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San Diego - List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand, gravel, or decomposed granite quarries.)

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  • Anza-Borrego Desert State Park Area, San Diego County, California – the Santa Rosa Mountains Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 184.  (Used with permission)  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  301;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Santa Rosa Mts. deposits; (Location)  Santa Rosa Mts., northeastern part of the county.  Mostly in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park; (Owner name, address)  Undetermined (1958); (Geology)  “Extensive, but undescribed, northwest-trending layers of carbonate rocks occur with schist high on the southwest flank of the Santa Rosa Mts.”

    (Remarks and references)  “Accessible only by foot, over very steep terrain.”  (Dibbles 54:21, pl. 2).” (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Bernardo District, San Diego County, California - Quarries in the Bernardo District
    See:Escondido (south of), Bernardo District, San Diego County, California – the Bly Stone Company” & “Escondido, Bernardo District, San Diego County, California – Daley Corporation Quarry
  • Borrego Springs (northwest of), San Diego County, California – Borrego Springs Limestone Outcrop (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V. "The Counties of San Diego, Imperial," by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    "About 4 ½ miles northwest of Borrego Springs, Secs. 2 and 3, T. 11 S., R. 7 E., is an outcrop of limestone on which claims have been located by Dr. D. B. Northrup, 771 Twenty-second street, San Diego, and T. A. Eckert."

    • Borrego Springs (4 ½ miles from), San Diego County, California – Borrego Springs Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Borrego Springs deposit is in secs. 2 and 3, T. 11 S., R. 7 E., S.B., 4 ½ miles from Borrego Springs. This is within the present boundaries of Borrego State Desert Park."

    • Borrego Springs (east of), San Diego County, California – the Borrego Springs Limestone Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 182.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

      (Map No.)  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Borrego Springs; (Location)  Secs. 2 and 3, T11S, R7E, SBM; east of Borrego Valley, in Anza-Borrego Dessert State Park; (Owner name, address)  (blank); (Geology)  (blank).

      (Remarks and references)  “Existence not substantiated.  (Logan 47: 301; Merrill 14:673-674)”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Borrego Springs (northeast of), San Diego County, California – the Coyote Mountain Deposit (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963.  (Used with permission)  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    See:  “Coyote Mountains, San Diego County, California – the Coyote Mountain Deposit (Limestone)

  • Carlsbad (southeast of), San Diego County, California – the Evans Point Deposit (Riprap)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 237.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  380;  (Company and Operations – or Deposit)  Evans Point deposit; (Location)  NW. ¼ Sec. 15, T. 12 S., R. 4 W., SMB (proj.); about 4 miles southeast of Carlsbad; (Status) Operated intermittently (1958); (History)  (blank)  (Geology)  Greenish-gray metavolcanic rocks  (Size of Excavation)  (blank)  (Products)  Ornamental stone, some riprap.

    (Mining, Processing, References, and Other Data)  “Operators undetermined”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Coyote Mountain, San Diego County, California – the Coyote Mountain Limestone/Marble Deposit (Crystalline Limestone/Dolomite)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 182.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

    (Map No.)  292;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Coyote Mountain deposit; (Location)  Near the center of sec. 3, T10S, R6E, SBM; on the southwest side of Coyote Mt., about 6 miles northeast of Borrego Springs.  Probably in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park; (Owner name, address)  Undetermined (1958); (Geology)  Small Crystalline limestone-dolomite deposit of undetermined extent and composition.

    (Remarks and references)  “Prospected briefly as possible source of marble, probably in 1920’s.  (Osterholt, 1934).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Coyote Mountain, San Diego County, California – Coyote Mountain Marble Deposit east of San Diego County Line  (Marble)  (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist – Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report – Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V.  “The Counties of San Diego, Imperial,” by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    “Very extensive deposits of marble, of several shades of color, which will soon be accessible (circa 1914) by the San Diego and Arizona Railroad, are in Coyote Mountain, T. 15 S., R. 10 E., a few miles east of the San Diego County line.  These will be described under Imperial County.”

  • Coyote Mountain, California – Elliott Dolomite Property  (Dolomite/Limestone) 

    See:  “Dos Cabezas (north of), California – the Elliot Deposit (Limestone

  • Coyote Mountains, Colorado Desert, San Diego County, California - the San Diego Desert Marble Company Quarries (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "San Diego Desert Marble Company owns several claims in T. 16 S., R. 9 E., S. B. M., on the most eastern extremity of the Coyote Mountains, Colorado Desert. Many blocks measuring from 10 to 20 feet in diameter have been taken out, ready for transportation, from two quarries. The marble is fine-grained and exceptionally hard, usually of a gray or black and white color, with strata of pink, yellowish, and reddish marble. Nothing but assessment work has been done."

    "San Diego Desert Marble Company owns several claims in T. 16 S., R. 9 E., S. B. M., on the most eastern extremity of the Coyote Mountains, Colorado Desert. Many blocks measuring from 10 to 20 feet in diameter have been taken out, ready for transportation, from two quarries. The marble is fine-grained and exceptionally hard, usually of a gray or black and white color, with strata of pink, yellowish, and reddish marble. Nothing but assessment work has been done."

    • Coyote Mountains, San Diego County, California – the San Diego Desert Marble Company (Limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963, pp. 184.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

      (Map No.)  (blank);  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  San Diego Desert Marble Company; (Location)  (blank); (Owner name, address)  (blank); (Geology)  (blank).

      (Remarks and references)  “An early explorer for minerals in the Jacumba region.  Especially interested in the Dos Cabezas limestone deposits and the Jacumba manganese deposits.  (Kunz 05:150).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Deer Park (near), San Diego County, California – the Glacier Deposits – North Glacier & South Glacier Marble Deposits– C. P. Hayes (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part V. "The Counties of San Diego, Imperial," by Frederick J. H. Merrill, Ph.D., Field Assistant (field work in December, 1914), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 427-634.)

    "Near Deer Park, in Sec. 1, T. 15 S., R. 4 E., are two claims, located on white marble, known as North Glacier and South Glacier, controlled by C. P. Hayes, Wm. A. Berkey and Zoe Beyers Vernon. This interest is represented by G. T. Vernon, 523 Timken Building, San Diego, and J. G. Beyers, of Descanso. It is at present intended to undertake the manufacture of lime, bringing the product to San Diego by motor truck."

    • Deer Park District, San Diego County, California – the Deer Park (Glacier) Limestone-Dolomite Deposit (Limestone – Dolomitic limestone)  (from Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, County Report 3, by F. Harold Weber, Jr., Geologist, California Division of Mines and Geology, 1963.  (Used with permission)  (This book is available on the Internet Archive – Texts.)

      (pp. 174)

      “…The Deer Park Deposit, north of Pine Valley, ranges in composition from limestone to magnesian limestone, a small quantity of this rock was used at the Stonewall Gold Mine before 1900.”

      (pp. 182)

      (Map No.)  293;  (Name of claim, mine, or group)  Deer Park (Glacier) deposit; (Location)  SW ¼ NE ¼ sec. 1, T15S, R4E, SBM; Deer Park district, about 5 miles north of Pine Valley and less than ¼ mile north of Pine Valley Creek, in a northeast-trending canyon; (Owner name, address)  Undetermined (1957)  C. M. Walker, Descanso (1925); (Geology)  Two bodies of carbonate rock are enclosed in metamorphic rocks which range from quartz-biotite schist to tactite.  The larger body, on the north side of Pine Creek road, strikes northward and dips steeply east.  It is between 100 and 125 ft. long, and is 30 to 40 ft. in width.  The rock is pale gray to white, and fine- to medium-grained.  It ranges in composition from limestone to dolomitic limestone and is partly siliceous.  The smaller body, about 500 ft. north of the larger body, was not examined.

      (Remarks and references)  “The deposit was reported by Merrill (1914, p. 673) to be covered by the North and South Glacier claims.  Tucker (1925) reported that the deposit was covered by one claim of the Schley group (see tabulated list under ‘Gold’).  Tucker also stated that the marble had been burned in a kiln on Indian Creek for use at the Stonewall gold mine.  (Logan 47:301; Merrill 14:673, 685, Tucker 25:370-372; Tucker and Reed, 39: pl. 1).”  (To see the bibliography that lists the books cited in the previous sentence, see the “Annotated Bibliographies” section of Geology and Mineral Resources of San Diego County, pp. 283-309.)

  • Dehesa, San Diego, California – “Black” Granite (orbicular or gabbro) Quarries circa 1913  (from the chapter entitled “California” (pdf), by G. F. Loughlin, in the Mineral Resources of the United States Calendar Year 1913, Part II.  Nonmetals, United States Geological Survey, 1914, pp. 1356)

    “At Dehesa, in San Diego County, there is an orbicular ‘black granite’ or gabbro, that is well adapted for ornamental work, and would probably be unique among building and ornamental stones.  The rock is characterized by abundant rounded segregations of varying textures uniformly scattered through a medium to rather coarse-grained matrix, and several varieties, based on variations in texture, are said to be available  The orbicular rock has been found only as residual bowlders.  Other orbicular ‘black granites’ have been found at Rattlesnake Bar, Eldorado (El Dorado) County, and in Sierra and Plumas counties, but none has been quarried.”

  • Descanso (northeast of), San Diego County, California – Deer Park Limestone Deposit (Limestone & Kiln) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Deer Park limestone deposit is 6 miles northeast of Descanso, in sec. 12, T. 15 S., R. 4 E., S.B. Many years ago white crystalline limestone was quarried from a lens 15 feet thick and burned in a kiln nearby for local use when gold mining was active on the adjacent Rancho Cuyama, now a state park."

  • Descanso (northeast of), San Diego County, California – Rancho Cuyama State Park (Lime Kiln) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Deer Park limestone deposit is 6 miles northeast of Descanso, in sec. 12, T. 15 S., R. 4 E., S.B. Many years ago white crystalline limestone was quarried from a lens 15 feet thick and burned in a kiln nearby for local use when gold mining was active on the adjacent Rancho Cuyama, now a state park."

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