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Monterey County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Anderson Landing (3 miles from), Monterey County, California – Marble Peak Limestone Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Marble Peak deposit is in sec. 22, T. 20 S., R. 3 E., about 3 miles from Anderson Landing on the coast. The peak is 3966 feet high. Several small deposits flank it on the west and south. None of them have been developed."

  • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – the Monterey Lime Company Limestone Quarries, Lime Kilns, & Tramway
    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – Monterey Lime Company Kilns & Tramway  (Big Sur: A Complete History and Guide, by Tomi Kay Lussier, Big Sur Publications, 1979, pp. 46)

      According to Big Sur: A Complete History and Guide, the land used by the Monterey Lime Company to build their kilns on Long Ridge above Bixby Creek, was sold to the company in 1906 by Charles Bixby. But, the California Coastal Resource Guide states that Bixby sold his land to the Monterey Lime Company in 1904.  (California Coastal Resource Guide, Madge Caughman, Joanne S. Ginsberg, California Coastal Commission, University of California Press, 1987)

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – Charles H. Bixby & the Monterey Lime Company Limekiln Settlement (Photograph) (This entry includes a photograph entitled, “The Bixby limekiln settlement. (Courtesy of Frank Trotter)”

      Another source, the “Corp. Charles H. Bixby” Find A Grave entry, states that Bixby sold his land to the Monterey Lime Company in 1905.
    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California - the Monterey Lime Company Limestone Quarries and Limekilns (Limestone & Kilns) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

      Monterey Lime Company, Mills Building, San Francisco, owns limestone quarries and limekilns on Bixby Creek, about 3 miles from the coast, in Sec. 16, T. 18 S., R. 1 E. Two quarries are opened on the north side of the creek. The limestone is much shattered and decomposed to considerable depths along the fissures. Where fresh, the rock is a white crystalline limestone, with grayish-blue streaks, closely approaching to marble. The surrounding rock is granite. The property is equipped with two patent continuous kilns of a daily capacity of 70 barrels, which were started in August, 1904; a similar kiln of 70 barrels capacity is under construction. The company produces two grades of lime, the Diamond M and common lime.”

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – Monterey Lime Company Shipping Lime from Bixby Landing

      According to Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009, by the Office of the Auditor-Controller, Michael J. Miller, Bixby Landing was the shipping point of lime for the Monterey Lime Company.  (Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2009, Prepared and Submitted by the Office of the Auditor-Controller, Michael J. Miller, CPA, CISA)

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County – Monterey Lime Company  (article from Coopers International Journal, 1906, pp. 226)

      “I understand the management at the Holmes Company is about to have a change, and the Monterey Lime Company has new owners.  I trust the friendly relations with the union will continue.”

    • San Francisco, San Francisco County, California – the Monterey Lime Company Offices & Warehouses  (Advertisement below from The Architect and Engineer, Vol. 13, No. 3, July 1908)

      Monterey Lime Company Offices & Warehouses, St. Clair Building, No. 16 California Street & Warehouses, Third and Channel Streets (July 1908 advertisement) Monterey Lime Company Offices & Warehouses, St. Clair Building, No. 16 California Street & Warehouses, Third and Channel Streets (July 1908 advertisement)
    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – the Monterey Lime Company Kilns & Tramway  (Scientific American  Supplement 1736, April 10, 1909, Vol. 67, pp. 240)

      “An overhead wire-rope tramway, believed to be unlike any other, was recently erected for the Monterey Lime Company, San Francisco, Cal., at its plant about 40 miles below Monterey, by the Hallidie-Painter Tramway Company, successor to the California Wire Works, Oakland, Cal.  The tramway runs from the company’s kilns to the ocean, approximately 2 ½ miles, and passes over very rough country.  In one place there is a span about 2600 feet long, and a number of others vary from 800 feet to 1,000 feet.  The tramway handles lime in barrels, two barrels to each carrier.  The barrels are inclosed in the carriers so that they are completely protected from rain and heavy fogs, which are quite prevalent in that part of the country.  Two attendants take care of the tramway, one at the loading and the other at the unloading end.  The capacity is fifty barrels per hour.  The operation is very simple:  The carriers stop to load and unload automatically, and are automatically started when the next carrier comes in.  The Monterey Lime Company has found the tramway of considerable benefit to it in the reduction of the cost of lime handling.  Previously this was done by teams, and it is stated that the change in the mode of handling the lime has made such a difference to the company that where there was formerly a loss there is now a profit.”

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – the Monterey Lime Company  (Certified Copy of Compiled Statement of Domestic Corporations Whose Charters Have Been Forfeited, and Foreign Corporations Whose Right to Do Business in This State Has Been Forfeited, California Secretary of State, 1912, pp. 15)

      Domestic Corporations – General:  (Corp. No.) 37849 (Name of Corporation)  Monterey Lime Company

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – the Monterey Lime Company Aerial Tramway  (The WPA Guide to the Monterey Peninsula, WPA Writers’ Program of the Work Projects Administration in Northern California, 1941.

      “On Castle Rock (R) the ruins of Bixby Landing stand gaunt on the edge of the cliff, reminder of the days when lime from the mines on three-mile-distant Long Ridge was brought down by cable and loaded here.  In 1905 one of the thrilling sights promised vacationers by the proprietor of nearby Hotel Idlewild…was the view from the summit above Bixby Creek of the aerial tramway of the Monterey Lime Company.  This cable transported the lime in two enormous buckets down to the mouth of the creek, where it was hoisted aboard small coastwise freighters.  The lime, never of superior quality, paid well enough until the supply of firewood gave out; then, as it was too expensive to import fuel for the kilns, Bixby Landing was abandoned.”

      According to Deep California: Images and Ironies of Cross and Sword on El Camino Real, by Craig Chalquist, “The heavy rains of 1907 removed the trails and bridges installed by the Monterey Lime Company….”  He further states that Permanente Meals Corporation began to quarry dolomite in 1942 at that location.  (Deep California: Images and Ironies of Cross and Sword on El Camino Real, Craig Chalquist, 2008)

    • Bixby Creek, Monterey County, California – Monterey Lime Company Limestone Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpt from Limestone in California, by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Monterey Lime Company worked deposits of limestone on Bixby Creek in sec. 16, T. 18 S., R. 1 E., about 3 miles from the coast. Lime production began in 1904 with two continuous kilns and in 1905 a third kiln was added. Work was suspended in 1910. Where fresh, the limestone is white and crystalline, with grayish-blue streaks, but much of it is shattered."

  • Carmel Bay (near), Monterey County, California – Pacific Carrara Marble Company Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Pacific Carrara Marble Company was organized before 1880 to work a deposit of white marble reported near Carmel Bay. There is no published record to indicate that production was ever made."

  • Gabilan Peak, Monterey County, California – Gabilan Peak (Bardin) Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The following (deposit) was either worked as noted or undeveloped."

    "Gabilan Peak (Bardin) deposit on the south and west side of the peak, is now partly included in Fremont Peak State Park. This is a siliceous limestone in which small deposits of barite were worked between 1915-21."

  • Jolon (south of), Monterey County, California – Jolon Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Jolon Deposit. E. B. Preston (92, p. 260),* mentions a shell deposit 'a few miles south of Jolon,' which supplied material for a lime kiln operated some years earlier, which was then idle. Jolon is about 19 miles by road southwest of San Lucas."

    (* E. B. Preston, "Monterey County," California Mining bureau Report 11, pp. 259-262, 1892.)

  • Limekiln Valley, along the Big Sur Coast, Monterey County, California – Limekiln State Park (photographs and history)

    Along one of the hikes in the park you can view four kiln towers that were in use in the late 19th century. According to this web site, ".these ovens supplied a thriving industry: Limestone was 'cooked' out of the rocks-a real stone soup-for use in building materials."

  • Metz (east of), Monterey County, California – Chalone Creek Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The following (deposit) was either worked as noted or undeveloped."

    "Chalone Creek deposit is in the southeast part of T. 17 S., R. 7 E., about 6 miles east of Metz. It is undeveloped."

  • Monterey County, California – Jamesburg Quadrangle (Limestone Deposits) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Unnamed Deposits in Jamesburg Quadrangle. Nearly two-thirds of the area of this quadrangle, as mapped by William M. Fiedler (44),* is occupied by rocks of the Sur series, which are so rich in limestone in the region to the west. Here, however, only a few deposits have been mapped. Most are in mountainous country devoid of roads. The area as a whole is probably too remote to be considered as a possible commercial source of limestone. Known deposits are located in sec. 34, T. 17 S., R. 3 E.; secs. 17, 18, 20, T. 18 S., R. 4E.; secs. 17, 20, T. 19 S., R. 3 D. (three separate small deposits)."

    (* William Morris Fiedler, "Geology of the Jamesburg Quadrangle, Monterey County, California," California Division of Mines Report 40, pp. 177-250, map, 1944.)

  • Monterey County, California – Natividad Quarry (Dolomite) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Natividad Quarry; Operator: National Refractories; Address & County: P. O. Box 1938, Salinas, CA 93902, Monterey County; Phone: (408) 633-2413; Latitude: 36.75, Longitude: -121.59, and Mine location number: Map No. 401; Mineral commodity: Dolomite.

  • Monterey County, California – Passadori Carmelstone Quarry (Carmelstone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Resources of San Benito County, California," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 3-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)
  • Monterey County, California – Stonewall Canyon Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Stonewall Canyon Quarry; Operator: Syar Industries, Inc.; Address & County: P. O. Box 867, Soledad, CA 93960, Monterey County; Phone: (408) 671-3576; Latitude: 36.45, Longitude: -121.27, and Mine location number: Map No. 405; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Parkfield (west of), Monterey County, California – Nelson Creek Limestone Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Nelson Creek deposits are along the creek of that name, about 20 miles northeast of San Miguel and 3 to 4 miles west of Parkfield. The limestone outcrops are on granite along the west side of the San Andreas fault and both rocks have been brecciated and recemented. There is no record of any work having been done here."

  • Parkfield (near), Monterey County, California – L. Patriquin et al. (Marble Deposit) (Excerpts from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part V. Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura counties, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 595-769. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "L. Patriquin et al. of Parkfield, have an undeveloped deposit of white marble in Sec. 6, T. 23 S., R. 14 E., near Parkfield. The ground is under lease to E. G. Lewis of Atascadero, who is drilling nearby for oil."

    • Parkfield (near), Monterey County, California – Patriquin Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Patriquin marble deposit is in sec. 6. T. 23 S., R. 14 E., about 18 miles northeast of the railroad. The marble is reported to be white. It has never been developed."

  • Pico Blanco Mountain, Monterey County, California – Pico Blanco Limestone Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Pico Blanco deposit is on the mountain of that name (elevation 3710 feet) in sec. 36, T. 18 S., R. 1 E., and extends north into section 25 as well as south into secs. 1 and 2, T. 19 S., R. 1 E. It is 5 miles east of Point Sur. According to Trask (26),* it is the largest of the deposits in the Point Sur quadrangle, being 'more than 1000 feet in thickness, but it thins rapidly in either direction.'

    (* Parker D. Trask, Geology of the Point Sur Quadrangle, California," University of California, Department of Geological Science Bulletin, vol. 16, pp. 119-186, 1926.)

    "The topography is rough and mountainous and the nearest road is about 2 ½ miles distant. There is said to be a landing on the coast north of Big Sur and about 5 miles from the deposit. The old Koch Ranch covers section 36. So far as known, the deposit is undeveloped."

  • Point Lobos State Reserve, Monterey County, California – Granite Quarry (In a previous version of this page, it was noted that there was a granite quarry located within the reserve, although the present version does not mention the granite quarry.)
  • Rockland Landing, Monterey County, California – the Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company Limekilns (Lime & Kilns) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company, 211 Drumm street, San Francisco, owns the former Rockland Lime and Lumber Company's plant at Rockland Landing, in Sec. 22, T. 22 S., R. 4 E. Formerly four continuous limekilns were in operation, but the plant has been idle for a number of years. (See also VIIIth Report of California State Mining Bureau, p. 480; XIIth ibid., p. 392; and XIIIth ibid., p. 629)

    • Rockland Landing, Monterey County, California – Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company Limestone/Marble Deposits (Limestone/Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company for many years owned the Rockland Lime and Lumber Company deposits in secs. 14, 15, T. 22 S., R. 4 E., and the loading place in section 22 nearby, from which lime was loaded by an aerial tramway 1000 feet long onto vessels standing offshore. Part, if not all of this property is now within the boundaries of Hunter Liggett Military Reservation. Four limekilns were operated 3700 feet inland as early as the late eighties. The property has remained idle for over 40 years. The large deposits of limestone here have been so thoroughly broken by landslides that the canyon side is covered by a loose layer of angular limestone blocks. All of the limestone has been changed to marble. In this region it occurs over a vertical range of several hundred feet."

  • Salinas (east of), Monterey County, California – Alisal Ranch (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The following…(deposit) was worked before 1910 in the region northeast and east of Salinas, principally for use in beet-sugar refining. None of the local limestone has been so used in recent years."

    "Alisal Ranch, about 5 miles east of Salinas."

  • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California – Bethlehem Steel Company

    Bethlehem Steel Company - See entry below entitled: Pacific Coast Steel Company (later Bethlehem Steel Company) Dolomite Deposit on the Sterling Ranch.

  • Salinas, Monterey County, California – Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp. (Lime & Dolomite) (Excerpts from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp. (producer of burnt lime and dolomite; (Address) Box 1531, Salinas; (Location) Salinas.

  • Salinas (east of), Monterey County, California – Kellogg Ranch (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The following…(deposit) was worked before 1910 in the region northeast and east of Salinas, principally for use in beet-sugar refining. None of the local limestone has been so used in recent years."

    "Kellogg Ranch, 16 miles south of east of Salinas."

  • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California - the Los Vergeles Rancho Limestone Quarry (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Los Vergeles Rancho. In lots 1 and 3 of the Los Vergeles Rancho; Mrs. J. H. Wythe, corner of Minnesota and Lincoln avenues, San Jose, owner; about 12 miles northeast of Salinas, on the San Juan road, several deposits of limestone occur, two of which are quite extensive. The stone ranges from a coarsely crystalline white and bluish-white calcite to a very compact, holocrystalline, fine-grained marble. It all averages very high in lime content and is suitable for cement and sugar purposes. Preparations are being made to open a quarry."

    • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California – Los Vergeles Ranch Limestone/Marble Deposits (Limestone/Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Los Vergeles Ranch deposits are 11 to 13 miles northeast of Salinas on the highway to San Juan Bautista, on 250 acres of land. They are part of a group of limestone bodies which extend for over 6 miles at intervals from San Benito County westward. The highway crosses one of the outcrops about midway of the group, so that most of the limestone on both sides is within 2 ½ miles of a paved road. A tunnel was placed under the highway when the latter was built, to permit working the limestone most of which can be handled by gravity.

      "No analysis is available, but the material is claimed to be of good grade, ranging from coarsely crystalline white and bluish to a compact fine-grained marble. Some has been used by Judson Iron Works (Laizure, C. McK 25, p. 43).*

      (* C. McK Laizure, San Francisco Field Division, "San Luis Obispo County," California Mining Bureau Report 21, pp. 499-538, 1925.)

  • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California – Natividad Ranch (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The following…(deposit) was worked before 1910 in the region northeast and east of Salinas, principally for use in beet-sugar refining. None of the local limestone has been so used in recent years."

    "Natividad Ranch, 6 miles northeast of Salinas, close to the dolomite quarry of Bethlehem Steel Company.

    "Just north of Natividad Ranch, limestone was quarried and hauled 1 ½ miles north to an old kiln near Gabilan Creek."

  • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California – Pacific Coast Steel Company (later Bethlehem Steel Company) Dolomite Deposit on the Sterling Ranch (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Pacific Coast Steel Company prior to 1940, and thereafter Bethlehem Steel Company, 20th and Illinois Streets, San Francisco, have quarried dolomite for many years from a deposit on the Sterling Ranch in what would be sec. 2, T. 14 S., R. 3 E., M.D. if surveyed, about half a mile north of the Permanente quarry described…(in the Permanente Metals Corporation Dolomite Deposit entry below). Production has usually been comparatively small and for their own use in lining bottoms of open-hearth steel furnaces.

    "The following have been mentioned as small producers 20 to 25 years ago but not recently: H. Bardin, C. Z. Hebert, C. Patton, and Robert Porter, all of Salinas (Boalich, E. S. 21, p. 156).

    (* E. S. Boalich, "Monterey County," California Mining Bureau Report 17, pp. 156-157, 1921.)

  • Salinas (northeast of), Monterey County, California – Permanente Metals Corporation Dolomite Deposit on the Sterling and Salmos Ranches (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Permanente Metals Corporation, Permanente, California, produced dolomite on a large scale during the late war from a deposit 6 ½ miles by road northeast of Salinas. The deposit is in the lower foothills of the Gabilan Mountains near Natividad School, at less than 1000 feet elevation. Production has continued since the war, and the dolomite is treated at the Moss Landing plant to make magnesian refractories.

    "Work began in August 1942 and at time of visit in December 1943 the quarry was 500 feet wide, had been extended 200 feet into the hill and had a face about 175 feet high. Every 2 to 3 months a series of 10 churn-drill holes was put down 50 feet and blasted with bag powder. A Marion 2 ½-cubic-yard electric shovel loaded trucks which delivered rock to the primary crusher just below the quarry floor on the west slope. Material under three-quarters of an inch was rejected here and left in a waste pile, as it carried considerable fine, thoroughly decomposed granite, which occurs in the quarry in the form of small offshoots or dikes from the underlying Santa Lucia granite. The coarser dolomite, which was white and quite pure, was carried by a large belt conveyor to the plant at the foot of the hill, in part for finer crushing and storage in bins from which it was taken by belt conveyors to two 8- by 300-foot rotary kilns, and in part for shipment as crude dolomite. The portion that was calcined at 2000 degrees Fahrenheit was taken by truck 12 miles to the company's plant at Moss Landing, Monterey County, where it was treated with sea water, resulting in replacement of the calcium by magnesium, so that after thickening and filtration a cake of nearly pure magnesium hydroxide was obtained. This was calcined, giving 96 percent MgO, which was hauled to the Permanente plant at Permanente, Santa Clara County, for making magnesium by the Hansgirg process…."

    "Crude dolomite was hauled 6 ½ miles by truck to a loading silo at the railroad at Salinas, for shipment to the steel plant. More than half a million tons of dolomite was produced from this quarry to the end of 1944. Waste in quarrying was high, running close to 50 percent. For making magnesium, the company desired dolomite carrying over 20 percent MgO (theoretically pure dolomite would carry 21.86 percent MgO). The following analysis from the company checks quite closely with those for San Benito County deposits.

    Analysis of dolomite, Permanente Metals Corporation

    CaO, 31.7 percent
    MgO, 20.5 percent
    SiO2, 1.0 percent
    Fe2O3, 0.2 percent
    Al2O3, 0.2 percent
    CO2, 46.4 percent

    "The deposit is on the Sterling and Salmos Ranches and was worked under lease with a sliding scale of royalty."

    Plate 28 - B. Permanente Metals Corporation Dolomite Quarry - Near Natividad School, Monterey County. Permanente Metals Corporation Dolomite Quarry
  • Salinas (east and southeast of), Monterey County, California - the Spreckels Sugar Company Limestone Quarries (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Spreckels Sugar Company, Salinas, owns several limestone quarries east and southeast of Salinas, located principally along Alisal Creek in the Rancho El Alisal and Rancho Cienega del Gabilan, about 6 miles from Salinas, in the belt west of the Gabilan range above described. The limestone is used in the beet-sugar factory. The rock is a very white, coarsely crystalline limestone, which makes an attractive white building stone, of which some rubble masonry has been made in Salinas.

    "An extensive deposit of limestone is reported in the Gabilan range, at the head of Chalone Creek, in the southeast corner of T. 17 S., R. 7 E., about 6 miles (air line) east from Metz, a station on the Southern Pacific Railroad."

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