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San Bernadino County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc. (Continued) *

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(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • San Bernardino County, California – Arlington and Black Hawk Limestone Groups (Limestone) (Excerpt from “Limestone in California,” by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Arlington and Black Hawk groups containing 175 claims located originally for gold in secs. 5, 8, 9,16, 17 and vicinity, T. 3 N., R. 2 E., S.B., were (Tucker, W.B. 43, p. 516)* owned by James Hay, 8517 West Third Street, Los Angeles. The claims are on the northeast slope of the San Bernardino Mountains, up to 6700 feet elevation. Gold occurs in a slightly silicified and iron-stained limestone breccia which lies between a massive limestone hanging wall and granite footwall.

    ( * W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, “Mineral resources of San Bernardino County,” California Div. Mines Rept. 39, pp. 427-549, 1943)

    "For details regarding limestone in this region, see Furnace Limestone."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Black Hawk Limestone Group

    Black Hawk Limestone Group See: San Bernardino County, California – Arlington and Black Hawk Limestone Groups above.

  • San Bernardino County, California – Black Mountain Quarry (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Black Mountain Quarry; Operator: Southwestern Portland Cement; Address & County: 16888 N. E. St., Victorville, CA 92392-2928, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 245-1681; Latitude: 34.63, Longitude: -117.11, and Mine location number: Map No. 553; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California - the Corona Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Corona Quarry, in Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; Fairchild-Gilmore-Wilton Company, Nos. 516-517 Pacific Electric Building, Los Angeles, owner. Granite boulders are worked in this quarry. The granite has a yellowish cast. Paving blocks are shipped from this quarry."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Cushenbury (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Cushenbury; Operator: Mitsubishi Cement Corporation; Address & County: 5808 State Hwy. 18, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 248,7373; Latitude: 34.35, Longitude: -116.85, and Mine location number: Map No. 566; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California – Douglas Lime Products Company (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Douglas Lime Products Company. President is L. C. Douglas, Wrightwood, California. During the past 2 years this company has done considerable work on limestone deposits described elsewhere in this report. In January 1945 they began work under lease and option on the Cajon Lime Products Company's deposit and plant in secs. 27 and 32, T. 3 N., R. 6 W., S.B. In the same year, the company had a lease and option on Lamb Brothers limestone deposits in secs. 3, 4, 10, 15, and 22, T. 3 N., R. 7 W., S.B. A quarry was opened on this deposit in section 4. This quarry is 1 mile east of Wrightwood at an elevation of 5700 feet on a limestone outcrop 500 feet wide. The quarry is 200 feet wide and about 200 feet below the outcrop on top of the mountain. The limestone is reported to be white, high-calcium stone but badly shattered. This large deposit is described in greater detail, herein, with analyses, under Lamb Brothers.*

    (* Lamb Brothers, see: San Bernardino County, California – Lamb Brothers Limestone Deposits (Sheep Creek Deposits) below.)

    "Early in 1947, Douglas Lime Products Company leased the Mill Creek Limestone Company's deposit in secs. 15 and 22, T. 1 S., R. 1 E., S.B., on north side of Mill Creek 2 miles above Fallvale and about 23 miles east of Redlands. This deposit was worked in 1942-43 by Mill Creek Limestone Company and is described under that name."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Dunton Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Dunton Limestone deposit comprises twenty-five 160-acre placer claims situated in Cushenberry Canyon on the north slope of the San Bernardino Mountains, between Arctic Canyon and Blackhawk Canyon, in secs. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, T. 3 N., R. 1 E., S.B., 9 miles southeast of Lucerne; elevation 4500 to 5200 feet. Owners are Claire Dunton and R. B. Kincannon, Alhambra, California; under lease to the Kennedy Minerals Company, John Kennedy, president and manager, 2550 East Olympic Boulevard, Los Angeles.

    "A belt of Carboniferous limestone, about 2 miles in width, strikes eastward, dips 50 S., and is exposed on both sides of Cushenberry Canyon. North of Monarch Flat, a quarry face has been started on a massive bed of white, crystalline limestone. The quarry face is 150 feet in length. The broken material from quarry is loaded by steam shovel into truck and hauled to ramp, dumped over railroad grizzly into ore pocket, then loaded into 10-ton trucks and hauled to Thorne Siding for shipment to Los Angeles. They are shipping 1000 tons per month. Ten men are employed.

    "This work is going on west of the Arlington Mining Corporation deposits. For a fuller description of these Carboniferous deposits, see under Furnace limestone." (below)

  • San Bernardino County, California – the Furnace Limestone (Limestone & Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "This interesting formation was first described and named by Francis Edward Vaughan (22).* His report covers the San Gorgonio quadrangle and a strip across the north end of San Jacinto quadrangle, and he mapped the areal geology from near Banning on the south to Lucerne Valley on the north, a length of 41 miles and a width of 29 miles. The principal limestone areas mapped are in the high mountain region in T. 2 and 3 N., R. 1, 2 and 3 E., S.B., which ranges in elevation from 4500 to 8200 feet. The northern deposits of limestone, now being opened, are accessible by road from Thorne on the Santa Fe Railroad 4 miles south of Victorville, thence via Box S Ranch and Lucerne School to Monarch Flat, a distance of about 28 miles. The distance to railroad from the more southerly and higher deposits northeast of Big Bear Lake would be a few miles longer.

    (* Francis Edward Vaughan, "Geology of San Bernardino Mountains north of San Gorgonio Pass," Univ. California, Dept. Geol. Sci. Bull., vol. 13, pp. 319-411, 1922)

    "In his discussion of the limestone, Vaughan frequently alluded to areas of it, some of large size, which are sunken into the granite, and in many places altered to coarsely crystalline white marble. Granitic intrusions into the limestone are also frequently observed, with resulting contact minerals. Graphite, usually impure, was seen at one place in a stratum 1 to 4 feet thick. Between Crystal Peak and Marble Canyon he saw a limestone scarp 3000 feet high. South of Smarts Ranch (in sec. 3, T. 2 N., R. 2 E.) he found the distance across the strike of the limestone was 4700 feet. With the dip 60 SW., he calculated the thickness to be 4300 feet.

    "A. O. Woodford and T. A. Harriss (28)* have described the Furnace limestone in a part of the area covered by Vaughan, but in greater detail. The following description and partial analyses are from their article. These notes refer especially to the limestone in the region of the Arlington Mining Corporation holdings, and the Dunton limestone deposit.

    (* A. O. Woodford and T. A. Harriss, "Geology of Blackhawk Canyon, San Bernardino Mountains, California," Univ. California, Dept. Geol. Sci. Bull., vol. 17, pp. 265-304, 1928)

    "'Approximate partial analyses, Furnace limestone, T. 3 N., R. 1 E., S.B., San Bernardino County (from Woodford and Harriss, 28)

    Approximate partial analyses, Firestone limestone

    1358B – White sugary limestone, 500-600 feet SW. of NE. corner sec. 14, E. of Cushenberry Canyon.

    1351D – Composite sample of white limestone along mountain front 1400-1500 feet west of mouth of Cushenberry Canyon.

    1365B – Composite sample of white limestone along mountain front 100-300 feet NW. of ¼ sec. corner between secs. 8 and 17.

    1359A – Dark gray limestone at ¼ sec. corner between secs. 13 and 14, E. of Cushenberry Canyon.

    1359C – Composite sample, SW. wall of Cushenberry Canyon due W. of 1359A.

    1360A – White limestone, about 800 feet SW. of center sec. 12, E. of Cushenberry Canyon.

    1358A – Composite sample, east side of Monarch Flat, E. of Cushenberry Canyon. Varied materials including quartz vein.

    1367A – Fine-grained white dolomite, SW. corner sec. 8, mountain front east of Furnace Canyon.

    1363B – Gray dolomite from SW. corner sec. 16; analysis indicates 53 molecular percent CaCO3.

    "'It is crystalline, the mineral individuals averaging about 1 mm. in diameter. Sometimes banding is pronounced, owing to variations in color or in grain (even up to 1 cm.) or both. The color bands are a few millimeters or centimeters wide and usually caused by vague changes in shade from light to dark gray. Some of the limestone is dazzling white, and much of the lower portion of the section, as here exposed, is stained red.

    "'Some parts of the limestone are composed of practically pure calcite;…sometimes dolomite grains are common and often tremolite is abundant as centimeter-long fibers or crystals radiating or variably oriented. A few beds are pure dolomite…there are also occasionally present chlorite, quartz, garnet, diopside, graphite, pyrite, wulfenite, galena, gold, etc. The banding is sometimes due to streaks of chlorite or other minerals. The red limestone is stained with hematite and limonite, which may be present in considerable percentage, often but not always accompanied by wulfenite in determinable amount and gold in commercial quantity. Rare limonite pseudomorphs after pyrite suggest the possibility that all the gold-bearing iron oxides have resulted from the decomposition of pyrite.

    "'Numerous poorly preserved fossils were found in a bed of fine-grained siliceous limestone at the top of the range scarp between the forks of Crystal Creek in the north central part of sec. 25, T. 3 N., R. 1 W. Dr. George H. Girty says '…the fauna is clearly Paleozoic and very probably Carboniferous…The only other possibility is Devonian and that may for the present be dismissed sans discussion. Both from what we have and what appears to be absent, I am inclined to believe that in the Carboniferous the geologic age is Mississippian rather than Pennsylvanian or Permian and that you have an horizon more or less equal to the Baird shale….''"

  • San Bernardino County, California – Inland Rock (Rock) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Inland Rock; Operator: Fourth Street Rock Crusher; Address & County: P. O. Box 6490, San Bernardino, CA 92412, San Bernardino County; Phone: (909) 885-6866; Latitude: 34.15, Longitude: -117.55, and Mine location number: Map No. 578; Mineral commodity: Rock.

  • San Bernardino County, California – Lamb Brothers Limestone Deposits (Sheep Creek Deposits) (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lamb Brothers limestone deposits (Sheep Creek deposits), occur on holdings of about 1700 acres in secs. 1, 3, 4, 10, 15, and 22, T. 3 N., R. 7 W., S.B. The part in sec. 4, which has received most attention, is about 10 miles by road from a mainline railroad. John Gaarden, Blackstone Apartments, 244 South Olive Street, Los Angeles 12, and associates, are at present interested in the property. It has been examined and sampled by Dr. W. C. Bass, president, Smith Emery & Company, Los Angeles (1929); Richard K. Meade, Baltimore, Maryland (1930); and numerous analyses have been made by Research Laboratories, H. J. Warsap, Chief Chemist, Los Angeles. These reports have been drawn upon for the following details. Most of the examinations have been for the purpose of determining if the limestone is suitable for making portland cement, and if tonnage is sufficient to justify a cement plant. Tests have also been made of clay deposits in the vicinity. A spur track 9 ½ miles long on an easy grade would connect the main limestone deposit with the broad gauge railroad used jointly by the Union Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Companies through Cajon Pass. The deposits are 80 to 85 miles from Los Angels by Rail or highway.

    "According to W. C. Bass,

    "'The deposit (on sec. 4) comprises two large hills of limestone. There is little or no overburden so that the limestone is well exposed. The east hill is about 1000 feet wide by 1800 feet long and rises to a height of 500 feet. Limestone outcrops over this entire hill with the exception of a few minor intrusions. The west hill lies about 700 feet further west and is connected with the first hill by a lower 'saddle.' The east and south ends of this hill are composed of limestone. The bold outcrops indicate limestone over an area extending from the east end of the hill 900 feet north to an intrusion of igneous rock. The east base of the hill is at an elevation of 5500 feet and the lime outcrop extends up to an elevation of 5950 feet at the west contact. The igneous intrusion, probably about 200 feet wide, cuts diagonally across the north side of the hill in a direction a little north of west. It also cuts out most of the limestone from the west half of the saddle which connects the two hills. North of the intrusion is a ledge of limestone, probably 50 feet or more in thickness, which extends from the east hill as far west as the west contact of the west hill.

    "The limestone is a crystalline, high-calcium stone. Much of it is pure white of a high grade which would be suited for chemical purposes.

    *"Average samples were taken, one over the East Hill and one over the West Hill, to represent material which would result from quarrying all the rock.

    Average analyses, Lamb Bros. limestone

    Silica (East Hill) 1.70 percent; (West Hill) 6.00 percent
    Aluminum oxide (East Hill) 0.54 percent; (West Hill) 1.42 percent
    Iron Oxide (East Hill) 0.26 percent; (West Hill) 0.38 percent
    Magnesium oxide (East Hill) 0.73 percent; (West Hill) 1.07 percent
    Calcium oxide (East Hill) 53.40 percent; (West Hill 50.50 percent
    Loss on ignition (East Hill) 42.60 percent; (West Hill) 40.60 percent
    Total (East Hill) 99.23 percent; (West Hill) 99.97 percent'

    (* Please note that the rest of the analyses by Meade are not included here.)

    "The two reports state the limestone is suitable for making several types of portland cement, when used with the clay which occurs in upper Cajon Canyon, 20 miles from the limestone.

    "The property has not been drilled, so far as known, but both Bass and Meade made estimates as follows of probable tonnage of limestone in the two hills above the 5200-goot contour:

    Bass estimate: 50,000,000 tons
    Meade estimate: 46,000,000 tons

    "Besides the numerous analyses quoted above, many others are available indicating from 97.5 to over 99 percent CaCO3. These were probably taken from selected beds which might be worked to yield a very high-calcium limestone for special uses."

    Plate 32-A. Face of Limestone - Lamb Bros. limestone deposit, San Bernardino County. Photo by courtesy of John Gaarden. Face of Limestone - Lamb Bros. limestone deposit
  • San Bernardino (north of), San Bernardino County, California – Lucky Strike Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lucky Strike deposit is on the Lake Arrowhead highway 12 miles north of San Bernardino on the southwest slope of the San Bernardino Mountains at an elevation of about 4500 feet. The deposit was exposed in the highway cut for a distance of 1000 feet and has an apparent thickness of 150 to 200 feet. The stone is white to gray crystalline limestone and said to be of good grade, but no analysis is available. It was leased in 1931, but no production is recorded (Tucker, W. B. 31, pp. 385-386)."*

    (* W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, "Los Angeles field district, San Bernardino County," California Div. Mines Rept. 27, pp. 262-401, 1931)

  • San Bernardino County, California – Marble Canyon (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Marble Canyon; Operator: Specialty Minerals, Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 558, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 248-7334; Latitude: 34.34, Longitude: -116.87, and Mine location number: Map No. 583; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California - the Mentone Sandstone Company Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mentone Sandstone Company operated in the S. W. ¼ of the section. The stone was used in the Hall of Records in San Bernardino; it is a tawny-colored, medium-grained sandstone, very similar to the Chatsworth sandstone. It is claimed that the best material was found near the surface, and that in depth the shale increased. the company has quit operations for the last three years."

    • San Bernardino County, California – the Mentone Sandstone Company (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "The Mentone Sandstone Company operated in the southwest quarter of the section. The stone was used in the Hall of Records in San Bernardino; it is a tawny-colored, medium-grained sandstone. It is claimed that the best material was found near the surface, and that in depth the proportion of shale increased. The company suspended operations a number of years ago.

  • San Bernardino County, California - G. E. Otis (Marble Deposit) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "G. E. Otis, Farmers' Exchange Building, San Bernardino, owns a deposit of rather fine-grained marble, white, blue-veined, and bluish-mottled, in Sec. 12, T. 1 N., R. 6 W., S. B. M. This deposit has an east and west course, is about one eighth of a mile wide, and can be traced for a considerable distance, occasionally interrupted by outcrops of presumably eruptive rocks."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Partin Limestone Products, Inc. (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Partin Limestone Products, Inc.; Operator: Partin Limestone Products, Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 637, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 248-7875; Latitude: 34.34, Longitude: -116.78; and Mine location number: Map No. 595; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California – the Russell-Greene-Foel Company Quarry (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The Russell-Greene-Foel Company, 816 Higgins Bldg., Los Angeles, are quarrying this stone for use as ballast, rubble and riprap."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Joseph Scheerer (Granite Quarry) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "Joseph Scheerer of Victorville has a deposit of granite in Secs. 26 and 27, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., which has been given the trade name of 'Scheerer's Firestone.' Though somewhat pulverulent under blows it has shown unusual fire-resistant qualities for a granitic rock. Scheerer has used it for several years in lime-kiln construction, and more recently it has been utilized with success as a rotary cement kiln lining by the Riverside Portland Cement Company. The following extract of a letter from a member of their staff, dated October 2, 1915, is of interest:

    "'I am pleased to inform you that the firestone blocks taken from your property near Victorville and placed in a rotary kiln of the Riverside Portland Cement Company, have proved to be of exceptional quality. This stone was superior to any brick used. Unfortunately we were compelled to close this kiln down after a three months' run, so did not find out the real life of these blocks, but on inspection of lining, found the fire brick on each side of this stone reduced to about 4 inches, while the firestone ran from 6 to 7 inches in thickness. The firestone was also placed at point in kiln where it was exposed to a her temperature than the bricks….'

    "Microscopic examination of a thin section of the rock shows it to be a highly acid granite, consisting mainly of quartz and orthoclase with a minimum of mica, and a small amount of albite. The feldspars show a light kaolinization, and it may be that a slight fusion of this kaolin results in cementing the rock particles and so assists in resisting the slight abrasion as well as the high temperature of the cement kiln. The spur track of the Southwestern Cement Company will pass through both this and the dolomite deposit owned by Scheerer. The 'firestone' has been located by separate claims, covering an area of 70 acres.

    "Mr. Scheerer has also a quarry in Sec. 29, from which considerable granite has been quarried by the Santa Fe Railroad for use as rubble and riprap along its roadbed between Victorville and Oro Grande. The stone is hauled from Scheerer's Siding."

    • San Bernardino County, California – Scheerer Quarry (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Mine name: Scheerer Quarry; Operator: Partin Limestone Products, Inc.; Address & County: 18400 Falchion Rd., Town of Apple Valley, CA 92307, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 243-7878; Latitude: 34.57, Longitude: -117.26, and Mine location number: Map No. 601; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California – Sentinel Quarry/USFS Land (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Sentinel Quarry/USFS Land; Operator: Pluess-Stauffer (CA), Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 825, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 248-7306; Latitude: 34.31, Longitude: -116.94, and Mine location number: Map No. 602; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California – Sheep Creek Limestone Deposits

    Sheep Creek Limestone Deposits - See: San Bernardino County, California - Lamb Brothers Limestone Deposits (Sheep Creek Deposits) above.

  • San Bernardino County, California - the Southern California Sandstone Company Sandstone Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Southern California Sandstone Company operated in the same section (as the Mentone Sandstone Company above). (See also IXth Report of California State Mining bureau, page 225.)"

    • San Bernardino County, California – the Southern California Sandstone Company (Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "The Southern California Sandstone Company operated in the same section (as the Mentone Sandstone Company)."*

      (* Page 896 footnote: See also Report IX, p. 225.)

  • San Bernardino County, California – White Knob/White Ridge; Limes (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: White Knob/White Ridge; Limes; Operator: Pleuss-Stauffer (CA), Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 825, Lucerne Valley, CA 92356, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 248-7306; Latitude: 34.37, Longitude: -117.03, and Mine location number: Map No. 607; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino County, California – White Mountain Quarry (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: White Mountain Quarry; Operator: Southwestern Portland Cement; Address & County: 16888 North E St., Victorville, CA 92392-2928, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 245-1681; Latitude: 34.62, Longitude: -117.11, and Mine location number: Map No. 608; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, California – Devil's Canyon Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Devil's Canyon limestone deposit is in N ½ sec. 5, T. 1 N., R. 4 W., S.B., 6 ½ miles north of San Bernardino, at an elevation of 1500 feet. San Bernardino Limestone Company, Incorporated, is the owner; Julian Bailey, president, and Cresti Waldenfelds, secretary, 1709 West 8th Street, Los Angeles.

    "A deposit of white crystalline limestone of good grade was worked here in 1942. After quarrying, the stone was crushed and screened in a plant having a capacity of 40 tons a day, after which it was shipped to Los Angeles where it is said to have been used in defense housing projects."

  • Santa Maria, San Bernardino County, California – the Erickson Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Erickson Quarry , in T. 9 N., R. 34 W., S. B. M.; J. B. Arrellanes, Santa Maria, owner. A sandstone quarry, about 5 miles south of Santa Maria , from which some good building stone has been quarried. (See XIIIth Report, California State Mining Bureau, p. 637.)

  • Siam (southwest of), San Bernardino County, California – Twin Buttes Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Twin Buttes dolomite deposit, of 160 acres, is in the SW ¼ sec. 9, T. 5 N., R. 15 E., S.B., 1 ½ miles southwest of Siam, a station on the Santa Fe Railroad; owner, Ira Judson Coe; under lease to C. I. Chubbuck, 5000 Worth Street, Los Angeles.

    "The deposit occurs as two dark-colored buttes rising from the plain on the northwest side of the Ship Mountains. They are composed entirely of dark-gray dolomite. The major axis of the larger butte is N. 40 E., paralleling the Ship Mountains. The dip of the dolomite is 25 SE and its length is 1500 feet; it has an average width of 700 feet, and a maximum height of 165 feet above the plain. The smaller butte lies 600 feet to the northeast, is 600 feet long and rises 125 feet above the plain. Estimated tonnage in the two buttes is 8,000,000."

  • Silver Lake (west of), San Bernardino County, California – Silver Lake Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Silver Lake deposit is 3 miles west of Silver Lake, on 120 acres in secs. 18 and 19, T. 15 N., R. 8 E., S.B. The deposit is reported to be high-grade limestone without overburden."

  • Silverwood Lake State Recreation Area, San Bernardino County, California - Quarry (The original version of this web site mentioned a stone quarry in the area. The present version does not.)
  • Slover Mountain, San Bernardino County, California - California Portland Cement Company Limestone Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "California Portland Cement Company, No. 401 Trust Building, Los Angeles, T. J. Fleming, general manager, owns Slover Mountain, in Secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., S. B. M. This mountain is an isolated knoll of crystalline limestone, about 500 feet high. The limestone is generally very pure, especially the coarser crystalline variety, which runs 98 ½ to 99 per cent of calcium carbonate. The lime burned from this limestone slakes very quickly and flashy, but must be slaked with a great amount of water to prevent it from being burned. The burned coarse variety shows small black specks (locally called fly-bitten rock). The fine-grained limestone is not so pure, but makes a better plaster. (See Marble and Cement.)"

    (California Portland Cement Co. - Also see: Colton (near) on Slover Mountain, San Bernardino County, California - California Portland Cement Company Quarries (Marble)

  • Slover Mountain (southwest of), San Bernardino County, California - Limestone Quarry and Kiln of Mrs. O. Burns and Rev. P. J. Stockman (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mrs. O. Burns, San Bernardino, and Rev. P. J. Stockman, Santa Barbara, own a limestone deposit in Sec. 33, T. 1 S., R. 5 W., S. B. M., about 3 ½ miles southwest of Slover Mountain. The exposure of limestone is small-not over 30 feet high and covers only a few acres. The limestone is white, coarsely crystalline, thinly bedded, and dips 45 degrees northeasterly. It is quarried and burned in a small kiln on the Santa Ana River, close to the hillock, but in Riverside County."

    • Slover Mountain (southwest of), San Bernardino County, California – Mrs. O. Burns and Rev. P. J. Stockman (Limestone Quarry/Deposit) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "A small deposit of white, coarsely crystalline limestone occurs 3 ½ miles southwest of Slover Mountain in Sec. 33, T. 1 S., R. 5 W., S. B. M. It was formerly quarried and burned in a small kiln on the Santa Ana River, but is now idle (circa 1913-1914). Owners, Mrs. O. Burns, San Bernardino, and Rev. P. J. Stockman of Santa Barbara.

      "Bibl.: Bulletin 38, p. 77."

  • Sugar Loaf Mountain, San Bernardino County, California – Sugar Loaf Mountain Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Sugar Loaf Mountain dolomite deposit is on 60 acres on the north slope of Sugar Loaf Mountain, in sec. 17, T. 1 N., R. 2 E., S.B., at an elevation of 7000 feet. Albert Rose, Big Bear Lake Post Office, is the owner. The deposit is reported to be large. A partial analysis made by John Herman, Los Angeles, indicates 41.7 percent MgCO3 and 53.6 percent CaCO3 (Tucker, W. B. 43, p. 528)."*

    (*W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, "Mineral resources of San Bernardino County," California Div. Mines Rept. 39, pp. 427-549, 1943)

  • Swartout Valley, San Bernardino County, California - Limestone Quarry and Kiln in Lone Pine Cañon (Limestone & Kiln) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "In Lone Pine Cañon, Sec. 15, T. 3 N., R. 7 W., S. B. M., near Swartout Valley, is an old limestone quarry and kiln. Unappropriated Government land."

  • NOTE: “Victor” & “Victorville” will be listed together below.
  • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California - Brownstone Quarry No. 4 (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Brownstone Quarry No. 4, in Sec. 34, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; J. W. Auchinachie, Victorville, owner. This quarry is in the northern part of a narrow and low granite ridge, running about north and south, through which the Mojave River cuts just above Victorville, forming the Upper Narrows, and on which all the granite quarries near Victorville are located. The surface boulders in this quarry have a less banded structure than those in the quarries south of and nearer Victorville. The solid granite lies in beds dipping very slightly to the northeast, from 6 to 8 feet thick. The granite breaks regularly and readily. It is medium-grained, of a very even, light-gray color. It is used for building and monument purposes. The county jail in San Bernardino is built of this granite. Through the quarry run seams of rhyolite, and in places masses of segregated quartz are found."

  • Victor (near), San Bernardino County, California – Granite Quarries  (Granite)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “Victor is a station on the California Southern Pacific Railroad, and has an altitude of two thousands seven hundred and thirteen feet above sea level.  It is the enterpot and depot for the mining districts situated in Holcomb and Bear Valleys, for the Old Woman’s Springs, and the Morongo Gold and Silver Mines.  It lies twenty miles southwesterly from Ord Mountain District.  Close to the town are large quarries of excellent granite, which are constantly worked.  The stone finds a ready market in the southern part of the state.”

  • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California - Granite Quarries (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Near Victorville several quarries are in operation, al o (sic) principally producing paving blocks."

  • San Bernardino County, California – Joseph L. Sheerer Granite Quarry (AKA Joseph Shearer & Sherer)
    • San Bernardino County, California – the Shearer Granite Quarry  (Granite)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

      “The Shearer Quarry is two miles and a half north of Victor, on the east bank of the Mojave River.  This quarry produces a fair quality of granite.  Where it has been opened, the face is fifty feet in height and seventy-five feet in width.  The rock is bluish in color, and in texture, fine-grained.

      “Dimension stone can be quarried in blocks four feet square, or larger, if so desired.  Twelve men are employed, and operations have been carried on for eighteen months.”

    • Victorville (north of), San Bernardino County, California - the Scheerer Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

      "Scheerer Quarry, in Sec. 29, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; Clemens Scheerer, San Bernardino, owner. It is close to the preceding quarry (the Leahy & Turner Granite Quarry) and in similar material.

  • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California - Joseph L. Sherer & Co. Limestone & Marble Quarries (AKA Scheerer & Shearer)
    • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California - Jos. L. Sherer & Co. (Lime) Office, Stevenson, off Fourteenth street, San Francisco (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

      Jos. L. Sherer & Co. Quarry (Lime) located in Victorville, Office at Stevenson, off Fourteenth street, San Francisco.

      Joseph Sherer & Co. (Paving Blocks) located in Victorville, Office at Tenth and Bryant sts., San Francisco.

    • San Bernardino County, California - the Jos. Sherer & Co. (Marble) (AKA Scheerer) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.) (The specific location of the quarry is not stated.)
    • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California – Scheerer Limestone and Marble Deposits (Limestone & Marble) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "Scheerer Limestone Deposits. These deposits are near Victorville and have been owned for some years by Joseph Scheerer of Victorville. He has recently sold portions of these deposits to the Southwestern Cement Company and to T. Henshaw for the Riverside Portland Cement Company. The first named company is now building a 5000-barrel per day plant out of Victorville and has a spur track connecting it with the quarry. Scheerer still retains other extensive limestone deposits in Secs. 23 and 24, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M., 3 ½ miles northeast of Victorville and near both the Santa Fe and Salt Lake railroads. There is a good wagon road to the property; and the best quarry sites are easily accessible by about a 2% grade from a spur track which can be run from a point on the right bank of the Mojave River about 3 miles below Victorville, a distance of 4 miles. The deposit forms a series of sharp and round-topped hills, rising abruptly on the west, and sloping off more gradually to the east, with limestone resting on and against granite…."

      "Analyses of the limestone by Smith, Emery & Co., San Francisco, show 93.3% to 99.2% CaCo3, a trace to 1.3 % MgO, and variable amounts of silica from a trace to 5.8%. Besides this high-grade limestone, there are also deposits of dolomite, suitable for marble.

      "Scheerer also has limestone deposits in Secs. 27, 28, 32, 33, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., S. B. M., 2 miles west of Barstow and adjoining the old Waterman silver mine. They are ½ mile from the railroad, and the limestone is a high-grade, being suitable for lime, cement or sugar making."

      "Scheerer Marble Deposits…Some white marble was produced from this quarry during the past year (1915). It is fairly accessible, being only 3 ½ miles by a good wagon road from Scheerer Siding on the Santa Fe Railroad. Joseph Scheerer of Victorville is the owner." (From Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, page 881.)

  • Victorville (north of), San Bernardino County, California - the Leahy and Turner Grante Quarry (formerly the Leahy, Storan & Rodgers Quarry) (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Leahy & Turner Granite Quarry, in Sec. 28, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; P. H. Leahy and J. C. Turner, Victorville, owners. It is on the southwest slope of Silver Mountain, north of Victorville, three-fourths of a mile from the Santa Fe Railroad. The granite lies in nearly horizontal beds from 6 to 15 feet thick. It is medium-grained and hard, and is broken down by hand drilling and blasting with black powder, and further split with plugs and feathers. It has been used in the Ferry Building, San Francisco, the Simpson Tabernacle, Los Angeles, and other structures. This quarry was formerly known as the Leahy, Storan & Rodgers quarry."

  • Victorville (northwest of), San Bernardino County, California - Marble Deposit (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Northwest of Victorville, 22 miles west of Northcamp, is stated to be a large reef of white marble about 150 feet wide and 1000 feet long. Unappropriated Government land.

    "A similar reef is stated to exist in the northern part of T. 6 N., R. 2 W., S. B. M., 3 miles south of the Verde Antique marble mines."

  • Victorville (east of), San Bernardino County, California - Marble Deposits in the Black Hawk Mountains (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Black Hawk Mountains, 30 miles east of Victorville, contain white marble of excellent quality. Not worked. (See XIIIth Report of California State Mining Bureau, p. 630.)"

  • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California - the Mojave Consolidated Development Company Quarries (Marble and "Verde Antique") (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mojave Consolidated Development Company; J. P. O'Brien, 175 Crocker Building, San Francisco. This company has been organized to operate the marble quarries formerly known as the 'Gem Quarries' (Alamo Consolidated Marble Company) and the 'Verde Antique,' in Sec. 28, T. 7 N., R. 2 W., S. B. M. (See IXth Report of State Mining Bureau, p. 363, and XIIIth Report, ibid., p. 630.) See chapter on Serpentine." (The entry referred to in the chapter on Serpentine is in the next paragraph.)

    "Mojave Consolidated Development Company, J. P. O'Brien, 175 Crocker Building, San Francisco, organized to operate the Verde Antique Marble quarry, formerly known as the Gem quarry (Alamo Consolidated Marble Company), or the Kimball mine, in Sec. 28, T. 7 N., R. 2 W., S. B. M., on the Mojave Desert, about 16 miles N. 25° E. from Victorville, a station on the Southern California Railway. It was opened a number of years ago by Frank Kimball of National City, San Diego County, and has been worked at several different times. It is idle this year (1904). More than 400 tons of marble have been hauled from this quarry to Victorville, and shipped by rail to Colton, where it was sawed, polished, and prepared for use. It has been used for interior decoration in a number of buildings in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Some very handsome stone has been obtained from this quarry, probably as fine as any in the United States, and it seems unfortunate that more of it is not put on the market.

    "While the long distance from the railway makes the marketing expensive, the beauty of the stone is sufficient to command a price that would pay for the transportation.

    "The quarry opening is from 60 to 100 feet long, with a face of about 75 feet. It is in what appears to be a large dike or intrusive mass of serpentine and calcite, in the midst of a granitic porphyry. The metamorphism is now so complete that it would require a more detailed study of the rock and the locality to determine the nature of the original rock from which the serpentine and calcite were derived. The rock is quite heterogeneous in structure. In some places the pure serpentine is from 5 to 10 feet thick; elsewhere the serpentine occurs in patches and bands of limestone, which alternates in white and blue. In places the limestone is from 10 to 20 feet thick, without any serpentine. The serpentine varies in color from light yellow-green to a dark green. The handsomest stone is that in which the bright yellow-green occurs banded with dark green and white limestone.

    "Both the limestone and serpentine contain many cracks and weather seams, so that there is a large quantity of waste material to be handled. The method of quarrying by blasting has caused additional waste.

    "There are two derricks in the quarry and another one at the base of the hill. The stone is dragged from the quarry to the base of the steep part of the mountainside, where it is loaded on wagons to be hauled to the railway.

    "It is to be hoped that this quarry may soon be again in operation, and that it may be worked more systematically and on a larger scale.

    "The serpentine outcrops again about half a mile S. 70° E. from the quarry, but it is not certain that this mass is connected with that at the quarry."

    Ill. No. 41. Mojave Consolidated Development Company's Verde Antique Marble Quarry, Victorville, San Bernardino County. Mojave Consolidated Development Company's Verde Antique Marble Quarry
    Ill. No. 42. Mojave Consolidated Development Company's Verde Antique Marble Quarry, San Bernardino County. From 1 ½ miles distant. Mojave Consolidated Development Company's Verde Antique Marble Quarry
  • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California – the Riverside Portland Cement Company (Limestone Deposit) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "The Riverside Portland Cement Company: office, Mills Bldg., San Francisco, owns extensive undeveloped deposits of limestone, shales, and silica, said to be suitable for the manufacture of Portland cement in the vicinity of Oro Grande and Victorville, which will ultimately be worked when their Riverside deposits are exhausted."

  • Victorville (northeast of), San Bernardino County, California – Southwestern Portland Cement Company (Limestone Deposit and Cement Plant) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "Southwestern Portland Cement Company, C. Leonard, president; O. J. Benford, secretary; general office, H. W. Hellman Bldg., Los Angeles; L. D. Gilbert, engineer and general manager, Victorville, Cal.

    "This company owns a deposit of limestone, shales and silica covering about 250 acres six miles northeast of Victorville. A large modern cement plant is being constructed one mile north of Victorville and it is expected to begin manufacturing cement by September 1, 1916. The plant is built entirely of reinforced concrete, and its capacity is to be, for the present, 300,000 barrels yearly. It is planned to double the capacity in the near future. One kiln 9' x 200' has been installed, and all the concrete work laid for the second one. The plant will be operated by electric power supplied by the Southern Sierra Power Company. Gypsum will be shipped to the plant from the Consolidated Pacific Cement Plaster Company at Amboy. A steam railroad, incorporated under the name Mojave Northern Railroad Co., has been built to haul the material from the quarries, 5.6 miles northeast, to the plant. The material is to be quarried by steam shovels. About 65 men will be employed upon the completion of the plant."

    Photo No. 40. Southwestern Portland Cement Co.'s Quarry, 5.6 miles northeast of plant. Steam shovel is seen at right. Southwestern Portland Cement Co.'s Quarry
    Photo No. 39. Plant of the Southwestern Portland Cement Co., 1 mile north of Victorville. The quarries are situated in the low mountains at right background. Santa Fe Railway seen in foreground. Plant of the Southwestern Portland Cement Co.
    • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California – Southwest Portland Cement Company's California Plant and Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Southwest Portland Cement Company's California plant is at Victorville. Limestone has been supplied from two large quarries, one of which is 6 miles northeast and the other, called Reserve quarry, 14 miles northeast of the plant. Late in 1946, they also purchased the Adelanto deposit on 320 acres of patented land in sec. 2, T. 6 N., R. 6 W., about 13 miles in an air-line northwest of Victorville. A railroad extends from the plant to the so-called main quarry 6 miles northeast, and an oiled road was built from this railroad 10 ½ miles to the Reserve quarry. Low-cost hauling of limestone over this road was developed, using units of a truck and trailer carrying 60 tons of stone at a trip in six separate-dump steel bodies which dump into railroad cars going to the plant.

      "For a description of the plant and quarry operations, see the report by Tucker and Sampson (43, pp. 525-528).* The plant capacity is 7000 barrels a day."

      (*W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, "Mineral resources of San Bernardino County," California Div. Mines Rept. 39, pp. 427-549, 1943)

    • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California – Southwestern Portland Cement Co. (Cement) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) Southwestern Portland Cement Co.; (Address) 1034 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles 17; (Location) Victorville.

  • Victor (south of), San Bernardino County, California – St. John’s Quarry – the Hesperia Land and Water Company (Granite)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “The St. John’s Quarry, half a mile south of Victor, owned by the Hesperia Land and Water Company, of Los Angeles, furnishes a good quality of granite for building purposes.  It is of a grayish-blue color, very hard and compact, straight and smooth cleavage, dresses well, and takes a fine polish.  The granite formation in which it is found rises to a height of two hundred feet above the Mojave River.  Stone from this quarry is used in San Francisco for building, curbing, and street paving; also in Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and other cities and towns in the State.  It lies in strata of great thickness.  The overlying stratum has been opened for a length of seven hundred feet, and to a depth of fifty, on both the east and west sides of the ridge.  The stone in the eastern development is less seamy than that in the western part, and generally of much better quality.  A block recently taken from the east side workings measured nine by thirteen by sixteen feet.  The strata dip easterly at an angle of 14 degrees.”

    • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California - the St. John Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

      "St. John Quarry, at Victorville, on the Upper Narrows of the Mohave River; Hesperia Land and Water Company, owner. This quarry has been idle for years."

  • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California – Stockholm Stone Quarry (Granite)

    Stockholm Stone Quarry - See the "Victor Quarry" below.

  • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California - the Victor Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Victor Quarry, in Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; T. H. Hargraves, Victorville, owner. Principally boulders are worked in this quarry. The material is similar to that of the Corona quarry in same section. Paving blocks and curbstones are shipped."

    Victor Quarry (Paving Blocks) located in Victorville, owned by J. H. Hargraves.

    • Victorville (near), San Bernardino County, California – Victor Quarry (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "Near Victorville several quarries were formerly operated producing principally paving blocks. Only one quarry is at present being worked.

      "The Victor Quarry is in Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M., 2 miles north of Victorville. It is also known as the Stockholm Stone Quarry. Granite boulders of a yellowish cast are cut by hand into paving blocks, varying from 8" to 12" long, 4" to 6" wide, and 6" thick. Some curbstones have been cut from these boulders. This quarry has been worked spasmodically since its location (sic) in 1904. Mr. James Hargraves, Victorville, Cal., is the owner.

      "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 51."

  • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California – Victorville Lime Rock Company Limestone Quarries (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Victorville Lime Rock Company, John S. Collbran, secretary, 5225 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, has leased from the Riverside Cement Company, 120 acres in the SW ¼ sec. 25, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., in addition to 570 acres which they own in sec. 36 T. 6 N., R. 4 W., approximately 5 miles northeast of Victorville.

    "The present quarry faces are in section 25, on the southwest slope of a ridge, the axis of which trends N. 20 - 30 W., which apparently is also the strike of the limestone, the dip being to the southwest. This ridge, approximately 3000 feet long, rising about 200 feet above the floor of the valley, is limestone, into which have been intruded numerous narrow diorite dikes. In some 1500 feet along the southwest slope six quarry faces have been opened. With one exception, these range from small open cuts to faces 50 feet high by 100 feet in length. The exceptional quarry consists of a cut about 30 feet wide driven 250 feet into the side hill, at the end of which the face is some 75 feet in diameter, with a maximum height of approximately 70 feet. Present work is in the northernmost quarry, the face of which is about 60 feet long by 20 feet high.

    "The material is loaded in 5-ton trucks by a 3/8-cubic yard Diesel shovel and hauled to the plant at Victorville. A LeRoi portable compressor supplies air for jackhammers drilling the face. Five men are employed at the quarry.

    "The plant flow-sheet consists of a 16- by 20-inch jaw crusher, elevator to bin to hammer mill, elevator to trommel with 20-, 16-, 4-mesh sections to vibrating screen 30 (?) mesh. Dust from the various machines is collected in a cyclone and sacked; other products go from four bins direct to railroad cars by shuttle conveyor. Products are used for glass, chicken feed, stucco, and lime. Capacity is about 50 tons in 14 hours.

    "Power is supplied by Southern Sierras Power company. One man runs the plant."

    • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California – Victorville Lime Rock Co. (Limestone) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) Victorville Lime Rock Co. (industrial limestone); (Address) Box 548, Victorville; (Location) Victorville.

  • Victor (3 miles from), San Bernardino County, California - the Victor Marble Company Quarry (Marble, Granite, & Limestone) - Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 528.

    “An extensive bed of marble was discovered about four years ago at a point three miles from the town of Victor. This bed has been opened up by the Victor Marble Company. The marble is of superior excellence, and of almost every variety and shade of color. Stones free from flaws can be quarried, and of any size and shape required. The tract of land secured by this company covers an area of nine hundred acres, six hundred of which consist of a solid bed of marble, the other three hundred acres being covered with granite and limestone, both of superior quality. The railroad company have laid a sidetrack to these deposits. Much of the marble and some of the granite have been used in the construction of buildings in Los Angeles and San Bernardino, and other cities in Southern California, with results that have brought this material into universal favor. This stone, both granite and marble, can be laid down in any of these places at about one quarter the cost of the imported article, which it is claimed to be equal to. A good deal of lime is also being made from the stone found here; two double, patent kilns of large capacity being kept in constant operation. These several quarries give employment to a large force of men and teams, adding much to the prosperity of the town and country adjacent.”

  • Victorville (north of), San Bernardino County, California - the White Granite Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "White Granite Quarry, in Secs. 22 and 23, T. 6. N., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; George E. Hunt, Victorville, owner. It is on the south slope of Silver Mountain, northeast of the Leahy & Turner quarry. The granite is stated to be bedded nearly horizontally and to be a rather fine-grained material of good quality for dimension stone. Very little work has as yet been done."

  • Victorville, San Bernardino County, California – White Lime Rock Co. (Limestone) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) White Lime Rock Co. (industrial limestone); (Address) 5953 Crenshaw Blvd., Los Angeles 43; (Location) Victorville.

  • Victor Mountain, San Bernardino County, California – Granite Quarries  (Granite)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “In this granitic range lie valuable quarries that are being worked and rapidly developed.  The range is two miles long by one wide, with a northerly and southerly strike.  Lying to the north is an extensive lime belt one mile in width, the strike of which is easterly and westerly, with a longitudinal extent of about twelve miles, where veins carrying gold, silver, copper, and lead occur.”

  • Westend, San Bernardino County, California – West End Chemical Co. (Lime & Limestone) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) West End Chemical Co. (producer of burnt lime and industrial limestone); (Address) 608 Latham Square, Oakland 12; (Location) Westend.

  • Wild (north of west of), San Bernardino County, California – Mojave Marl Deposit (Marl) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Mojave marl deposit is about 2 miles north of west of Wild, a siding on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway midway between Victorville and Barstow.

    "About 1930 a plant was built containing a Williams mill, and bins and conveyors for storing marl and loading it on railroad cars. This was operated for 3 years and marl was shipped for use in the citrus groves. There has been no reported production since 1932. Mojave Marl Company, San Bernardino, carried on the work."

  • Wrightwood (near), San Bernardino County, California – Big Pine Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Big Pine deposit is just north of Swarthout Valley in the northwest corner of T. 3 N., R. 7 W., S.B., near Wrightwood and the Los Angeles County line, and about 12 miles by the Lone Pine Canyon road from Cajon on the Santa Fe Railroad. The valley follows the trace of San Andreas fault and has an elevation of 6000 feet; the limestone extends several hundred feet higher on the north.

    "In 1930, Big Pine Mining Corporation (?) had three 160-acre association placer claims, covering partly exposed limestone outcrops said to be 200 feet or more thick and traceable for a mile. There is no record of any work by the above company except shallow prospect cuts made about 1930. The limestone is white and is reported to carry 85 to 95 percent CaCO3. It strikes northwest and dips 45 SW. The older formation on the north side of the fault is Archean metamorphic. (See Lamb Bros. and Douglas Lime Products.)"

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