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San Diego - List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand, gravel, or decomposed granite quarries.)

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  • Peninsula Range of Mountains, bounding the Colorado Desert on the West, San Diego County, California, & the Mexican territory of Baja California - Stone Resources (Marble, Limestone, Sandstone, & Granite, etc.) - Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 899 & 906.

    (pp. 899)

    “...This great basin, near the mouth of the Colorado River of the West, forms one of the most extensive and important portions of the arid regions of the United States. The vast area known as the Colorado Desert, comprises all the country lying between the Colorado River on the east and the Peninsula Range of mountains on the west - a vast triangular-depressed plain, below the level of the sea for the larger portion of its surface, and comparatively destitute of verdure or of animal life.

    “This remarkable region has an approximate area of twelve million acres, about one half of which lies within the boundaries of San Diego County, California, the remainder in the Mexican territory of Baja California....”

    (pp. 906)

    “The Peninsula Range of mountains, bounding the Colorado Desert on the west, possesses a rich variety of the choicest granite, marble, and sandstone, unsurpassed in quality for building purposes. Some of these varieties are exceedingly beautiful, but are still practically unavailable from their comparative inaccessibility.

    “The surface of the desert is strewn with fragments of marble for a large portion of its area. These are worn and beautifully polished or sculptured by the drifting sand, until each is in itself a natural ornament. Da Costa, in his ‘Natural History of Fossils’ (1757), page 197, says that ‘yellow marble was more esteemed by the Romans than all other varieties.’ Some of the delicately tinted pink, yellow, and variegated marble specimens from this region would lead us to indorse the taste of these ancient connoisseurs.

    “Aside from the marble and limestone so abundant in this section, we find immense quarries of red and brown sandstones worthy of entering into the construction of the finest palatial homes.

    “The following are the principal species of rock found on the desert which may become useful in building construction:

    Marble and limestone, in different grades.

    Cement rock.

    Pumice. - Abundant in the great basin.

    Gypsum.

    Asbestos.

    Porphyry, lava, and other volcanic rocks.

    Sandstone; red, brown, and gray.

    Gneiss, granite, and other granitic rocks.

    Dunnite. - ‘From Cargo Muchacho Mining District, San Diego County. This consists of three distinct minerals - olivine, magnetite, and micaceous mineral, unknown.’ (See Sixth Annual Report of the State Mineralogist, Pt. I, pages 32-33.)

    Breccia. - Suitable for building purposes.

    Clay. - A variety of clays suitable for a great number of uses, exist in large deposits of as great a degree of purity as could be desired. But little attention has naturally been given to these natural resources of our county. That these deposits will prove a source of wealth in the future cannot be doubted.”

  • Ramona (south of), San Diego County, California – the Jacobs Ranch Limestone Outcrops (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 182.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Jacobs Ranch; (Location)  Listed by Tucker (1925) with “other outcrops of limestone” as 3 miles south of Ramona; (Owner name, address)  E. Jacobs, Ramona (1925); (Geology)  (blank).

    (Remarks and references)  “Unsubstantiated.  No additional published information.  (Tucker 25:372).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Ramona (east-northeast of), San Diego County, California – the Hatfield Creek Quarry (Crushed Stone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 244-245.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  389;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Hatfield Creek quarry.  Ownership undetermined (1958); (Location)  Center W. ½ SW. ¼ sec. 7, T. 13 S., R. 2 E., SBM; about 2 ¾ miles east-northeast of Ramona, adjacent to State Highway 78; (Status) Inactive since 1951; (History)  Opened in 1920 as source of road base for new route of Highway 78.  Also in 1920’s rock from quarry used in construction of Sutherland dam.  From 1946 to 1951 worked b Alfred Lewis as source of roofing granules and poultry grit.  (Geology)  Light-gray granitic rocks  (Size of Excavation)  Small quarry  (Products)  Crushed stone for use as roadbase, roofing granules, and poultry grit; broken stone for use as riprap.  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  (blank)

  • Ranchita (west of), San Diego County, California – Marble Deposit (Limestone/Marble)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 183.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  “Marble Deposit”; (Location)  Secs. 14 and 15, T11S, R4E, SBM; west of Ranchita, in Montezuma Valley; (Owner name, address)  Undetermined (1957); (Geology)  (blank).

    (Remarks and references)  “A map locality of Tucker and Reed (1939, pl. 1).  Unsubstantiated by the present writer.  (Tucker and Reed 39: pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Ranchita (northwest of), San Diego County, California – the Sentenac Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 184.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  302;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Sentenac deposit; (Location)  Near the center of sec. 11, T11S, R4E, SBM; Montezuma district, about 2 miles northwest of Ranchita store, on San Ysidro Mt.; (Owner name, address)  Ray Jacobs, Julian (1958); (Geology)  “An unexplored pendant of crystalline limestone in hybrid rocks; it strikes northwest, dips steeply southwest, and cuts across the crest of a narrow, northeast-trending ridge.  The pendant seems to have the shape of a segment of an orange which tapers downward.  It is between 1,200 and 1,500 ft. long, and ranges in width from nearly 0 at the two ends to be between 200 and 250 ft. in the middle.  Its composition is undetermined.  A smaller pendant lies several hundred ft. to the northeast.”

    (Remarks and references)  “Covered by one lode claim of 20.7 acres which was located for gold.  It was patented in 1905 by Paul Sentenac (see map of claim in text).  The deposit is in a very brushy area, about 800 ft. higher, and ½ mile northwest of the nearest road.  Accessible only by very steep trail from the ranch house at the northwest corner of sec. 14.  (Tucker 25:372; Tucker and Reed 39: pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Ranchita (near), San Diego County, California – Verruga Marble Quarries (Marble) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Verruga marble quarries are in sec. 10, T. 11 S., R. 4 E., S.B. Eight patented claims were owned by John Johnson, Escondido, in 1939. The nearest railroad point is Lakeside, about 52 miles southwest. Road improvements in late years should permit hauling of marble at much less than the former cost, which was prohibitive when the quarries were last worked from 1921-23.

    Two deposits of marble, 800 feet apart and separated by mica schist, occur in an area of metamorphic rocks near granite. The western deposit outcrops for about 1000 feet striking N. 20 W. and is about 100 feet wide. The eastern outcrop is reported to be 200 feet by 1000 feet. Two quarries were opened in the twenties on the western deposit and the marble was used in several buildings in San Diego. Some work was also done on the eastern deposit. The marble is white, coarsely crystalline and of uniform texture and color. It is quite hard and can be quarried in large blocks."

    • Ranchita (west-northwest of), San Diego County, California – the Verruga Marble Quarries (Limestone / Marble)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego Count, California, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963)

      (pp. 39)

      “…In 1923, Nelson and Sloan began production of sand and gravel on the Otay River bed.  At this time, also Fenton-Sumption-Barnes merged with the Independent Stone Company to become Fenton-Parker Company (which was to be renamed H. G. Fenton Material Company in the early 1930’s).  From 1921 to 1923, marble for buildings and monuments were quarried from the Verruga Deposit near Ranchita….”

      (pp. 181)

      Verruga (Verruga Marble) Deposit

      “Location:  Center E. ½ W. ½ Sec. 10, T. 11 S., R. + E., B.M.; 2 ¾ miles west-northwest of Ranchita store, low on the southwestern slope of San Ysidro Mountain.  Ownership:  Constance J. Ehrnke, 543 E. Grand Ave., Escondido, owns one patented 20-acre placer claim which comprises the SW. ¼ SE. ¼ NW ¼ and NW. ¼ NE. ¼ SW. ¼ Sec. 10 (1958).

      “The Verruga Deposit was first worked from 1921 to 1923 when the Verruga Marble Company, of San Diego, quarried limestone from it for use as building stone, finished stone (or marble) produced by the company was used in the construction of several buildings in San Diego, for the Lee Highway Milestone opposite the U.S. Grant Hotel, also in San Diego.  The quarried stone was cut and polished on the property.  The operation ceased reportedly because transportation costs of $8 per ton from the quarry to the railroad at Lakeside proved too high (Tucker, 1925, p. 372).  More recently, the part of the deposit covered by the White Peak property, which is described in the accompanying tabulated list, was worked for crushed stones as roofing granules.  The Verruga Deposit consists of two nearly parallel, elongate bodies of crystalline limestone which cut a west-southwest trending interfluve.  The more westerly body strikes north-northeastward, and the more easterly one north-northwestward.  The distance between the bodies widens southward from about 250 feet at the north to 600 feet at the south.  Both are enclosed in schist and dip about 75º to the west.  The more westerly of the bodies the more extensively developed.  It is exposed nearly continuously along its strike for about 1,200 feet, and ranges in width from less than 25 to probably no more than 10 feet.  At the south end it is about 25 to 30 feet thick.  The limestone is white to pale bluish-gray, dense, and coarse- to very coarse-grained.  The body was worked along its southeastern edge from two small quarries which are about 150 feet apart.  Each of the quarries trends northward.  The more southerly one is about 150 feet (Photo 53.)  A short inclined shaft was sunk from a point at the base of the face.  The more northerly quarry is about 75 feet long and its face has a maximum height of about 25 feet.  An inclined shaft also was sunk from a point at the base of the face of this quarry.  The part of the limestone body opened by this quarry is interlayered with a band of schist about five feet thick.

      “The more easterly body is about 750 feet long and as wide as 100 feet.  Its northern part is covered by the White Peak property.

      “Following are chemical compositions calculated from analyses of six samples collected from the western body (described above) by O. E. Bowen, Jr., and C. H. Gray, Jr., Division of Mines, and amazed by Abbott A. Hanks, Inc., San Francisco (June 27, 1957).  (1) The first composition is based on an average of analyses of four samples collected from the more southerly of the two quarries.  (2) The second is an analysis of a single sample collected from near the western margin of the western body.  (3)  The third is an analysis of a single sample collected from the more northerly of the two quarries.”

      (The table that accompanied this entry will not be presented here.  See the book on the Internet Archive – Texts to see the table on pp. 181Peggy B. Perazzo.)

      “In addition to having been a source for dimension stone, the deposit might be considered as a possible source of lime for use in the manufacturing of glass, although most users prefer rock that contains no more than 0.02 percent ferric oxide.  Rock from the deposit would probably average 0.05 percent, or more, ferric oxide.  Other uses for the deposit might also be considered.  However, it is too small to be considered as the source of limestone for a cement plant.”

      “Photo 53.  Verruga crystalline limestone deposit, 2 ¼ miles west-northwest of Ranchita.  View north toward more southerly of two small quarries, showing crystalline limestone, or left, in contact with schist, on right.  Rock was quarried for building stone from 1921 to 1923.”  (pp. 181) Verruga crystalline limestone deposit, 2 ¼ miles west-northwest of Ranchita, San Diego Co., CA

      (pp. 184)

      (Map No.)  304;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Verruga (Verruga Marble) deposit; (Location)  North of Montezuma Valley; (Owner name, address)  (blank); (Geology)  (blank).

      (Remarks and references)  “See text.  (See above.)  (Logan 47:302-303; Tucker 25:370, 371, 372, 373; Tucker and Reed 39:45, pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

      (Remarks and references)  “See White Peak claim.  (Tucker 25:372; Tucker and Reed 39: pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

      (pp. 267)

      (Map No.)*  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Verruga deposit; (Location)  Near Ranchita, in the northeast part of the county.* (Owner name, address)  (blank); (Geology)  (blank).  (*  You can find the location of this quarry on Plate 10 near the end of the book at the link above.  This map covers the Lakeside-Foster, the Escondido, and Vista areas of San Diego County.)

      (Remarks and references)  “In the early part of the 1920’s marble was quarried at the Verruga deposit for use as building stone.  See description in text under ‘Limestone-dolomite.’  (Logan 47:302-303; Tucker 25:370, 371, 372, 373; Tucker and Reed 39:45, pl. 1).”    (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Ranchita (west-northwest of), San Diego County, California – the White Peak Claim (Volk Deposit) (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 184.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  306;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  White Peak Claim (Volk deposit); (Location)  Center of the S ½ N ¼ sec. 10, T11S, R4E, SBM; about 2-2/3 miles west-northwest of Ranchita store, on the south slope of San Ysidro Mountain; (Owner name, address)  W. W. Johnston, Route 3, Box 210, Escondido (1958); (Geology)  “Property covers the north part of the more easterly of two crystalline limestone bodies which are described in the text as the Verruga deposit.  Body strikes north-northwestward and dips steeply west in schist.  Width of outcrop in vicinity of workings is about 100 ft.  Limestone is medium- to coarse-grained and generally milky white to pale bluish gray.”

    (Remarks and references)  “One unpatented lode claim located in 1939.  Property is adjacent to the Verruga property which lies to the southwest.  This deposit was worked briefly by the owner immediately prior to World War II and in 1956.  Product was sold for roofing granules and chicken grit.  Small grinding mill on property  Developed by shallow cuts and trenches.  (Tucker 25:372; Tucker and Reed 39: pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Rancho Santa Fe (northeast of), San Diego County, California – the Greenstone Quarry (Crushed Stone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 244.  (Used with permission.)  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  386;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Greenstone quarry; (Location)  SW. ¼ SW. ¼ Sec. 11, T. 13 S., R. 3 W., SBM; about 3 miles northeast of Rancho Santa Fe, on southwest slope of group of hills north of San Dieguito River; (Status) Inactive since 1940’s (?); (History)  Probably worked for short period during 1940’s, perhaps by Calaveras Rock Co., which see  (Geology)  Dense, gray-green meta-andesite which is aphanitic in texture.  Rock is known commercially as “greenstone” (Size of Excavation)  Small  (Products)  Crushed stone used as roofing granules.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Owned by G. L. Dodds, Escondido, in 1939.  About ¼-mile southeast of Carmean quarry, which see also.  (Tucker and Reed 39:51).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Rancho Santa Fe (north of), San Diego County, California – the Meadowlark Ranch Quarry (Broken Stone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 246.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (pp. 231)

    “During the mid- and late-1950’s two deposits of granitic rocks were quarried for riprap, both by the J. R. Stringfellow Company, of Riverside.  These deposits are the Marron Quarry, near Oceanside; and the Meadowlark Ranch Quarry, north of Rancho Santa Fe.  The former quarry was operated only for a short period in the mid-1950’s because it yielded fragments only as large as 10 tons, and the operator needed 20-ton fragments for construction of a jetty.  The Meadowlark Ranch Quarry, which was opened in 1957 to replace the Marron quarry, yields fragments that range from five pounds to 20 tons.”

    (pp. 233)

    “In 1957, nearly 250,000 tons of riprap, valued at almost $1,000,000, was produced in San Diego County (San Diego County Division of Natural Resources, 1957, p. 20).  During that year at least 95 percent of the stone produced was used in the Mission Bay Park Project to construct jetties and to cap or line the sides of man-made islands.

    “Fragment size and classification of stone used for riprap generally are different for each job.  Classes A and B stone used for shore facing in the Mission Bay Park Project range in size as follows:  Class A, 1 pound to 1 ½ tons;  Class B, 1 pound to 3 tons; with specified percentages of sizes within the general classes.  Blocks to face the Mission Park jetty ranged from 7 to 20 tons; the core of the jetty was constructed of quarry-run material, with the largest pieces as heavy as five tons.

    “During the 1950’s, riprap also was used in San Diego County in construction of the 10th Avenue mole pier; the San Diego River Flood Control Project; Sutherland Dam north of Ramona; and in naval seafront projects.  In 1957, J. R. Stringfellow Company, of Riverside, was the principal producer of riprap in the county.”

    (pp. 246)

    (Map No.)  398;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Meadowlark Ranch Quarry.  J. R. Stringfellow Co., P.O. Box 6, Riverside; (Location)  S. ½ NE. ¼ Sec. 29, T. 12 S., R. 3 W., SBM; about 6 miles north of Rancho Santa Fe, on San Marcos Creek; (Status) Active intermittently (1958); (History)  Opened 1957 by Stringfellow  (Geology)  Massive, fine-grained granitic rocks  (Size of Excavation)  Quarry face 650 X 85-ft. (1958)  (Products)  Broken stone in fragments 5 pounds to 20 tons, used as riprap.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Use coyote hole blasting with equipment listed under ‘Stringfellow’ herein.  Stone used in Mission Bay Park project; 22 men employed.  Hourly capacity 250 tons.  Property (50 acres) purchased in 1957 from owners of Meadowlark Ranch.”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Rancho Santa Fe (southeast of), San Diego County, California – the Smith Construction Quarry (Crushed Gravel)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 249.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  406;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Smith Construction Co.; (Location)  On boundary between Secs. 28 and 33, T. 13 S., R. 3 W., SBM (proj); portion Lot L, Block 39, Rancho Santa Fe, San Dieguito Grant; about one mile southeast of Rancho Santa Fe; (Status) Active (1958); (History)  Started 1937  (Geology)  San Dieguito River bed.  Deposit contains some silt beds, ½- to 4-ft. thick  (Size of Excavation)  10 acres  (Products)  Plaster sand; crushed gravel (3/4-in. to ½-in.; and ½-in.).

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Property consists of 40 acres.  ¾-yd. dragline to pit trucks; sort haul to plant.  Dump over 8-in. grizzly.  Conveyor from grizzly to 3-ft. X 5-ft. screen (dry) to stockpile.  When float rock (gravel) hauled in, goes from grizzly to 8-in. X 16-in. jaw crusher, then to rolls, and to screws and washer.  Hourly capacity 35 tons; 4 employees.  Have 90-ft. wells delivering 800 gpm.”

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the American Marble and Granite Works (Granite), Office, San Pedro and Seventh sts., Covas and Escalli, proprietors. (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.) (No further information is given.)
    • San Diego, San Diego County, California - the American Marble and Granite Works (Granite) (From Commercial ‘Black Granite’ of San Diego County, California, Special Report 3, by Richard A. Hoppin and L. A. Norman, Jr., State of California, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines, San Francisco, December 1950.”)
      No. 1 on “Figure 1. Index map of San Diego County granite quarries,” located in the Santee District of San Diego County, produces a black stone, trade name “Blue-Diamond Granite.” First year of production was 1927, last year of production was 1941
    • (Also see:  “Santee (southeast of), San Diego County, California – American Marble and Granite Works (Jose Covas) Quarry  (Granite)”)
  • San Diego (southeasterly of), San Diego County, California – Hydraulic Cement Manufacture (Limestone, Cement Plant, & Kilns) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "At Jamul, 18 miles southeasterly from San Diego, hydraulic cement was manufactured on a small scale a number of years ago. The reason commonly assigned for abandoning the industry at this point is that it is too far from the railway. The plant was designed, it is said,* to produce 200 barrels per day."

    (*Footnote: Ninth Annual Report of State Mineralogist, 1889, pp. 139 and 309. Twelfth ibid., 1892, p. 383.)

  • San Diego (southeasterly of), San Diego County, California – Jamul Cement & Kilns
    • Jamul Cement: Speculation in the San Diego Hinterland,” by David C. Burkenroad, in The Journal of San Diego History, Fall, 1979, Vol. 25, No. 4, San Diego Historical Society.

      (Excerpt from the article) “A Little More Than Twenty miles southeast of San Diego, within the boundaries of the Mexican land grant Rancho Jamul, a curious and substantial masonry structure stands isolated at the foot of a low hill. The structure houses two octagonal kilns, a brick smokestack rising more than thirty feet above them. Limestone and clay from a deposit on the hill behind were once burned in these kilns by the Jamul Portland Cement Manufacturing Company, an enterprise created during the boom of the 1880s….”

      (Key words for the above article: Rancho Jamul, Jamul Cement Works, masonry kilns, cement clinker, boiler-iron casings, Jamul Portland Cement Manufacturing Company, Kumeyaay, Diegueño, Captain Henry S. Burton, Maria Amparo Ruiz Burton, limestone deposits, cement plant, Hotel del Coronado, Spreckels Brothers Commercial Company, European Portland, Island of Portland England, Santa Cruz manufacture Portland cement, Jamul limestone deposit, Jamul Portland Cement Manufacturing Company, David O. Saylor, Coplay Cement Manufacturing Company, Pennsylvania, Jamul Cement Works, French flour milling buhrstones, pot kilns, Schoefer kilns, Dietzsch kilns, California Portland Cement Company Colton)

  • San Diego (southeasterly of), San Diego County, California – Jamul Portland Cement Company Cement Plant (Limestone, Cement Plant, & Kilns) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Jamul Portland Cement Company was organized in San Diego County in 1889, to manufacture cement at a plant on Jamul Rancho, 18 miles east of San Diego (Irelan 90, p. 309).* The erection of a plant was started in 1890 (Storms 93, p. 383)** and it was finished on June 1891. It contained seven kilns and had a capacity of 150 barrels a day. The product was used for sidewalks in San Diego and according to Storms (93),** it was also sold elsewhere in southern California. The project was evidently short-lived. It was said to cost more to haul the cement to San Diego than the cost of bringing English portland cement to California by water.

    (* William Irelan, Jr., Ninth annual report of the State Mineralogist for the year ending December 1, 1889, California Min. Bur. Rept. 9, 352 pp., illus., 1890)

    (** W. H. Storms, "San Diego County," California Min. Bur. Rept. 11, pp. 376-387, illus., 1893)

    "The following analysis of the 'soft concretionary limestone' found on the property and used as raw material in making cement is taken from Irelan (90),* who does not mention what other ingredients were used."

    (* William Irelan, Jr., Ninth annual report of the State Mineralogist for the year ending December 1, 1889, California Min. Bur. Rept. 9, 352 pp., illus., 1890)

    Silica, 1.86 percent
    Alumina, 1.10 percent
    Carbonate of lime, 94.28 percent
    Carbonate of magnesia, 1.19 percent
    Carbonates of alkalies, 1.15 percent.

    "The composition of the cement was given as follows:

    Lime, 65.2 percent
    Magnesia, 1.20 percent
    Silica, 24.00 percent
    Alumina, 5.24 percent
    Iron Peroxide, 2.21 percent
    Alkalies, 1.00 percent
    Sulphuric acid, 0.20 percent
    Carbonic acid, 1.00 percent

    • San Diego (southeasterly of),, San Diego County, California – the Jamul Portland Cement Company  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

      (pp. 179-181)

      Jamul Ranch (Jamul Portland Cement Co.) Deposit

      Location:  Near the center of the E. ½ Sec. 27 (projected), T. 17 S., R. 1 E., S.B.M.; about 18 miles east-southeast of San Diego City Hall, on the Jamul (Daley) ranch.  The deposit is on the mesa-like crest of a group of low hills, about 2 ½ miles by dirt road and trail south-southwest of the ranch headquarters.  Ownership:  Daley, George R. Daley) Enterprises, Murphy Canyon Road, San Diego (1957).

      “The Jamul Portland Cement Company was organized in 1889 to manufacture portland cement.  In 1891 this company placed into operation on the Jamul Ranch a small plant of 150 barrels per day capacity (Irelan, 1890, p. 309-310; Storms, 1893, p. 383).  The venture lasted less than one year, however.  Apparently the cost of transport between the plant and San Diego was higher than had been anticipated; thus the price of the cement was not competitive with that of portland cement shipped from England to San Diego via water.  This enterprise represented the second attempt in California to produce portland cement.  The site of the plant is on the east side of Jamul Creek Valley, about 700 yards west-northwest of the deposit from which the raw material was supplied.

      “The Jamul Ranch Deposit consists of a thin mantle of caliche-like material which lies on a gently humped surface underlain by metavolcanic rocks (Fig. 43).  The deposit is about 1,400 feet long, 350 feet in average width, and ranges in thickness from less than one foot on the edges to between six and eight feet in the middle.  Approximately 85,000 tons of material remain in the deposit (calculation based on an average thickness of six feet through the north-trending crest and an average density of 2.0).  The carbonate rock is cream-colored, commonly porous, and poorly indurated (Photo 51).  It most resembles Caliche, although the origin is not obvious.  In a single exposure at the northwest end of the northern quarry (Fig. 43) the material has a travertine-like appearance.  Throughout the deposit the carbonate rock is mixed with angular fragments of the underlying metavolcanic rocks which consist of dark grayish-green, dark grayish-blue and dark-gray meta-andesite and meta-basalt.  These fragments are sparse to abundant and range in length from less than one inch to three feet.

      “Following are analyses of samples collected from the deposit by O. E. Bowen, Jr., of the California Division of Mines and Geology (analyses by Abbott Hanks, Inc., San Francisco, June 1955).

      (table headings)  SiO2 – Fe3O4 – Al2O3 – CaO – MgO – P2O5

      North quarry:  8.32%0.281.1648.491.230.02
      South quarry:  13.340.613.2044.241.400.15

      “The deposit is developed by a north-northwest trending (north) quarry about 160 feet long near the center of the deposit, and an east-trending, partially quarried trench (south quarry) about 140 feet long near the southwest boundary (Fig. 43).  There are also two 50-foot exploratory pits.  A road bed that resembles the bed of a narrow gauge railroad extends from the north quarry to the plant site and north along the east slopes of Jamul Creek Valley.

      “Figure 43.  Geologic sketch map and cross section of the Jamul Ranch limestone deposit, San Diego County, California.”  (pp. 179) Geologic sketch map and cross section of the Jamul Ranch limestone deposit, San Diego County, CA

      “The remnants of the old cement plant remain on the property (Photo 52).  These consist mainly of a large stone and brick structure which houses three vertical kilns, each about 6 ½ feet in diameter (Bowen, 1954).  The structure is 35 feet high and the stack extends another 30 feet.  The kilns were probably wood-fired.  A few yards to the north of the structure are the remains of five pot kilns, each also about 6 ½ feet in diameter.

      “Photo 52.  Remains of kiln of Jamul Cement Company plant, Jamul Creek Valley, 1957.”  (pp. 180) Remains of kiln of Jamul Cement Company plant, Jamul Creek Valley, 1957, San Diego Co., CA

      (pp. 182)

      (Map No.)  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Jamul Portland Cement Company; (Location)  (blank); (Owner name, address)  (blank); (Geology)  (blank).

      (Remarks and references)  “(Also) See Jamul Ranch deposit in text.  (Irelan 90:309-310; Logan 47:302  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • San Diego County, California – San Diego Stone Company Quarry - Sweetwater Dam

    See: “Sweetwater Dam, San Diego County, California – Sweetwater Dam

  • San Diego County, California – Elliott Dolomite Property  (Dolomite/Limestone) 

    See:  “Dos Cabezas (north of), California – the Elliot Deposit (Limestone

  • San Diego County, California – Marble Deposit east of San Diego County Line (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V. "The Counties of San Diego, Imperial," by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    "Very extensive deposits of marble, of several shades of color, which will soon be accessible (circa 1914) by the San Diego and Arizona Railroad, are in Coyote Mountain, T. 15 S., R. 10 E., a few miles east of the San Diego County line. These will be described under Imperial County."

  • San Diego County, California – Mission Gorge Pit (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Mission Gorge Pit; Operator: Superior Ready Mix Concrete; Address & County: 7500 Mission Gorge Rd., San Diego, CA 92120, San Diego County; Phone: (619) 265-0296; Latitude: 32.81, Longitude: -117.09, and Mine location number: Map No. 627; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • San Diego County, California – the Murray Canyon Operation (Crushed Rock/Aggregate)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 241.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  381d;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Murray Canyon operation (see flow sheet in text); (Location)  SE. ¼ Sec. 14, T. 16 S., R. 3 W., SBM (proj); Pueblo Lot 1187, Mission Lands, San Diego; Murray Canyon, about one mile northeast of interchange between U.S. Highways 80 and 395; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  Started 1923  (Geology)  Poway conglomerate  (Size of Excavation)  60 acres  (Products)  Crushed gravel (3/4 inch to dust; used entirely as aggregate in blacktop plants); also fill material.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Use dozer and ripper where necessary; 2 ½-yard shovel to 22-ton pit truck, 1/8 mile to plant; dump on 12-inch grizzly; to screens:  (1) minus ½-inch out, for fill material; (2) minus 2-inch, plus ½-inch to 5 ½-foot Symons short head cone crusher; (3) plus 2-inch to 15-inch X 38-inch jaw crusher, then to 4 ¼-foot Symons cone crusher.  From two crusher units above to screens:  minus 1-inch out, to final screens; plus 1 ½ inch to 4-foot Symons short head cone crusher and plus 2-inch, minus 1 ½-inch to 3-foot Symons short head crusher, and recycled in closed circuit; to final screens.  A dry operation.  Hourly capacity 200 tons; 17 employees.” 

  • San Diego County, California – Nelson and Sloan  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 247.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  (blank);  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Nelson and Sloan, P.O. Box 488, Chula Vista; (Location)  (blank); (Status) (blank); (History)  (blank)   (Geology)  (blank)   (Size of Excavation)  (blank)   (Products)  (blank).

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “One of the three principal sand and rock producers in county.”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • San Diego County, California – Sim J. Harris Company (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Sim J. Harris Company; Operator: Sim J. Harris Company; Address & County: P. O. Box 639069, San Diego County; Phone: (619) 277-5481; Latitude: 32.88, Longitude: -117.13, and Mine location number: Map No. 641; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the Southern California Granite Company  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 258.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (pp. 258)

    “In mid-1958, four companies were both quarrying and finishing granite in the county for use as dimension stone:  Pacific Cut Stone Company, Alhambra (Escondido Quarries, Inc.); Allied Granite Company, Los Angeles, Pomona Granite Company, Pomona; and Valley Granite Company, Escondido.  The National ‘Quarries, Inc., Escondido, was producing only unfinished stone.  Five companies were finishing stone only:  California Wire Sawyer Corporation, Lakeside; Clemens Granite Company, El Cajon; Escondido Granite Company, Escondido, Pyramid Granite Company, Escondido; and Southern California Granite Company, San Diego.

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the Southwest Onyx and Marble Company  (previously known as the Southwest Onyx and Marble Company)

    Guide to The Southwest Onyx and Marble Company, presented by the San Diego History Center. (The following excerpt is from the Guide.)

    (from the web site)  Biographical Or Historical Note:

    “Established in San Diego under the direction of Leslie B. Mills and later operated by his son John Y. Mills, the Lyman-Mills Onyx and Marble Company became the Southwest Onyx and Marble Company in 1921. It specialized in the fabrication of building fixtures and novelty works made of onyx from its Pedrara Onyx Company quarry in Baja California, Mexico. After the quarry closed in the late 1970s and John Y. Mills retired in 1992, the Southwest Onyx and Marble Company ceased operation....”

  • San Diego County, California – J. R. Stringfellow, Company – operated the Fletcher Quarries, Marron Quarry, and Meadowlark Ranch Quarry at one time  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 250.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  (blank);  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Stringfellow, J. R., Co.; (Location)  See under “Processing, etc.”; (Status) Active in county (1959); (History)  Major producer in S. Calif. Of broken stone for use as riprap in seafront projects  (Geology)  See various quarries listed under “Mining, etc.”  (Size of Excavation)  (blank)  (Products)  Broken stone for use as riprap.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Uses various equipment, including compressors, etc.; two 2 1/2-yd. shovels; and one 1 ½-yd. shovel.  Principal contractor for construction of jetties and for facing of islands in Mission Bay Park and other projects in San Diego region.  Works Fletcher and Meadowlark Ranch quarries and formerly operated Marron quarry, which see.”  (Note:  Fletcher quarries are located northeast of Grantville, the Meadowlark Ranch Quarry is located north of Rancho Santa Fe, and the Marron Quarry is located east of Oceanside.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

  • San Diego County, California – TTT Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: TTT Quarry; Operator: Superior Ready Mix Concrete; Address & County: 12494 Hwy. 67, Lakeside, CA 92040, San Diego County; Phone: (619) 443-7510; Latitude: 32.91, Longitude: -116.94, and Mine location number: Map No. 646; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • San Diego County, California – UCLH San Marcos (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: UCLH San Marcos; Operator: South Coast Materials Company; Address & County: P. O. Box 639069, San Diego County; Phone: (619) 729-2010; Latitude: 33.13, Longitude: -117.17, and Mine location number: Map No. 647; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Emil Johnson and Sons (National Quarries) (Granite) (From Commercial 'Black Granite' of San Diego County, California, Special Report 3, by Richard A. Hoppin and L. A. Norman, Jr., State of California, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines, San Francisco, December 1950.")

    No. 9 on "Figure 1. Index map of San Diego County granite quarries," located in the San Marcos District of San Diego County, produced a black stone, trade name "National Blue granite." First year of production was 1946, last year of production was 1948.

    • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Emil Johnson and Sons or Johnson Brothers or National Quarries (Granite Quarry)

      See:  Escondido Area, San Diego County, California – Emil Johnson and Sons (National Quarries) (Granite Quarries)

  • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Pete Matson (Granite Quarry) (From Commercial 'Black Granite' of San Diego County, California, Special Report 3, by Richard A. Hoppin and L. A. Norman, Jr., State of California, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines, San Francisco, December 1950.")
    No. 13 on "Figure 1. Index map of San Diego County granite quarries," located in the San Marcos District of San Diego County, produced a black stone, trade name "California Black granite." First year of production was 1948, last year of production was 1948.
  • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Matson & Kouns (Granite Quarry) (From Commercial 'Black Granite' of San Diego County, California, Special Report 3, by Richard A. Hoppin and L. A. Norman, Jr., State of California, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines, San Francisco, December 1950.")
    No. 13 on "Figure 1. Index map of San Diego County granite quarries," located in the San Marcos District of San Diego County, produced a black stone, trade name "California Black granite." First year of production was 1944, last year of production was 1946.
  • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Matson and McDonald (Granite Quarry) (From Commercial 'Black Granite' of San Diego County, California, Special Report 3, by Richard A. Hoppin and L. A. Norman, Jr., State of California, Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines, San Francisco, December 1950.")

    No. 13 on "Figure 1. Index map of San Diego County granite quarries," located in the San Marcos District of San Diego County, produced a black stone, trade name "California Black granite." First year of production was 1938, last year of production was 1944.

  • San Marcos District, San Diego County, California – Pete Matson Quarry  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (pp. 260)

    Vista Area (Black Granite).  The 10 quarries in the Vista area are within 3 ½ to 4 miles east to northeast of Vista, on the southwest tip of the San Marcos Mountains, and in Gopher Canyon, on the northeast side of the mountains.  The material quarried is obtained from hard, residual boulders of San Marcos gabbro which is fine- to medium-grained and dark gray to dark bluish- gray (Photo 83).  Stone produced in the area is used for monuments, building, and surface plates.  It is marketed generally under such a name as ‘Vista Black Granite.’

    “The first quarry in the Vista area was opened by Pete Matson in 1938, and was worked by him and various partners until 1952.  Since 1938 nine other quarries have been opened, and in 1958 two of these were active:  one was the National Blue Granite quarry, being operated by the Pomona Granite Company; the other as the Vista Black Quarry, being operated by National Quarries (see description below).  Other operators in the area have been Fellows and Clutter (1945-46); California Cut Stone and Granite Company (1945 to 1947); and Texas Quarries (1944).”

  • San Ysidro (east-northeast of), San Diego County, California – the Kuebler Ranch (McCarthy Ranch) Limestone Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 183.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  298;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Kuebler Ranch (McCarthy Ranch) deposit; (Location)  Center of the W ½  sec. 29, T18S, R1E, SBM (proj.); 8 miles east-northeast of San Ysidro; (Owner name, address)  Claude Kuebler, Kuebler Ranch, San Ysidro (1957); (Geology)  A deposit of cream-colored caliche at the north bend of an intermittent stream whose origin is a spring in the SW ¼ NW ¼  sec. 29.  The deposit covers several thousand square feet.  Its thickness is undetermined.  A similar but smaller deposit is near the center of sec. 32, T18S, R1E, SBM, beneath a cultivated field.

    (Remarks and references)  “Undeveloped.  (Logan 47:302).  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • San Ysidro (east-northeast of), San Diego County, California – the McCarthy Ranch Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 183.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Remarks and references)  “See Kuebler Ranch deposit.  (Logan 47:302).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

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