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Riverside County List of Quarries, Etc. (Continued) *

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

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  • Riverside County, California – Midland/Shepwell's (Rock) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Midland/Shepwell’s; Operator: Shepwell's Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 790, Blythe, CA 92226, Riverside County; Phone: (619) 922-7731; Latitude: 33.71, Longitude: -1114.64, and Mine location number: Map No. 485; Mineral commodity: Rock.

  • Riverside County, California – Mountain Avenue Pit #1 (Rock) (active circa 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Mountain Avenue Pit #1; Operator: Elsinore Ready Mix Co., Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 959, Lake Elsinore, CA 92531-0959, Riverside County; Phone: (909) 674-2127; Latitude: 33.69, Longitude: -117.40, and Mine location number: Map No. 487; Mineral commodity: Rock.

  • Riverside County, California - Painted Hills (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Painted Hills; Operator: Whitewater Rock & Supply Co.; Address & County: P. O. Box 254, Whitewater, CA 92282, Riverside County; Phone: (619) 325-2747; Latitude: 33.96, Longitude: -116.63, and Mine location number: Map No. 492; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Riverside County, California - Pyrite Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Pyrite Quarry; Operator: Paul Hubbs Construction; Address & County: 3500 Pyrite St., Riverside, CA 92509, Riverside County; Phone: (909) 366-3990; Latitude: 34.03, Longitude: -117.46, and Mine location number: Map No. 496; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Riverside County, California - Riverside Granite Quarry (photographs) This is a rock climbing web site in an abandoned granite quarry. The exact location of the quarry is not stated. Also, this may not have been the original name of the quarry.
  • Riverside (northwest of), Riverside County, California - Riverside Portland Cement Co. (Limestone & Kilns) (Excerpts from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part IV. Los Angeles County, Orange County, Riverside County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 465-589. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Riverside Portland Cement Co., Tyler Henshaw, president; W. H. Metcalf, secretary; corporation office, Mills Bldg., San Francisco, Cal.; John Treanor, manager, business office, Trust Ins. Bldg., Los Angeles. Quarry and works at Cement Plant near Crestmore, F. F. Parker, superintendent.

    Riverside Portland Cement Co. plant as seen from Fairmount Park. Riverside Portland Cement Co. plant as seen from Fairmount Park
    Quarries of Riverside Portland Cement Co. Upper quarry, limestone; lower quarry, diorite. Quarries of Riverside Portland Cement Co.

    "This company was organized in October, 1909, and its quarry and plant are about 5 miles northwest of Riverside, in Secs. 2 and 3, T. 2 S., R. 5 W., S. B. M. The limestone which is coarsely crystalline, is quarried in a butte similar to many which occur in this region, but which are generally granite. This limestone butte near Riverside, in some respects, resembles Slover Mountain southwest of Colton, which is the source of limestone for the California Portland Cement Company. Both show mixtures of blue and white calcite, but the Riverside County stone, on the north side of the hill, has a particularly rich blue color. The limestone is in two beds separated by quartzite. The strike is northeast and the dip is 25 SE. On the west side of the mountain the limestone is underlain by mica diorite, an intrusion of which has caused the local uplift and tilted the sedimentaries toward the southeast. Below the limestone is micaceous quartzite, in turn overlain by another bed of limestone.

    Limestone Quarry of Riverside Portland Cement Co. Limestone Quarry of Riverside Portland Cement Co.
    Cement plant of Riverside Portland Cement Co. Cement plant of Riverside Portland Cement Co.

    "This limestone was formerly quarried by the Blue Sky Marble and Onyx Company,* of Riverside, some of it being used for building purposes in Riverside and Los Angeles, and some for ornamental purposes in San Francisco. There were, also, two kilns at the quarry; the product having been put on the market under the name of 'Lily White' lime. About 75,000 barrels of lime were burned at the quarry."

    (* Page 556 footnote: Bull. 38, pp. 75-76.)

    "The raw materials are passed through Gates' crushers which reduce them to 3 inches and under, and then are dried separately in rotary driers. They then pass to ball and tube mills for grinding and after mixing are burned in 18 rotary kilns 8 ft. in diameter, 10 measuring 100 ft. in length and 8 measuring 120 ft. From the kilns the clinker passes on conveyors to piles for cooling. In these piles it remains two or three weeks. From these piles it is taken to be found in ball and tube mills, and thence to a Bates automatic weighing machine for packing. The McCaslen system of conveyors is used throughout."

  • Riverside County, California - Sierra Granite Co. (Paving Blocks) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.) J. J. Clark, Oro Grande P. O.
  • Riverside County, California - Temecula Granite Quarries (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "There are two granite quarries about two miles south of Temecula, near the junction of Temecula Creek and the San Jacinto River. One quarry is owned and operated by F. L. Fernald, and the other by Patrick Quinn. The quarries are both worked by hand, and the stone is largely quarried from boulders. The solid ledges are exposed in a number of places, but in most places the surface is covered wholly or in part with large rounded boulders of disintegration. Nearly all the work has been done on boulders, because they are more readily split and cut into the desired shape. The rock has a remarkably even fracture, one large boulder having been split with a single drill hole, leaving the fractured surface more than 200 feet square, almost as regular as a sawed surface. Some of the boulders are partially disintegrated to a depth of several inches, and sometimes discolored slightly to a depth of a foot from the surface. The interior of the stone has a rich, light gray color, with a faint rose tint which makes it very attractive. Part of the stone is made into Belgian blocks, and part is cut into dimension stone. They now (about 1906) have two contracts of 30,000 blocks each. Its smooth fracture makes it a desirable stone for paving blocks, as they can be made rapidly and more regular than from a stone with a rough fracture. It is also adapted for curbing and flagging for the same reason. It has a local use for fence posts, where the stone has been split out in pieces about 4 by 8 inches and 5 or 6 feet long, and barbed wire fastened to them after they have been put in place.

    "There is a hand derrick in each quarry, and two derricks are at the railway station, used in loading the stone. The railway formerly extended down the valley near the quarries, but the part south of Temecula is now abandoned and the stone is hauled by wagon from the quarries to Temecula, two miles distant.

    The microscope shows the Temecula stone to be a biotite granite, with a very little hornblende and muscovite. There is a little soda feldspar and some microcline, but the prevailing feldspar is orthoclase, some of it perthite."

  • Riverside County, California - Whitecap Limestone No. 1 and No. 2 Claims (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Whitecap Limestone No. 1 and No. 2 claims were located in 1928 by the same persons who located the Carbonate and Blythe cement claims. These claims are 160-acre placer locations in the SW ¼ sec. 29, W ½ sec. 31, and in sec. 32, T. 3 S., R. 21 E., S.B., 1 to 2 miles north of Midland on the Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. No work nor production has been reported from these claims, which are said to be on a deposit of high-calcium limestone."

  • Riverside County, California - Wyroc Lake Street Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Wyroc Lake Street Quarry; Operator: Wyroc, Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 1239, Vista, CA 92085, Riverside County; Phone: (619) 727-0878; Latitude: 33.73, Longitude: -117.39, and Mine location number: Map No. 507; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • San Jacinto (northwest of), Riverside County, California - Hubbard Limestone Deposit & Lime Kiln (Limestone & Kiln) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Hubbard limestone deposit is in sec. 23, T. 4 S., R. 1 W., S. B., 4 miles northwest of San Jacinto and on a steep slope just north of the road between Soboba Hot Springs and Gilman Hot Springs. Many years ago it is said to have been worked by Snowflake Lime Company, who had a lime kiln below it near the road. It is a white crystalline limestone, one of a series of outcrops striking northwest, and is believed to be of good grade. The quarry, which was a small one, is about 1000 feet above the road. There has been no recent activity. William F. Rohland and Mary Heinsen, Gilman Hot Springs Post Office, were listed as owners in 1945."

  • San Jacinto (northwest of), Riverside County, California - Lamb Canyon Limestone Deposit & Lime Kiln (Limestone & Kiln) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Lamb Canyon deposit is in sec. 36, T. 3 S., R. 2 W., S. B., 3 miles by road northwest of Gilman Hot Springs. This is one of the small deposits worked many years ago. The limestone was burned in a kiln which stood near the main road a mile south of the quarry. No work has been done here in many years."

  • San Jacinto (north of), Riverside County, California - Lime quarry and Kilns of Ferdinand Snyder (Limestone & Kiln) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Ferdinand Snyder owns a productive lime quarry 7 miles north of San Jacinto, on a branch of the Santa Fe Railway. The stone is coarsely crystallized limestone, and is said to make an excellent lime for the sugar refineries. There are two kilns in use, in which the lime is burned with wood, and shipped to different points in southern California. The quarry has been in operation for eight years."

  • Temecula (south of), Riverside County, California - Bly Brothers Granite Quarries - the Declez Quarry and another unnamed quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Bly Brothers, 720 Alameda street, Los Angeles. Two quarries: one in the N. W. ¼ of Sec. 2, T. 2 S., R. 6 W., S. B. M.; the other in the S. E. ¼ of the same section. (Formerly belonged to the West Riverside Granite Company.) This quarry produces a large quantity of fine granite used for building purposes in Los Angeles and vicinity. This firm has in Los Angeles one of the best equipped stone yards for handling and dressing the stone that there is in southern California. There are saw gangs for sawing the stone, as they handle considerable sandstone and marble in their contracts. They have stone planers, surfacing machines, steam drills, pneumatic drills, and surfacing tools. There is also a large force of stonecutters, as much of the cutting and finishing of granite is necessarily done by hand.

    "The stone from Bly Brothers' Declez quarry (San Bernardino County) is a typical granite, composed of quartz, orthoclase feldspar, and muscovite and biotite mica, with a small percentage of the soda feldspar, albite. It has a light gray color and medium-grained texture. Physical tests made on this stone by L. D. Hunt, Engineer at the University of California, gave the following results:

    Dimension of sample, 3.02" x 3.03" x 3.01".
    Crushing load, 201,120 pounds.
    Crushing strength per square inch, 21,980 pounds.
    Weight of stone per cubic foot, 167 pounds.

    "It will be seen that in both specific gravity and crushing strength, as well as in mineral composition, it is an average granite. Because of the uniformity of its pleasing light gray color, it will no doubt continue to be a popular building stone."

    Ill. No. 12. Stone-sawing machine. Bly Bros. Stone Company, Los Angeles. Stone-sawing machine
    Ill. No. 13. Machine surfacing granite at Bly Bros.' Stone Yards, Los Angeles. Machine surfacing granite at Bly Bros.' Stone Yards
    Ill. No. 16. H. W. Hellman Building, Los Angeles, First two stories constructed of Riverside Granite. (Bly Bros. Stone Co. is printed on the photograph.) H. W. Hellman Building, Los Angeles
  • Temecula, Riverside County, California - F. L. Fernald Granite Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "There are two granite quarries about two miles south of Temecula, near the junction of Temecula Creek and the San Jacinto River. One quarry is owned and operated by F. L. Fernald, and the other by Patrick Quinn. The quarries are both worked by hand, and the stone is largely quarried from boulders...." (For more information about the granite quarried here, see the "Temecula Granite Quarries" above.)

  • Temecula (south of), Riverside County, County, California - M. Machado and Joseph Winkles (Granite Quarry) (Excerpts from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part IV. Los Angeles County, Orange County, Riverside County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 465-589. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Temecula. Two granite quarries have long been worked about two miles south of this place. They have lately been operated by M. Machado and Joseph Winkles, but were formerly worked by other persons.*

    (* Page 586 footnote: Bull. 38, pp. 42-47.)

  • Temecula (south of), Riverside County, California - Patrick Quinn Granite Quarry (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "There are two granite quarries about two miles south of Temecula, near the junction of Temecula Creek and the San Jacinto River. One quarry is owned and operated by F. L. Fernald, and the other by Patrick Quinn. The quarries are both worked by hand, and the stone is largely quarried from boulders." (For more information about the granite quarried here, see the "Temecula Granite Quarries" above.)

  • Temescal Cañon, Riverside County, California - Temescal Rock Quarry (Crushed Rock/Rhyolite Porphyry) (Excerpts from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part IV. Los Angeles County, Orange County, Riverside County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 465-589. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Temescal Rock Quarry. The quarry is owned by the Temescal Rock Company; office, 603 Central Building, Los Angeles; A. B. Filch, president; H. S. Cook, secretary. The company has about 200 acres of mountain land lying in Sec. 4, T. 4 S., R. 6 W., S. B. M. The quarry is located in Temescal Cañon, 4 miles southeast of Corona. The material that is being crushed is a rhyolitic porphyry and is very hard and sharp. The mountain side where the rock is being quarried slopes steeply and has an elevation of 1000 to 1200 feet above the cañon."

    "The company has near four miles of its own tracks which connect through the cañon with the main line of the Santa Fe Railroad. The plant has a capacity of 1500 to 2000 tons of crushed rock products per day. Besides crushed rock products, an incline tramway has been installed to load massive rock material up to 10 tons in weight, for riprap and sea wall construction.

    "The quarry extends along the mountain side south of the head of the crushing plant, this quarry floor being 180 feet above the floor of the cañon. It is so arranged that while one end of the quarry is being drilled and blasted, the broken rock on the other end of being loaded into cars and hauled to the crusher. A Marion steam shovel, model 100, loads the broken rock into all-stewel dump quarry cars, which have a capacity of 8 tons. The drilling is done by two Star drills, by means of which a line of holes are drilled from a bench and then blasted at one round. Trojan powder is used in the blasting operations. The quarry dump cars are operated by electric motors, receiving the current from a third rail. By a system of levers in a tower over crusher in the crusher plant, operated by one man, an empty car is sent to the steam shovel, when loaded brought back and spotted at chute before large crusher. By means of another lever controlled by the same operator, the load is dumped into a Blake Jaw type of crusher, size 84"x66", and capable of handling a rock 5'x6'x10. The crusher is driven by 300 h. p. motor. The capacity of this crusher is rated at 600 tons per hour.

    "The material from this crusher will pass through a 10" ring. The product from the crusher passes through revolving screen (5' in diameter by 12' in length), where the fine dirt material is screened out. The over-size runs down into a No. 9 McCully gyratory crusher and is reduced to 3 ½" maximum pieces. This crusher is driven by 150 h. p. motor. The material is then conveyed by belt conveyor to two revolving screens (size 5' in diameter by 12' in length) which take out all rock more than two inches in diameter. The over-size material is conveyed to two 48" Symons Disk crushers, where it is reduced to 2" or less. The finished product is carried by means of a belt conveyor from the scalping screens and disk crushers to a sizing screen over storage bins, where it is separated into five different sized products. Those sizes of smallest volume are conveyed by chutes direct into the bins nearest the screen, and those of larger volume are carried by shuttle belt conveyors to bins farther away.

    "The storage bins have a capacity of 5000 tons of crushed rock. Supplies and material are hoisted from the main railroad tracks over a standard gauge track to the quarry floor by means of 75 h. p. Lidgerwood electric hoist. Another 50 h. p. Lidgerwood electric hoist operates cars over incline to load riprap material...."

  • Temecula Valley, Riverside County, California - Granite Quarries - Temecula History: A chronology 1797 - 1993, Compiled by Emily Gerstbacher. (This link is no longer available.)
    <http://www.pe.net/~dilemman/History1.htm>

    Granite quarrying began about 1883 in the hills south of town. The granite was used for curb stones, foundation blocks, and paving stones throughout California. the quarrying continued until 1915.

  • West Riverside, Riverside County, California - the Sky Blue Marble and Onyx Company Limestone Quarry and Limekilns (Limestone & Kilns) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Sky Blue Marble and Onyx Company, E. W. Tucker, Eighth and Walnut streets, Riverside, general manager, operates a limestone quarry at West Riverside, about 5 miles northwest of the town of Riverside, in Secs. 2 and 3, T. 2 S., R. 5 W., S. B. M. The limestone occurs in one of the numerous buttes found in the northern part of Riverside and the southern part of San Bernardino counties, which are generally granite. This limestone butte at Riverside resembles in some respects the one at Colton. Both are mixtures of blue and white calcite, but the Riverside stone has a particularly deep and rich blue color. There are two beds of the limestone separated by granite and quartzite. The strata dip 25° N. 25° E., and at the north end of the mountain the limestone is underlaid by granite, which is followed by quartzite, and that in turn by another bed of limestone. The contact of the limestone with the granite and with the quartzite is quite sharp...."

    "The chemical analysis shows it to be a remarkably pure carbonate of lime, which verifies the appearance of the stone in the quarry.

    "Some of the limestone has been used for building purposes in Riverside and in Los Angeles and some has been used for ornamental purposes in San Francisco.

    "There are two kilns at the quarry; the product is put on the market under the name of 'Lily White' lime. About 75,000 barrels of lime have been burned at this quarry.

    "By utilizing the small dimensions for quicklime, the quarry can be profitably worked and a variety of marble obtained different from that in any other known quarry in the United States.

    "The durability of the Riverside limestone is indicated by its strong topographic relief, where it stands up in prominent knobs in the midst of granite and quartzite."

    (From the "Marble" section.) "Sky Blue Marble and Onyx Company's Quarry, in Secs. 2 and 3, T. 2 S., R. 5 W., S. B. M.; E. W. Tucker, Eighth and Walnuts streets, Riverside, manager. (For description of quarry, see Limestone, page 75.) This limestone takes an admirable polish, with a dark blue color, making a very desirable material for ornamental purposes, and for trimming with lighter colored marbles."

  • Whitewater Station (south of), Riverside County, California - Guiberson Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Guiberson limestone deposit is on 160 acres of patented land in E ½ NE ¼ and NE ¼ SE ¼ sec. 22 and SW ¼ sec. 23, T. 3 S., R. 3 E., S. B., about 1 mile south of Whitewater Station on the Southern Pacific Railroad. Owner, S. A. Guiberson, Jr., 1000 Forrest Avenue, Dallas, Texas. The limestone is enclosed by and intruded by the granitic rocks of San Jacinto Mountain, on whose northern flank it lies. As mentioned by Tucker (45, p. 172)* it was drilled by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the greatest thickness of limestone reported was 110 feet. Some prospect cuts and adits were run nearly 20 years ago, but no production has been reported. The following analysis of the limestone is from Tucker (29a).**

    (* W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, Los Angles Field Division, "Mineral Resources of Riverside County," California Division of Mines Report 41, pp. 121-182, pls. 23-35, 1945.)

    (** W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, Los Angeles Field Division, "Riverside County," California Division of Mines Report 25, pp. 468-526, illus., 1929.)

    SiL2, 0.74 percent
    Al2O3, 0.004 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.008 percent
    CaO, 53.29 percent
    MgO, 2.39 percent

  • Whitewater (south of), Riverside County, California - Novell Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Novell limestone deposit is in sec. 26, T. 3 S., R. 3 E., S. B., 2 miles south of Whitewater on the Southern Pacific Railroad. It is blue to gray, coarsely crystalline limestone striking N. 40 W. and is reported to extend southeast on the strike for 2500 feet. No production has been reported.

    "About 1 mile southwest of Pinyon Flat and probably in secs. 5 and 6, T. 7 S., R. 5 E., S. B., about 28 miles by road southwest of Indio, there is a prominent outcrop of limestone striking N. 45 W. and dipping 50 NE. It is at an elevation of 4000 feet. According to Waring (Merrill 19, p. 550)* it overlies granite unconformably and is overlain by coarse granitic gneiss and has a 'surface exposure about ½ mile wide.' This may be the Big Hill deposit (Tucker 45).**

    (* Frederick J. H. Merrill, "Riverside County," California Mining Bureau Report 15, pp. 522-589, illus., 1919.)

    (** W. Burling Tucker and R. J. Sampson, Los Angles Field Division, "Mineral Resources of Riverside County," California Division of Mines Report 41, pp. 121-182, pls. 23-35, 1945.)

  • Whitewater Station, Riverside County, California - Southern Pacific Land company Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Southern Pacific Land Company owns a limestone deposit near the railroad in sec. 23, T. 3 S., R. 3 E., S.B., less than 1 mile south of Whitewater station. It is coarsely crystalline, white, and reported to carry 98 percent CaCO3. The reported thickness of 100 to 200 feet includes some layers of diorite and of mica schist. No production has been reported from this deposit."

  • Winchester (southwest of), Riverside County, California - Talc Deposit Owned by F. A. Stephens (Talc) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "F. A. Stephens, Winchester. Some superficial work has been done on deposits of white, scaly talc, about 3 miles southwest of Winchester. (See XIIIth Report of the California State Mining Bureau, p. 639.)"

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