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Los Angeles County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc. (Continued) *

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

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  • Hollywood (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - Brush Canyon Quarry (Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from “Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County,” by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Brush Canyon quarry; (Owner name, address) Los Angeles Stone Co., 1316 Baker-Detwilder Bldg., Los Angeles (1919). Union Rock Co., George A. Rogers, pres. (1921-1927); (Location) Sec. 35 (?), T. 1 N., R. 14 W., S.B. or 2 (?), T. 1 S., R. 14 W., S.B. ; (Remarks) East slope of Brush Canyon, about 2 miles northeast of Hollywood. Fine-grained crystalline rock quarried from excavation 200 ft. by 700 ft. by 150 ft. deep. Power shovel loaded railroad cars for transport to plant for crushing and screening. Crushed stone produced for concrete aggregate. Capacity about 1000 tons per day (1919); 16 employees (1927). Long idle. (Merrill 19:486; Tucker 21:322; 27:341-342.)

  • Largo Vista (south of), Los Angeles County, California - Amercal Mine (Limestone) (Excerpts from “Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County,” by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Amercal Mine. Location: sec. 19, T. 4 N., R. 8 W., and sec. 24, T. 4 N., R. 9 W., S.B.M., in Grandview Canyon, on the north base of the San Gabriel Mountains, about half a mile south of Largo Vista and about 23 airline miles southeast of Palmdale. Ownership: Amercal Mining Company, Inc., Robert L. Griffin, Jr., president, 16321 Lakewood, Bellflower, California, owns and works three unpatented claims.

    "The Amercal deposit, although not extensively developed, has yielded a modest tonnage of dolomitic rock for use as roofing granules since 1949. The rock is a dolomitic limestone. The deposit consists of several irregularly exposed bodies of the dolomitic rock in metamorphic rocks of the San Gabriel Mountains.

    "The rock being mined is coarsely crystalline and light gray to white. Bodies of it intimately interfinger with and are enclosed by a biotite-rich granitic rock which ranges in color from pink to gray and commonly has well-defined gneissic texture. Foliation planes in the gneissic phase generally strike N. 40 E. and dip 60 NW., but other attitudes are common.

    "The bodies of dolomitic limestone constituting the deposit are discontinuous in outcrop and irregularly distributed in the country rock. Where exposed in the pits the rock is fractured and its contact with the country rock disrupted by movement of the shattered rock. The discontinuity and fracturing of the rock are apparently related to movements on the San Andreas fault zone, about half a mile south of the deposit.

    "The body of rock now being mined (circa 1953) is at least 100 yards wide and a quarter of a mile long, but its extremities are hidden under alluvium. The deposit is mined by open-pit methods. Three pits have opened along the canyon bottom within a quarter of a mile of each other. The largest pit has a vertical face about 50 feet high, a base 50 feet wide, and has been cut about 40 feet into the hill. The other pits are slightly smaller.

    "For use in roofing granules the rock must be kept free of admixtures of overburden and country rock. Each pit is mined until separation of waste from desirable rock becomes unfeasible; then a new pit is opened. To move as infrequently as necessary, yet to mine only satisfactory rock is a continual problem in this area.

    "After the rock is drilled and blasted, it is sorted by bulldozer, loaded on trucks by diesel-powered shovel, and hauled three-quarters of a mile to a mill. There the rock is crushed in a 15 by 24 inch jaw crusher and a Sturdevant Gyro crusher, then elevated for treatment by screens and air blowers before dropping into bins for sacking. The roofing granules pass a 3/8-inch screen and are caught on a 10-mesh screen. The fines are sold as soil conditioner. The mill is compactly arranged in a single metal structure and has a capacity of about 30 tons a day. Four men handle the entire mining and milling operation."

    (Map No.) 160; (Claim, Mine or Group) Amercal; (Owner name, address) American Mining Co., Inc., Robert L. Griffin, pres., 16321 Lakewood, Bellflower; (Location) Sec. 19, T. 4 N., R. 8 W., S.B.M.; (Remarks) Grandview (Deadman) Canyon, north base of San Gabriel Mts., about 24 airline miles southeast of Palmdale.

  • Little Tujunga Canyon (east of), Los Angeles County, California - Hansen Dam Quarry (Granitic Rock/Broken Rock) (Excerpts from “Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County,” by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 180; (Claim, Mine or Group) Hansen Dam quarry; (Owner name, address) Operated by Guy F. Atkinson Construction Co., 22233 S. Santa Fe Ave., Long Beach; (Location) Sec. 27, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) South side of Gold Creek, about mile east of Little Tujunga Canyon, about 6 airline miles northeast of San Fernando. Area about mile by mile quarried to provide about 770,000 tons of granitic rock for facing, toe filling, and crib-rock for Hansen Flood-Control Dam., 1938-1940. Idle.

  • Llano, Los Angeles County, California - L. C. Tilghman (Lime) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906. No other information is given.)
  • Lomita (southwest of), Los Angeles County, California - Palos Verdes Limestone Deposit (Algal Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Palos Verdes Deposit. On the grant of the same name, in the San Pedro Hills southwest of Lomita, fossiliferous limestone was produced for 3 years, 1927-29 inclusive, by Torrance Lime & Fertilizer Company. It was used principally by Pioneer Compost Company and also by citrus fruit growers on adobe soils. Although stated to carry 70 percent CaCO3, an analysis quoted by Tucker (27, p. 328)* as having been made by Smith Emery & Company, showed the following:

    (* W. Burling Tucker, Los Angeles Field Division, "Los Angeles County," California Mining bureau Report 23, pp. 287-354, illus., 1927.)

    Fe2O3, 0.57 percent
    Al2O3, 0.74 percent
    CaO, 49.21 percent
    MgO, 2.26 percent
    (K2O, Na2O), 0.44 percent
    CO2, 39.23 percent
    P2O5, 0.73 percent
    Moisture (below 105 C.), 0.17 percent
    Combined water (over 165 C.), 2.89 percent
    Acid insoluble matter, 3.63 percent

    "These fossil beds are reported to be 30 feet thick and are covered by 12 feet of adobe soil. They are probably Quaternary (Pliocene)."

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California - Blue Diamond Corp. (Cement) (Excerpts from "California Mineral Commodities in 1951," California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, pp. Vol. 50, No. 1, January 1954, pp. 59-147. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Operator) Blue Diamond Corp.; (Address) 1650 S. Alameda St., Los Angeles 54; (Location) Los Angeles.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the California Marble Company (Marble)  (The following excerpt is from “Marble Produced in California” (PDF), in Rock Products:  Stone Edition, August 5, 1909, Vol. IX, No. 1, pp. 3.)

    “A number of unfinished jobs are still keeping the California quarries busy, and there is enough new work coming up from time to time to take up the surplus output.  Indeed, there is a tendency at present to enlarge the scope of operations and seek a wider market as an outlet for this state’s production of marble, which has so far been confined almost entirely to local use.  Quarry operators have been somewhat handicapped in the past by lack of sufficient capital to exploit the business in a large way, and several promising projects are still held back on this account, but some of the local concerns are coming to a point where they can look for some recognition outside of California....”

    “In 1908 Tuolumne county produced 23,000 cubic feet of marble valued at $46,000.  The only other California counties which in that year produced marble in commercial quantities were Ingo* and San Bernardino, whose output brought the total for the state to 31,400 cubic feet valued at $75,800.  That the quarrying of marble is a growing industry in California is shown by comparing the 1907 report of the state mining bureau with the report of 1906 quoted above.  In 1907, 37,512 cubic feet were produced, a gain of 6,000 cubic feet, the increase of the value in 1907 being $118,066.  In addition to the three counties listed in 1906, marble was quarried in Los Angeles, Riverside and San Diego counties in 1907.”

    (*  “Ingo” should be “Inyo,” which is located in Inyo County, California.)

    “The California Marble Company, of Los Angeles, Cal., are at present opening quarries in San Bernardino county and are installing a full line of machinery which they recently purchased in the East.”

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Colton Marble and Lime Company  (The company offices were in Los  Angeles, and the marble quarries were located near Colton in San Bernardino County, California.)

    See:  “Colton (near), San Bernardino County, California – the Colton Marble and Lime Company Quarries (circa 1887) (Marble)”

  • Los Angeles County, California - Fish Canyon Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Fish Canyon Quarry; Operator: Azusa Rock Inc.; Address & County: 3901 Fish Canyon Rd., Duarte, CA 91010-1600, Los Angeles County; Phone: (805) 856-6160; Latitude: 34.16, Longitude: -117.92, and Mine location number: Map No. 307; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Los Angeles (8 miles from), California - the Glendale Ranch, Verdugo Cañon (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "E. M. Ross, Glendale. On the Glendale ranch, Verdugo Cañon, 8 miles from Los Angeles, and three fourths of a mile from railroad, is a body of very dark hornblende biotite granite, somewhat banded (gneissic), taking a very high polish, and very well adapted for monument work and for trimming of the light-colored granites and marbles. No development work."

  • Los Angeles County, California - Fairchild-Gilmore-Wilton Co. (Macadam) (office) 204 Bryson Block, Los Angeles (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Fairchild-Gilmore-Wilton Co., Los Angeles. Official owner located at: 204 Bryson Block, Los Angeles. (No other information is given.)

  • Los Angeles County, California –  Granite Quarry (circa 1891)  (from transcription of Stones for Building and Decoration (pdf), by George P. Merrill, Curator for Geology in the United States National Museum, J. Wiley & Sons, 1891, pp. 182.
  • “A fine-grained, very light-gray granite of excellent appearance, said to be found on the line of the California Railroad between Los Angeles and Cucamonga, is beginning to be used in Los Angeles.  In texture it is as fine as the finest Westerly, (Rhode Island), or Manchester (Virginia) stone, and of a uniform light gray color.  A coarser stone, carrying abundant hornblende and black mica, is found also at Sawpit Cañon, in the same county.  It works readily, but contains too much hornblende, and also too many small crystals of sphene, to be of value for fine monumental work.”

  • Los Angeles County, California - H. Clement & Co. - Sandstone Quarry leased by H. Clement & Co. (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "H. Clement & Co., 2124 Bay street, Los Angeles, lease part of the quarry of the California Construction Company in Sec. 13, T. 2 N., R. 17 W., S. B. M., west of the main quarry. They produce dimension stone. The stone is similar in character to that in the quarry of the California Construction Company. The bed worked at present is from 20 to 25 feet thick, dipping about 20 degrees northwesterly. The rock is worked with plugs and feathers. The gray rock has not as yet been reached in this quarry."

  • Los Angeles County, California - Livingston-Graham, Irwindale (Rock) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: Livingston-Graham, Irwindale; Operator: Livingston-Graham; Address & County: 13550 Live Oak Ave., Irwindale, CA 91706, Los Angeles County; Phone: (818) 960-5471; Latitude: 34.10, Longitude: -117.99, and Mine location number: Map No. 311; Mineral commodity: Rock.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Livingston Rock and Gravel Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    The following information is from the table entitled, "Producers Active in 1952" from the "Broken and Crushed Stone" section:

    (Name of Operator) Livingston Rock & Gravel Co., Palos Verdes Crushed Rock, 3366 Cherry Ave., Long Beach (Plant in Palos Verdes Hills); (Location) Secs. 9, 16, T. 5 S., R. 14 W., S.B. proj.; (History of Operation) Operated at various times for many years by different companies. Livingston active since 1948; (Geological Data/Type of deposit) Altered Miocene basalt and minor sediments, including dolomitic rock and shale; (Mining Data/Holding) (blank); (Mining Data/Equipment and haulage) 2 -yd. diesel shovel loads trucks for - -mile haul to plant. After crushing, 10-yd. trucks haul 4 miles to barges for transport to harbor area; (Approximate size of Excavation/Width/Length/Depth) 500 ft. x several thousand ft. x 100 ft. max. (a series of adjacent excavations; Processing Data: (Crushing classification, washing) 30 x 42-in. jaw, 54 x 42-in. and 42 x 22-in. roll crushers; mechanical screens; (Products) Crusher run base: fines to 1 in.; 1-in. to 3-in. crushed stone for fill base, etc., Largest is 6" rock; (Reported capacity) (blank); (Number of employees) About 15 (2 shifts); (Remarks) Blasting by 30-ft. holes in 60-ft. benches. Selection of rock from different parts of quarry to meet requirements.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Los Angeles County Quarry (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Los Angeles County quarry - See San Dimas Rock Co. (Merrill 19:486.)

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California - the Los Angeles Fireproof Cement Company (Cement Factory) (from The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Los Angeles Fireproof Cement Company, J. E. brown, 318 Grant Building, Los Angeles, manufactures a cement out of sawdust, sand, and Portland cement. The works are located in Garvanza. The material is mixed by hand. Capacity, about 20 tons per day.”

  • Los Angeles County, California - McCaslin Materials Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 185; (Claim, Mine or Group) McCaslin Materials Co.; (Owner name, address) McCaslin Materials Co. 450 Potrero Grande Dr., Monterey Park (1953); (Location) Sec. 35, T. 1 S., R. 12 W., S.B., proj.; (Remarks) Montebellow Hills, just northwest of Potrero Grande Dr., about 1 mile northeast of Garfield Ave. - 3d St., corner.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Monterey Park Granite Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 186; (Claim, Mine or Group) Monterey Park Granite Co.; (Owner name, address) Monterey Park Granite Co., Inc., 1310 S. Garfield Ave., Monterey Park (1953); (Location) Secs. 27, 34, T. 1 S., R. 12 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Montebello Hills, just east of Garfield Ave., about 1 mile north of 3d St.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Mulholland DG Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 187; (Claim, Mine or Group) Mulholland DG Co.; (Owner name, address) Mulholland DG Co., 5032 Landershim Blvd., North Hollywood; (Location) Sec. 35, T. 1 N., R. 16 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Monica Mts., just south of Mulholland Drive, about mile east of a line extended due south of Reseda Blvd.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Owl Rock Products Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 188; (Claim, Mine or Group) Owl Rock Products Co.; (Owner name, address) Owl Rock Products Co., P.O. Box 187, Monrovia; (Location) Sec. 36, T. 1 S., R. 12 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Montebello Hills, just south of Arroyo Drive, about mile northwest of San Gabriel Blvd. No data released for publication.

  • Los Angeles County, California - Reynolds Crushed Gravel Co. (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 189; (Claim, Mine or Group) Reynolds Crushed Gravel Co.; (Owner name, address) Reynolds Crushed Gravel Co., 914 N. Humphrey, Los Angeles (1952); (Location) Secs. 30, 31, T. 1 S., T 12 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Repetto Hills, north end of Cordova Ave. (N. Humphreys), about mile southwest of L.A. Co. Sheriff's pistol range. Poorly sorted, unconsolidated sandy conglomerate of Pleistocene La Habra formation (?) strikes west, dips 40-60 S. Granitic rock types, largely decomposed. Pit 800 ft. long, 150 ft. wide, 50 ft. deep mined with 1-yard diesel shovel, hauled by trucks, reduced injaw crusher. After many years activity became inactive in 1952 because of excessive clay content.

  • Los Angeles County, California - San Dimas Rock Co. (Los Angeles County Quarry) (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) San Dimas Rock Co. (Los Angeles County quarry); (Owner name, address) San Dimas Rock Co. (prior to 1919); (Location) Sec. "Approx.," T. 1 N., R. 9 W., S.B.; (Remarks) San Dimas. Rock plant acquired by L.A. County prior to 1919 for employment of prisoners. (Merrill 19:486.)

  • Los Angeles County, California - the Southern Pacific Railway Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Southern Pacific Railroad Quarry, in Sec. 12, T. 2 N., R. 17 W., S. B. M., near the eastern end of the middle tunnel; leased to C. Bertelson, 1307 West Ninth street, Los Angeles; produces dimension stone similar in character to the Chatsworth sandstone. The stone is broken down by hand-drilling and blasting with black powder and split with wedges. It is rather coarse-grained, heavily bedded. The gray stone has not been reached in this quarry. The quarry is equipped with a derrick, moved by the horse-power. Capacity, 25 tons (one carload) per day. Nine men are employed."

  • Los Angeles County, California - West Slope Construction Co. (Broken Rock/Granitic Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) West Slope Construction Co.; (Owner name, address) West Slope Construction Co., Azusa (1936); (Location) (blank); (Remarks) Location undetermined. More than 7 million yards of granitic rock produced about 1936 in sizes up to 2 tons for use in the San Gabriel Dam project. No commercial production. Long idle. (Sampson, R. J., unpublished report, 1937.)

  • Pacoima Canyon (a ridge northwest of), Los Angeles County, California - Baughman Dolomite Deposit (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Baughman dolomite deposit is in secs. 7 and 18, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B., on a ridge northwest of Pacoima Canyon. This is a belt of white crystalline dolomite, originally reported to be 3000 feet long and 300 feet wide. Actual dimensions of the outcrop are not over one-quarter those indicated. Strike is west-northwest and dip steeply toward the north."

    • Pacoima Canyon (north side of), Los Angeles County, California - Baughman Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Map No.) 161; (Claim, Mine or Group) Baughman deposit; (Owner name, address) Will Baughman et al., 141 W. Ave. 30, Los Angeles 31; (Location) Sec. 7, 18, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.M.M.; (Remarks) North side of Pacoima Canyon, about 6 airline miles north - miles northeast of San Fernando. Belt of white crystalline dolomite about 1,000 ft. long and 100 ft. wide dips steeply northward. Explored by shallow open cuts in 1920's. No production. Idle. (Logan 47:250; Oakeshott 37:244; Sampson 37:202; Tucker 27:322.)

  • Pacoima Canyon (northwest of), Los Angeles County, California - Wilson Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Wilson deposit; (Owner name, address) Mr. Wilson (1888); (Location) Sec. "Approx.", T. 3 N., R. 15 W., S.B.; (Remarks) San Gabriel Mts., about 2 miles northwest of Pacoima Canyon. Crystalline limestone body in mica schist and gneissoid rocks. No lime produced for many years prior to 1919. Idle. (Goodyear 88:342; Merrill 19:487.)

  • Pacoima Canyon, Los Angeles County, California - Wragg Ranch Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 172; (Claim, Mine or Group) Wragg Ranch Deposit; (Owner name, address) George A. Mitchell, Glendale. Operated by Leo. I. Gordon, 6742 Kraft Ave., North Hollywood (1941); (Location) Sec. 18, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Pacoima Canyon, about 6 miles northeast of San Fernando. Slide boulders of white dolomitic limestone crushed for poultry grits. Yielded 400 tons 1940-1941. Idle since.

  • Palos Verdes Hills, Los Angeles County, California - Livingston Rock and Gravel Company Quarry (Basalt) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "In the western Palos Verdes Hills the Livingston Rock and Gravel Company has produced several sizes of crushed stone, mainly smaller than 6 inches. The principal tonnage in 1952 was crusher-run base of minus 1 1/8-inch size. The rock in the quarry is chiefly middle Miocene altered basalt (Woodring, Bramlette, and Kew, 1946, pl. 1) but dolomitic limestone and Monterey shale of the same age border the pit and also occur as lenses, and are sometimes mined. Benches of 60 feet high are drilled and blasted. Broken stone is loaded in trucks by power shovels and carried to the mill. A large jaw crusher, several rolls, and appropriate screens produce the sizes of stone desired. Much of the product is loaded on barges for use in the harbor area as core rock in dikes. Some uncrushed pieces are used for riprap."

    (Map No.) 181; (Claim, Mine or Group) Livingston Rock & Gravel Co.; (Owner name, address) (blank); (Location) Sec. 9, 16, T. 5 S., R. 14 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Southwest slope of Palos Verdes Hills, overlooking Portuguese Bend, about 4 miles northwest of Pt. Fermin. (Rock Products 49a:68-69, 85.)

  • Palos Verdes Hills (east slope of), Los Angeles County, California - Lomita Quarry (Palos Verdes Deposit, Torrance Lime & Fertilizer Co. (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 168; (Claim, Mine or Group) Lomita quarry (Palos Verdes deposit, Torrance Lime & Fertilizer Co.; (Owner name, address) Torrance Lime and Fertilizer Co., Frank Samons, pres., Torrance (1927); (Location) Sec. 34, T. 4 S., R. 14 W., S.B. Proj.; (Remarks) East slope of Palos Verdes Hills, about 1 mile southwest of Lomita. Fossiliferous Pleistocene marl and limestone beds 30 ft. thick dip 30 northwestward under 12 ft. of overburden. Nodules of phosphorite present in marl. Mined 1927-1929 from open pit 300 ft. long, 200 ft. wide, 60 ft. high, with dragline scraper. Crushed in 100-ton plant on property for use as soil conditioner and fertilizer. Total production undetermined. Idle. (Logan 47:249; Sampson 37:206; Tucker 27:328; Woodring 46:120.)

  • Palos Verdes Hills (east slope of), Los Angeles County, California - Palos Verdes Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Palos Verdes Deposit - See Lomita quarry. (Logan 47:249.)

  • Palos Verdes Hills (east slope of), Los Angeles County, California - Torrance Lime & Fertilizer Co. (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Torrance Lime & Fertilizer Co. - See Lomita quarry. (Sampson 37:206.)

  • Pasadena (northwestern), Los Angeles County, California - Devil's Gate (Crushed Granite) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Devil's Gate; (Owner name, address) Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad (1906); (Location) Sec. 7 (?), T. 1 N., R. 12 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Devil's Gate, northwestern Pasadena. Granite rock quarried and crushed for railroad ballast (1906). Inactive. (Aubury 06:28.)

  • San Fernando (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - Goodan Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 163; (Claim, Mine or Group) Goodan deposit; (Owner name, address) Goodan Co., Roger Goodan, pres., 2550 Aberdeen, Los Angeles (1951); (Location) Sec. 28, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) South side of Limerock Canyon, about 6 miles northeast of San Fernando. Bodies of dolomitic limestone associated with graphitic schist in San Gabriel metamorphic complex. Small tonnage produced and crushed for poultry grits 1945-1947; idle since 1947. See American Graphite Co. in graphite section.

  • San Fernando Station (8 miles from), Los Angeles County, California –  Henley Sandstone quarried 8 miles from the San Fernando Station circa 1891 (from transcription of Stones for Building and Decoration (pdf), by George P. Merrill, Curator for Geology in the United States National Museum, J. Wiley & Sons, 1891.

    “In the Santa Susanna Mountains, about eight miles from San Fernando Station in Los Angeles County and on the Southern Pacific Railroad occur inexhaustible deposits of coarse and fine yellowish sandstone and which are now being worked from bowlders by a Los Angeles company.  Prof. Jackson reports* the coarse variety, when treated as above, as absorbing 5.33 per cent of water, and losing on treatment with acid fumes 7.3 per cent of its weight by disintegration, besides becoming discolored.  Highly heated the stone changed to a beautiful brownish red, but did not crack or scale when dropped into cold water.  The finer-grained variety from this source is described as a beautiful evenly fine-grained stone, of nearly uniform light grayish yellow color, minutely specked with black and silver-white mica scales.  This variety absorbed 6.19 per cent of water and in the acid fumes lost by disintegration 16.9 per cent of its weight besides staining yellowish in spots.  In the heat test it behaved as did the coarser variety.  The Henley sandstone is described as a moderately fine grained light bluish gray stone, showing to the unaided eye, dark gray and whitish quartz granules with numerous black and few white mica scales, held together by an argillaceous and calcareous cement.  The absorption of water was 4.07 per cent.  In the acid fumes it lost by disintegration 5.55 per cent, and changed to a bright yellow color.  In the muffle samples at full red heat turned to a brownish red color, cracked and scaled somewhat, but underwent no further change when dropped in cold water.  The stone is stated to work readily, and as shown by the specimens is free from flaws.  The beds as above noted are quarried near Henley, at a point within one mile of Hornbroke Station on the California and Oregon Railroad.  The supply is inexhaustible.”

  • (*  Seventh Annual Report State Mineralogist of California, 1887, p. 209.)

  • San Fernando (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - Hilltop (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 165; (Claim, Mine or Group) Hilltop; (Owner name, address) Frank A. Neher (1936); (Location) Secs. 21, 28, T 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) North side of Limerock Canyon, about 6 miles northeast of San Fernando. Bodies of light-colored dolomitic limestone in metamorphic rocks of San Gabriel complex. Developed by open cuts in 1940's. Production smell but undetermined. Idle.

  • San Fernando (east of), Los Angeles County, California - Lincoln Service Corp. (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 167; (Claim, Mine or Group) Lincoln Service Corp.; (Owner name, address) Hewitt R. Taylor, 5853 Troost Ave., North Hollywood (1930); (Location) Sec. 27, T. 3 N., 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) East side of Little Tujunga Canyon, about 6 airline miles east of San Fernando (Independent American Mica claims). Dolomitic limestone at contact with granitic rock mined for poultry grits and roofing granules. Several hundred tons produced 1924-1930. Idle.

  • San Fernando (east of), Los Angeles County, California - Ramelli Limestone Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Ramelli deposit is in sec. 17, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B., at 2200 feet elevation. It is reported to be 300 feet long by 50 feet wide."

    • San Fernando (east of), Los Angeles County, California - Ramelli (White Crystal) (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Map No.) 169; (Claim, Mine or Group) Ramelli (White Crystal); (Owner name, address) Leo I. Gordon, 6742 Kraft Ave., North Hollywood (1943); (Location) Secs. 16, 17, T. 3 N., R. 14 W.; (Remarks) West side of head of Little Tujunga Canyon, about 6 miles northeast of San Fernando. Belt of white crystalline dolomitic limestone about 50 ft. wide and 300 ft. long dips moderately northward in granitic rock.

  • San Fernando (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - San Fernando Dolomitic Limestone Deposits (Dolomitic Limestone/Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "San Fernando deposit is in sec. 19, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B., about 3000 feet southeast of Pacoima dam. Some work has been done on it."

    "Gordon B. Oakeshott (37, pp. 220-221) has described some small deposits of dolomitic limestone, some of it approaching true dolomite. These are roof pendants and inclusions, representing the remains of what he thinks were once a thick and extensive deposit. He places them in the Placerita meta-sediments, (Carboniferous ?). The deposits are in T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B., a few miles north of San Fernando.

    (* Gordon B. Oakeshott, "Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Western San Gabriel Mountains, Los Angeles County," California Division of Mines Report 33, pp. 215-249, 7 figs, pl. 3, 1937.)

    "The following is quoted from Oakeshott's article:

    "'.Megascopically, it is usually a medium- to coarse-grained white marble. Crystals of calcite up to a half inch in length are common. Fine-grained limestone is found, but all of it has been recrystallized. Not all of it is pure calcite, but much of it indicates by color and composition derivation from calcareous argillaceous and arenaceous sediments. One of the commonest accessory minerals is graphite which occurs in small flakes in the limestone on varying percentages. Near the contacts with intruding diorite and granodiorite, contact metamorphic minerals are often developed. Particularly common are tremolite, brown and red garnet, epidote and diopside...A small percentage...is strongly zoned and is probably dolomite. However, typical dolomite rhombs are not present. The mineral composition indicates derivation from a dolomitic limestone carrying a small percentage of clay...."

    • San Fernando (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - San Fernando Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Map No.) 170; (Claim, Mine or Group) San Fernando deposit; (Owner name, address) Henry P. Dixon, 3475 East Randolph St., Huntington Park; (Location) Sec. 19, 3 N., R 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Limekiln Canyon, about 4 miles northeast of San Fernando. Body of white crystalline dolomitic limestone several hundred ft. wide and several thousand ft. long dips northward in granitic rock. Active to undetermined extent in 1800's; lime burned nearby. Long idle. (Logan 47:250; Oakeshott 37:244; Sampson 37:203; Tucker 27;322.)

  • San Fernando (northeast of), Los Angeles County, California - Turner Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Turner Deposit; (Owner name, address) Dr. J. S. Turner (1919); (Location) Sec. "approx.", T. 3 N., R. 15 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Pacoima Canyon, about 3 miles northeast of San Fernando. Crystalline limestone of variable purity, in granitic rock. Production undetermined. No activity reported since 1872. (Goodyear 88:340-341; Merrill 19:487.)

  • San Fernando (east of), Los Angeles County, California - White Crystal (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    White Crystal - See Ramelli.

  • San Francisquito Canyon, Los Angeles County, California - Blue Goose (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 194; (Claim, Mine or Group) Blue Goose; (Owner name, address) Robert and Mary Cox, 1975 Lundy Ave., Pasadena (1953); (Location) Sec. 11, T. 5 N., R. 16 W., S.B., (Remarks) San Francisquito Canyon, about mile southwest of Power House No. 2. Fissile silver-gray Pelona schist produced from quarry face 100 ft. high, 100 ft. wide. Intermittent production of flagstone and wall rock since about 1924 by various lessees. Total production about 100 tons.

  • San Francisquito Canyon, Los Angeles County, California - Raggio's Franciscan Quarry & Silver Sheen Quarry (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 202; (Claim, Mine or Group) Raggio's Franciscan & Silver Sheen Quarries; (Owner name, address) Frank P. Raggio, Frt. 2, Box 353, Saugus (1953); (Location) Sec. 11, T. 5 N., R. 16 W., S.B.; (Remarks) San Francisquito Canyon, about airline mile north of Power House No. 2, about 8 airline miles north of Saugus. Gray Pelona schist removed from 2 quarries about 50 ft. square, 100 yards apart across San Francisquito Creek. Several hundred tons of flagstone and building stone produced in intermittent operations since 1924.

  • San Francisquito Canyon, Los Angeles County, California - Raggio's Silver Sheen Quarry (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Silver Sheen Quarry - See Raggio's Franciscan Quarry above.

  • San Francisquito Canyon and Bee Canyon (junction of), Los Angeles County, California - Deem (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 196; (Claim, Mine or Group) Deem; (Owner name, address) Charles M. Deem, Box 332, Rt. 2, Saugus (1953); (Location) Sec. 34, T. 6 N., R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) South slope of juncture of Bee and San Francisquito Canyons, about 11 airline miles north of Saugus. Fractured gray Pelona schist quarried by hand methods from face 100 ft. long, 40 ft. high. Several hundred tons of total production in intermittent operations since quarry operated in late 1940's.

  • San Francisquito Canyon and Bouquet Canyon (between), Los Angeles County, California - Hoffman (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 199; (Claim, Mine or Group) Hoffman; (Owner name, address) Samuel L. Hoffman, 417 S. Boyle Av., Los Angeles (1952); (Location) Sec. 35, T. 6 N., R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Del Sur Ridge, between Bouquet and San Francisquito Canyons, about 12 airline miles northeast of Saugus. Gray Pelona schist exposed in shallow workings. Production undetermined but small. Idle in 1952.

  • San Francisquito Canyon and Bouquet Canyon (between), Los Angeles County, California - Perry (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 200; (Claim, Mine or Group) Perry; (Owner name, address) Roger C. Perry, 195 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena (1952); (Location) Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 15 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Del Sur Ridge, between Bouquet and San Francisquito Canyons, about 10 airline miles northeast of Saugus. Pelona schist exposed in shallow workings. Production undetermined but small. Idle in 1952.

  • San Francisquito Canyon and Bouquet Canyon (between), Los Angeles County, California - Poteet (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 201; (Claim, Mine or Group) Poteet; (Owner name, address) Don Poteet, 630 Flower Ave., Venice (1953); (Location) Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 15 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Del Sur Ridge, between Bouquet and San Francisquito Canyons, about 11 airline miles northeast of Saugus. Flat-lying, fissile, blue-gray Pelona schist exposed in area about 100 yards square by bulldozer, hand work. Production undetermined but small. Intermittently active in 1952.

  • San Francisquito Canyon and Bouquet Canyon (between), Los Angeles County, California - Switzer No. 1 (Schist/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 203; (Claim, Mine or Group) Switzer No. 1; (Owner name, address) L. Glen Switzer, 3464 E. Foothill Blvd., Pasadena (1952); (Location) Sec. 3, T. 5 N., R. 15 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Del Sur Ridge, between Bouquet and San Francisquito Canyons, about 11 airline miles northeast of Saugus. Flatlying, fissile Pelona schist exposed in shallow workings about 100 ft. by 200 ft. Production undetermined but small. Active in 1952.

  • San Gabriel Mountains (north flank of), Los Angeles County, California - Breslin Greenstone Quarry (Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Breslin greenstone quarry; (Owner name, address) Gene Breslin, Little Rock (1927); (Location) Sec. 19, T. 5 N., R. 11 W., S.B.; (Remarks) North flank of San Gabriel Mts., about 2 airline miles east of Vincent, about 6 airline miles southeast of Palmdale. Green Tertiary Escondido (Vasquez) basalt ('diabase') quarried by 3 employees; ground to coarse sand for roofing material in Los Angeles (1927). Inactive since before 1931. Idle. (Simpson 34:411; Tucker 27:332.)

  • San Gabriel Mountains (south flank of), Los Angeles County, California - Lordsburg Deposit (Gneiss/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Lordsburg deposit; (Owner name, address) Undetermined; (Location) Sec. 26, T. 1 N., R 9 W., S.B.; (Remarks) South flank of San Gabriel Mts., about 4 miles east of Glendora. Red, fine-grained eruptive rock bordered by red gneiss quarried for building stone (1890). Idle. (Preston 90a:209.)

  • San Gabriel Mountains (north flank of), Los Angeles County, California - Nickel Greenstone Quarry (Broken/Crushed Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Nickel greenstone quarry; (Owner name, address) R. E. Nickel, Acton (1927). Leased to R. C. Sides, Hollywood; (Location) Secs. 21, 28, T. 5 N., R. 11 W., S.B.; (Remarks) North flank of San Gabriel Mts., about 4 airline miles east of Vincent and about 1 mile northwest of Little Rock Reservoir. Green Tertiary Escondido basalt "diabase" exposure 500 ft. by 1000 ft. mined in 4 places. Crushed and screened in plant with 25 tons per day capacity, operated by 3 men. Several sizes of crushed stone, about sand size, product for roofing materials. Idle. (Simpson 34:411; Tucker 27:322.)

  • Santa Catalina Island (Los Angeles County), California – Serpentine Quarry and Mill & ancient Olla or Mortar Site (Photographs from the Scientific American, Vol. LXXXI, No. 25, December 16, 1899 , pp. 393-394) (The article below, “A California Verde Antique Quarry” is also available in PDF format.)

    A California Verde Antique Quarry

    By Prof. Charles F. Holder

    “The question whether we are advancing in the mechanical arts and great schemes of engineering is often suggested when we are confronted with the work of the ancients. The pyramids are the most stupendous works of man ever contemplated and there appears to be nothing new under the sun. Interest in irrigation in the Southwest dawned within the past twenty years, yet in Arizona and New Mexico there are traces of a civilization so old that the mind falters in following it back. We see beds of streams cut through miles of country, even mountain ranges, and a maze of irrigation streams crossing and recrossing the land, made unknown ages in the past years, so perfect from an engineering standpoint that the experts of to-day are emptying them of the sand and debris of centuries and using them as the arteries that shall bring new life to this fertile part of what was the old American Desert. Everywhere we follow in the steps of the ancients, and on the island of Santa Catalina there is an interesting illustration of this.

    “When the whites first visited Southern California, they found in use among all the mainland Indians richly shaped ollas or mortars of steatite or serpentine, while scores of articles were formed of finer grades of the same, which experts have pronounced verde antique. In almost every grave ollas were found, and hundred had been handed down and were in the possession of the Mexican descendants of the Indians. There were flat stones, perforated to hang on pegs, quaint ornaments, sculpturings of various animals and tally stones with lines cut in them. One found by the writer at Santa Cruz Island on the breast of skeleton bore fifty or more straight marks – which might have been the man’s age – and were all that could be made out.

    “Verde antique was valuable, and a search was made for the point of supply. Finally Prof. Schumacher, of the Smithsonian, discovered it on Santa Catalina Island , which lies off Southern California, in a locality named Pott’s Valley, about fifteen miles from the little town of Avalon. Prof. Schumacher found on this island a perfect treasure house, and carried to the National Museum hundreds of objects representing the ancient California islanders. All the islands of this group were inhabited by a hardy race that had camps in every cañon where there was water, and Santa Catalina abounds in kitchen middens and places where these people live. That they were a commercial …ace is shown by the ollas they made, and they were the merchants who supplied the races of Southern California with their pots and mortars or ollas.

    “Prof. Schumacher’s attention was attracted at Pott’s Valley by the remarkable rock shown in the accompanying illustration, where the scars of ollas that have been broken off by the islanders are plainly seen. The rock is a lofty mass of steatite that rises in the center of Pott’s Valley, now called Empire Landing. It is a land-mark from a long distance at sea, and is overgrown and surrounded with cactus and various kinds of vegetation; indeed, the cactus hides a large portion of it – an almost impregnable chevaux de fries. The scars are circular and are the marks where the round ollas were broken off. The method of work was very primitive, the natives having only slate and quartz knives to work with. With these rude implements they carved out an object the shape of a cannon ball and as a large as a football. Gradually this was picked away until, finally, it hung by a narrow stem, which was broken off. The inside was then slowly dug out with the same rude tools, and in time the olla acquired the smooth and often artistic form so familiar in all the museum collections. The common shape is round, but fine mortar shapes three feet in height are not unusual.

    “The Round scars indicate the places from which the ollas were broken by the Indians.” (1899)

    “The Round scars indicate the places from which the ollas were broken by the Indians.”

    “The writer some weeks ago went over this old manufactory very carefully and found it most interesting. Here was an aboriginal manufactory – an out-door workshop – in the immediate vicinity of which were found verde antique implements in various stages from the olla just outlined to the one that had been broken off leaving the scars in the rock. In a word, the complete evolution of the olla could be traced here, especially at the head of Cottonwood Cañon, back of Pott’s Valley, where verde antique crops out in ledges in every direction. On many of these can be seen the work of the native carvers, while beneath are the piles and heaps of chips as they were left centuries ago.

    “The early Spanish Navigators, Cabrillo and Viscaino, who discovered the island three hundred years ago, described the fine canoes of the natives. These, laden with ollas, crossed the Santa Catalina channel, and the natives exchanged them for game and skins not found here. The present owners of the island, recognizing the value of the stone for commercial purposes, have followed out the mute suggestion of the ancients by establishing at Empire Landing a sawing plant, opening up a valuable quarry and one that is unique, it is believed, having no prototype at least in this country. The verde antique resembles soapstone in the crude rock and would easily escape observation. If is of different degrees of hardness and while so soft that it can be readily worked, it has great tensile strength, its chief value being in the remarkable manner in which it can be worked. Almost every possible object can be made from it from a boat to a screw. A great value lies in its imitation when polished of the darker grades of marble; and owing to its cheapness and durability it is in demand among architects for mantles, lining, electrical slabs, and where a perfectly polished surface is required with the strength of marble. The new city hall of Los Angeles and many of the fine buildings in that city and San Francisco are finished in it, the stone taking a rich polish, abounding in greens and yellows, grays and black.

    “Serpentine Quarry and Mill, Santa Catalina Island, Cal.” (1899)

    “Serpentine Quarry and Mill, Santa Catalina Island, Cal.”

    “A visit to this quarry is most interesting. Here, eight or nine hundred feet above the sea, is an elaborate plant and a series of saws that are capable of cutting out hundreds of feet of verde antique a week. The rock is first bored into with a steam rock drill, a modern improvement on the flint chips of the ancient owners of the soil. A series of borings make it an easy matter to break off the slab, which is then by means of a huge crane lowered upon a car and run under the saws and blocked for cutting. The term saw would be misleading to the layman, as it is really a gang saw with blunt surface, and worked by the steam engine moves back and forth on the edge of the stone, not touching it, but cutting by the grinding into it of a mass of steel shot which are really the teeth of the saw. The rapidity with which this is accomplished is marvelous, and large slabs are cut out with ease – huge slabs for the side of a wall, fronts for fireplaces, aquarium sides or plates, tiles for flooring, etc. All the tanks of the Geological Station here were made from this stone, which apparently solves the question of producing a cheap but attractive aquarium one so far as the tanks are concerned that can be built rapidly. The stone is cut into the proper shape and shipped to Los Angeles , where it is polished and applied to many purposes, and its development has become one of the valuable industries of Southern California.”
  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Stone Quarries on Santa Catalina Island (Conglomerate, Graywacke, Dioritic Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Several types of stone have been quarried on Santa Catalina Island. At the Pebbly Beach quarry of Connolly-Pacific Company, south of Avalon, compact metamorphosed conglomerate and graywacke is quarried in blocks as large as 35 tons. The stone is blasted from 150- to 200-foot faces by coyote-hole methods, with secondary blasting of large pieces. Diesel shovels load 15-yard trucks, which dump in huge metal boxes called skips. A crane of 30-ton capacity sets the loaded skips on barges. Larger pieces are handled in chain slings.

    "At the Empire quarry of Graham Brothers, Inc., partly decomposed dioritic rock is quarried. Little blasting is required. the product is generally of smaller size than at the Pebby Beach quarry. A 100-foot face has been excavated by a diesel shovel which loads trucks for the short haul to the crusher. Stone larger than 12 inches goes over a grizzly and rolls downhill to the loading beach. Minus 12-inch stone is crushed and sorted to required sizes. A walking Monighan that has a 135-foot boom loads all stone to barges of about 1,000-ton capacity. Tugs haul the barges to the mainland in 5 to 7 hours."

  • Santa Catalina Island, California - Empire Landing - the Banning Company Serpentine Quarry and Soapstone Deposit (Serpentine & Soapstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Banning Company, 593 Pacific Electric Building, Los Angeles, owns a quarry in a belt of serpentine, at Empire Landing, Santa Catalina Island, on the east coast, about 12 miles from Avalon. The serpentine is very dark green and occurs in that part of the island in bunches, in conjunction with soapstone and steatite, from which a very good material for ornamental, sanitary, and electrical purposes is obtained. It can be worked out into very thin slabs and even used for open work, and takes a very fine polish. (See XIIth Report, California State Mining Bureau, p. 402; also XIIIth ibid p. 639.)"

    "Banning Company, 593 Pacific Electric Building, Los Angeles. At Empire Landing, Santa Catalina Island, soapstone is found in conjunction with the serpentine. It has a grayish color and can be easily worked...Steatite (French chalk) of a good grade is also found in the same vicinity."

    • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - the Banning Company Quarry (Serpentine and Steatite) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part IV. Los Angeles County, Orange County, Riverside County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 465-589. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "(Report X, p. 280; R. XII, p. 402; R. XIII, p. 639; Bull. 38, p. 147.)

      "On Santa Catalina Island, which is owned by the Banning Company, 594 Pacific Electric Bldg., Los Angeles, is a deposit of serpentine, formerly worked commercially under lease by F. C. Carey, 772 San Fernando Street, Los Angeles. The deposit is about a mile from Empire Landing on the north shore of the island and in a depression known as Potts' Valley.

      "The rock is fibrous in structure but takes a fine polish. There are two varieties, hard and soft. The soft variety may be sawed into slabs of any length. The hard variety is worked with ordinary stonecutter's tools. This stone has been used in several buildings in Los Angeles for ornamental, sanitary and electrical purposes, also for lining fireplaces. The dark green columns at the entrance to the Henne Building are of this material. Sanitary slabs and electrical insulators manufactured from this stone are said to give great satisfaction. The soft variety was supplied in slabs one inch thick f.o.b. Los Angeles, for 75 cents a running foot. The hard variety was supplied in similar slabs at the rate of $2.50 a running foot. The quarry has not been worked since 1913.

      "Near the south side of the isthmus on this island there is also a large body of steatite. It is said that about 400 tons of this rock were supplied every year to plasterers, soap factories, druggists, and foundry-men, but it has not been worked for about eight years."

      Trachyte on Santa Catalina Island

      "This volcanic rock, consisting chiefly of orthoclase feldspar, has been quarried on Santa Catalina Island, between Avalon and Empire Landing, according to the following note made 1894. (See The Lang Quarry entry below.)

    • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - the Banning Quarry (Talcose Serpentine) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Facing stone was produced prior to 1914 from talcose serpentine rock at the Banning quarry on Santa Catalina Island, and used for monumental, sanitary, and electrical purposes."

    • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Banning (Empire Landing Quarry (Serpentine/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Map No.) 205; (Claim, Mine or Group) Banning (Empire Landing) quarry; (Owner name, address) Santa Catalina Island Co., Avalon (1953); (Location) Sec. 4 (?), T. 9 S, R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island, about 1 mile south of Empire Landing, about 9 airline miles northwest of Avalon. Fibrous green serpentine rock bearing tremolite-actinolite in part altered to talc, suitable for polishing. Quarry yields both hard and soft commercial stone. The soft material was sawed into slabs 1-inch thick but the hard material was worked with stonecutter's tools. Used for ornamental, sanitary, and electrical purposes. Eighty employees reported in 1896. Inactive since 1913. (Aubury 06:147; Crawford 94:402; Merrill 19:483; Preston 90b;280; Tucker 27:331.)

  • Santa Catalina Island (southeast of Avalon), Los Angeles County, California - Connolly-Pacific (Pebbly Beach) Quarry (Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 178; (Claim, Mine or Group) Connolly-Pacific (Pebbly Beach) quarry; (Owner name, address) (blank); (Location) Sec. 11(?), T. 10 S., R. 14 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island, Jewfish Pt., about 2 miles southeast of Avalon.

    The following information is from the table entitled, "Producers Active in 1952" from the "Broken and Crushed Stone" section:

    (Name of Operator) Connolly-Pacific Co., 1925 Water St., Long Beach 2 (Pebbly Beach quarry, Santa Catalina Island); (Location) Sec 11 (?), T. 10 S., R. 14 W., S.B. proj.; (History of Operation) Active intermittently since 1934 by Case-Connolly (Connolly-Pacific); (Geological Data/Type of deposit) Compact metamorphosed conglomerate and graywacke; (Mining Data/Holding) 200 acres leased; (Mining Data/Equipment and haulage) After coyote-hole blasting 2 -yd. diesel shovels load 15-yd. trucks which dump into steel skips. 30-ton crane unloads skips on barges for towing to mainland. Largest stone moved in slings mile average haul to barge; (Approximate size of Excavation/Width/Length/Depth) 150-200 ft. x 1200 ft. x 200-500 ft. working face on bench in steep hillside; Processing Data: (Crushing classification, washing) No crushing or screening; (Products) A-rock: 1 to 10 tons mixed, (as large as 35 tons). B-rock: 20 lbs. to 2 tons. C-rock: fines to ton for piers, breakwaters, etc.; (Reported capacity) 1800-2000 tons per shift; (Number of employees) 18-20; (Remarks) Used for piers, breakwaters, etc., in Los Angeles, San Pedro, and Long Beach harbors.

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Empire (Graham Brothers) Quarry (Crushed/Broken Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 179; (Claim, Mine or Group) Empire (Graham Brothers) quarry; (Owner name, address) (blank); (Location) Sec. 29 (?), T. 8 S., R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island coast, about 1 miles northwest of Empire Landing. (Lenhart 50a:184-186; Tucker 27:39.)

    The following information is from the table entitled, "Producers Active in 1952" from the "Broken and Crushed Stone" section:

    (Name of Operator) Graham Brothers, 5500 N. Peck Rd., El Monte (Empire quarry, Santa Catalina Island); (Location) Sec. 29 (?), T. 8 S., R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (History of Operation) Continuously active since opened by Graham Bros. in 1949; (Geological Data/Type of deposit) Partly decomposed dioritic rocks; (Mining Data/Holding) 100 acres leased; (Mining Data/Equipment and haulage) 2 -yd.,1 -yd. diesel shovels 6-yd., 3-yd. Walking Monighans, 8-ton end dump trucks for hauling, several hundred feet to grizzly and crusher. Walking Monighan loads barge for transport to mainland; (Approximate size of Excavation/Width/Length/Depth) Working face several hundred feet high on bench cut in steep hillside; Processing Data: (Crushing classification, washing) 8- x 36-in. jaw, 40-in. rolls crushers used as required. Classification into size categories by grizzlies. No screens; (Products) A-rock: 2-15 tons; Rip-rap: 2 tons-12-in.; 12-in. to 6-in. stone. Crusher-run base (minus 2-in.); (Reported capacity) 250 tons per hour; (Number of employees) 20; (Remarks) Wagon drill, primary blasting used occasionally. Used for road-base, fill for subsidence areas, rip-rap, breakwater.

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Graham Bros. Inc., Quarrying Methods & Costs (Book)

    Quarrying and Crushing Methods and Costs at the Santa Catalina Island Quarry of Graham Bros., Inc., Santa Catalina Island, California, by George Adams Roalfe, United States Bureau of Mines, Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Mines, 1932.

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Graham Brothers Quarry (Crushed/Broken Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Graham Brothers Quarry - See Empire and Pebbly Beach Quarries.

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - the Lang Quarry (Trachyte Quarry)(From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "On Santa Catalina Island, bluffs of trachyte come to the water's edge on the east coast, between Avalon and Empire Landing, in places to a height of 800 feet. This trachyte has been used in the old breakwater from Terminal Island to Deadman's Island, San Pedro harbor, and formerly in the Government breakwater at San Pedro, but in the latter its use was abandoned on account of the difficulty in obtaining the large blocks required, weighing over 4000 pounds. (See also Xth Report, California State Mining Bureau, p. 279, and XIth ibid., p. 404.)

    • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - the Lang Quarry (Trachyte) (Excerpt from Report XV of the State Mineralogist, Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report Biennial Period 1915-1916, Part IV. Los Angeles County, Orange County, Riverside County, California State Mining Bureau, 1919, pp. 465-589. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "The Lang Quarry is situated on Santa Catalina Island. It is said that although this stone is admirably suited for building purposes, the greatest demand for it has been as rubble, rock, for use in railroad construction and harbor improvements. It is stated that 150,000 tons of this rock have been used during the last fifteen years. This rock can be supplied f.o.b. at Los Angeles, at the rate of from $3.00 to $4.00 a cubic yard.

      "As stated in Bulletin 38, p. 155, trachyte from this quarry was used in the old breakwater between Terminal Island and Deadman's Island and, to a certain extent, in the great government breakwater at San Pedro, but blocks of sufficient size were difficult to obtain."

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - the Lang Quarry (Trachyte/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Lang Quarry; (Owner name, address) Santa Catalina Island Co., Avalon (1953); (Location) Sec. 3 (?), T. 9 S., R. 15 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island, northeast coast, near empire Landing. Bluffs of "Trachytic rock" suitable for building stone but most used for railroad construction and San Pedro Harbor projects. Quarry active about 1880-1895; 150,000 tons removed. Difficulty of obtaining large blocks curtailed operations. (Aubury 06:154-155; Crawford 96:404; Merrill 19:484; Preston 90b:279; Tucker 27:332.)

  • Santa Catalina Island (northwest of Empire Landing), Los Angeles County, California - Los Angeles City Quarry (Broken/Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Los Angeles City quarry; (Owner name, address) Santa Catalina Island Co., Avalon. Leased to City of Los Angeles, Office of the Harbor Engineer; (Location) Sec. 29 (?), T. 8 S., R. 15 W., S.B., proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island, about 2 miles northwest of Empire Landing, adjacent to Graham Bros. Empire quarry. Operated intermittently from about 1920 to 1940 to provide riprap and facing for harbor projects. Stone as large as several tons, excavated with power shovels from face 500 ft. long, hauled by rail to barges for transport to mainland. Capacity about 400 tons per day. Idle since 1940.

  • Santa Catalina Island (southeast of Avalon), Los Angeles County, California - Pebbly Beach (Santa Catalina Island) Quarry (Crushed Rock/Andesitic Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Pebbly Beach (Santa Catalina Island) quarry; (Owner name, address) Santa Catalina Island Co., Avalon. Output handled by Graham Bros., 5500 N. Peck Rd., El Monte (1927); (Location) Sec. 2 (?), T. 10 S., R. 14 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Santa Catalina Island about 1 mile southeast of Avalon. Andesitic rock quarried with steam shovels, hauled by rail to crushers, barged to mainland. Capacity 1,000 tons per day; 100 employees in 1927. (Tucker 27:38-39, 337.)

    Pebbly Beach Quarry - See Connolly-Pacific.

  • Santa Catalina Island, Los Angeles County, California - Santa Catalina Island Quarry (Crushed/Broken Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Santa Catalina Island Quarry - See Pebbly Beach (Santa Catalina Island) quarry.

  • Santa Susana Mountains, Los Angeles County, California – the Gilbert Stone Company Sandstone Quarry circa 1887 (Sandstone) – Excerpts from California “Building Stone” (pdf), Seventh Annual Report of the State Mineralogist.  For the Year Ending October 1, 1887, California State Mining bureau, Sacramento:  State Office, J. D. Young, Supt. State Printing, 1888, pp. 208-210.  (See the pdf version of the transcription above for detailed information on the Santa Susana sandstone.)

    Santa Susana Sandstone.

    “Two varieties of this stone were sent by the Gilbert Stone Company, one very coarse-grained and the other very fine-grained. 

    “...To the unaided eye the rock appears as a very coarse-grained, light grayish-yellow sandstone, consisting of subangular, smoky gray quartz granules, from 5 mm. in diameter downwards, averaging perhaps about 1.5 mm., dull yellowish-white, soft granules, apparently of kaolinized feldspar, numerous small, black, and a few white, mica scales; the whole cemented together by a very slight yellowish argillaceous cement.*  An occasional bluish-black slate fragment is observable....” 

    “...This variety differs in appearance from the former in the size of the grain.  It is a beautiful evenly fine-grained stone, of nearly uniform light, grayish-yellow, minutely specked with black and silver-white mica scales.  Under the microscope, all of the characteristics of the preceding rock reappear here.” 

    Occurrence. – According to the sender, an official of the Gilbert Stone Company, Los Angeles, the stone occurs in bowlders, of which the company has an inexhaustible supply in the Santa Susanna Mountains, about eight miles southwesterly from San Fernando Station, on the Southern Pacific Railroad, in Los Angeles County, and about twenty-eight miles from Los Angeles City.  Great difficulty is at present experienced in getting the stone hauled from the quarries to the railroad.  The cost of hauling is $1.50 per ton, and the cost from San Fernando to Los Angeles is $1 per ton.  The sandstone beds cover an area of two and one half miles in length by one mile in width, and the beds of the finer grained stone are said to be one half mile in thickness.  Both the Southern Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroads are expected to run through the immediate vicinity of these beds, and thus furnish a ready means of transportation to market.”

  • Santa Susana Mountains, Los Angeles County, California – the Santa Susana Pass State Park – Sandstone Quarry. From the 1880s until the early 1900s, sandstone from the quarry was used to construct the Los Angeles harbor breakwater and was also used in the construction of buildings in Los Angeles. (The previous version of this web site included the above information. This current version does not speak of the quarry at all.)
  • Santa Ynez Canyon (east side of), Los Angeles County, California - Santa Ynez Limestone Deposit (Algal Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Santa Ynez Deposit. The most interesting and probably most important limestone deposit in the county is on the west slope of the Santa Monica Mountains at elevations of 1100 to 1400 feet on Rancho San Vicente y Santa Monica, 2 to 3 miles north of Castellamare. It is in the Martinez formation (Paleocene) in the Reseda and Topanga Canyon quadrangles of the U. S. Geological Survey and has been described as follows by H. W. Hoots (31):*

    (* Harold W. Hoots, Geology of Eastern Part of the Santa Monica Mountains, California, U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 165, pp. 83-134, 1931.)

    "'.Near the head of Santa Ynez Canyon the Martinez formation has an approximate thickness of 250 to 350 feet. The algal limestone is one of the most striking and probably the most unusual rock types in the Santa Monica Mountains. It occurs in prominent white reefs from a few feet to several hundred feet thick which vary in lateral extent from only a few feet to about 4000 feet and commonly terminate in an abrupt wall.This limestone is distinctly nodular and has irregular bedding. Although weathered outcrops are commonly white, some black or very dark gray algal limestone and fresh exposures of even the white-weathering rock have a characteristically spotted appearance due to the abundance of nearly white irregularly shaped algae and algal colonies embedded in a limestone matrix of light brown or gray color. In some places there appear to be all grades of purity of this limestone, a condition which may be noted in single outcrops or even in hand specimens where comparatively pure white or light brown algal limestone grades laterally or vertically into a darker gray algal rock with a matrix that is highly argillaceous.'

    "According to an unpublished field report by W. B. Tucker, District Mining Engineer, State Division of Mines, this limestone and the shale near it were investigated in 1928 by Los Angeles Mountain Park Company as sources of material for Portland cement. The largest reef of limestone is reported 4000 feet long and up to 700 feet thick. Tucker quotes the following analysis made by Raymond Laboratories, Los Angeles:

    SiO2, 3.56 percent
    Al2O3, 0.94 percent
    Fe2O3, 1.86 percent
    CaO, 50.66 percent
    MgO, 2.13 percent
    Loss on ignition, 40.55 percent.

    "The Santa Ynez quarry was opened at that time and showed a thickness of 50 to 100 feet and a shaft 200 feet deep on 45 incline passed through limestone into limey shale. This bed is about 2000 feet long. Since 1936, W. F. Glasser, Inc., 713 North Sepulveda, Brentwood Heights, Los Angeles, has been producing limestone from this deposit."

    • Santa Ynez Canyon (east side of), Los Angeles County, California - Santa Ynez Deposits (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Santa Ynez Deposits. Location: sec. 16, T. 1 S., R. 16 W., S.B.M. (projected), on the east side of Santa Ynez Canyon, about 3 airline miles northeast of Topanga Beach, and about 5 airline miles northwest of Santa Monica. Ownership: Mountain Park Company, 17201 Sunset Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, California, owns a large tract, leases quarry rights jointly to Santa Monica Rock Company, A. H. Braun, president, 2018 6th St., Santa Monica, and Flickinger and Welker, general contractors, 2719 West Vernon, Los Angeles, California.

      "The Santa Ynez Canyon deposits, although incompletely developed have been noted to be 'probably the most important limestone deposit in the county' (Logan, 1947, p. 248). The deposits and general geological features of the area have been described in detail by Hoots (1931) who states 'some of these deposits are of sufficient size and purity to warrant serious consideration of the use of this limestone in the manufacture of cement'.

      "The limestone is algal in origin, and occurs as lenses in the Paleocene Martinez formation, widely exposed in this area. The deposits are discontinuous white reefs from a few feet to several hundred feet thick and as much as 4,000 feet long. Exposures of the rock have a characteristically spotted appearance caused by abundant, nearly white, irregularly shaped algae and algal colonies in the light brown or gray limestone matrix. Seams of brown argillaceous material are abundant, commonly paralleling the bedding plane. Both the upper and lower contacts of the limestone are gradational into limy shale.

      "Limestone has been quarried from two sites, about half a mile apart and on separate lenses; one lens is near the canyon bottom and the other is high on the east slope. The lower quarry as opened about 1928 and the more productive upper one a few years later. The lower quarry has been idle since 1952 because of road washouts. The upper quarry covers several acres, the face being about 50 feet high and over a hundred yards long.

      "The limestone ledge at the lower quarry site is about 2,000 feet long and as much as 100 feet thick. It shrikes slightly north of west and dips about 45 S. A 200-foot shaft on a 45 incline passed from limestone into limy shale. The upper quarry is in a limestone lens about 700 feet in maximum thickness and 4,000 feet in length, by far the largest deposit in this area. This lens strikes northwestward and dips about 40 SW. One estimate placed the amount of limestone in this deposit above the level of the canyon bottom at 20,000,000 tons (Hoots, 1931, p. 134). In 1928, this limestone was tested for use in cement. One plan was to crush it to minus 200-mesh size at the deposit and transport it by gravity as a slurry in 10- or 12-inch pipes to shipping facilities at the coast, a distance of 4 miles. This plan met formidable opposition from property owners in the vicinity, and was abandoned.

      "Prior to 1931 limestone from the lower quarry was used locally to surface roads. From 1936 to 1944 several thousand tons of rock were removed from both quarries by W. F. Glasser Inc., 713 North Sepulveda, Brentwood Heights for use in various construction projects. The present lessees have been continuously active on a small scale since early 1947, the Santa Monica Rock Company being the more active. A total of several thousand tons of dimension stone has been produced in this period for the construction of buildings, walls, and fireplaces. Flickinger and Welker generally quarry larger sizes of stone for waterfront and other large construction projects, and use less limestone than sandstone from nearby sites.

      "Open-pit methods are used, the fractured condition and fissile argillaceous seams in the limestone making blasting unnecessary. Power shovels and bulldozers have been used, but much of the rock is lifted from the quarry face to trucks by hand and is occasionally broken by sledge hammers or crow bars."

      "Small tonnages of sandstone and limestone have been produced for building stone in Santa Ynez Canyon in the Santa Monica Mountains."

      (Map No.) 171; (Claim, Mine or Group) Santa Ynez Deposit; (Owner name, address) Los Angeles Mountain Park Co., Los Angeles. Leased jointly to Santa Monica Rock Co., A. H. Braun, pres., 17201 Sunset Blvd., Pacific Palisades and Flickinger & Welker, contractors, 2719 W. Vernon, Los Angeles (1953); (Location) Sec. 16, T. 1 S., R. 16 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) East side Santa Ynez Canyon, 3 airline miles northeast of Topanga Beach. (Hoots 31:92, 133-134; Logan 47;248-249.)

  • Sugar Loaf Hill, Los Angeles County, California - O. A. Charlton Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "O. A. Charlton, in Sec. 7, T. 2 N., R. 16 W., S. B. M., on Sugar Loaf Hill, has quarried some boulders of sandstone similar in character to that in the other quarries near Chatsworth."

  • Sunland (east of), Los Angeles County, California - Haines Canyon (Crushed Rock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Haines Canyon; (Owner name, address) Haines Canyon Rock Co., Peter Perry, Pres., 5200 San Fernando Rd., Glendale (1927); (Location) Sec. 17 (?), T. 2 N., R. 13 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Haines Canyon, several miles east of Sunland. Screening and crushing plant (1927). Inactive. (Tucker 27:338.)

  • Sunland (north of), Los Angeles County, California - Haskins Dolomite Deposit & Millsite (Dolomite) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Haskins dolomite deposit comprises 5 claims and millsite 3 miles north of Sunland in sec. 28, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B., on slope of ridge northeast of Little Tujunga Canyon, elevation 2000 to 2700 feet. Both Oakeshott (37, p. 244)* and Reid J. Sampson (37, pp. 202-203)** have described this property, on which some development was done prior to 1937. It is not mentioned in later bulletins as a producer. Quarry No. 1 on Lady Helen claim is on a body of dolomite 150 feet long.

    "On the Lone Jack claim there is an outcrop 50 feet thick by 200 feet long, prospected by an open-cut. Other smaller outcrops were mentioned...."

    (* Gordon B. Oakeshott, "Geology and Mineral Deposits of the Western San Gabriel Mountains, Los Angeles County," California Division of Mines Report 33, pp. 215-249, 7 figs, pl. 3, 1937.)

    (** Reid J. Sampson, "Mineral Resources of Los Angeles County," California Division of Mines Report 33, pp. 173-213, illus. 1937.)

    • Sunland (north of), Los Angeles County, California - Haskins (Limerock) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      (Map No.) 164; (Claim, Mine or Group) Haskins; (Owner name, address) Mrs. Tessie Cook Haskins, 268 Burlington Ave., Los Angeles (1951); (Location) Sec. 28, T. 3 N., R. 14 W., S.B.; (Remarks) Limerock Canyon, about 4 airline miles north of Sunland. Discontinuous belt of white crystalline dolomitic limestone lenses 30-40 ft. thick, 100-200 ft. long. Bodies dip nearly vertically in meta-sediments and gneissoid granitic rocks of the San Gabriel complex. Worked by open cuts. Active 1880-1885 when lime was burned in 3 kilns on property. Production about 5,000 tons in 1921-1924, intermittent subsequently. Idle since 1948. (See Lap Wing in gold section) (Logan 47:250; Oakeshott 37:244; Sampson 37:202-203.)

  • Table Mountain (north side of), Los Angeles County, California - Big Pine (Little Johnnie, Eagle) (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) 162; (Claim, Mine or Group) Big Pine (Little Johnnie, Eagle); (Owner name, address) Big Pine Mining Co., R. E. Shonerd, pres., 10909 Kenwood St., Inglewood (1930); (Location) Sec. 1, T. 3 N., R. 8 W., S.B.; Sec. 36, T. 4 N., R. 8 W., S. B.; Sec. 6, T. 3 N., 7 W., S.B.; (Remarks) North side of Table Mt., about 2 airline miles east of Swartout (Big Pine). Partly in San Bernardino County. White limestone lens about 200 ft. thick, over a mile long, dips 45 southwestward in granitic gneiss. Explored by shallow surface trenching. No production. Idle. (Logan 47:281; Tucker 30:308; 31:383.)

  • Table Mountain, Los Angeles County, California - Eagle (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Eagle - See Big Pine.

  • Table Mountain (north side of), Los Angeles County, California - Little Johnnie (Limestone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Little Johnnie - See Big Pine.

  • Tujunga Canyons, Los Angeles County, California - Building Stone Deposit (circa 1890) (Granite & Limestone) - Excerpt from the Tenth Annual Report of The State Mineralogist For The Year Ending December 1, 1890, California State Mining Bureau, Sacramento: State Printing Office, 1890, pp. 282.

    “These cañons, which empty into San Fernando Valley about six miles south and east of the village of San Fernando, have in their upper part considerable useful mineral (sic), that cannot, however, be made available at the present time on account of inaccessibility; but should, as is contemplated, a railroad be brought into this country from the southeast of Utah, it would open up this cañon, and the iron ores, limes, quartz veins, graphite, and building stones could all be made available.....”

    “...Up (the Big Tujunga Cañon) a couple of miles on the north side there exists a deposit of crystalline lime; also a granite that seems in every way fitted for a good building material.”

    “Opposite the town of San Fernando on the east is the mouth of the Pacoima cañon, a narrow, extremely rough passage through the mountain; the sides are granitic, almost perpendicular. Near the entrance to the cañon are crystalline limestones and metamorphic magnesian rocks and stretching out into the valley on the sides of the mouth of the cañon are heavy-bedded sandstones. A very short distance up the Pacoima the sides of the mountain close in, until about two miles up the cañon the passage is barred by perpendicular falls.”

  • Verduga Canyon, Los Angeles County, California - Ross Deposit (Granite/Dimension Stone) (Excerpts from "Mines and Mineral Deposits of Los Angeles County," by Thomas E. Gay, Jr., Assistant Mining Geologist, California State Division of Mines, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 50, Nos. 3 and 4, July - October 1954, pp. 467-709. (Manuscript submitted for publication October 6, 1953.) Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    (Map No.) (blank); (Claim, Mine or Group) Ross deposit; (Owner name, address) E. M. Ross, Glendale (1906); (Location) Sec. "Approx.," T. 1 N., R. 13 W., S.B. proj.; (Remarks) Glendale Ranch, Verdugo Canyon, 8 miles from Los Angeles, mile from the railroad. Banded dark hornblende biotite granite reported suitable for monuments and trim. Undeveloped (Aubury 06:28; Merrill 19:481; Tucker 27:330.)

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