Logo Picture Left SideLogo Picture Right SideLogo Text at Center
Home > Search > Site Map > California > CA - Quarry Links & Photographs > San Bernardino County > List of Stone Quarries

San Bernardino County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc. (Continued) *

Go to

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Colton (near), San Bernardino County, California - Marble Quarries near Colton in San Bernardino County (Many of the offices for these quarry companies were located in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California.)
  • Colton (near), San Bernardino County, California – Marble Quarries at Colton (circa 1891)  (from transcription of Stones for Building and Decoration, by George P. Merrill, Curator for Geology in the United States National Museum, J. Wiley & Sons, 1891.

    “...At Colton, in Los Angeles County** the marble beds are described by Prof. Jackson* as affording pure white clouded with gray and grayish black finely mottled with white varieties, the clouded white being the most abundant.  This is stated to be a medium grained granular stone, homogeneous in texture quite sound and strong and taking a good polish.  Chemical tests show that the stone is composed of a mixture of calcite and dolomite granules.  This not only renders the production of a perfect surface and polish more difficult than would otherwise be the case, but will also cause it to weather unevenly (see p. 381).  The clouding of the marble and the dark gray colors are here due to scales of graphite.”

    (*  Footnote:  Seventh Annual Report State Mineralogist of California, 1887, p. 212.)

  • (**  Los Angeles County should be San Bernardino County.  Peggy B. Perazzo)

    • Colton (near), San Bernardino County, California – San Bernardino County Marble Quarries circa 1894 - Excerpt from “California Marble,” in Stone Magazine, Vol. VIII, No. 3,  February 1894, pp. 254-257.

      San Bernardino County Marble

      “Here again we have an immense deposit of marble very different in character from that of Inyo or Amador counties, at the same time it is a very fine material of different varieties.  There is black, dark gray and blue, these are variegated; also pure white.  The deposit is situated about one mile from the town of Colton, has excellent railroad facilities and an improved plant of machinery for working the marble into slabs, pillars, wainscoting and tiling.  A company was organized some four years ago to work this deposit.  Their principal marble job was done in the interior of the new Academy of Sciences in this city.

      “I am informed that the property or the business of the company has now passed into the hands of two experienced marble men from the Eastern states, and I understand that these men are fully able to handle the quarries as well as the mill.  I trust their efforts will be successful, for the marble from these quarries is worth of the consideration of every one intending to build or desiring to use marble in any form.

      The California Architect and Building News.”

  • Colton (west of), San Bernardino County, California – California Portland Cement Company Colton Cement Works and Limestone Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Colton Cement Works, in Secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., S. B. M.; at Colton; California Portland Cement Company, 401 Trust Building, Los Angeles, owner; T. J. Fleming, general manager. Preliminary work has begun about 1892, and in 1894 the works were producing about 50 barrels per day and employing 25 men* In 1896, the capacity of the plant was 200 barrels per day and 75 men were employed.** Since that time the capacity of the plant has been increased nearly threefold.

    (* Footnote: Twelfth Annual Report of State Mineralogist, 1894, p. 380.)

    (** Footnote: Thirteen Annual Report of State Mineralogist, 1896, p. 612.)

    "The works are located about 1 ¼ miles west of Colton, on the south side of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and at the north end of Slover Mountain. This mountain, which is nearly all pure limestone, is about a mile in length, more than a half mile wide, and 500 feet high. (See Limestone and Marble, pages 77 and 102.) Near the summit of the mountain, on the northeast side, is the quarry from which the cement rock is obtained. The limestone is here very coarsely crystallized, some of the calcite rhombs being more than an inch in diameter. Analyses of this stone show it to be a remarkably pure carbonate of lime. Our analysis gave: lime, 55.216 per cent; carbonic acid, 43.384 per cent; silica, 0.55 per cent; alumina and iron oxide, 0.85 per cent. The composition of the stone in the quarry is said to be remarkably uniform, as its appearance would indicate. A tunnel has been cut through the mountain from the level of the quarry floor to a point directly above the cement works. the broken stone from the quarry is run through the tunnel in small tram-cars and dumped into a rock crusher. After crushing it is sent by gravity down a long chute to the cement mill, where it is finely pulverized in a Griffin mill, and then thoroughly mixed with the clay in a mixer. The mixed product is fed into three rotary kilns, where it is burned to a clinker with an oil fire…The clinker is removed by wheelbarrow from the kilns to the drying floor, where it is spread out and sprinkled with water for the double purpose of cooling and seasoned it. It is then ground in the Griffin mill and sacked ready for shipment. "

    Ill. No. 81. Elevation of Limestone Quarry of Colton Cement Works, San Bernardino County. Elevation of Limestone Quarry of Colton Cement Works

    "The clay is obtained from Alberhill, Riverside County, and is shipped in by rail. The gypsum is obtained from Arizona. "Besides cement, this company produces crushed stone, marble, plaster of Paris, lime, and marble dust for making carbonic acid gas for soda fountains.”

  • Colton (near) on Slover Mountain, San Bernardino County, California - California Portland Cement Company Quarries (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    California Portland Cement Company, No. 401 Trust Building, Los Angeles, T. J. Fleming, general manager, owns Slover Mountain, in Secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., S. B. M. This mountain is an isolated knoll of crystalline limestone, about 500 feet high. The limestone is generally very pure, especially the coarser crystalline variety, which runs 98 ½ to 99 per cent of calcium carbonate. The lime burned from this limestone slakes very quickly and flashy, but must be slaked with a great amount of water to prevent it from being burned. The burned coarse variety shows small black specks (locally called fly-bitten rock). The fine-grained limestone is not so pure, but makes a better plaster. (See Marble and Cement.)”

    "California Portland Cement Company, 401 Trust Building, Los Angeles, owns several quarries on Slover Mountain, near Colton, as follows:

    "(1) Colton Cement Works Quarry. (See Lime and Limestone, and chapter on Cement.)

    "(2) Crusher Plant Quarry, on the northwest corner of the mountain, about 200 yards from the cement works. The limestone is similar to that in the quarry of the Colton Cement Works, only the inclusions of hornblendic rock are larger. The rock is crushed in a spindle crusher to a size about 2 inches in diameter, and is used for concrete.

    "(3) Marble Dust Quarry and Plant, on the west side of the mountain. The limestone is purer, without inclusions of the hornblendic material. The rock is broken down by hand in the quarry, then crushed in a Potts crusher to ½ inch in size, from which it passes through a 30-inch Sturtevant mill, and then through four screens. The grit is used for coating tar roofing paper; the finer material passes through a 36-inch Sturtevant mill, where it is ground to an impalpable dust. This material is used as mixture with asphalt for street paving.

    "(4) Colton Marble Works are leased by the California Portland Cement Company to the Colton Marble Company, W. A. Berrin, Colton. They are located on the south side of Slover Mountain, and use marble from two quarries. The lower quarry, about 30 feet above the works, is the larger. The dark bluish-gray limestone dips at a slight angle, not over 10 degrees, northwesterly. In the upper quarry, 160 feet above the works, the limestone has a very light color. The beds are from 5 to 7 feet thick. The rock is broken down by hand-drilling, the holes having the depth of the beds, with about 5 feet face, blasting being done with black powder. The marble is principally used for ornamental building purposes, but some monument work is turned out. It has been used in the Academy of Sciences, Crossley, and Rialto buildings, San Francisco, in the latter being trimmed with the verde antique marble (see Mojave Consolidated Development Company); also in the Lankershim Hotel, Los Angeles, and will be used in the new Bishop Building, San Francisco. It is mostly cut to 1-inch stock. the plant is equipped with six gang-saws, one 14-foot ribbing bed, two polishing machines, one counter sinking machine, one tile machine, and one machine for cutting plumber's slabs, etc. Power is furnished by a 100-horsepower boiler using oil as fuel, one 50-horsepower steam engine, and one 50-horsepower electric engine."

    Ill. No. 39. Marble Mill and Yard, Colton, San Bernardino County. Marble Mill and Yard
    Ill. No. 40. Colton Marble Quarry, Colton, San Bernardino County. Colton Marble Quarr
  • Colton (west of), San Bernardino County, California – Colton Cement Plant (Limestone) (Excerpts from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist’s Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "California Portland Cement Company, 401 American Bank Bldg., Los Angeles. This company owns Slover Mountain, ½ mile southwest of Colton, in Secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., S. B. M., which is an isolated knoll of crystalline limestone about 500 ft. high….”

    "The lime is burned during only a part of the year, employing 8 to 10 men. T. J. Fleming is general manager….”

    "Colton Cement Plant,* in Secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., S. B. M. This is operated by the California Portland Cement Company, 401 American Bank Bldg., Los Angeles, Dan Murphy, president; T. J. Fleming, secretary and general manager; E. J. Strock, superintendent at the plant.

    (* Page 857 footnote: Report XII, p. 380, 1894.)

    "Preliminary work was begun about 1892 and in 1894 the works were producing about 50 barrels per day and employing 25 men.** In 1896 the capacity of the plant was 200 barrels per day, and 75 men were employed.*** Since that time the capacity of the plant has been increased nearly three-fold.

    (** Page 858 footnote: XIII, p. 612, 1896.)

    (*** Page 858 footnote: Bulletin 38, p. 183.)

    "The works are about 1 ¼ miles west of Colton, at the north end of Slover Mountain, south of the Southern Pacific Railroad. This mountain is a knoll of crystalline limestone, about a mile long, more than half a mile wide, and 500 feet high. Near its summit, on the northeast, is the quarry from which the rock was formerly obtained. Here the limestone is very coarsely crystalline, some of the calcite rhombs being more than one inch in diameter Analyses of this stone show it to be very nearly pure carbonate of lime….”

    "The composition of the stone in the quarry is said to be remarkably uniform, as its appearance would indicate. A tunnel was driven through the mountain from the level of the quarry floor to a point directly above the old cement works, and the broken stone from the quarry was run through the tunnel on small tram cars and dumped into a rock crusher. After crushing it was sent by gravity down a long chute to the old cement mill now used only for making lime (circa 1913-1914). The rock is finely pulverized in a Griffin mill, and then thoroughly mixed with clay in a mixer. The mixed product is fed into eight rotary kilns, where it is burned to clinker with an oil fire. A patent appliance which is used for spraying the oil into the furnaces is said to be a great aid in burning. The clinker from the kilns is spread out and sprinkled with water for the double purpose of cooling and seasoning it. It is then ground in Griffin mills and tube mills and sacked for shipment.

    "The clay is now obtained from Chester, Riverside County, a station on the Santa Fe Railway, east of Corona, and is shipped in by rail. The gypsum is shipped from Amboy, Cal. Besides the cement, this company produces crushed stone, lime, and marble dust for making carbon dioxide gas for soda fountains.”

  • Colton (near), Riverside County, California – California Portland Cement Company Quarries and Cement Plant (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "California Portland Cement Company, E. E. Duque, president; L. E. Bancroft, secretary; W. C. Hanna, chief chemist and mechanical engineer; E. I. Hendrickson, superintendent, 601 West Fifth Street, Los Angeles, owns and operates the Colton cement plant and quarry, situated in secs. 19 and 30, T. 1 S., R. 4 W., about a mile west of Colton.

    "The plant is at the foot of the south slope of Slover Mountain and the quarry is in the south side of this mountain, which is approximately a mile long, half a mile wide at its base, and 500 feet high. With the exception of a little shale, the whole mass is crystalline limestone suitable for the manufacture of cement. The shale is not waste as it also is utilized in the mix. The present quarry face is about 3500 feet long and something over 300 feet in height. The rock is broken by churn-drill holes from the top and coyote holes in the face. One shot a few years ago brought down more than a million tons.

    "The rock is loaded into 30-ton trucks by two 3 ½-yard electric shovels, and hauled to a 66- by 84-inch jaw crusher, the feed floor of which is on the quarry floor. The 10-inch product goes to no. 9 gyratory, then no. 18 gyratory, by means of elevators, to vibrating screen; plus ¾-inch goes to hammer mill, discharge from which, together with undersize from screen, goes to storage bins, thence to driers (sic), to twelve 250-ton proportioning bins, where it is held until analyses of samples show that the proper mix has been attained. From bins it goes to battery of 6- by 22-foot tube mills, one 7 ½- by 26-foot tube mill and Allis-Chalmers preliminator mill, where it is all ground to minus mesh. These machines are equipped with air separators. From raw grinding section it goes to silos having storage capacity of 16,000 tons, thence by Fuller-Kenyon pumps to 8 kilns (seven 200 feet in length, and one 236 feet long), thence to cooling rotary tubes to belt, to clinker pile, where gypsum is added; it is reclaimed by traveling crane and the grinding is finished by tube mills. The plant has a capacity of 50,000 sacks of cement per day, and is the largest in southern California. The company has been making cement on practically this same site since 1891. Two hundred and fifty men are employed (circa 1947)."

  • Colton, San Bernardino County, California – California Portland Cement Co. (Cement, Lime & Limestone) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) California Portland Cement Co.; (Address) 612 S. Flower St., Los Angeles 17; (Location) Colton.

    (Operator) California Portland Cement Co. (producer of burnt lime and industrial limestone); (Address) 612 S. Flower St., Los Angeles 17; (Location) Colton.

  • Colton, San Bernardino County, California – Colton Quarry (Limestone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Colton Quarry; Operator: California Portland Cement Co.; Address & County: P. O. Box 947, Colton, CA 92324, San Bernardino County; Phone: (none listed); Latitude: 34.06, Longitude: -117.34, and Mine location number: Map No. 565; Mineral commodity: Limestone.

  • Colton (near) on Slover Mountain, San Bernardino County, California – California Portland Cement Company (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    (Please note: In this account of the California Portland Cement Company, the writer copied almost verbatim the account above from "The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California," 1906 above. The only difference I can see is that in the list of buildings in which the Slover Mountain marble was used, the Rialto building in San Francisco is not listed in this version, instead, the Monadnock building is San Francisco is listed as one of the buildings in which the Slover Mountain marble was used in the construction. Peggy B. Perazzo)

  • Colton, San Bernardino County, California – the Colton Marble and Lime Company Quarries (circa 1887) (Marble) – Excerpts from California “Building Stone,” in the Seventh Annual Report of the State Mineralogist.  For the Year Ending October 1, 1887, California State Mining bureau, Sacramento:  State Office, J. D. Young, Supt. State Printing, 1888, pp. 212-213.  (Use the link above for detailed information on the Colton Marble.)

    Colton Marble.

    “From the Colton Marble and Lime Company, of Colton, Los Angeles County, specimens were received illustrating three varieties of marble:  a nearly pure white, a white clouded with gray, and a grayish-black finely mottled with white.  Most of the specimens were of the clouded white variety, and the examinations made have special reference to this stone.

    “...The clouded Colton marble is a medium-grained, granular limestone, homogeneous in texture, and so far as can be judged from hand specimens, quite sound and strong.  It takes a good polish, but closely observed on a polished surface, unless the polishing has been very carefully done, a thick sprinkling of duller granules in the more perfectly polished ground can be seen....”

    “Mr. O. T. Dyer, President of the Colton Marble and Lime Company, states that the company owns an inexhaustible supply of the marble in all shades and colors, and that the quarries are located at Colton, Los Angeles County, within one half mile of the junction of the Southern Pacific Railroad and the California Central Railroad.  Both roads have built switches and side-tracks to the quarries.  The stone can be quarried in large blocks without seams, suitable for large pillars, shafts, etc.

    “A further study of this stone will be made for next year’s report.”

  • Colton (east of), San Bernardino County, California – the Southern California Sandstone Company Sandstone Quarry  (Sandstone)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “The Southern California Sandstone Company has opened a quarry and erected a mill at a point twenty miles north 70 degrees east from Colton, in the Yuciepa Mining District, above the mouth of Mill Creek, in Section 7, township 1 south, Range 1 west, San Bernardino Meridian.  The strike of this stone is northwest and southeast, dip 30 degrees southwesterly.  It consists of two varieties, one hard and fine grained, the other a yellow, soft and coarse.  The rock cleaves straight, dresses well, and can be quarried in blocks of any dimensions.”

  • Daggett (near), San Bernardino County, California – Maurice Mulcahy and J. C. McMillan (Limestone Deposit) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "Maurice Mulcahy and J. C. McMillan, Daggett, Cal., own a deposit of limestone in the vicinity of Daggett, 4 miles south of Gale Siding on the Santa Fe Railway. The limestone is white, rather coarsely crystalline, and is almost pure calcium carbonate. It is said to outcrop for 400' along the strike in beds varying from 35' to 80' in width. Undeveloped."

  • Declez, San Bernardino County, California - the Declez Quarries (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "The Declez Quarries, owned by the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, and leased to the California Construction Company, 324 East Market street, Los Angeles, are in Sec. 35, T. 1 S., R. 6 W., S. B. M. At Declez, on a spur of the Southern Pacific Railroad, about 1 mile south of Declez station on the main line, and 9 miles west of Colton. The stone is a rather dark-colored biotite granite, which has a gneissoid structure in places. There are a number of feldspar veins from 2 to 4 inches wide, which consist principally of orthoclase feldspar, but in a few places contain large biotite crystals. The rock is partially disintegrated for a few feet from the top, but below this comparatively thin weathered portion it is bright and fresh, and below the few feet of weathered stone the rock could be quarried in blocks large enough for dimension stone, and good building and monument stone could be obtained. At present nearly the entire output is used for rubble in the Government breakwater at San Pedro. Dynamite is used to loosen the stone from the bed, and the large irregular blocks are loaded on the cars at the quarry and taken to the breakwater at San Pedro. The drilling is done with steam drills, and seven large steam-power derricks are used to handle the stone."

    "The stone from Bly Brothers' Declez quarry is a typical granite, composed of quartz, orthoclase feldspar, and muscovite and biotite mica, with a small percentage of the soda feldspar, albite. It has a light gray color and medium-grained texture. Physical tests made on this stone by L. D. Hunt, Engineer at the University of California, gave the following results:

    Dimension of sample, 3.02" x 3.03" x 3.01".
    Crushing load, 201,120 pounds.
    Crushing strength per square inch, 21,980 pounds.
    Weight of stone per cubic foot, 167 pounds.

    "It will be seen that in both specific gravity and crushing strength, as well as in mineral composition, it is an average granite. Because of the uniformity of its pleasing light gray color, it will no doubt continue to be a popular building stone."

    Ill. No. 17. Declez Granite Quarry, Declez, San Bernardino County. Declez Granite Quarry
    Ill. No. 18. Farmers and Merchants National Bank Building, Los Angeles. The granite in this building was quarried in Bly Brothers' Quarry, Declez, San Bernardino. Farmers and Merchants National Bank Building, Los Angeles
    • Declez, San Bernardino County, California – Declez Granite Quarry/Deposit (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "The Declez deposits are in Sec. 35, T. 1 S., R. 6 W., S. B. M., 9 miles west of Colton, and are commercially the most important. The stone has been used for several years in building the government breakwater at San Pedro, for building stone used in Los Angeles buildings, and for curbstones used in several of the southern cities. This material is described on our Bulletin 38, p. 48, as follows. 'The stone is rather dark-colored biotite granite, which has a gneissoid structure in places. There are a number of feldspar veins from 2' to 4' wide, which consist principally of orthoclase feldspar, but in a few places contain large biotite crystals. The rock is partially disintegrated for a few feet from the top, but below this comparatively thin weathered portion it is bright and fresh, and below the few feet of weathered stone, and good building and monument stone could be obtained.'"

  • Devil's Canon, San Bernardino County, California - the Muscapabia Land and Water Company Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Muscapabia Land and Water Company, M. S. Severance, San Bernardino; Sec. 6 T. 1 N., R. 4 W., S. B. M., in Devil's Canon. A deposit of limestone, similar in character to that described above in Cable Canon and Cajon Canon. Lime was also burned here in former years."

  • Fallvale (2 miles above), San Bernardino County, California – Mill Creek Limestone Company’s Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Mill Creek Limestone Company's deposit comprising the NE ¼ NW ¼ and NE ¼ NE ¼ sec. 22; E ½ SW ¼, SE ¼ and S ½ of NE ¼ sec. 15, T. 1 S. R. 1 E., S.B., is on the north side of Mill Creek, about 2 miles above Fallvale and about 23 miles east of Redlands; elevation is 6850 feet. Owner is Mill Creek Limestone Company, John D. Scouller, vice president, 6009 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles; the property is leased to Douglas Lime Products Company, L. C. Douglas, president, Wrightwood, California.

    "The crystalline limestone deposit some 60 to 70 feet thick, occurs between granitic walls. Strike is N. 50 E., dip 45 NW. The outcrop may be traced for a half a mile or more in an eastward direction some 350 feet above Mill Creek on an extremely precipitous slope. Mill Creek here follows the San Andreas fault, trending north of west. The limestone is somewhat finely crystalline, white in color and appears to be free from impurities, except for slight iron stain on fracture faces, at the surface.

    "The deposit has been developed by a quarry face of which is approximately 150 feet long by 60 feet high. Material from quarry goes onto grizzly (8-inch opening); oversize goes to a small jaw crusher, thence to a wooden chute 3 feet wide by 2 feet high. This chute is approximately 400 feet long on about 50 inclination; it discharges into 200-ton bin built of poles at the level of the creek. Mill Creek Limestone Company operated the property in 1942-43.

    "Equipment consisted of compressor, drills, air tugger for raising supplies to the quarry level. About a quarter of a mile down the creek from the quarry there are three dwellings used for the camp.

    "The last 2 miles of road to this property was completely washed out and filled with boulders, and the ground was covered with 2 feet of snow at the time of visit in January 1947 by Reid J. Sampson.

    "Five miles up the Mill Creek road from Mentone and 12 miles from the deposit, a grinding plant to treat the limestone was erected, and sold to L. C. Douglas. This provides the following flow sheet: At the plant, trucks dump into hopper to 16- by 20-inch jaw crusher, belt-driven by 50 horsepower motor; crusher set at 2 ½ inches, to 20-inch belt conveyor to double deck vibrating screen, 12 and 24 mesh; oversize to Williams hammer mill; minus 12- plus 24-mesh into bunkers, minus 24-mesh to elevator to two conical air separators, oversize to bunkers, undersize to another air separator, oversize sacked; undersize to another air separator; all connected to dust collector system; all machines motor driven; capacity 15 tons per hour. The plant was idle at time of visit."

  • Halleck, San Bernardino County, California - Lime Production (Lime) (Neither the name nor the specific location is listed.) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)
  • Hesperia, San Bernardino County, California – Hesperia Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Hesperia dolomite deposit comprises five 160-acre placer claims, located on the north slope of Ord Mountain in secs. 27, 28, 33, T. 4 N., R. 3 W., S.B., 7 miles east of Hesperia, a station on the Santa Fe Railroad; elevation 3500 to 4200 feet; owners, S. D. Greenwood, Clinton Ray and Claire Dunton, Glendale, California.

    "The deposit of dolomite is 700 feet thick by half a mile in width and 1 ½ miles in length. The dolomite is white to brown in color. The estimated tonnage is said to be 80,000,000. Idle."

    Analysis

    Calcium oxide (CaO), 32.1 percent
    Magnesium oxide (MgO), 21.7 percent
    Silica (SiO2), 0.40 percent
    Iron (Fe2O3), 0.40 percent

  • Hinkley (north of), San Bernardino County, California - the Bonanza King Quarry (Limestone/Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Bonanza King Quarry, in T. 10 N., R. 3 W., S. B. M., 1 mile north of Hinkley, on the Santa Fe Railway. Claimed to be very pure limestone."

  • Hinkley (southwest of), San Bernardino County, California – Hinkley Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Hinkley dolomite deposit comprises 320 acres in the SE ¼ sec. 11 and the SW ¼ sec. 12, T. 9 N., R. 4 W., 4 miles southwest of Hinkley, a station on the Santa Fe Railroad. The owner is A. R. Mills, 9396 Second Street, Riverside, California; the property is under lease to W. C. O'Connor, 7940 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles; J. A. Vandergrift is consulting engineer.

    "The deposit forms a ridge, the axis of which trends eastward. On the north this ridge rises abruptly to some 200 feet above the valley, while the south slope is much more gradual. On the north, the granitic rock which apparently forms the footwall of the deposit, outcrops to about 50 feet above the valley, while on the south the deposit dips under the alluvium of the valley. The deposit is approximately 200 feet long by 1200 to 1500 feet wide at the base of the ridge, by 150 feet high. Except for a few narrow, discontinuous diorite dikes which strike N. 50 to 60 E., the whole mass is white to light-gray dolomite, the analysis of which is as follows:

    Silica SiO2, 3.03 percent
    Alumina Al2O3, 0.25 percent
    Iron Fe2O3, trace
    Lime CaO, 28.93 percent
    Magnesia MgO, 20.93 percent
    Ignition loss, 48.86 percent

    "Early in 1944 some 4 miles of road was built from the Hinkley highway to the deposit. At the terminus of this road, which is about midway of the east-west extremities of the deposit and 125 feet below the crest of the ridge on the south slope, machinery to give the following flow sheet was installed: Railroad rail grizzly, about 15-inch openings, to pocket to inclined 20-inch belt conveyor to 12- by 24-inch jaw crusher to 18-inch inclined conveyor to hopper to double deck vibrating screen; 5/8-inch and 1/8-inch through screen; plus 5/8 by elevator to Symons impact crusher; back to screens; the minus 5/8-inch plus 1/8-inch by two inclined, 18-inch conveyors to 3 bins each 130 tons capacity. The plant is all-steel construction. Machines have individual motor drives. Power is supplied by 3-cylinder Fairbanks-Morse Diesel engine, direct-connected to 162 K.V.A. generator. there is also a 309-cubic-foot Chicago pneumatic compressor to supply air for the quarry.

    "The plant has a capacity of 50 tons per hour. The product has been shipped to Kaiser Company's steel mills at Fontana."

  • Ivanpah Station (southeast of), San Bernardino County, California - O'Connell Limestone and Dolomite Deposit (Limestone & Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "O'Connell limestone and dolomite deposit is covered by two 160-acre association placer claims in secs. 8 and 9, T. 14 N., R. 16 E., S.B., 3 miles southeast of Ivanpah station on Union Pacific Railroad. The owners are J. J. O'Connell and associates, 437 North Oakhurst Drive, Beverly Hills, California, or 240 Cherokee Building, Hollywood, California. The following information and analyses have been supplied by S. E. Chiapella.

    "The outcrop of limestone and dolomite rises abruptly from low undulating hills, had a width of about 300 feet and a length of about 1 mile. The elevation is 3000 feet. The deposit is well suited for working by open pits. A direct road from the deposit to the railroad would be slightly over 2 miles long. Sufficient water for domestic use and milling could be had from Slaughter House Springs, which are near the northeast corner of section 9. The electric line of The California-Nevada Power Company in 5 miles distant. From 1927-29 the property was under option to Emerson Gee and associates. All stone produced was shipped to West Coast Kalsomine Company, Los Angeles.

    "The limestone is suitable for calcining in rotary kilns and for making whiting, foundry flux, chicken grits, and some types of glass. Chiapella quotes the following analyses:"

    Limestone:

    CaCO3, 96.64 percent
    SiO2, 1.87 percent
    MgCO3, 0.47 percent
    Al2O3, 1.08 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.08 percent

    Dolomite:

    MgCO3, 42.57 percent
    CaCO3, 56.14 percent
    Al2O3 and Fe2O3, 0.54 percent
    SiO2, 1.01 percent
    Ignition loss, 46.64 percent

  • Ivanpah (northeast of), San Bernardino County, California – Standard Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Standard limestone deposit is 2 miles northeast of Ivanpah in sec. 20 (?) T. 15 N., R. 16 E., S.B., close to the line of the Union Pacific Railroad. As originally located, it contained six 160-acre placer claims held by Standard Lime Chemical Company. There is no record of any such company incorporated in California, and their address is unknown.

    "The deposit, at an elevation of 4000 feet, is white and gray crystalline limestone, but no analysis is available. It is undeveloped except for an old shaft 30 feet deep and old cuts along a former branch railroad."

  • Keenbrook (north of), San Bernardino County, California – Lawton Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lawton deposit is on 800 acres of land in sec. 18, T. 2 N., R. 5 W., and sec. 13, T. 2 N., R. 6 W., S.B., about 1 ½ miles north of Keenbrook. Dolomite and silica are reported on the property also, and some work has been done on the silica, but so far as the records indicate, no limestone has been sold. In 1931 John P. Lawton, Sierra Madre, was listed as owner."

  • Lucerne (north of), San Bernardino County, California – Peterson Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Peterson limestone deposit contains 95 acres in sec. 12, T. 5 N., R. 1 W., S.B., 7 miles north of Lucerne Post Office and 23 miles east of Victorville on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway. The following is from a field report by W. B. Tucker: The owner, Carl Peterson, Lucerne Post Office, leased the deposit in 1944 to Marter Mining Company, R. L. Richter president and manager, 530 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles.

    "The claims were located in 1932 and have been prospected for scheelite and talc, as there is a granite intrusive and a belt of tactite 100 feet wide to the west of the limestone. The mountain containing the deposit rises 600 feet above the surrounding desert to 4000 feet elevation. The belt of limestone is from 300 to 600 feet thick and 4500 feet long, striking N. 30 W. and dipping 50 SW. It is cut by dikes of diorite. Work was started on the northwest slope early in 1944 and exposed a face of white crystalline limestone reported to carry 98.5 percent CaCO3. The deposit has been worked by open cut. Equipment includes a 130-cubic-foot portable air compressor, jackhammers and a 5-ton truck.

    "The property has been a producer since early 1944. Limestone is hauled to Victorville for rail shipment to Los Angeles."

  • Lucerne (north of), San Bernardino County, California – Richter Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Richter dolomite deposit comprises two placer claims and two lode claims located on a low hill in north Lucerne Valley, in SE ¼ SE ¼ sec. 15, T. 6 N., R. 1 W., 10 miles north of Lucerne Post Office and 30 miles northeast of Thorn Siding, on the Santa Fe Railroad; elevation 3300 feet; owner, Marter Mining Company, R. M. Richter, president and manager; Lawrence B. Martin, secretary, 630 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles.

    "The general strike of the dolomitic limestone beds is N. 20 W., dip 70 E. On the north slope of the hill the dolomite beds are cut by a granite intrusive dike, strike N. 50 E., dipping 45 NW. The dolomitic beds are also cut by a network of stringers and veins of magnesite, ranging from 2 to 18 inches in width. One series of magnesite veins strikes east; the other series strikes north. Development consists of a number of open cuts and shallow shafts from 10 to 20 feet in depth. It is estimated the depot contains 1,200,000 tons of commercial dolomite. The crystalline dolomite is white to brown in color, fine to medium grain. Two men were employed on development work in 1943."

    Analysis of dolomite by Smith-Emery Company

    Silica (SiO2), 0.46 percent
    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3), 1.05 percent
    Iron oxide (Fe2O3), 0.09 percent
    Calcium oxide (CaO), 34.64 percent
    Magnesium oxide (MgO), 23.97 percent
    Carbon dioxide (CO2), 29.40 percent
    Moisture and combined water, 9.97 percent
    Total, 99.54 percent

  • Mill Creek (head of), San Bernardino County, California - Marble Exposure owned by W. E. Van Slyke (Marble) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "W. E. Van Slyke, 716 Fifth street, San Bernardino. In the northeastern part of T. 1 S., R. 1 E., S. B. M., as the head of Mill Creek, is an exposure of marble of various colors, red and mottled blue and white."

  • New Berry Mountains, San Bernardino County, California – Limestone Quarry (Limestone)

    Self-Guided Tour of Newberry Springs. This site is presented by the Newberry Springs Chamber of Commerce. The quarry is southwest of the town of Newberry Springs and is mentioned on the Self-Guided Tour of Newberry Springs on this site presented by the Newberry Chamber of Commerce. The conveyor belt is described, which transports the mauve colored rock from the quarry.

  • Newberry Springs, San Bernardino County, California – Newberry Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Newberry Quarry; Operator: Cal West Rock Products; Address & County: P. O. Box 190, Newberry Springs, CA 92365, San Bernardino County; Phone: (619) 257-3400; Latitude: 3481, Longitude: -116.69, and Mine location number: Map No. 587; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California – Golden State Portland Cement Company (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "Golden State Portland Cement Company: This company, formerly known as the Wyman Limestone Company, is incorporated under the laws of Arizona with officers as follows: F. O. Wyman, president; C. W. Russell, secretary; W. K. Watkins, superintendent; C. W. Green, foreman; J. J. Quint, head chemist; with offices at the works and also at 522 Marsh-Strong Bldg., Los Angeles. The plant is at Oro Grande (P. O. Halleck) and consists of an up-to-date and complete cement plant where the limestone is ground, burned and the clinker ground into cement, the company employing about 60 men. The quarries are four miles east of the plant, the rock being transported from the quarries to the plant by a local railway owned by the cement company. The total area of land owned is 320 acres, and about 600 barrels of cement are made per day, the output to date amounting to 300,000 barrels. Electric power is generated by steam at 7 cents per h.p.-hour."

  • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California - the Hoey Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Hoey Quarry; American Beet-Sugar Company, Oxnard, Ventura County. Idle last year.

    (Hoey Quarry - Also see the "Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Limestone Quarries" entry above for more information on the stone in this quarry.)

    • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California – the Hoey Quarry (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "Hoey Quarry: This was formerly operated for the American Beet Sugar Company at Oxnard, but has been idle for some years."

  • Oro Grande (south of), San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Granite Quarries (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "The Oro Grande Quarries have furnished considerable granite in the past few years, but they were not in operation during the summer of 1904. About two miles south of Oro Grande the Mojave river cuts a narrow cañon through the granite rock, which forms rocky hillsides on each side of the river. On the west side of the river the granite is deeply disintegrated, and except on the river bluff no solid rock appears on the surface. On the east side of the river the solid granite in rounded ledges and rounded boulders of disintegration covers an area of more than a square mile. In several different places over this area small granite quarries have been operated, the product being mostly Belgian blocks. The quarries are in Secs. 28 and 29, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. Most of the work has been done on the surface boulders, but in a few places some work has been done in the solid ledge underneath the boulders. The quarrying has been done almost entirely by hand, and most of it has been on paving blocks, although some building and monument stone has been shipped."

    Ill. No. 19. Granite quarry at Oro Grande, San Bernardino County. Granite quarry at Oro Grande
    • Oro Grande (south of), San Bernardino County, California – the Oro Grande Granite Quarries (Granite) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "The Oro Grande Quarries* have furnished considerable granite in past years, but they are not in operation at present. About two miles south of Oro Grande the Mojave River cuts a narrow cañon through the granite, which forms rocky hillsides on each side of the river. On the west side of the river the granite is deeply disintegrated, and except on the river bluff no solid granite appears at the surface. On the east side of the river the granite is in rounded ledges, and rounded boulders of disintegration cover an area of more than a square mile. In several different places over this area small granite quarries have been operated, the product being mostly Belgian (paving) blocks. The quarries are in Secs. 28 and 29, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. Most of the work has been done on the surface boulders, but in a few places some work has been done on the solid ledge underneath the boulders. The quarrying has been done almost entirely by hand, and most of the product has been paving blocks, although some building and monument stone has been shipped."

      (* Page 897 footnote: Bull. 38, pp. 48-50.)

  • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Lime Company's Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Oro Grande Lime Company's Quarry; N. L. Morrow, 116 S. Avenue 20, Los Angeles. Idle for many years.

    (Oro Grande Lime Company's Quarry - See the "Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Limestone Quarries" entry above for more information on the stone in this quarry.)

    • Oro Grande (east of), San Bernardino County, California – Oro Grande Lime Stone Company (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "Oro Grande Lime and Stone Company, P. C. Thompson, manager, 408 Stimson bldg., Los Angeles. This company owns a quarry in Sec. 9, T. 6 N., R. 4 W., 3 ½ miles east of Oro Grande, which was formerly operated for the American Beet Sugar Company, but is now idle (circa 1913-1914)."

  • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California – Limestone Quarries & Kilns  (Limestone/Lime)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “Oro Grande is situated on the banks of the Mojave River, about forty-five miles northerly from the City of San Bernardino.  Lime is at present the principal product.  It is shipped in large quantities to various parts of the State, and also to Lower California.  Two large, double, patent kilns are kept constantly burning to supply the demand, and the business gives employment to a number of quarrymen, kilnmen, woodchoppers, and teamsters.”

  • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Limestone Quarries (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Oro Grande. The Limestones are interstratified with reddish-brown quartzites and brown shale. In the quarries the limestone varies from 60 to nearly 200 feet in thickness, but the total thickness or the total extent of the limestones in this region is not known. In the area surrounding the quarries are isolated outcrops of smaller lenticular masses of limestone. About 3 miles east of Victorville is another outcrop of massive, crystalline white and clouded limestone that would make a handsome marble.

    "The limestone is a hard, coarsely crystalline rock, mostly of a dark blue color, with numerous iron stains; but in the large quarry nearest the railway there is much white limestone stained with dendrite along the surfaces in the joint and cleavage planes.

    "In several places in the upper quarries there are great clusters of calcite and aragonite crystals, which occur in long prisms, sometimes 4 or 5 inches long. The crystals have a brownish-yellow color from the iron stain. There is also considerable pyrite, in places some bornite, along the joint seams, the weathering of which gives rise to free sulphur in a number of places, and in places stains of yellow-brown iron rust. The impurities are not in sufficient quantity to materially injure the quicklime, but they are sufficient to disfigure it for use as a building stone.

    "The rock is so much fractured that no large dimension stone is available; but this texture is an aid for lime quarrying, where the stone is used in small dimensions and must be broken up artificially if not done by nature. The quarrying is done by hand-drilling and blasting.

    "The quarries are located well up on the hillside, east of the railway, and northeast of the town of Oro Grande, in T. 6 N., R. 4 W., near the middle of the township. It is down grade, part of it quite steep, to the railroad. Some of the limekilns are located on the railway, several north and one south of the town of Oro Grande, and two of the kilns are on the hillside half a mile east of the railway. The stone is hauled by wagons from the quarries to the kilns are on the hillside half a mile east of the railway. The stone is hauled by wagons from the quarries to the kilns."

    (* Page 876 footnote: Bulletin 38, p. 77.)

  • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California – the Riverside Portland Cement Company (Limestone Deposit) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "The Riverside Portland Cement Company: office, Mills Bldg., San Francisco, owns extensive undeveloped deposits of limestone, shales, and silica, said to be suitable for the manufacture of Portland cement in the vicinity of Oro Grande and Victorville, which will ultimately be worked when their Riverside deposits are exhausted."

    • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California – Riverside Portland Cement Company's Oro Grande Limestone Quarry and Plant (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Riverside Portland Cement Company's Oro Grande quarry and plant were described in detail in several reports of this division, the latest being the one by Tucker and Sampson (43, pp. 524-525).* This property, formerly operated by Golden State Portland Cement Company, was acquired June 1, 1923 by the present owners. It was idle from 1923-42, when it was reopened to produce clinker which was shipped to the company's Crestmore plant to make cement during the war. Limestone was quarried under contract from the deposit 2 miles east of the plant at the rate of 1000 to 1100 tons per day and delivered to the plant in 10-ton trucks. Nearly $400,000 was spent at that time to rehabilitate the cement plant, which was again closed after the war. The company has recently begun modernizing the plant by installing new kilns 350 by 10 feet, adding crushers and an air washer and putting in new mills for raw grinding as well as enlarging the finishing department. It is a dry-process plant formerly having a nominal capacity of 3000 barrels daily, which will be increased by the new work."

      (*W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, "Mineral resources of San Bernardino County," California Div. Mines Rept. 39, pp. 427-549, 1943)

    • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California – Riverside Cement Co. (Cement & Limestone) (Excerpt from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Operator) Riverside Cement Co.; (Address) 621 S. Hope St., Los Angeles 17; (Location) Oro Grande.

      (Operator) Riverside Cement Co. (industrial limestone); (Address) 621 So. Hope St., Los Angeles 17; (Location) Oro Grande.

  • Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California – Riverside Cement Plant & Kilns (aka Southern California Cement Company / Riverside Portland Cement Company) – “Cementing Success,”  A leading supplier of the highest quality cement to the West Coast for virtually all concrete and construction needs, Riverside Cement celebrates 100 years of success in a very hard business. David Soyka bonds with this California company, in Riverside Cement Company, in Industry Today, Vol. 9, Issue 4.

    According to this article, the Southern California Cement Company opened in Crestmore, Riverside County, California, in 1905; and the company purchased a six-kiln plant in 1910 at the town of Oro Grande in San Bernardino County.  Local cottonwood from along the riverbank was used as fuel to produce a crude lime, which was used in mixing the mortar.  In 1910, the Southern California Cement Company was renamed the Riverside Portland Cement Company, which was later shortened to Riverside Cement.  The Oro Grande plant was shut down in 1928 and was re-opened again during World War II.  In 1998 Texas Industries, Inc. (TXI) acquired Riverside Cement.  The article goes on to state that “Riverside will retire the old plant completely” in the “next century” due to the need to modernize the plant and equipment.

  • Oro Grande (east of), San Bernardino County, California – Joseph Scheerer (Dolomite Deposit) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

    "Joseph Scheerer of Victorville has a deposit of dolomite on his claims east of Oro Grande."

  • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California - the Summit Quarry (formerly Stimson & Fleming) (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Summit Quarry; Oro Grande Lime and Stone Company (formerly Stimson & Fleming), Third and San Pedro streets, Los Angeles. This company manufactures the Red Star brand of lime, and ships limestone to the beet-sugar factories.

    (Summit Quarry - See the "Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Limestone Quarries" entry above for more information on the stone in this quarry.)

  • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California - the Superior Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Superior Quarry; American Beet-Sugar Company, Chino, Los Angeles County. (See the "Oro Grande, San Bernardino County, California - the Oro Grande Limestone Quarries" entry above for more information on the stone in this quarry.)

    • Oro Grande (near), San Bernardino County, California - Superior Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part VI. San Bernardino County and Tulare County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 775-954.)

      "Superior Limestone Quarry, owned by the American Beet Sugar Company, adjoins the Oro Grande Lime and Stone Company's quarry in Secs. 9-16, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. Limestone from this quarry was shipped to the sugar beet factories at Oxnard and Chino for several years previous to 1914, since which time the quarry has been idle."

  • Oro Grande Mountain Range, San Bernardino County, California – Limestone Quarries (Limestone/Lime/Kilns)  (Excerpts from Ninth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1889, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento:  California State Printing Office, 1890. 

    “Extensive quarries have recently been opened on a blue limestone belt situated in the Oro Grande Mountain Range.  For the reduction of this stone eight kilns have been constructed at Oro Grande with a capacity of four hundred and fifty barrels daily.  The stratification of the quarries is from northeast to southwest.  Thirty men are employed at present, and the production of lime amounts to one hundred barrels per day.  The subsidence of the building ‘boom,’ as the excitement was called in the southern part of the State, has materially decreased the need for lime.  The quarry is two hundred and fifty feet long, one hundred feet wide, and sixty feet in height.”

[Top of Page]