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Santa Clara County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Almaden (near), Santa Clara County, California - Paul Houret - Serpentine Quarry (Serpentine) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, “Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California,” by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "A moderate quantity of serpentine was mined at the quarry of Paul Houret near Almaden during 1946 and 1947. The product was transported to the plant of the Permanente Metals Corporation, Permanente, where it was fused with imported phosphate rock. The resultant calcium magnesium phosphate (Thermophos) was granulated and sold as a fertilizer for soils deficient in phosphorus and magnesium."

  • Alum Rock Canon, Santa Clara County, California - the Alum Rock Quarry (Shale with Slaty Material) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Alum Rock Quarry, in Alum Rock Canon, at end of railway track, about 100 yards above the baths. It is operated by the City of San Jose, for grading the roads within Alum Rock Park and the city streets. The rock is a siliceous shale, interbedded with a slaty material. It is broken down into a talus slope, and fed through a 60-foot steel-lined chute into bins which load directly to the cars."

  • Alviso (near), Santa Clara County, California - Bay Shell Company (Limestone/Shells) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Bay Shell Company, 503 Market Street, San Francisco, began operation about 1924 and has reported production every year since. They pump shells from the south arm of San Francisco Bay near Alviso. Shells are unloaded from barges by an overhead crane, dried in a rotary oil-fired kiln, screened, and crushed partly in a hammer mill and partly in rolls. Fine- and medium-sized products are sold for use in fertilizers and as chicken grits."

    • Alviso, Santa Clara County, California - Bay Shell Co. (Lime & Shells) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) Bay Shell Co. (agricultural lime and shells); (Address) 1583 E. 14th St., Oakland; (Location) Alviso.

  • Alviso (near), Santa Clara County, California - Beck Dredging Company (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Beck Dredging Company, Capt. L. H. Beck, 305 Parrott Drive, San Mateo, has been producing shell lime since 1931. The plant is near Alviso, at the south end of San Francisco Bay. Limestone is sold for agricultural use, poultry grits, etc."

  • Alviso (near), Santa Clara County, California - W. B. Ortley Shell Company (Limestone/Shells) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "W. B. Ortley Shell Company, Alviso, produced shells near Alviso from 1930-41. Shells were pumped from the bay by a rotary pump mounted on a barge and after drying for several days were put through a rotary kiln fired by natural gas. They were then elevated and run through a rotary screen. Coarse shells were crushed in rolls in closed circuit with the screen. Crushed shells were sold for poultry food."

  • Anderson Lake Dam, Santa Clara County, California - Anderson Lake (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 3 E., M. D. B. M. (projected) at Anderson Lake Dam; Date quarry opened: possibly 1950; quarry was idle on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: metamorphic; Rock type (grab sample): Silicified serpentine; Operation size: Moderate; Equipment used: (Removed); Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: Semicircular, 200-ft. diameter, 100 ft. face; Transport distance: mile; Crushing equipment: (Removed); Classification equipment: (Removed); Products: Rip rap and rock for dam; Rated capacity (per day): (Blank); Number of employees: (Blank); Remarks: Tough massive rock.

  • Campbell, Santa Clara County, California - the Greystone Sandstone Quarry, presented by E. B. Keck.

    The Greystone Sandstone Quarry is located southeast of San Jose and Palo Alto in today's town of Campbell. The quarry was owned by Leland Stanford and was used in the construction of Inner Quad of Stanford University located near Palo Alto in the Santa Clara Valley. This information, photographs, and more history can be viewed on The City Rocks - Explore the Hidden World of Building Stone - Stanford's Sandstone by E. B. Keck.

  • Campbell, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California - the Greystone Quarry  (Books)

    Archeological Evaluation of the Greystone Quarry in the Santa Teresa Hills: Report, 1978, by Archeological Resource M.

    A Biography of Stanford Sandstone:  From Greystone Quarry to Stone River” (PDF magazine article), by Charles Junkerman, in Sandstone and Tile, Vol. 34, No. 3, Fall 2010, Stanford Historical Society.

    The City Rocks!:  Explore the Hidden World of Building Stone, Stanford’s Sandstone, by E B Keck, Publisher, 1999.  

    The Founders and the Architects:  The Design of Stanford University, by Paul Venable Turner, Marcia E Vetrocq, Karen J Weitze, Stanford, California, Department of Art, Stanford University, 1976.

    Greystone Area Geology and Topography, by Olaf Pitt Jenkins,  Logan Burrell, A. E. Remington, Stanford Geological Survey, 1912.

    Memorial Arch, Stanford University, published between 1903 and 1906?

    Stanford University Buildings (Stanford, California), by Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson, and Abbott,  Stanford University, Stanford, California, 1891.

    Stanford University Buildings and Grounds, 1893.

    Stanford University: The Campus Guide, by Richard Joncas, David J. Neuman, and Paul V. Turner, 2nd edition, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006, 191 pp.

    The Stanfords and the Serra Statue at the Presidio Monterey,” by Dorothy Regnery, in Sandstone and Tile, Stanford Historical Society, Vol. 13, No. 2, Winter 1989, pp. 2-5.

  • Edenvale (southwest),* Santa Clara County, California - Bernal Marl and Limestone Deposit (Limestone & Marl) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (* Please note the above-cited book indicates the deposit is located "southwest of Edenvale" while the book cited below dated April 1954, indicates the deposit is located "southeast of Edenvale.")

    "Bernal marl and limestone deposit is 3 miles by road southwest of Edenvale, a town on the railroad and highway 4 miles southeast of San Jose.

    "A hard bluish-gray limestone occurs over an area of 100 acres and is overlain by a soft marl, the thickness of marl being irregular. The deposit is on the east slope of the Santa Teresa Mountains and the total thickness of limestone is claimed to be 200 feet.

    "The marl has been worked at intervals since 1915, the last reported producing have been in 1938, by California Lime Marl Fertilizer Company. It was sold for agricultural use. Thirty years ago several thousand tons of the hard limestone was used in beet-sugar refining. Work has recently (circa 1947) been reported under way to reopen the deposit, by Los Gatos Construction Company, Los Gatos.

    "The following is an analysis of the marl supplied by the operator in 1919l

    SiO2, 1.08 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.64 percent
    CaO, 54.99 percent
    CaCO3, 98.20 percent
    MgO, 0.25 percent
    MgCO3, 0.52 percent
    Loss on ignition, 43.14 percent
    SO3, 0.02 percent

    "A partial analysis by the State Department of Agriculture in 1937 of the product then being marketed as 'Bernal's Carbonate of Lime' showed 79.2 percent CaCO3 equivalent."

    • Edenvale (southeast of), Santa Clara County, California - Bernal Marl and Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Bernal Marl and Limestone Deposit. Location: On the southeast side of the Santa Teresa Hills, 3 miles southeast of Edenvale on Highway 101, and 1 miles southwest of the highway; in sec. 19, T. 8 S., R., 2 E., M. D., projected.

      "A very hard, fine-grained, gray limestone with a low easterly dip crops out over a vertical distance of about 200 feet at this locality. A typical exposure shows 2 feet of soil and 4 feet of soft marl overlying hard limestone. The thickness of the marl varies in the quarry workings where it is exposed in a number of irregular benches 20 to 30 feet high.

      "Marl for agricultural use has been produced here intermittently since 1915. The last reported production was made in 1938 and a California Department of Agriculture analysis of the product tested a 79.2 percent calcium carbonate equivalent. Some production of hard limestone for use in the beet sugar industry was made about 30 years ago."

  • Edenvale (southwest), Santa Clara County, California - California Lime Marl Fertilizer Company

    California Lime Marl Fertilizer Company - See: Edenvale, Santa Clara County, California - Bernal Marl and Limestone Deposit above.

  • Guadalupe (2 ½ miles from), Santa Clara County, California – the Guadaloupe Lime Company  (Lime/Kilns)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “The Guadaloupe Lime Company has continued its operations during the past year, producing fully three hundred barrels of lime per month.  A full description of their lime kiln was given in the eighth annual report of the State Mineralogist, pages 543 to 545.  The quarries, as developed at present, show several grades in the limestone, varying from a black bituminous to grayish white.  One special feature of the lime has been noted and complained of by the parties using the same, that is, the quick setting of the lime when made up as mortar.  This is rather a property of cement than of lime, and indicates the presence of silicates in the lime.  A close examination of the quarries reveals that the limestone interstratified with narrow bands of chert often dark colored, and then easily separated by hand, but the limestone itself is often dark or the chert light in color, thus rendering the segregation of the chert well nigh impossible, and it thus finds its way into the kiln.

    “The silica thus introduced into the kiln with the lime fully accounts for the property of quick setting noticed and objected to by the consumers.

    “These bands of dark colored chert emphasize the intricate placations of the foldings which the strata have been subjected, very similar to those exposed along the Penetencia Creek mentioned before.  These plications render the work of quarrying the limestone more difficult and expensive on account of the large amount of surface and soil and waste material that it becomes necessary to remove.

    “Possibly the manufacture of cement might be advantageously commenced at this place, as the lime already has some of the properties of cement, and further materials necessary for the manufacture can be found near at hand.”

    • Guadalupe (2 miles from), Santa Clara County, California - Guadalupe Lime Company Limestone Quarries and Lime Kilns (Limestone & Lime Kilns) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "...The only recorded limestone production in the vicinity was in early days by Guadalupe Lime Company, who operated quarries and kilns on the south side of Capitancillos Creek 2 miles from Guadalupe."

  • Guadalupe/Los Gatos (near), Santa Clara County, California - Los Gatos Lime Company Kiln  (Limestone/Lime/Kiln)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “The lime kiln near Los Gatos was in operation for a while during the past year, and the local market supplied.  At these limestone quarries they likewise have to contend with the interstratified chert, rendering hand picking necessary, and thus increasing the cost of production.”

    • Guadalupe/Guadaloupe, Santa Clara County, California - Los Gatos Lime Company Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 619.

      Santa Clara County, by W. L. Watts, Assistant in the Field.

      Lime.

      “Lime quarries and Kilns at Guadaloupe have been running in full force since last report, and through the summer of 1890 have produced one hundred and fifty barrels per day. This lime is principally in demand for laying foundations and for concrete work.

      “The works of the Los Gatos Lime Company, although delayed by the wet winter of 1889 and 1890, have been running steadily since the month of April. A. Page’s improved kiln, with a nominal capacity of one hundred barrels of lime per day, has been erected by this company at Los Gatos. The Kiln is about two miles from the limestone quarries of Mr. J. E. Ellis, which were described in the report of the State Mineralogist for 1888. The road from the quarries to kiln is down grade, so that a two-horse team can haul six thousand five hundred pounds at a load.

      “The general dimensions of the kiln are as follows: Height of masonry, nineteen feet; external diameter of cupola, twelve feet; internal, six feet. The kiln is lined with firebrick, and is fired by three fireplaces. On a level with the fireplaces are arches which support the charge, and beneath these is a kettle, into which the lime falls when burnt. The draw doors are on a level with the floor of the warehouse, which is a continuation of the shed around the kiln, so that the lime can be barreled at the kiln and rolled directly across the warehouse to the cars n the sidetrack. This kiln has worked to the entire satisfaction of the company, making ninety-three barrels of lime, and consuming less than four cords of wood per day.”

  • Lone Hill, Santa Clara County, California - Lone Hill (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, April 1954, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Secs. 7 and 18, T. 8 S., R. 1 E., M. D. B. M. (projected) at Lone Hill, Date quarry opened: 1952; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Volcanic; Rock type (grab sample): Rhyolite; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Rooter-scarifier, bulldozer; Type excavation: Hilltop; Excavation size: 500 ft. diameter; Transport distance: 500 ft.; Crushing equipment: Jaw; Classification equipment: Screens, dry; Products: Crusher run base; Rated capacity (per day): 1000 tons; Number of employees: 5 ?; Remarks: Leveling hill for housing development.

  • Los Altos (southwest of), Santa Clara County, California - Bond Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Bond limestone deposit is on 80 acres in sec. 14, T. 7 S., R. 3 W., M.D., on the west side of Black Mountain 10 miles by road, southwest of Los Altos. The following analysis quoted by Franke (30a, p. 9),* should probably be considered as a picked sample in view of what is written elsewhere in this report about the Calera limestone."

    (* Herbert A. Franke, "Santa Clara County," California Mining Bureau Report 26, pp. 2-39, illus., 1930.)

    SiO2, 1.08 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.64 percent
    CaO, 54.99 percent
    CaCO3, 98.20 percent
    MgO, 0.25 percent
    MgCO3, 0.52 percent
    Loss on ignition, 43.14 percent
    SO3, 0.02 percent

  • Los Altos (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Sondgrath Bros. (Neary) (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 6, T. 7 S., R. 2 W., M. D. B. M. (projected) west of Los Altos. Date quarry was opened: 1935; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Contact; Rock type (grab sample): Serpentine and shale; Operation size: Large; Equipment used: Rooter, bulldozer, carryalls (3); Type excavation: Hilltop; Excavation size: 500 ft. diameter; Transport distance: 500 ft.; Crushing equipment: Jaw; Classification equipment: Belt to loading bins; Products: Fill rock and sub base; Rated capacity (per day): 2500 tons; Number of employees: 7; Remarks: Prevents expansion of adobe under slab construction.

  • Los Altos (south of), Santa Clara County, California - Winship Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Winship deposit is in the SW sec. 13, T. 7 S., R. 3 W., on the southwest side of Black Mountain. It is about 8 miles by road from a point on the railroad just south of Los Altos. So far as known, it is undeveloped. The following is an analysis by Sidney A. Tibbets of Berkeley, of a sample taken by Walter W. Bradley, but it is not known how much of this grade of limestone is available (Franke 30a).*

    SiO2, 1.56 percent
    Al2O3, 0.47 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.22 percent
    Mn3O4, 0.05 percent
    P2O5, 0.06 percent
    CaCO3, 97.20 percent
    MgCO3, 0.43 percent

    (* Herbert A. Franke, "Santa Clara County," California Mining Bureau Report 26, pp. 2-39, illus., 1930.)

  • Los Gatos (2 miles from), Santa Clara County, California - Douglas Ranch or Ellis Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Douglas Ranch or Ellis limestone deposit is in the SW NW sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 1 W., 2 miles by road from Los Gatos (Irelan 88, pp. 544-545).* In 1886, 900 tons of this limestone was shipped to a sugar refinery at Alvarado and in 1889 and 1890 the quarries supplied the kiln of Los Gatos Lime Company, about 2 miles distant. The first quarry opened with a width of 18 feet composed of 'alternate layers of black bituminous limestone interstratified with dark-colored chert' but other openings exposed a thickness of over 100 feet. The stone is fine-grained with a flinty fracture and with bands and masses of chert, as is characteristic of the Calera limestone. The color ranges from white in narrow calcite veinlets, to black.

    "The only shipment of limestone from Los Gatos in recent years of which we have a record, was in 1938 by Basic-Limestone Products Company. Possibly it came from this deposit."

    (* William Irelan, Jr., Eighth Annual Report of the State Mineralogist for the Year Ending October 1, 1888, California Mining Bureau Report 8, 948 pp. illus., 1888.)

  • Los Gatos (2 1/2 miles from), Santa Clara County, California - Ellis Limestone Deposit

    Ellis Limestone Deposit - See: Los Gatos, Santa Clara County, California - Douglas Ranch Limestone Deposit above.

  • Los Gatos (10 miles from), Santa Clara County, California - the Cassell Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Cassell Quarry, on the Bear Creek road, 10 miles from Los Gatos; John Cassell, Los Gatos, owner. A buff-colored sandstone, similar to that in the Goodrich quarries (see below). The Carnegie Library in Santa Cruz is built of this stone."

  • Los Gatos (southeast of), Santa Clara County, California - Los Gatos Lime Company Kiln (Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 619.)

    Santa Clara County, by W. L. Watts, Assistant in the Field.

    Lime.

    “Lime quarries and Kilns at Guadaloupe have been running in full force since last report, and through the summer of 1890 have produced one hundred and fifty barrels per day. This lime is principally in demand for laying foundations and for concrete work.

    “The works of the Los Gatos Lime Company, although delayed by the wet winter of 1889 and 1890, have been running steadily since the month of April. A. Page’s improved kiln, with a nominal capacity of one hundred barrels of lime per day, has been erected by this company at Los Gatos . The Kiln is about two miles from the limestone quarries of Mr. J. E. Ellis, which were described in the report of the State Mineralogist for 1888. The road from the quarries to kiln is down grade, so that a two-horse team can haul six thousand five hundred pounds at a load.

    “The general dimensions of the kiln are as follows: Height of masonry, nineteen feet; external diameter of cupola, twelve feet; internal, six feet. The kiln is lined with firebrick, and is fired by three fireplaces. On a level with the fireplaces are arches which support the charge, and beneath these is a kettle, into which the lime falls when burnt. The draw doors are on a level with the floor of the warehouse, which is a continuation of the shed around the kiln, so that the lime can be barreled at the kiln and rolled directly across the warehouse to the cars n the sidetrack. This kiln has worked to the entire satisfaction of the company, making ninety-three barrels of lime, and consuming less than four cords of wood per day.”

    • Los Gatos (southeast of), Santa Clara County, California - the Los Gatos Lime Quarry and Kilns (Limestone & Kilns) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

      "Los Gatos Lime Quarry; J. W. Taylor, San Francisco, owner. Located on the mountain 2 miles southeast of Los Gatos. There is a good road, all down grade, to Los Gatos, where the stone was hauled and burned in kilns located on the bank of the creek in the town. The quarry has been idle for a number of years.

      "There are three quarry openings, exposing a total thickness of more than 100 feet of limestone. The rock is in thin layers from a few inches to 30 inches thick; the strata are more or less crumpled. The stone occurs in fragments of such small dimensions that no building stone could be obtained, but which adapts it to use for macadam or lime burning.

      "The limestone is very compact, fine-grained and quite brittle, with a flinty fracture, and locally contains many fine white calcite veins, also considerable inclusions of chert ('flint'), partly in continuos bands and partly in irregular lenses."

  • Los Gatos (south of), Santa Clara County, California - Lyndon Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lyndon Limestone Deposit. Location: About 1 mile due south of Los Gatos on the north side of Limekiln Canyon in sec. 28, T. 8 S., R. 1 W., M. D.

    "Old quarry workings now overgrown with brush extend over a small area. Calera-type limestone is exposed in one face about 10 feet high. It consists of alternating beds of light-colored limestone and black chert ranging from half an inch to 3 inches in thickness."

  • Lyndon (east of), Santa Clara County, California - Lyndon Limestone & Travertine Deposit (Limestone & Travertine) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lyndon deposit has been mentioned by Edwin C. Eckel (33)* as containing both Calera limestone and later travertine. It is reported to be about 2 miles east of Lyndon, a railroad point south of Los Gatos."

    (* Edwin C. Eckel, "Limestone Deposits of the San Francisco Region," California Division of Mines Report 29, pp. 348-361, illus., 1933.)

  • Madrone Station (east of), Santa Clara County, California - Clark Ranch Hydraulic Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 619.)

    Santa Clara County, by W. L. Watts, Assistant in the Field.

    Hydraulic Limestone.

    “An extensive deposit of hydraulic lime is said to have been discovered on the Clark Ranch, situated seven miles east of Madrone Station. There is a good road leading to the ranch.”

  • Monta Vista (west of), Santa Clara County, California - the Permanente Limestone Deposit (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits, Santa Clara Holding Company, El Dorado Sugar Company Quarry, Alameda Sugar Company Quarry) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Permanente Limestone Deposit (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits, Santa Clara Holding Company, El Dorado Sugar Company Quarry, Alameda Sugar Company Quarry). Location: The quarry is about 4 miles west of Monta Vista on the north side of Permanente Creek in SE sec. 18 and the SW sec. 17, T. 7 W., R. 2 W., M. D. Ownership: Permanente Cement Company, Permanente.

    "The presence of limestone deposits on the slopes of Black Mountain has been known for many years and the production of high-grade selectively mined limestone for use in the sugar industry began about 1902 (Aubury, 1906). Early production was at the rate of 30 to 60 tons per day during the dry season. It was stated that the limestone contained black chert, shale, and clay, and that the waste from these impurities caused extra expense in quarrying the rock. Production from this usage continued intermittently until 1934.

    "The Permanente Cement Company began working the deposits in 1939 and gradually increased the production of limestone to about 6,500 tons per day in 1952. The cement company continued to supply the sugar industry with high-lime rock for a number of years and a low-level quarry was opened for this purpose in 1941. Low-grade rock from this quarry was sold as crushed stone. This practice was discontinued as the output of the cement plant expanded and its requirements for limestone increased.

    "The geology at the Permanente quarry and other quarries to the northwest has been described in a recent report by C. W. Walker (1950), as follows:

    "'The limestone apparently is in one stratigraphic zone which is divided lithologically into at least two units. The upper unit is light buff to gray and locally has been named the 'Upper Light' limestone. The unit stratigraphically beneath the light limestone is dark blue gray to black and is referred to locally as the 'Blue' limestone.

    'The 'Upper Light' limestone is light gray and contains numerous well-defined chert lenses and beds which form darker bands on weathered surfaces. Most of the limestone between the layers of chert is very finely crystalline and contains some foraminiferal remains. The beds, which range in thickness from 3 to 18 inches, have not been deformed as intensely as those of the 'Blue' limestone; however, near faults the 'Upper Light' limestone has been considerably drag-folded and crumpled. Average CaCO3 content of 'Upper Light' limestone at Permanent is 70.8 percent.

    'The 'Blue' limestone has beds ranging in thickness from 1 inch to 8 inches, and the unit varies in lithology from the base to the top. Near the base finely crystalline limestone beds are intercalated with abundant chert lenses and layers. Upward the number of chert lenses diminish, and locally the top 15 or 20 feet is relatively free of siliceous material. The upper limestone beds in this sequence are medium to coarsely crystalline. Interbedded in the 'Blue' limestone are layers of laminated tuffaceous debris a few inches to a few feet thick, and at many outcrops bedding-plane shearing has caused complex intermingling of tuffaceous fragments with fragments of oxidized and altered greenstone and sandstone. Weathered surfaces throughout the sequence are gray, whereas freshly broken surfaces are dark gray to black. A distinct petroleum-like odor is noticeable on freshly fractured surfaces, particularly in the upper part of the 'Blue' limestone sequence. Locally, along bedding planes and near cross faults, the limestone is brecciated and the fragments are recemented by caliches and other carbonate material. In some places, incomplete recementation of the breccia has resulted in porous, spongelike masses of limestone. The 'Blue' limestone is highly deformed and fractured and prominent drag folds occur near all but the smaller faults.

    'Locally solutions have filled cavities with large calcite crystals and have introduced finely crystalline carbonate material into numerous fractures and joints. Solutions have also introduced silica which has replaced the limestone near the larger chert lenses.

    'The 'Upper Light' limestone and the 'blue' limestone are very similar in chemical composition...."

    "A light limestone unit appears stratigraphically below the 'Blue' limestone at Permanente and was formerly termed 'Lower Light.' Current studies, however, have supported the belief that 'Upper Light' and 'Lower Light' are the same unit separated by an east-dipping, low-angle thrust fault. Consequently the terms 'Upper Light' and 'Lower Light' are no longer used.

    "The limestone quarry is about 1 miles west of the cement plant at an elevation of 1,525 feet. The horseshoe-shaped quarry face is about 150 feet high. The rock is intensely fractured. Churn drills formerly used were replaced in 1951 by an electrically operated Joy rotary blast-hole drill which in 8 hours can drill 300 feet of smooth-walled hole 7 3/8 inches in diameter. Cartridge loading can thus be used, resulting in improved fragmentation.

    "'The Joy Rotary drill is also used in the exploratory work being carried on at the plant. A 'split stream' sampler is mounted on the drill samples obtained at intervals of ten feet. Sampling is even carried on in the blast holes giving some quality control of the variable limestone.'" *

    (* Page 366 footnote: Covello, A., Permanent Cement Company, personal communication.)

    "Broken stone is loaded by a 5-yard Bucyrus-Erie electric power shovel into diesel-powered Caterpillar-Le Tourneau rubber-tired buggies of 20-ton capacity. The load is transported about a quarter of a mile to the edge of the quarry floor where the 8-inch grizzly and the 56- by 72-inch Buchanan jaw crusher are located. Secondary size reduction is made in a 4 -foot Telesmith gyratory crusher. The minus 3-inch product is discharged directly to a 48-inch-wide conveyor belt which carries it at the rate of 1,000 tons per hour to the transfer house about a mile away. Here, the rock is dropped to down-slope storage piles adjoining the cement plant. After further reduction to minus 3/8-inch size in two 5-foot and one 4-foot Symons cone crushers, the limestone enters the cement raw grinding circuit."

  • Mountain View (9 miles from), Santa Clara County, California - El Dorado Sugar Company's Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "El Dorado Sugar Company's Quarry, in Sec. 18, T. 7 S., R. 2 W.; Granite Rock Company, owner; Mr. Wilson, Watsonville, manager. This quarry is located on Black Mountain, 9 miles by wagon road from Mountain View, on the Southern Pacific Railroad.

    "The limestone is hauled by wagon to Mountain View, where it is shipped by rail, at the rate of 30 to 60 tons per day during the dry season, to the sugar factory at Alviso, where it is burned into quicklime and used in the factory. The quarry has been in operation for three years.

    "The limestone is thinly bedded and much shattered, compact to finely crystalline, of a gray to nearly black color, of the variety known as anthraconite; containing considerable organic matter and numerous small veins of white calcite. The strata are highly inclined, the dip being 55 N. 10 E. at the quarry. The limestone contains considerable dark gray to black chert, in seams 2 to 3 inches thick and in small irregular lenses. In places the limestone is shaly and contains much clay. In quarrying, the very thin layers break up into pieces too small for use. Hence the waste from the chert, the clay, and the small fragments causes considerable extra expense in quarrying. The stone, however, when freed from the chert and the shale is said to make a most desirable lime for the use of the sugar-maker.

    "The stone has been quarried in several places. The present workings on the east side of the cañon near the base of the mountain have a face of about 35 or 36 feet, the upper 10 or 12 feet of which contain much black shale. The limestone extends to the top of the mountain, several hundred feet above the quarry.

    "The outlines of the limestone area, as that of other neighboring small patches, are shown on the U. S. Geological Survey Atlas sheet of this region.

    "The stone would make a good road material, as it is already in such small dimensions that there would be little expense for further crushing."

  • Mountain View (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Mixture of Shale and Slickensided Serpentine (Shale & Serpentine) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Mixture of shale and slickensided serpentine. This rock is quarried for fill rock west of Mountain View."

  • New Almaden (west of), Santa Clara County, California - San Jose Cement Company Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "San Jose Cement Company (which lapsed as a corporation as of March 4, 1936), was mentioned by Franke (30a)* as owner of a deposit of limestone on 331 acres of land in secs. 4 and 5, T. 9 S., R. 1 E., and sec. 32, T. 8 S., R. 1 E., M.D.

    "This land is about 4 miles west of New Almaden and southeast of the Guadalupe mine, a region where quicksilver was mined first in 1824. The only recorded limestone production in the vicinity was in early days by Guadalupe Lime Company, who operated quarries and kilns on the south side of Capitancillos Creek 2 miles from Guadalupe."

    (* Herbert A. Franke, "Santa Clara County," California Mining Bureau Report 26, pp. 2-39, illus., 1930.)

  • Permanente, Santa Clara County, California - Permanent Cement Co. (Cement) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) Permanente Cement Co.; (Address) Permanente; (Location) Permanente.

    (Also see: San Jose (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Permanente Cement Company (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits) below.

  • San Jose (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Black Mountain Limestone Deposits

    Black Mountain Limestone Deposits - See: San Jose (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Permanente Cement Company (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits) below.

  • San Jose (southeast of), Santa Clara County, California - Clark Ranch Limestone Deposit (Hydraulic Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Clark Ranch is 7 miles by road east of Madrone, a station on the Southern Pacific Railroad 18 miles southeast of San Jose. A deposit of 'hydraulic limestone' on this land was noted by Watts (90a, p. 619),* but so far as known has not been worked."

    (* W. L. Watts, "Santa Clara County," California Mining Bureau Report 10, pp. 604-619, 1890.)

  • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Flynn Sandstone Quarry  (Sandstone)  (Excerpts from the Eighth Annual Report of the State Mineralogist, For the Year Ending October 1, 1888, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Superintendent State Printing, 1888, pp. 546-547)

    Building Stone in Santa Clara County  (pp. 546)

    “The only quarries that supply anything more than local demand are those situated at and in the vicinity of Graystone, upon the Southern Pacific Railroad.  They comprise the Goodrich quarries, eight miles south-southeast of San José, and the Flynn quarry, which is situated in the same range of hills and formation, a mile nearer to San José.  All these quarries are located upon the Almaden branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad, which affords excellent facilities for transportation.

    The Flynn Quarry  (pp. 547)

  • “Is about one mile to the northwest of the Stanford quarry.  The stone of the former is said to be equally good, and facilities for working as great.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Flynn Quarry  (Sandstone)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

      “The Flynn Quarry lies about one mile nearer San José, likewise close to the same railroad.  The material is of the same quality as in the other quarries, and the beds are easily worked.  This quarry has not been opened as largely as the others.”

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - the Gay Quarry (Igneous Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Gay Quarries; James W. Rea & Co., corner Market and Santa Clara streets, San Jose, owners. On the Monterey road, one quarter of a mile south of Oak Hill Cemetery. The stone is a close-grained, igneous rock, suitable for macadam and concrete. It is a large, circular quarry, and has furnished rock for the streets of San Jose for many years. Idle during 1904."

  • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Quarries (Sandstone)

    Also see the “Greystone Quarry” & the “Graystone Quarry” & the “Stanford Quarry.”

  • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Quarry (Sandstone/Freestone) 

    The Goodrich Quarry was located furthest south of all of the quarries in Almaden township, about eight miles south from San José.  The Stanford Quarries were located about half a mile to the north of the Goodrich Quarries, close to the railroad.  They took their name from Governor Stanford, who had leased the quarries from Mr. Goodrich to procure building material for the Stanford University, at Palo Alto. 

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – Goodrich’s Free Stone Quarry, on Almaden Road, 8 miles south of San Jose (Map)

      Ranch of D. & T. Williams of Williams Bros., San Jose, California, Goodrich's Free Stone Quarry, on Almaden Road, 8 miles South of San Jose, California, (Map) by Thompson & West, David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Cartography Associates, 1876. (Historical atlas map of Santa Clara County, California. p. 59.)

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone/Freestone)  (Excerpt from History of Santa Clara County, California, by J. P. Munro-Fraser, Alley, Bowen & Co., 1881, pp. 242-243.  (This book is available on Google Books.)
    • “Goodrich’s Free-Stone Quarry – Levi Goodrich, proprietor.  Was first opened in 1875, and is situated in Almaden township, about eight miles south from San José.  It covers an area of about five hundred acres, which is owned and controlled by the proprietor.  The supply is, comparatively speaking, inexhaustible, and the quality, for building purposes, good.  Mr. Goodrich has worked it continuously since 1875, and the stone work for the Court House in San José, State Normal School, San Francisco City Hall, and Masonic Temple in Oakland, came from this quarry.  The shipping is done at San José, and gives employment to from fifteen to forty men.  Office, room twenty, Knox Block, San José.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Sandstone Quarry  (Sandstone)  (Excerpts from the Eighth Annual Report of the State Mineralogist, For the Year Ending October 1, 1888, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Superintendent State Printing, 1888, pp. 546-547)

      Building Stone (in Santa Clara County).  (pp. 546)

      “The only quarries that supply anything more than local demand are those situated at and in the vicinity of Graystone, upon the Southern Pacific Railroad.  They comprise the Goodrich quarries, eight miles south-southeast of San José, and the Flynn quarry, which is situated in the same range of hills and formation, a mile nearer to San José.  All these quarries are located upon the Almaden branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad, which affords excellent facilities for transportation.

      The Goodrich Quarry.  (pp. 547)

      “Is situated in Almaden Township, and belongs to the estate of Levi Goodrich.  It has been worked since 1866, and the stone, a light-buff color, has been and is being extensively used in San Francisco.  It has been used in the Pioneer building, the Union Club, the Lachman block, as well as in many other buildings, and as copings in the cemeteries.  It is from that portion of these quarries, leased to Senator Stanford, that the stone used in the construction of the Stanford University is being obtained.  At the southern end of this working the dip is towards the north, at an angle of about 35 degrees.  About thirty feet from the lowest point of this inclination, which is near the center of the working, the strata still maintain the same direction, but dip only at an angle of about 15 degrees. Between the two dips the stone is much broken and the strata faulted.  The best stone is naturally obtained from that portion where the angle of inclination is the least; in the language of a quarryman ‘the leveler the bed, the solider the stone.’  Between the courses of sandstone are layers of clay, being in some places a foot thick, and passing from a tough unctous clay to a sandy shale.  Small round or oval bowlders are occasionally met with from three or four inches to a foot or more in diameter.  They occur more frequently in the upper strata of the quarry, and sometimes in the clay or shale between the sandstone, penetrating the underlying and superimposed strata for a few inches.  The finest-grained sandstone is obtained in the upper portion of the quarry, the lower being coarser and occasionally interspersed with smaller fragments of clay or shale matter.  This stone can be quarried and put on board the cars for 70 cents per cubic foot.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Quarry  (Sandstone/Free Stone)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

      “The Goodrich Quarry is furthest south of all, about four hundred yards from the railroad (the Almaden branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad) at the mouth of a small ravine.  One of these cross-faults mentioned before runs through the middle of the quarry as now opened.  To the south of the fault the beds have a dip of fully 30 degrees to the north, while on the other side they incline but 10 to 15 degrees northeast.  As at present exposed and worked the beds show the following thickness:

      South of the fault from the bottom –

      First ledge, eight and one half to nine feet thick.
      Second ledge, five feet thick.
      Third ledge, eight feet thick.
      Fourth ledge, eight to nine feet thick.
      Fifth ledge, twelve feet thick.
      Sixth ledge, seven to eight feet thick.
      Seventh ledge, nine feet thick.

      “The seams between the several ledges are all well defined, and carry more or less clay, especially between the fourth and fifth ledges.  The clay averages fully two inches in thickness, greatly facilitating the working of the heavy top ledge (fifth, twelve feet thick).  The seventh ledge, or top, is naturally much broken, being at the surface; but the others show very few fissures.  Along the line of the fault all the beds are, of course, much broken.  To the north of the fault six beds are exposed; their thickness is as follows, likewise beginning at the bottom:

      First ledge, nine feet thick.
      Second ledge, nine feet thick.
      Third ledge, four feet thick.
      Fourth ledge, one foot thick.
      Fifth ledge, one foot thick.
      Sixth ledge, ten feet thick.

       “The two nine-foot beds afford excellent material, while the three ledges at the surface (ten feet, one foot, one foot, respectively) are so much broken up that nearly all has to go to the dump.

      “There are other smaller openings around, from which blocks of stone have been taken occasionally, but the main work is concentrated on the quarry described above.

      “The beds near the surface are harder (from exposure) and somewhat finer grained than those below.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Quarries (AKA the “Graystone Quarry”) (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Twelfth Report of the State Mineralogist, (Second Biennial), Two Years Ending September 15, 1894, California State Mining Bureau, State Office, 1894, pp. 399.)  (This book is available on Google Books.)

      “There are several quarries 7 miles from San José, on the branch railroad running to New Almaden.  The station is called Graystone.  The rock from these several quarries is similar, being a rather coarse-grained, buff to yellowish-gray stone, the better quality of which makes a handsome and apparently durable building-stone.

      Goodrich Estate Quarry. – This is the largest quarry and the only one working at present, and is commonly known as the Graystone Quarry.  The works consists of two gangs of saws; the cutting and finishing department is at the station.  The quarry is half a mile distant, on a spur track.  The stone lies in quite uniform stratum, 10 to 18 ft. in thickness, dipping 15° to 20° S.E.  During 1893 about 18,000 cu. ft. of stone were quarried, furnishing stone for the new Post Office in San José, the Oakland High School, and the Moir Block in San José.  At the quarry 10 to 20 men are employed as required.  At the works about 20 men are employed constantly.

      Stanford Quarry. – It is just below Graystone Station, at the side of the railroad.  It is a portion of the Goodrich estate, which was leased to Senator Leland Stanford, who took from it all the stone used in constructing the handsome Stanford University buildings.  It has not been worked for more than two years.”

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - Graystone Quarry (previously known as Levi Goodrich’s Freestone Quarry) located at Mt. Carmel and Camden .

    According to the Bay Area Hike web site, “Almaden Lake was created by filling an old quarry.”

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - the Graystone Quarry (Sandstone)

    Graystone Quarry (Sandstone) – See: Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California – the Goodrich Quarries (Sandstone) above & Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California - the Stanford Quarries below.

    The Goodrich Quarry was located furthest south of all of the quarries in Almaden township, about eight miles south from San José.  The Stanford Quarries were located about half a mile to the north of the Goodrich Quarries, close to the railroad.  They took their name from Governor Stanford, who had leased the quarries from Mr. Goodrich to procure building material for the Stanford University, at Palo Alto. 

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California – Graystone Quarry Plaque. According to the E Clampus Vitus 1850 web site, this plaque is located “in San Jose, on Greystone Lane. 0.1 mile north of Camden Avenue intersection. (Santa Clara Valley Water District property.)”

    Goodrich Quarry (photo)

    "On the hillside north of this plaque, only the scars remain to mark the spot where the brown stone was quarried for the San Jose Hall of Justice, Post Office, St. Mary's Church, Original Buildings of Stanford University, and Carson City Mint. This small structure, known as the Pfeiffer House, was built from quarried rock around 1875 and used for food and tool storage. Dedicated June 10, 1978, Mountain Charlie Chapter #1850, E Clampus Vitus. 'Right Wrongs Nobody.'"

  • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – Limestone Outcrop  (Limestone)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “Another very promising outcrop of limestone of good quality occurs to the northeast of the Goodrich Quarries.  On the eastern side near the top of the ridge the limestone shows in considerable quantity.  The locality is certainly a promising one, inasmuch as good roads are on both sides of the ridge; likewise railroads, the Almaden branch being on the west, while on the east the main line of the Southern Pacific is less than two miles away.  The establishment of a lime kiln here would depend mainly on the supply of cheap fuel and upon the uniformity of the limestone and its freedom from chert.  The latter condition cannot be answered without a more thorough examination of the magnitude of the deposit by means of small quarries or cuts.”

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - Oak Hill Quarry  (next to Oak Hill Cemetery) Minerals of Santa Clara County, presented by John Messina. This site mentions the quarry, although the type of stone is not stated. (This web site from which this information was obtained is no longer available.)
    <http://www.slip.net/~advisor/Minerals/scminerals.html>
  • San Jose (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Permanente Cement Company (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits – Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Permanente Cement Company (Black Mountain Limestone Deposits). The summit of Black Mountain, 2787 feet high, is near the southwest corner of sec. 13, T. 7 S., R. 3 W., about 15 miles due west of San Jose. It is the most prominent natural feature of the area of Franciscan rocks which extends southwest along the west side of the county, with a width here of 3 miles. Limestone deposits have been mentioned on the long eastward slope, on the west side and on the southwest flank. The production has been entirely from the more accessible eastern side in secs. 17 and 18, T. 7 S., R. 2 W., about 5 miles west of Monta Vista, where stone was quarried on a small scale to make lime for sugar refining. No detailed information was published up to the time the Permanente Cement Company began work in 1939 and the few analyses available were evidently of selected or sorted rock. It was known, however, that the limestone was generally more or less siliceous and for that reason no effort had been made to use it for cement.

    "The great mass of the mountain lies between San Andreas fault and a branch fault called the Black Mountain fault which starts in Portola Valley several miles northwest and crosses the Page Mill road on the north side of the mountain, east of the main fault. This area between the faults was badly shattered by the 1906 earthquake (Lawson 08, vol. 1, pt. 1, p. 107)* although it is not clear whether the abundant cracks found over the surface are to be attributed to the boldness of the topography or to the crushing of the wedge-shaped end of the fault block. According to the above report, 'several days after the earthquake 345 cracks, large and small, were counted along the country road (Page Mill road) in a distance of less than 3 miles between these faults.'

    (* Andrew Cowper Lawson with J. C. Branner, G. K. Gilbert, H. F. Reid, and others, "The California Earthquake of April 18, 1906." Report of the State Earthquake Investigation Commission, Carnegie Institute Washington Publication 87, vol. 1, pt. 1, 18, 254 pp., pt. 2, pp. 255-451; atlas, 25 maps and seismograms, 1908.)

    "The interest in the Permanente plant was so great from the start that numerous technical articles on all phases of its operation have been published. A list of these articles is given in the Engineering Index. For the purposes of this report, which is intended to give information primarily on the limestone resources of the state, the best of these articles is probably that by A. M. Kivari, entitled Milling at the Permanente Cement Plant, published first as Technical Publication 1359, American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers (1941) and later in Volume 148, Transactions, American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers (1942). A few details are given below from this article to fill out the meager information hitherto available about the Calera (Franciscan) limestone and the results of applying to its benefication of the art of modern hydrometallurgy.

    "The limestone quarry is 45 miles south of San Francisco and 12 miles west of San Jose, at an elevation of 1850 feet. The overburden is only a few feet thick, and is easily removed. As the limestone is well fractured it is seldom necessary to use explosives. The quarry has been worked in benches by a 5-cubic-yard electric shovel which furnishes limestone to the conveying system at the rate of 5600 tons a day. The cement plant capacity of 12,000 barrels in early 1941 required about 3130 tons of limestone, 620 tons of 'clay' (sandstone and andesite) and 100 tons of gypsum per 24 hours. The plant capacity was increased to 16,000 barrels late in 1941; capacity was increased again in 1943 and the plant became the world's largest (circa 1947). Further expansion is indicated in the accompany information furnished by Permanente Cement Company. A stockpile of 550,000 tons is maintained for the cement plant and in the autumn, when the beet-sugar refineries demand large tonnages of limestone, another stockpile of 100,000 tons is made.

    "In a geologic report on the property, the late Professor C. F. Tolman and J. V. Neuman Jr., of Stanford University, estimated about 30,000,000 tons of proven and 18,000,000 tons of possible limestone. They distinguished two main types of limestone. The first is platy, dark blue gray, colored by hydrocarbon residue and usually finely crystalline with occasional coarsely crystalline layers or spots. The second type is white to gray, dense, and usually has conchoidal fracture. It contains chert bands that lower the average CaCO3 content to between 50 to 75 percent. They mapped the following beds:

    1. Light, cherty and dark limestone, portions running 80 to 95 percent CaCO3 and other parts 60 to 75 percent.
    2. Sandstone and andesite.
    3. Lower cherty white limestone requiring benefication.
    4. Sandstone and andesite.
    5. Dark limestone averaging 86 percent CaCO3, about 200 feet thick.
    6. Upper cherty light limestone.
    7. Andesite.
    8. White cherty limestone, varying in thickness from 10 to 160 feet, requiring benefication.
    9. Sandstone, tuffs, and andesite.
    10. Dark cherty limestone, 75 to 100 feet thick, requiring benefication.
    11. Fine-grained andesite.
    12. Complex folded and sheared limestone, sandstone and andesite, requiring benefication.
    13. Undifferentiated Franciscan sandstone, shale and andesite.

    "The average chemical composition of numerous samples from four limestone beds was quoted by Kivari as follows, raw basis:

    Average analyses, Permanente limestone

    SiO2 (1) 29.23; (2) 12.86; (3) 7.24; (4) 4.18
    CaO (1) 38.04; (2) 47.48; (3) 50.96; (4) 52.74
    Fe2O3 (1) 0.54; (2) 0.54; (3) 0.42; (4) 0.32
    Al2O3 (1) 1.26; (2) 1.12; (3) 0.60; (4) 0.66
    MgO (1) 0.24; (2) 0.27; (3) 0.04; (4) 0.05
    Ignition loss (1) 30.66; (2) 37.70; (3) 40.48; (4) 41.90
    Total (1) 99.97; (2) 99.97; (3) 99.74; (4) 99.85
    CaCO3 (1) 68.4; (2) 85.12; (3) 91.39; (4) 94.67

    "The plant and methods used to beneficiate limestone for cement making in 1941 were described in detail by Kivari. This included the use of the Breerwood flotation process in which the only reagent used was talloel. It was saponified to the desired degree at the plant with caustic soda and diluted with water. About 0.8 of a pound of reagent was used per ton of dry solids. This process is no longer used."

    Plate 29. Permanente Limestone - Generators driven by a system of gravity flow conveyor belts produce enough electricity to operate the 5-yard shovel used to excavate limestone in Permanente Cement Company's quarry. Permanente Limestone - Generators driven by a system of gravity flow conveyor belts
    Plate 30. Permanente Limestone - Limestone starts the mile-long journey, by way of conveyor belt, from the Permanente Cement Company quarry, Santa Clara County, to the processing plant. Buggies like the one pictured above are 25-yard capacity. The plant uses more than 4 miles of conveyor belting by which rock moves downhill at the rate of 1000 tons per hour Permanente Limestone - Limestone starts the mile-long journey

    "Current Developments, Permanente Cement Company.*

    (* Page 215 footnote: Supplied by Permanente Cement Company, Kaiser Building, 1924 Broadway, Oakland 12, California.)

    In line with the current industrial growth of the West Coast, Permanente Cement Company is nearing completion of an expansion program which will boost its plant's annual production by 500,000 barrels, or two million sacks of cement.

    "Officials of the Henry J. Kaiser-sponsored plant, located 10 miles west of San Jose, California, pointed out that the plant is already the world's largest cement mill and that the new facilities and changes effected will push its annual productive capacity to a peak of 5,500,000 barrels - 10 percent more than its present rated capacity.

    "The availability of high-quality raw materials, limestone and clay, is partially responsible for Permanente's new production goal. Located immediately above the mill on plant property, Permanente operates a quarry from which it takes 6,000 tons of limestone in an 8-hour sift. Over a period of 1 year, a quarry force of 19 men move approximately 1,500,000 tons of limestone downhill to the processing plant.

    "Novel in operation of the quarry is the 48-inch conveyor belt by which rock moves to the mile-distant plant at the rate of 1,000 tons an hour. The plant throughout uses more than 4 miles of conveyor belting. After induction motors start the conveyors, generators driven by gravity flow supply enough electricity to operate a five-yard shovel in the quarry.

    "Limestone not suitable for manufacturing cement, is used to produce high-quality commercial rock for concrete aggregates, railroad ballast, highway paving material and other similar products.

    "Starting with changes in the raw grinding department, new facilities include four Fuller coolers for Permanente's kilns, an additional kiln feed slurry tank, new clinker conveying and crushing facilities, additional cement pumping equipment under the storage silos, and enlargement of the packhouse.

    "The California cement plant is not only the world's largest; it also employs revolutionary production methods made possible by varied equipment of special design.

    "A unique closed-circuit method of raw grinding in the mill building assures accurate control of fineness. This raw-grinding circuit produces slurry of which 95 percent will pass through a 200-mesh sieve that has 40,000 openings per square inch. New improvements in methods generally used in closed-circuit raw grinding have already been put into practice, the result being an increased productive capacity of 10 percent.

    "To take care of this additional raw slurry another kiln feed slurry tank of 13,500-barrel capacity is being installed. During kiln-down time the slurry tank, Permanente's third, will be used for storage, enabling raw grinding to continue.

    "Fuller coolers are being installed - two are already in operation - on Permanente's four mammoth rotary kilns which are 12 feet in diameter by 463 feet long. In the kilns calcining takes place under temperatures of 2700 F. Following the calcining process, resulting clinker will be cooled much more efficiently by the new Fuller coolers, thus enabling increased kiln capacity.

    "Clinker is then reduced to finish cement in primary and secondary grinding mills in closed circuit with air separators. Because of increased kiln production it was necessary to install a new clinker conveying and crushing system. This is composed of two gyratory crushers both of which are closed-circuited with vibrating screens. Here the clinker will be reduced to minus three-eighths inch.

    "An additional 6-inch Fuller-Kenyon pump is being installed under the 500,000-barrel cement storage silos. This fifth pump will greatly facilitate pumping cement to the packhouse.

    "The packhouse addition consists of a four-compartment, 5,000-barrel packer bin which can be used either for bulk loading or feeding a Bates C-113, four-spout packer. This addition was installed so that Permanente can competently handle sacking of the 17 types of cement now being produced.

    "Construction of Shasta Dam provided the occasion for the birth of Permanente Cement Company. As a result of competitive bidding Kaiser and his associates were awarded the cement contract for this greatest of overflow dams, even before they had a plant constructed to manufacture the required cement.

    "In June 1939, ground was broken in the western foothills of Santa Clara Valley, near San Jose, California; on Christmas Day, or less than seven months later, the first barrel of cement was produced.

    "Permanente furnished the entire 6,800,000 barrels of cement used for Shasta Dam and, by the end of World War II, had filled major government contracts totaling $25,000,000. A notable example of one war job consisted of supplying all the bulk cement for military fortifications in the Pacific area up to July 1945.

    "This latter contract was made possible due to the fact that Permanente Steamship Company had acquired two ships and were making plans to refit them for bulk use when Pacific hostilities broke out. These vessels, the S. S. Permanente and S. S. Philippa, went into action in May 1942, giving the United States a total of four bulk cement carriers with an average capacity of 40,000 barrels each. One-way passage required about 10 days.

    "Today (circa 1947), Permanente produces 17 different kinds of cement, including Standard Portland, Modified Portland, Hi-Early Strength, Low-Heat, Sulphate Resisting, Plastic, Concrete Pipe Cement, three types of oil well cement, Plastite, and Brick Mix, High Magnesia Building Lime, as produced by The Permanente Metals Corporation at Natividad, is also marketed by the Permanente Cement Company.

    "Since the war a booming construction business has required all the cement Permanente can produce, and the Kaiser organization is now serving the great northwest and the Hawaiian Islands, as well as its home northern California market.

    "At Seattle, Washington, Honolulu, T. H., receiving, storage, and packing equipment have been installed. Located at Merced, California, similar facilities serve eastern and central California. Bulk loading and shipping facilities are situated at Port of Redwood City, on San Francisco Bay, for shipments to Seattle and Honolulu."

    • Santa Clara County, California - Kaiser Cement Permanente (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Mine name: Kaiser Cement Permanente; Operator: Kaiser Cement; Address & County: 24001 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino, CA 95014, Santa Clara County; Phone: (408) 996-4158; Latitude: 37.32, Longitude: -122.11, and Mine location number: Map No. 723; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - Sandstone Quarrying near San Jose County, California - Sandstone Quarrying (From Geologic Guidebook of the San Francisco Bay Counties: History, Landscape, Geology, Fossils, Minerals, Industry, and Routes to Travel, Bulletin 154, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, December, 1951. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "...In the sixties quarries were opened, on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay to furnish a bluish sandstone, and near Petaluma in Sonoma County for the production of basalt. During the eighties and nineties light-brown sandstone was quarried at Benicia in Solano County, and near San Jose in Santa Clara County...."

  • San Jose (west of), Santa Clara County, California - Santa Clara Holding Company's Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Santa Clara Holding Company's quarry is in secs. 17 and 18, T. 7 S., R. 2 W., M.D. This is in the locality where Permanente Cement Company is now operating (circa 1947). The land is on the east slope of Black Mountain and is 3 to 4 miles west of Simla, a railroad point. It may be called a type locality for the Calera (Franciscan) limestone. When freed from chert and shale it made good lime for beet-sugar refining and was used for many years by El Dorado Sugar Company and Alameda Sugar Company. Several small quarries were worked but the property had been idle many years up to 1934, when the company shipped some limestone from Simla.

    "The above refers to the shallower aspects of the limestone, and fuller details are given under Permanente."

    (* Also see San Jose (west of) Santa Clara County, California - Permanente Cement Company above.)

  • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Stanford Quarry was leased from the heirs of Levi Goodrich (referred to as the Goodrich Estate) by Senator Leland Stanford to obtain sandstone to use in the construction of the early Stanford University buildings.

    The Goodrich Quarry was located furthest south of all of the quarries.  The Stanford Quarries were located about half a mile to the north of the Goodrich Quarries, close to the railroad.  The quarry took its name from Governor Leland Stanford, who had leased the quarries from the Levi Goodrich estate/heirs to procure sandstone for the early Stanford University buildings at Palo Alto.  John D. McGilvray with his family moved to the Escondite Cottage at the Stanford University in 1898 when Mrs. Jane Stanford hired his company to be the new builder for the university builders.

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Stanford Sandstone Quarry  (Sandstone)  (Excerpts from the Eighth Annual Report of the State Mineralogist, For the Year Ending October 1, 1888, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Office, J.D. Young, Superintendent State Printing, 1888, pp. 546-547)

      Building Stone in Santa Clara County  (pp. 546)

      “The only quarries that supply anything more than local demand are those situated at and in the vicinity of Graystone, upon the Southern Pacific Railroad.  They comprise the Goodrich quarries, eight miles south-southeast of San José, and the Flynn quarry, which is situated in the same range of hills and formation, a mile nearer to San José.  All these quarries are located upon the Almaden branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad, which affords excellent facilities for transportation.

      The Goodrich Quarry.  (pp. 547)

      “Is situated in Almaden Township, and belongs to the estate of Levi Goodrich.  It has been worked since 1866, and the stone, a light-buff color...It is from that portion of these quarries, leased to Senator Stanford, that the stone used in the construction of the Stanford University is being obtained.” 

      The Stanford Quarry.  (pp. 547)

    • “Is situated about half a mile northwest of that worked by the Goodrich heirs.  As already mentioned, the building stone used in the construction of the Stanford University at Mayfield, in this county, is obtained here, about four carloads, or eight hundred cubic feet, of dressed stone being shipped daily for that purpose.  About one hundred feet of sandstone have been here exposed by quarrying in strata from two to twenty feet in thickness, dipping to the north at an angle of about 20 degrees.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Stanford Quarry leased from Goodrich (Sandstone/Free Stone)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889 (pdf), California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 
    • “The Stanford Quarries lie about half a mile to the north of the Goodrich Quarries, close to the railroad.  They take their name from Governor Stanford, who has leased them from Mr. Goodrich to procure building material for the Stanford University, at Palo Alto.  Fully one hundred feed vertical are exposed in these quarries.  The beds are usually very thick (ten, fifteen, and twenty feet).  They have a dip of about 20 degrees to the northeast.  The seams separating the beds carry so little clay that, at first sight, the whole face exposed appears to be one solid bed; only on close inspection can the seams be made out and traced.  On the contrary, the fissures, quite numerous here, carry considerable clay, so that the stone, instead of coming out in more or less regular blocks, is obtained in large irregularly shaped masses, entailing considerable loss of material and time needed to shape them.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California - the Stanford Quarry (Sandstone) - Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 618.

    Santa Clara County, by W. L. Watts, Assistant in the Field.

    Building Stone.

      “Work has been carried on at the Stanford quarry through 1889 and 1890, with the exception of three months in 1890. The stone has been steadily shipped to Palo Alto, in Santa Clara County, for the Stanford University.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California - the Goodrich Quarries (Also known as the Graystone Quarry) (Sandstone) (Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 618.)

    Santa Clara County, by W. L. Watts, Assistant in the Field.

    Building Stone.

      “The demand for stone from the Goodrich quarry still continues.

      “During the last two years the facilities for handling the stone have been greatly increased. Six derricks, three of which are worked by steam power, are now in operation; and a switch has been run from the San José and New Almaden branch of the Southern Pacific Railroad into the quarry. Both rough and dressed stone, and rubble rock for cellar work, are shipped from this quarry.

      “Work has been carried on at the Stanford quarry through 1889 and 1890, with the exception of three months in 1890. The stone has been steadily shipped to Palo Alto, in Santa Clara County, for the Stanford University.”

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County, California – the Stanford Quarry (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Twelfth Report of the State Mineralogist, (Second Biennial), Two Years Ending September 15, 1894, California State Mining Bureau, State Office, 1894, pp. 399.)  (This book is available on Google Books.)

      “There are several quarries 7 miles from San José, on the branch railroad running to New Almaden.  The station is called Graystone.  The rock from these several quarries is similar, being a rather coarse-grained, buff to yellowish-gray stone, the better quality of which makes a handsome and apparently durable building-stone.

      Goodrich Estate Quarry. – This is the largest quarry and the only one working at present, and is commonly known as the Graystone Quarry.  The works consists of two gangs of saws; the cutting and finishing department is at the station.  The quarry is half a mile distant, on a spur track.  The stone lies in quite uniform stratum, 10 to 18 ft. in thickness, dipping 15° to 20° S.E.  During 1893 about 18,000 cu. ft. of stone were quarried, furnishing stone for the new Post Office in San José, the Oakland High School, and the Moir Block in San José.  At the quarry 10 to 20 men are employed as required.  At the works about 20 men are employed constantly.

      Stanford Quarry. – It is just below Graystone Station, at the side of the railroad.  It is a portion of the Goodrich estate, which was leased to Senator Leland Stanford, who took from it all the stone used in constructing the handsome Stanford University buildings.  It has not been worked for more than two years.”

    • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - the Stanford / Goodrich Quarries (Sandstone) (Also known as the Graystone Quarry) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)
    • "Goodrich Quarries, Jos. Maddox, owner; operated by the McGilvray Stone Company, Second and King streets, San Francisco. At Graystone station, 9 miles south of San Jose, on a spur of the Narrow Gauge Railroad running from San Jose to Santa Cruz. An extensive body of buff-colored sandstone, which has been quarried in this locality for many years by several different parties.

      "The sandstone occurs in beds from a few inches to 10 feet or more in thickness. The present (August, 1904) quarry face shows beds 10 feet, 3 to 4 feet, 10, 6 feet, 6 feet, and 4 to 6 feet thick, respectively. About 50 feet of sandstone are exposed below the bottom of the present quarry, and about 100 feet on the outcrop above the quarry, while a still greater thickness is exposed on the hills immediately adjoining the northeast and northwest. The strata dip 25 N., 75 W., in the quarry opening, but this varies somewhat over other portions of the outcrop.

      "Like many sandstones, it is quite soft when first quarried, but indurates on exposure until it has a quite firm, hard surface. In grain, color, and texture the stone is fairly uniform. In a few places some of the iron has been leached out by the surface waters, leaving the stone a mottled yellow and gray; however, only a comparatively small part of the stone is thus affected. In some of the abandoned quarry openings the stone contains iron oxide concretions, which disfigure the stone, but none of these are visible in the present working.

      "The freestone character of the rock adapts it to carved work, as is so well shown in the elaborate and intricate carving on and in the costly chapel at Stanford University, Palo Alto.

      "The stone is quarried by hand, loaded with steam-power derrick on small tram-cars, and sent down an inclined track about 800 feet to the stone mill and cutting yard near the railway track. The mill is supplied with two gang-saws for cutting dimension stone, and a large crew of stonecutters is at work finishing the stone.

      "The stone has been used for building purposes in San Jose and nearby towns for many years, but the greatest and most elaborate monument to the architectural value of this stone is to be found in the many costly buildings of Leland Stanford Junior University, which, with the exception of one or two cement and one or two brick buildings, are constructed of this buff sandstone."

      Ill. No. 63. Stanford Quarry, Santa Clara County. (Goodrich Sandstone Quarry. McGilvray Stone Company.) Stanford Quarry, Santa Clara County
      Ill. No. 64. Stanford Sandstone quarry, Santa Clara County. (McGilvray Stone Company.) Stanford Sandstone quarry
      Ill. No. 65. Memorial Arch, with church in background, Stanford University, showing types of carved work with the sandstone. Memorial Arch, with church in background, Stanford University
      Ill. No. 66. General view of quadrangle buildings, Stanford University, constructed of sandstone from Grayston Quarries. General view of quadrangle buildings, Stanford University
    • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - the Stanford Quarries & John D. McGilvray, Quarrier & Builder
    • California’s Granites are Unsurpassed.  John D. McGilvray, Pioneer Stone Man, Develops Great Industry Here”  “Company Builds Mausoleums for our Cemeteries:  Many of Finest Structures on Pacific Coast Erected by His Firm (pdf), in the “Little Journeys to the Homes of Big Industries,” section of the San Francisco Chronicle, June 7, 1921, pp. 7.

    • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - Graystone/Stanford Quarries Plaque. According to the E Clampus Vitus 1850 web site, this plaque is located “in San Jose, on Greystone Lane. 0.1 mile north of Camden Avenue intersection. (Santa Clara Valley Water District property.)”
    • Goodrich Quarry (photo)

      "On the hillside north of this plaque, only the scars remain to mark the spot where the brown stone was quarried for the San Jose Hall of Justice, Post Office, St. Mary's Church, Original Buildings of Stanford University, and Carson City Mint. This small structure, known as the Pfeiffer House, was built from quarried rock around 1875 and used for food and tool storage. Dedicated June 10, 1978, Mountain Charlie Chapter #1850, E Clampus Vitus. 'Right Wrongs Nobody.'"

    • San Jose (south of), Santa Clara County - Greystone/Stanford Sandstone Quarry - “A Biography of Stanford Sandstone: From Greystone Quarry to Stone River” (PDF magazine article), by Charles Junkerman, in Sandstone and Tile, Vol. 34, No. 3, Fall 2010, Stanford Historical Society.
  • San Jose, Santa Clara County, California - the T. O'Neil and Co., (Timothy O'Neil), granite works located at 370 First Street, San Jose. (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.) (No further information is given.)
  •  San Jose (7 miles out of), Santa Clara County, California – the Western Granite & Marble Company’s Sandstone Quarry. (The following article is from the San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday, April 23, 1893, pp. 16.)

“Monuments in Stone: The Output of a San Jose Manufactory”

One of Santa Clara County’s Public Buildings – A Stately Tomb.

    “One of the big industries of San Jose, and in fact one that is known the whole length of the Pacific coast, is that of the Western Granite and Marble Company. This company was organized with a capital stock of $100,000 only about three years ago. From its very interception the enterprise met with success. Behind it were wide-awake, energetic business men, who whenever the opportunity presented, pushed in and established themselves. During the past year their business has increased almost 100 per cent; to-day they are giving employment to over 100 skilled mechanics, and they are producing some of the handsomest work in stone and marble to be found in the country. In all parts of the State they are rearing piles of masonry which will stand for ages as monuments of their skill and enterprise.

    (Photo caption: “Western Granite and Marble Co., San Jose.”)

    “The company’s works are on First street, near the broad-gauge railway depot. Their mammoth workhouse has a frontage of seventy feet on First street and runs back 275 feet to Second street. Probably the first thing to challenge the wonder of a visitor to the works is the ease with which the workmen handle the large blocks of marble, granite and sandstone which are to come under chisels and hammers. There is every facility for the handling of these great blocks of stone with the least possible waste of force and labor. The expense has been reduced to the minimum. A switch from the railway runs the whole length of the building down the middle. So complete are the company’s facilities that two men are able to unload a car of granite within twenty minutes from the time it leaves the main track. With their machinery two men are able to handle a twenty-ton block of any kind or size almost without exertion. By the aid of overhead tracks and cranes they are not only able to remove the block from the car, but to put it down on any spot within the walls of the company’s works, which, by the way, are the largest on the Pacific coast.

    “The Western Granite and Marble Company has extensive quarries in Santa Clara and Placer counties. From its great sandstone quarry, seven miles out from San Jose, is obtained the finest quality of stone for facing and dressing purposes. The company’s granite quarries are in Placer county. Not far from Loomis, in two quarries, they have granite in almost inexhaustible quantity. They own another great granite quarry at Crystal Lake. Besides these native stones the company is its own importer of Italian, Vermont and Tennessee marbles and fine Italian statuary. They also handle in large quantities all kinds of American, Scotch and Swedish granites….”

  • Santa Clara County, California - Azevedo Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Azevedo Quarry; Operator: A. J. Raisch Paving Company; Address & County: P. O. Box 7092, San Jose, CA 95150, Santa Clara County; Phone: (408) 228-9227; Latitude: 37.29, Longitude: -121.85, and Mine location number: Map No. 721; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Bahr & Ledoyen (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 26, T. 6 S., R. 3 W., M. D. B. M. projected on Page Mill Road. Date the quarry was opened: 1951; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Contact; Rock type (grab sample): Silica-carbonate, serpentine, claystone; Operation size: Moderate; Equipment used: Rooter and bulldozers (2); Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: Cut 500 ft. wide, 50 ft. high, mi. long; Transport distance: mile; Crushing equipment: Jaw; Classification equipment: Portable plant, dry; Products: Crusher run base; State spec. sec. 21 rock; drain rock; Rated capacity (per day): 800 tons; Number of employees: 6; Remarks: 1 in. rock to yard stockpile.

  • Santa Clara County, California - County (Alum Rock) (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 23, T. 6 S., R.1 E., M. D. B. M. at the mouth of Penitencia Creek. The date the quarry was opened possibly 1950; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Cemented conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Black chert, porphyry, quartzite; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Bulldozer; Type excavation: Hilltop; Excavation size: Face 75 ft. high, 700 ft. long; Transport distance: Load at face; Crushing equipment: None; Classification equipment: None; Products: Road work; Rated capacity (per day): 200-300 tons; Number of employees: 2; Remarks: Bulldoze top and drop to loading level.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Curtner Products (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Curtner Products; Operator: Oliver De Silva, Inc.; Address & County: 11555 Dublin Blvd., Dublin, CA 94568, Santa Clara County; Phone: (408) 942-1230; Latitude: 37.47, Longitude: -121.89, and Mine location number: Map No. 722; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Fredrickson-Watson (Winterbower) (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 4, T. 6 S., R. 1E. , M. D. B. M. on Los Coches Creek. The date the quarry was possibly opened was 1951; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Folded sediments; Rock type (grab sample): Monterey chert; Operation size: Large; Equipment used: Diesel shovel; Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: Face 150 ft. high, mi. long, 500 ft. diameter; Transport distance: Load at face; Crushing equipment: None required; Classification equipment: None; Products: Base rock; Rated capacity (per day): 1500-2000 tons; Number of employees: 2; Remarks: Freeway base west of Milpitas.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Piazza (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 23, T. 6 S., R. 1 E., M. D. B. M. (projected) at the mouth of Penitencia Creek. Date quarry was opened: 1952; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Sandstone, siltstone, serpentine; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Bulldozer, loader; Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: Face 50 ft. high, 400 ft. long; Transport distance: Load at face; Crushing equipment: None; Classification equipment: None; Products: Road Rock; Rated capacity (per day): 300-400 tons; Number of employees: 3; Remarks: Strip overburden with bulldozer.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Piazza (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 21 or 22 , T. 7 S., R. 2 W. , M. D. B. M. at the Stevens Creek Dam. Date the quarry was opened: 1952; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Chert, sandstone, shale; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Diesel shovel; Type excavation: Bank; Excavation size: 25 ft. high; Transport distance: 100 ft.; Crushing equipment: None; Classification equipment: Loading bins; Products: Road rock; Rated capacity (per day): 300-400 tons (?); Number of employees: ?; Remarks: Installing loading bins.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Rhodes-Robinson (Stanford) (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 23, T. 6 S., R. 3 W. , M. D. B. M. (projected) on Page Mill Road. Date quarry was opened: before 1900 (?); quarry was idle on November 1, 1952. Type of deposit: Volcanic flow and agglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Basalt; Operation size: Large; Equipment used: (Removed); Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: (blank); Transport distance: mile; Crushing equipment: (Removed); Classification equipment: (Removed); Products: Road rock; Rated capacity (per day): (Blank); Number of employees: (Blank); Remarks: Shut down owing to encroachment of residential development.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Roggasch Bros. (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 6, T. 6 S., R. 1 E. , M. D. B. M. (projected) on Story Road. Date quarry opened: possibly in 1950; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Cemented conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Porphyry, chert, quartzite; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Rooter, bulldozer loader; Type excavation: Bank; Excavation size: Circular, 1000 ft. diameter, 50 ft. face; Transport distance: 1000 ft. max.; Crushing equipment: Kue Ken jawcrusher; Classification equipment: None; Belt to loading bins; Products: Road rock; Rated capacity (per day): 500 tons (?); Number of employees: 4; Remarks: Installing grizzly, crusher, bins.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Senator Dump (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 29, T. 8 S., R. 1 E., M. D. B. M. (projected) at the Seantor (sic) Mine. Date quarry opened: 1952; it was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Furnace dump; Rock type (grab sample): Calcine; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Loader; Type excavation: (blank); Excavation size: Dump 30 ft. high, 20 ft. wide; Transport distance: Load at face; Crushing equipment: None required; Classification equipment: None; Products: Used as excavated; Rated capacity (per day): 200 tons (?); Number of employees: 2; Remarks: Driveway fill and base rock.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Serpa Pit (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Serpa Pit; Operator: Raisch Company; Address & County: P. O. Box 643, San Jose, CA 95106, Santa Clara County; Phone: (408) 227-9222; Latitude: 37.45, Longitude: -121.86, and Mine location number: Map No. 726; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Santa Clara County, California - Voss (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 28, T. 7 S., R. 2 W., M. D. B. M. on Stevens Creek Road. Date quarry opened: 1952; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Shale, chert, sandstone; Operation size: Small; Equipment used: Bulldozer; Type excavation: Bank; Excavation size: 200 ft. high; Transport distance: 200 ft.; Crushing equipment: Gyratory; Classification equipment: Trommel ahead of crusher, dry; Products: crusher run base; Rated capacity (per day): 700 yds.; Number of employees: 4; Remarks: Santa Clara gravel with streaks of sand.

    Figure 10. Voss quarry and plant near Stevens Creek Dam. Bulldozer delivers gravel from conglomerate member of Santa Clara formation to crushing plant. Voss quarry and plant near Stevens Creek Dam
  • Santa Clara County, California - Wright's Ranch Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Wright's Ranch marble deposit, 5 miles southeast of New Almaden mine was described by Crawford (94, p. 394).* It is reported to show an outcrop from 60 feet to over 100 feet wide and over 3000 feet long. It is described as mostly light gray, curiously mottled by light blotches and streaks in a darker crystalline groundmass. Samples took a high polish. Although believed to be a promising deposit, it has not been commercially developed. It is near Llagas Creek, some 9 or 10 miles by road from Madrone, a station on the southern Pacific Railroad."

    (* J. J. Crawford, Twelfth Report of the State Mineralogist, California Mining Bureau Report 12, 541 pp., 1894.)

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the west side of), Santa Clara County, California - the Basalt Lava Flows of Miocene Age (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The Basalt lava flows of Miocene age. These have been quarried for many years at numerous points along upper Page Mill Road, west of the Stanford University campus. Unweathered basalt is a tough hard rock which breaks into equidimensional fragments very suitable for road rock. Quarrying in this district has diminished in recent years, owing to the gradual encroachment of residential development (circa 1953)."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the east side of), Santa Clara County, California - the Monterey Formation of Miocene Age (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The Monterey formation of Miocene age. This formation crops out in narrow discontinuous belts along the foothills and contains an appreciable thickness of alternating beds of chert and shale. The chert beds usually range from 1 inch to 3 inches in thickness, while the shaly layers are usually a fraction of an inch in thickness. The Monterey formation is so folded and distorted in places that cross fractures have developed in the chert normal to the bedding planes. In such places the chert breaks into small fragments when quarried. Substantial quantities of this chert are currently being mined (circa 1953). The distribution of the Monterey formation and the location of quarries is shown on maps prepared by Crittenden (circa 1953)."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the east side of), Santa Clara County, California - the Oakland Conglomerate of Cretaceous Age (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The Oakland conglomerate of Cretaceous age. This formation is composed of pebbles, cobbles, and boulders cemented in a matrix of sand grains. It is generally hard and massive. Blasting is necessary to break the rock, and crushing may also be necessary for proper size reduction. This formation is being quarried near the mouth of Penitencia Creek (circa 1953)."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the west side of), Santa Clara County, California - Rhyolite at Lone Hill (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Rhyolite at Lone Hill. About 5 miles northeast of Los Gatos, quarries were operated in 1952-53. The rhyolite was loosened with a rooter, and bulldozed to the crushing plant. The product was used in road construction."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the west side of), Santa Clara County, California - Senator Mine Dump (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Furnace calcine from the Senator mine dump. This was sold during 1952 under the name of 'Almaden Slag.' The material was loaded directly to trucks and used in driveways where it was said to make a firm, smooth, mudless surface."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the west side of), Santa Clara County, California - Purisima Sandstone (Sandstone - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Soft tan Purisima sandstone. The sandstone overlies the basalt on the lower part of Page Mill Road, in the Stanford area."

  • Santa Clara Valley (along the west side of), Santa Clara County, California - the Santa Clara Formation (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The Santa Clara formation. This is composed of loosely consolidated, poorly sorted conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and clay. The conglomerate members of the formation are quarried in the vicinity of the Stevens Creek Dam. Quarrying is done with power equipment and crushing is sometimes necessary to separate the sand matrix. Preliminary blasting in place usually provides sufficient fragmentation for use of the material as fill rock without subsequent crushing."

  • Saratoga (west of), Santa Clara County, California - the Franciscan Sandstone of Jurassic (?) Age (Rock - Crushed) (From California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," by Fenelon F. Davis, Associate Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, and Charles W. Jennings, Junior Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines., California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Franciscan sandstone of Jurassic (?) age. A mile west of Saratoga, Franciscan sandstone is quarried by the county and crushed at the county plant. This locality has provided road rock since 1908."

  • Saratoga (west of), Santa Clara County, California - County (Saratoga) (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 2 W., M. D. B. M., a mile west of Saratoga. Date quarry was opened: 1908; quarry was active on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Metamorphosed sediments; Rock type (grab sample): Quartzite; Operation size: Large; Equipment used: Bulldozer; Type excavation: Hillside; Excavation size: 200 ft. high; Transport distance: mile max.; Crushing equipment: Jaw; Classification equipment: Screens, dry.; Products: Unwashed road rock; Rated capacity (per day): 1200-2000 tons; Number of employees: 8-10; Remarks: Oldest operating quarry in (Santa Clara) county.

  • Stanford, Santa Clara County, California - Page Mill Quarry Area (Book)

    Geology of the Page Mill Quarry Area, Stanford, California, by Frank William Atchley and L Trowbridge Grose, 1954.

  • Stevens Creek, Santa Clara County, California - Commercial Materials (Rock - Crushed) (From "Table 6. Rock (crushed) operations in Santa Clara County," California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, No. 2, April 1954, "Mines and Mineral Resources of Santa Clara County, California," California Division of Mines, pp. 320-430. (Manuscript submitted for publication March 1, 1953.) (Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Location: Sec. 22, T. 7 S., R. 2 W. , M. D. B. M. on Stevens Creek. Date quarry opened: possibly 1950; quarry was idle on November 1, 1952; Type of deposit: Conglomerate; Rock type (grab sample): Fine sandstone and shale; Operation size: Moderate; Equipment used: (Removed); Type excavation: Bank; Excavation size: Face 175 ft. high, 400 ft. long; Transport distance: 400 ft.; Crushing equipment: None; Classification equipment: None; Products: Base and fill rock; Rated capacity (per day): (Blank); Number of employees: (Blank); Remarks: (Blank).

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