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San Diego - List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand, gravel, or decomposed granite quarries.)

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  • Linda Vista Siding, San Diego County, California – the Carrol Canyon Operation (Crushed Gravel)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 242.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  381e;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Carrol Canyon operation; (Location)  S. ½ Sec. 2, T. 15 S., R. 3 W., SBM; about 1 ½ miles northeast of Linda Vista Siding; (Status) Active (1958); (History)  Started 1958  (Geology)  Alluvium derived from nearby exposures of Poway conglomerate (Poway conglomerate in walls of canyon contain too high percentage fines for present processing system.  (Size of Excavation)  Pits in streambed (about 100 acres)  (Products)  Concrete sand and crushed gravel (standard sizes of rock for aggregate).

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Have 300 acres of property.  1 ½-yard dragline to 10-yard truck to 12-inch grizzly.  Then to 15-inch X 28-inch jaw crusher to 4-foot X 12-foot screen, to 3-foot short head and 4-foot standard Symons crushers; then to 4-foot X 12-foot screen; washed; by conveyors to stockpiles over tunnels  Material is elevated to overhead concrete batch mixer which dumps into trucks.  Water from well in stream bed.  Hourly capacity 150 tons; 8 employees.”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Los Peñasquitos Creek Valley, San Diego County, California – Mexican Onyx /Onyx Marble Deposit (Onyx Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V. "The Counties of San Diego, Imperial," by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    "(Mexican onyx or onyx marble) This handsome ornamental stone is mineralogically aragonite, a form of carbonate of lime often deposited form hot springs. The only occurrence in this county has been reported from the valley of Los Peñasquitos Creek on the grant of that name.* The exact locality could not be ascertained by the writer.

    (* Page 674 footnote: Bulletin 38, page 369.)

  • Mt. Helix (near), San Diego County, California – San Diego Granite Works (Granite Quarry) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V. "The Counties of San Diego, Imperial," by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    "San Diego Granite Works, corner Eleventh and M streets, San Diego, Fred Fickas, proprietor. Formerly operated a quarry near Mt. Helix, one quarter mile east of Hotel Grossmont. Also at one time operated the quarry near La Mesa, now controlled by Charles G. Moore. It now uses stone from the Sampson-Pirnie quarry west of Foster and from Lehnberg's quarry near Lakeside (circa 1914).

  • Oceanside (east of), San Diego County, California – the Marron Quarry (Broken Stone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 246.  (Used with permission.)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (pp. 231)

    “During the mid- and late-1950’s two deposits of granitic rocks were quarried for riprap, both by the J. R. Stringfellow Company, of Riverside.  These deposits are the Marron Quarry, near Oceanside; and the Meadowlark Ranch Quarry, north of Rancho Santa Fe.  The former quarry was operated only for a short period in the mid-1950’s because it yielded fragments only as large as 10 tons, and the operator needed 20-ton fragments for construction of a jetty.  The Meadowlark Ranch Quarry, which was opened in 1957 to replace the Marron quarry, yields fragments that range from five pounds to 20 tons.”

    (pp. 233)

    “In 1957, nearly 250,000 tons of riprap, valued at almost $1,000,000, was produced in San Diego County (San Diego County Division of Natural Resources, 1957, p. 20).  During that year at least 95 percent of the stone produced was used in the Mission Bay Park Project to construct jetties and to cap or line the sides of man-made islands.

    “Fragment size and classification of stone used for riprap generally are different for each job.  Classes A and B stone used for shore facing in the Mission Bay Park Project range in size as follows:  Class A, 1 pound to 1 ½ tons;  Class B, 1 pound to 3 tons; with specified percentages of sizes within the general classes.  Blocks to face the Mission Park jetty ranged from 7 to 20 tons; the core of the jetty was constructed of quarry-run material, with the largest pieces as heavy as five tons.

    “During the 1950’s, riprap also was used in San Diego County in construction of the 10th Avenue mole pier; the San Diego River Flood Control Project; Sutherland Dam north of Ramona; and in naval seafront projects.  In 1957, J. R. Stringfellow Company, of Riverside, was the principal producer of riprap in the county.”

    (pp. 246)

    (Map No.)  395;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Marron quarry, Abe Marron, Vista (owner); (Location)  E. ½ NE. ¼ Sec. 33, T. 11 S., R. 4 W., SBM (proj); about 5 miles east of downtown Oceanside; (Status) Inactive (1959); (History)  Worked in 1957 by J. R. Stringfellow  (Geology)  Granitic rocks related to Santiago Peak volcanics  (Size of Excavation)  Quarry face 100 ft. long, 80 ft. high  (Products)  Broken stone 5 pounds to 10 tons for use as riprap.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Operator used coyote hole blasting with equipment listed under ‘Stringfellow.’  Operation was moved to Meadowlark Ranch deposit in late 1957 because Marron deposit would not easily yield blocks larger than 10 tons, and 20-ton blocks were needed for construction of a jetty.  While operating this deposit, company produced as much as 100 tons of stone per hour; 10 employees.” 

  • Otay (southwest of), San Diego County, California – the Otay Quarry & Plant (Crushed Gravel)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 242.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  381f & 381g;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Otay operation (No. 1), Plant (381f) and Deposit (381g); (Location)  Plant:  N ½ NW. ¼ SW. ¼ Sec. 22, T. 18 S., R. 2 W., SBM; about ½ mile southwest of Otay; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  Since 1918  (Geology)  Otay River bed  (Size of Excavation)  200 acres  (Products)  Concrete sand and crushed gravel (standard sizes of rock for aggregate).

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “In 1958 source of sand was about 3 miles east of plant, in Sec. 19, T. 18 S., R. 1 W., SBM; haul to plant, dump on 15-inch grizzly; grizzly to 22-inch X 36-inch jaw crusher, then to 4-feet X 12-feet screen.  Wash, then split 3 ways:  (1) to 3-foot short head Symons crusher, (2) to 3-foot standard Symons, and (3) to 4-foot Symons Standard cone crusher in closed circuit.  Stockpiled over tunnel.  Hourly capacity 200 tons; 22 employees.  Water from well.”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

    (pp. 247)

    (Map No.)  399a;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Otay operation; (Location)  Plant:  SE. ¼ NE. ¼ Sec. 22, T. 18 S., R. 2 W., SBM; Blocks 19 and 20, Bruchall’s Addition, Township of Otay; less than ¼ mile southwest of center of Otay; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  Continuous operation since 1923  (Geology)  See below  (Size of Excavation)  See below  (Products)  Concrete and plaster sand; crushed gravel (standard sizes rock for aggregate).  3/8 in. minus and 7/16 in. minus to hot plant).  Crushed gravel consists of about 1/5 to 1/3 naturally rounded material.  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “At plant sand and gravel dumped through hopper to 15-in. X 30-in. jaw crusher to surge pile, to 3 deck vibrating screen.  Through cone crushers to washer and classifier.  Through sand wheels and drag washers to stockpile by overhead conveyors.  Tunnels to hoppers.  Hourly capacity 100 tons; 12 employees.  Water from 300-ft. well an float pump on pond.”  

    (Map No.)  399b;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  (Otay operation)  (1) Source of sand and gravel; (Location)  Otay River bed, about 5 miles east of plant; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  Worked various deposits on river since 1923  (Geology)  Otay River bed (about ½ sand and ½ gravel)  (Size of Excavation)  40 acres  (Products)  See above (399a)  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “2-yd. dragline to 10-yd. trucks.  Haul 5 miles to plant and dump on stockpile.  (See above for data on processing).”

    (Map No.)  399c;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  (Otay operation)  (2) Source of sand and gravel; (Location)  NE. ¼ NE. ¼ Sec. 9, T. 19 S., R. 2 W., SBM; about 3 miles west-southwest of San Ysidro, in Smugglers Gulch; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  Opened 1958 (?)  (Geology)  Alluvium probably derived from terrace deposits; mostly gravel, small proportion of sand  (Size of Excavation)  (blank)  (Products)  See above (399a)  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  Recently opened deposit.  See first section of “Otay operation” 399a above for data on processing). 

    (Map No.)  399d;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  (3) Source of sand; (Location)  S. ½ SW. ¼ Sec. 35, T. 18 S., R. 2 W. and N. ½ Sec. 2, T. 19 S., R. 2 W., SBM; less than one mile west of San Ysidro; (Status) Active (1959); (History)  (blank)  (Geology)  Tia Juana River bed, which is mainly source of plaster sand, some concrete sand  (Size of Excavation)  (blank)  (Products)  See above (399a)  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Portable dragline to trucks; 2 ½ mile haul to plant.  (See above for data on processing).” 

    (Map No.)  300e;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  (Otay operation) No. 5 operation; (Location)  NW. ¼ Sec. 19, T. 15 S., R. 2 W., SBM (proj); portion Lot 72, Rho Mission; about one mile west of Camp Elliot headquarters, in San Clemente Canyon; (Status) Active (1958); (History)  Started 1956  (Geology)  Alluvium derived from Poway conglomerate  (Size of Excavation)  20 acres total (pit 30 ft. deep 1958)  (Products)  Concrete sand; crushed gravel (standard size rock for aggregate; 1-in. minus for concrete mix.  (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Lease land from Sim J. Harris.  2-yd. shovel to trucks which haul 1/8 mile to plant and dump on stockpile.  Through 10-in. X 30-in. jaw crusher; then to 1-in. X 4-ft. X 15-ft., 3-deck scalping screen: plus one-in. gravel to rolls; ½-in. gravel to 4-ft. Symons cone crusher, then to plant.  Crushed gravel from rolls (above) goes through 3-deck, 4-ft. X 12-ft. screen.  Oversize from screen through 4-ft. Symons crusher in closed circuit.  Hourly capacity 100 tons; 14 employees.  Water from well (250 g.p.m., operated continuously).”