs (located near the entrance to the University of California, Santa Cruz Campus).
    • Henry Cowell Lower Marble Quarry Area – Photographs. This quarry is located in one of the residential areas for the students of the University of California, Santa Cruz campus.
    • Henry Cowell Upper Marble Quarry Area & Lime Kiln – Photographs. This quarry is now the site of the amphitheater on the University of California, Santa Cruz campus.
    • Marble rocks used as landscaping on the University of California, Santa Cruz campus. (Please note that these pieces may not have come from this quarry. There is no indication of the original location from which these pieces originated.)
      Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus
      Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus  
      Close-up photographs of some of the marble
      on the Santa Cruz campus.

      Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus Close-up photographs of some of the marble rocks on the Santa Cruz campus
      More close-up photographs of some of the marble
      on the Santa Cruz campus.
    • View from Santa Cruz area. According to Larry Perazzo, “…was taken from the eastern edge of the U.C.S.C. campus and looks in a southerly direction. The rolling hills in the foreground are a section of the Pogonip wilderness area which is part of the Santa Cruz Parks and Recreation Dept. The buildings you see are a part of Santa Cruz. If you were to scan to the right, you would see the town of Monterey across the bay.
      Looking at Santa Cruz from eastern edge of U. C. Santa Cruz campus. Looking at Santa Cruz from eastern edge of U. C. Santa Cruz campus

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