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Glenn County


  • Glenn County Sandstone, Slate, Volcanic Tuff, and Talc (historical times through circa 1906) - Excerpt from The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Sandstone beds extend in a west of north course from the southern to the northern boundary of the county. In T. 18 N., R. 4 W., the beds maintain an average thickness of from 2 to 4 feet, and though broken on the surface by numerous small valleys and ravines are of sufficient continuity of length to insure the quarrying of masses equal to any but an extraordinary demand. In the central portion of the county greater thickness and continuity of the beds were observed in the exposures in T. 20 N., R. 6 W., where Stony Creek cuts through the sandstone for a width of about 1000 feet. In T. 20 N., R. 4 W., are exposures of massive beds lying close to the surface and in the northern part of the county the sandstone series are clearly marked by exposures along the southern slope of the foothills east of Newville."

    Slate of good roofing quality may be developed in Glenn County. Some of the following deposits may be worth of future investigation:

    "Alter Spring road, T. 21 N., R. 7 W.
    "Grindstone Canon, T. 22 N., R. 6 W.
    "Kilgore road, T. 22 N., R. 7 W.
    "J. Shelton ranch, T. 22 N., R. 6 W.
    "Stout ranch, Sec. 20, T. 20 N., R 7 W."

    “A belt of tuff runs along the foothills in the western part of Glenn County. It is the southern continuation of the belt of similar material found in Tehama County. The tuff is quarried for local purposes, and also used in the manufacture of ollas (water jars).”

    "Talc occurs in the eastern edge of Glenn County, underlying the serpentine formation that extends from T. 22 N., R. 7 W., southerly into Colusa County.”

  • Glenn County, Mines and Mineral Resources (circa 1913-1914) - Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), San Francisco, California, July, 1915, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.

    "Glenn County, formerly a part of Colusa, which is on its south, was formed March 11, 1891, and has an area of 1400 square miles. The Sacramento River forms the eastern boundary, separating it from Butte County. Tehama is on the north, with Mendocino and Lake on the west. The drainage is all tributary to the Sacramento, the principal streams being Stony Creek and Willow Creek. Being one of the valley counties, Glenn's resources are largely agricultural. Chrome, brick clay, gravel, and crushed rock are the only mineral substances from which commercial production has resulted so far. Besides these, occurrences have been noted of coal, copper, gold, granite, manganese, quicksilver, marble, sandstone, slate, and soapstone."

    The following information is taken from "Table of Mineral Production," on page 197:

    1909, 140,000 tons, (value) $49,000, Macadam
    1910, 378,000 tons, (value) $34,020, Rubble

    "Slate of good roofing quality occurs in the northwestern part of the county, but it is as yet undeveloped.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 152."

    Stone Industry (in Glenn County).

    "The only mineral product on the active list in Glenn County for the past three years is gravel (circa 1913). Besides the beds of the present creeks, there is an extensive, old gravel deposit running in an irregular line from Wyo southerly through the county, passing to the east of Willows. It extends to near Maxwell in Colusa County. As distinguished from the fresher gravels in the creek beds, this material has more or less clay mixed with it. The clay acts as a binder, and improves the value of the gravel for road material. However, the same feature makes washing necessary when it is used for concrete...."

  • Glenn, County, California, Mineral Resources & Introduction to the Glenn County Area of California (circa 1915) - Excerpt from Sacramento Valley and Foothill Counties of California: An Illustrated Description of all the Counties Embraced in this Richly productive Geographical Subdivision of the Golden State, compiled and edited by Emmett Phillips and John H. Miller, Published under the direction of The Sacramento Valley Exposition, J. A. Filcher, Director-in Chief, January, 1915.

    Glenn County

    "Glenn County lies in the west central portion of the Sacramento Valley. Its eastern boundary for the most part is the Sacramento River, and its western line extends into the Coast Range Mountains. It is about thirty miles wide with an average length of about fifty miles, and contains one million acres of land.

    "The eastern half of the county lies in the valley proper and is level and adapted to farming of all kinds. About midway between the eastern and western boundaries, the land becomes broken by low rolling hills, which increase in altitude as they near the western line, until they become the Coast Range Mountains. The foothill and rolling land is adapted to grain and fruit growing, much of it being cropped. In the higher altitudes there is a great area of fine grazing land, almost numerous small valleys, which are exceedingly productive. The mountains are clothed with forests of merchantable timber.

    "The county has undergone rapid development during the past ten years. Great farms of 10,000 acres or more, which were formerly cropped only to grain have been and are now being subdivided and sold in small tracts to newcomers. Thousands of new families have settled in the county and new methods of farming and new crops have been introduced. Irrigation has been practiced and wrought wonderful changes. Alfalfa has to a large extent taken the place of grain, and dairying and stock raising have become important and profitable industries.

    "One of the most successful irrigation projects ever carried to completion under the supervision of the United States Reclamation Service, is in Glenn County. This is the Orland Project which will irrigate 21,000 acres of land near Orland, a rich section in the northern part of the county. The system was built and is now managed by the United States Government. Eventually it will belong to the land owners benefitted (sic), as they are paying the government the cost of construction in ten equal yearly payments. Under the law governing the project no land owner can hold more than 160 acres within the project. Wonderful prosperity has followed the completion of this system. The water is taken from Stony Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River.

    "Thousands of acres in Glenn are irrigated by the Sacramento Valley Irrigation Company, which takes water from the Sacramento River and conveys it by canals to the fertile farms, consisting of about 200,000 acres. Deep well irrigation is also followed, there being an abundant subterranean supply.

    "Artesian water has been developed at Germantown in great quantities at a distance of about 500 or 600 feet, which adds materially to the irrigation of the uplands.

    "In former years Glenn was noted for its great yields of barley and wheat. While it still produces quantities of these important grains, much of its best land has recently been planted to other and more profitable crops. The planting of fruit trees has been particularly heavy during the past few years. These new orchards include all varieties of deciduous and citrus fruits and nuts. Indeed, Glenn County has been selected by the James Mills Orchard Company for a plantation of 10,000 acres devoted exclusively to citrus fruits. The planting of this orchard has been under way for several seasons and when it is completed, it will be the largest citrus fruit grove in the world. The deciduous fruits produced include all the standard profitable varieties of the Sacramento Valley, which are the apricot, cherry, peach, plum, prune, pear and grape. Berries of all kinds are also grown, and as stated in a preceding paragraph, alfalfa is an important crop. It is one of the best crops to engage the attention of a newcomer.

    "The production of sugar beets has been found profitable in Glenn. There is a large sugar factory at Hamilton, in the northern part of the county and it is supplied with beets grown in this and neighboring counties. Beets produce heavily on the river lands and on the uplands when irrigated.

    "Broom corn is another crop that is grown extensively along the river lands. It yields about 100,000 pounds to the acre and pays well.

    "Glenn is also one of the counties of the Sacramento Valley that has land within its borders suited to the culture of rice. Rice has been grown successfully here for several seasons.

    "English walnuts and almonds are both paying crops and there is a large acreage in the county suited to the successful culture of the olive.

    "Stock raisers and poultry raisers find unsurpassed natural conditions here. In the northern part of the county there are many farms devoted exclusively to the production of turkeys.

    "Vegetables of practically all kinds are produced and find ready markets in the large California cities.

    "Glenn has excellent rail and water transportation facilities. The main line of the Southern Pacific Company passes through the county from north to south and a branch road serves the river districts of the county. The West Side Electric Line, which is now being built, will pass through the county. The Sacramento River, which separates Glenn from Butte, is navigable the year round.

    "The principal city and county seat is Willows, a growing community situated near the geographical center of the county on the main line of the Southern Pacific Company. Willows is lighted by electricity, has a good water and sewer system. It has good business buildings and large stores. One of the county's high schools is located here.

    "Orland is another growing community in the northern part of the county. It is in the center of the Orland irrigation project, previously mentioned. It is out of the frost belt and noted for its almonds and a rapidly growing and profitable citrus industry.

    "Hamilton is on the Southern Pacific branch road. It is in the center of the beet growing districts and is the location of a large sugar factory.

    "Germantown is in the center of a rich farming district in the valley section of the county. Other important towns are Butte City, on the Sacramento River, Elk Creek, in the foothills, and Norman, on the Southern Pacific Railroad.

    "Glenn offers excellent opportunities for new settlers. Land is cheap, when its productive capacity is taken into consideration, and water for irrigation is abundant."

  • Glenn County Mineral Industry (circa 1919) - Excerpt from California Mineral Production for 1919, Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, 1920.

    Area: 1,259 square miles.
    Population: 11,853 (1920 census).
    Location: West side of Sacramento Valley.

    "Glenn County, standing forty-fourth, owes its position among the mineral-producing counties of the state mainly to the presence of large deposits of sand and gravel which are annually worked, the product being used for railroad ballast, etc. In 1917 and 1918, chromite was also an important item. In the foothills in the western portion of the county, deposits of chromite, copper, manganese, sandstone, and soapstone have been found.

    "Commercial production for 1919 was as follows:"

    (Headings for the information below are: Substance, Amount, and Value.)

    Stone, miscellaneous, ---, $58,137
    Other minerals, ---, $1,500
    (Total value) $59,637

    Glenn County, 1916 Map, from California Mineral Production for 1919 (with County Maps), Bulletin No. 88, by Walter W. Bradley, California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco: California State Printing Office, 1920, pp. 185 Glenn County , 1916 Map, from California Mineral Production for 1919
  • Glenn County Limestone Industry and Deposits - Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The populous, eastern one-third of Glenn County lies in the Sacramento Valley and consists of agricultural land in which no mineral deposits except sand and gravel have been found. The westerly two-thirds, rising gradually into the Coast Range, is occupied in succession, east to west, by Pliocene and Cretaceous sediments and by the Jurassic complex, partly sedimentary and partly metamorphic, including a good deal of serpentine. Several of these beds are known to carry limestone or marl in other parts of the state and a few small deposits in Glenn County have been mentioned in former reports, but there is no record of production from them. The principal mineral products have been sand and gravel from Stony Creek near Orland, and a few thousand tons of chromite from the serpentine in the Coast Ranges.

    "The few deposits of marble mentioned in past reports are in the southwestern part of the county and 18 to 20 miles from the nearest railroad points, Fruto or Riz."


Glenn County List of Stone Quarries, Etc.*

(* Please note this list does not include sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Glenn County, California - Alexander Brown - Serpentine and Talc Exposures (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Alexander Brown, Oakland. In the northwest corner of T. 18 N., R. 6 W., a cropping of a ledge of serpentine is exposed. The material has the texture, solidity, and luster requisite to the production of a good quality of serpentine marble. No prospecting or development work."

    "Alexander Brown, Oakland, owner. In T. 18 N., R. 6 W., various croppings indicate the presence of a good quality of talc of the tailor's chalk variety. The exposures, which are made by the flow of Salt Creek, are associated with the blue and light-colored clays."

    • Glenn County, California - Alexander Brown - Serpentine Marble Deposit (Serpentine Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "Alexander Brown, of Oakland, has a deposit of serpentine marble in the northwest corner of T. 18 N., R. 6 W." The deposit was not developed as of 1913."

  • Glenn County, California - J. M. Nye Ranch - Onyx Marble Deposit (Onyx Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "On the J. M. Nye ranch in the southwest corner of the county is said to be a body of onyx marble. The deposit was not developed as of 1913."

    • Glenn County, California - Nye Onyx Marble Deposit (Onyx Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Nye deposit of onyx marble is reported to be on the Nye Ranch, in secs. 1 and 12, T. 18 N., R. 8 W., on the west side of Mount St. John near the Lake County line."

  • Glenn County, California - Soapstone Deposit (Soapstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

    "Soapstone occurs in T. 18 N., R. 6 W., but it is not utilized.

    "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 351."

  • Stony Creek, Glenn County, California - H. A. Daniels - Marble or Alabaster Limestone Exposure (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "H. A. Daniels, Stonyford, Colusa County; Sec. 21, T. 18 N., R. 6 W., M. D. M. Several years ago a ledge of marble of the white or alabaster limestone variety was prospected by W. H. Wiltson of San Francisco, to a distance of about 40 feet into the exposure. The ledge may be traced for about a mile north and south along the east side of Stony Creek."

    • Stony Creek, Glenn County, California - H. A. Daniels - Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "H. A. Daniels, of Stonyford, has a deposit of white marble along the east side of Stony Creek in Sec. 21, T. 18 N., R. 6 W. The deposit was not developed as of 1913."

    • Stony Creek, Glenn County, California - Daniels Marble Deposit (Marble) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      "Daniels deposit was reported in Bulletin 38 (Aubury, L. E. 06, p. 99) to be a ledge of white marble traceable for about a mile north and south along the east side of Stony Creek in sec. 21, T. 18 N., R. 6 W."

  • Willows (10 miles southwest of), Glenn County, California - Talbott Granite Quarry (Granite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Talbott Granite Quarry - "In Sec. 8, T. 18 N., R. 4 W. - 10 miles southwest of Willows. James Talbott, Willows, owner. Syenitic granite is exposed in the form of a dike intruding through the sandstone formation, within 8 miles of the Southern Pacific Railroad. At the point of chief exposure, the granite stands from 10 to 15 feet high and is exposed along the surface of the western slope of the hill for a width of about 40 feet. The dike strikes north 14 degrees west, and follows the general trend of the sandstone. This granite is hard, fine-grained, and of even fracture, as has been shown by rifting large pieces from the main body."

    • Willows (southwest of), Glenn County, California - Talbott Ranch (Granite & Sandstone) (Excerpt from Report XIV of the State Mineralogist - Mines and Mineral Resources of Portions of California, Chapters of State Mineralogist's Report - Biennial Period 1913-1914, Part II. "The Counties of Colusa, Glenn, Lake, Marin, Napa, Solano, Sonoma, Yolo," by Walter W. Bradley, Field Assistant (field work in September, 1913), California State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1916, pp. 173-370.)

      "There is a dike of syenitic granite in sandstone on the Talbott Ranch, in Sec. 8, T. 18 N., R. 4 W., southwest of Willows. Not developed.

      "Bibl.: Bull. 38, p. 28."

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