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Home > Search > Site Map > California > CA - Quarry Links & Photographs > Alameda County > List of Stone Quarries

Alameda County - List of Stone Quarries, Etc. *

(* Please note this list does not include all of the sand or gravel quarries.)

  • Alameda County, California - La Vista Quarry (Stone) (active ca 1996) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    Mine name: La Vista Quarry; Operator: East Bay Excavating Company; Address & County: 28814 Mission Blvd., Hayward, CA 94544, Alameda County; Phone: (510) 538-5080; Latitude: 37.64, Longitude: +122.05, and Mine location number 2; Mineral commodity: Stone.

  • Alameda County, California - the Newark Road Quarry (Red Jasper) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Realty Syndicate, owner, and operated by the county. In Sec. 34, T. 4 S., R. 2 W. The quarry was opened twenty-three years ago. The rock is a hard, flinty, red jasper, interbedded with soft seams of red clay. This quarry furnishes all the macadam for Newark road district."

  • Alameda County, California - the Pacific Land and Investment Company's Quarry (Sandstone, Shales, & Chert) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Pacific Land and Investment Company's Quarry. In Sec. 10, T. 5 S., R. 2 W. The quarry formerly furnished a large amount of ballast for the Southern Pacific Railroad, but is idle at present. The north end of the quarry shows beds of red flinty chert, some siliceous shale, and red clay; the south end, some soft sandstone and shales; also small outcrops of manganese ore."

  • Alameda County, California - the Spring Construction Company's Quarry (Shale) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Spring Construction Company's Quarry; J. E. Porter, superintendent; office, University Savings Bank, Berkeley. Located on Greenwood Terrace, about one half mile east of the reservoir in North Berkeley. The company is driving a 250-foot two-compartment tunnel, to connect by an upraise with the present floor of the old quarry. The rock will be broken down in the quarry and transported through the tunnel to the crushing plant on the hillside below. A Gates crusher is driven by electric power. The rock in the main quarry face varies, in a short distance, from hard, siliceous shale to a highly metamorphosed rock of coarse, sandy texture. It is to be used for macadam and concrete work. Twenty-five men are employed."

  • Alameda (near), Alameda County, California - Sandstone Quarrying (From Geologic Guidebook of the San Francisco Bay Counties: History, Landscape, Geology, Fossils, Minerals, Industry, and Routes to Travel, Bulletin 154, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, December, 1951. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The earliest stone building in San Francisco was constructed in 1854; dressed granite from China was used. Soon after this, granite from Folsom came on the market. In the sixties quarries were opened, on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay to furnish a bluish sandstone, and near Petaluma in Sonoma County for the production of basalt. During the eighties and nineties light-brown sandstone was quarried at Benicia in Solano County, and near San Jose in Santa Clara County. Sandstone of other colors was marketed from quarries near Alameda, Livermore, and Hayward in Alameda County during the same period, and some stone was imported."

  • Altamont (southwest of), Alameda County, California - the Collins Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Collins deposit is reported to show a small outcrop of crystalline limestone on a hilltop in sec. 30, T. 2 S., R. 3 E., M. D. a mile or more southwest of Altamont. There is no record of work on it."

  • Altamont Station (southeast of), Alameda County, California - the Altamont Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Altamont Sandstone Quarry, in Sec. 28, T. 2 S., R. 3 E.; H. T. Knowles, 30 California street, San Francisco, owner; one quarter of a mile southeast of Altamont station. It was operated until 1888, the principal shipments being to San Francisco, where it was used in the Odd Fellows' cemetery. The stone is a massive, buff-colored sandstone, with occasional hard nodules in face."

  • Brooklyn Township, Alameda County, California - the Hays School Quarry (Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Hays School Quarry, near Hays school, in Brooklyn Township. It is a small quarry, the product of which is used locally for roads. The rock is much altered and contains considerable lime. It is idle at present."

  • Hayward (north of), Alameda County, California - McLaughlin Lithographic-Stone Quarry (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "McLaughlin lithographic-stone quarry is in SW SW sec. 35, T. 1 S., R. 2 W., M.D., close to the Contra Costa County line. It is about 8 miles north of Hayward by the Cull Canyon road.

    "This quarry (Laizure, C. McK. 29, pp. 433-434) was opened about 1905, exposing a vein about 5 feet thick for 25 feet along the strike. A test by Schmidt Lithographing Company indicated it might be used for 'penning', in which the design is painted on the stone instead of being cut. The stone exposed by the shallow work had some properties of a good lithographic stone but was not quite fine-grained and uniform enough for engraving. So far as known no recent work has been done on it. The outcrop extends for 570 feet, striking northwest."

  • Hayward (near), Alameda County, California - Sandstone Quarrying (Sandstone) (From Geologic Guidebook of the San Francisco Bay Counties: History, Landscape, Geology, Fossils, Minerals, Industry, and Routes to Travel, Bulletin 154, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, December, 1951. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The earliest stone building in San Francisco was constructed in 1854; dressed granite from China was used. Soon after this, granite from Folsom came on the market. In the sixties quarries were opened, on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay to furnish a bluish sandstone, and near Petaluma in Sonoma County for the production of basalt. During the eighties and nineties light-brown sandstone was quarried at Benicia in Solano County, and near San Jose in Santa Clara County. Sandstone of other colors was marketed from quarries near Alameda, Livermore, and Hayward in Alameda County during the same period, and some stone was imported."

  • Livermore (northeast of), Alameda County, California - J. D. Collins - Limestone Outcrop (Limestone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "J. D. Collins, Livermore, Owner; in Sec. 30, T. 2 S., R. 3 E. A small outcrop of crystallized limestone occurs on summit of hill, 6 miles northeast of Livermore. Undeveloped."

  • Livermore (southeast of), Alameda County, California - the Gray Eagle Talc Claim (Talc) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Gray Eagle Talc Claim; A. J. Merchant, Livermore, owner. In Sec. 32, T. 4 S., R. 4 E., 20 miles southeast of Livermore. The talc is light green in color, and outcrops in several places in small seams in serpentine. The claim has been opened by a small pit."

  • Livermore (near), Alameda County, California - Sandstone Quarrying (Sandstone) (From Geologic Guidebook of the San Francisco Bay Counties: History, Landscape, Geology, Fossils, Minerals, Industry, and Routes to Travel, Bulletin 154, Olaf P. Jenkins, Chief, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, December, 1951. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "The earliest stone building in San Francisco was constructed in 1854; dressed granite from China was used. Soon after this, granite from Folsom came on the market. In the sixties quarries were opened, on Angel Island in San Francisco Bay to furnish a bluish sandstone, and near Petaluma in Sonoma County for the production of basalt. During the eighties and nineties light-brown sandstone was quarried at Benicia in Solano County, and near San Jose in Santa Clara County. Sandstone of other colors was marketed from quarries near Alameda, Livermore, and Hayward in Alameda County during the same period, and some stone was imported."

  • Mission District, Alameda County, California - the Mission District Quarry (Black Shale) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mission District Quarry; A. S. Escobar, owner, and operated by the county. On Sunol road, one mile above its intersection with Mission San Jose-Niles road. The rock is a black shale, recemented by lime and gypsum."

  • Mission San Jose (east of), Alameda County, California - Mission Lime Marl Deposit (Lime Marl) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Mission lime marl deposit is about a quarter of a mile east of Mission San Jose and outcrops at the base of a small hill, where some work has been done in an open cut. Other exposures nearby are reported. Although some production was made years ago, the property has not produced during the past 20 years.

    Nitrogen, 0.46 (percent)
    Calcium carbonate, 83.10 (percent)
    Lime phosphate, 0.59 (percent)
    Potash (soluble), 0.46 (percent)
    Undetermined, 15.39 (percent)

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Berkeley Rock Company's Quarry (Trap-Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Berkeley Rock Company's Quarry; Berkeley Rock Co., J. T. Cochran, manager, Bacon Block, Oakland. This quarry is one quarter of a mile beyond the end of Broadway, Oakland, and is reached by College avenue. The deposit is a much altered trap-rock, and is used for concrete, macadam, and gutter rock. The company produces about 250 yards a day."

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Berkeley Rock Company’s Quarry  (Trap Rock)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Blair Quarries (Chert - Phthanite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Blair Quarries; The Realty Syndicate, 1160 Broadway, Oakland, owner. On Moraga road, just east of Mountain View Cemetery, and about 4 miles from the city hall. The main quarry is located near the summit of the hill, about 100 yards up the slope north of the road. It was opened in 1901. The rock is a chert (phthanite), mostly red, some yellowish, and is extensively used as road-dressing in Piedmont district and in the cemetery. The company is opening a 'blue rock' quarry, of metamorphosed sandstone, on the south side of the road, and is tunneling in quest of rock for a quarry 50 yards west of and below the larger Blair quarry. Twenty men are at work."

    Ill. No. 135. Blair Quarry No. 1 (Macadam Rock), Oakland, Alameda County. Ill. No. 135. Blair Quarry No. 1 (Macadam Rock), Oakland, Alameda County
    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Blair Quarries  (Chert)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Blake & Bilger Company's Quarry (formerly the Oakland Paving Company's Quarry) ("Blue Rock"/Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Blake and Bilger Company's Quarry (formerly the Oakland Paving Company's Quarry); F. W. Bilger, secretary and treasurer, Central Bank Building, Fourteenth and Broadway, Oakland. Located on McAdam street, just off Broadway. It was opened about 1870, and has been operated almost constantly since. It is the largest quarry in Alameda County. The rock is typical 'blue rock,' as termed by the trade, and is a metamorphosed sandstone, with lime carbonate in seams. It is used for macadam, concrete, and gutter rock. Two Gates crushers handle all the rock. Two steam percussion drills are in operation. From 60 to 80 quarrymen are employed."

    Ill. No. 136. Blake & Bilger Quarry (Formerly Oakland Paving Co.), McAdam Street, Oakland. Ill. No. 136. Blake & Bilger Quarry (Formerly Oakland Paving Co.), McAdam Street, Oakland
    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Blake and Bilger Company’s Quarry  (AKA the “Oakland Paving Company’s Quarry)  (Blue Rock, a metamorphosed sandstone)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland; & Photo caption:  “Blake and Bilger Quarry, Photo from “Our Oakland”)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Broadway Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Broadway Quarry, on both sides of Broadway, near Hudson street, Oakland. The rock is a soft, friable, buff-colored sandstone, interbedded with soft, slate-colored shales. Idle in October, 1904."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Broadway Quarry  (Sandstone)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Crusher Quarry (Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Crusher Quarry; E. B. & A. L. Stone Company, 900 Broadway, Oakland. Near their crushing plant on Laundry Farm; opened about 1899. Reddish, decayed rock is hauled from face without crushing, and used for sidewalks, etc."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the E. B. & A. L. Stone Company’s Crusher Quarry  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Curran Quarry (formerly the O'Brien Quarry) ("Red Cement Gravel") (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Curran Quarry; John Curran, School street, owner. This was formerly the O'Brien Quarry, and is on Maple avenue, Fruitvale District. The rock is termed 'red cement gravel, and is a very much altered rock, recemented by a red clay. Used as a top dressing for roads and walks."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Curran Quarry  (AKA the O’Brien Quarry)  (Red Cement Gravel)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Diamond Canon Quarry (Heyland Quarry) (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Diamond Canon Quarry (Heyland Quarry); Hutchinson Company, 401 Fourteenth street, Oakland, owner. There are two quarries; in the upper one the rock is a hard, medium-grained, gray sandstone; in the lower quarry face in the canon, 100 yards below the road, is a flinty, dark-colored, metamorphosed sandstone. The crushing plant is abandoned and badly out of repair."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Hutchinson Company’s Diamond Cannon Quarry (AKA the Heyland Quarry)  (Sandstone)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Easton & Wilson Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Easton & Wilson Quarry; Clark Avery, at quarry, owner. On Lincoln avenue, 1 mile from Diamond P. O. It was opened about 1899 and worked intermittently for two years. The rock, a blue metamophosed sandstone, occurs in boulders. Large quantities of soft sandstone and slaty shales made so much waste that it was unprofitable to work at the time. Two other small openings show similar characteristics."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Easton & Wilson Quarry (Sandstone)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Fruitvale White Gravel Mine (Packard Quarry) (Quartz Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Fruitvale White Gravel Mine (Packard Quarry); George Mack, in charge. A small quarry at the end of Maple avenue, Fruitvale District. A disintegrated quartz rock, with a clay cementing material in seams; used as a top dressing for roads and walks."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Fruitvale Gravel Mine (Packard Quarry) (Quartz)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Leona Heights Quarry (formerly the California Improvement Company's Quarry (Basalt) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Leona Heights Quarry; E. B. & A. L. Stone Company, 900 Broadway, Oakland, owner; G. H. Luchs, superintendent. It was formerly the California Improvement Company' quarry. It is on Laundry Farm, on the summit of a prominent ridge, one mile north of Mills College. The rock is a fine-grained basalt, and is used for macadam and concrete. The quarry face is about 125 feet high. Two gravity trams, one 2500 feet long and the other 1200 feet, take the rock from the quarry to the crusher at the termini of the railroads, both narrow and broad gauge. About 300 yards a day are rushed by two Gates crushers. Electricity is used for power. thirty-five men are at work in the quarry."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California - Leona Rock Quarries (Basalt), presented by Steven Mix (history) The following quote is used with the permission of the author. Steven Mix has placed three maps that include the Leona Heights area on Picasa – Oakland History Maps(1)  Laundry Farm Canyon (with Laurel, Mills, Leona Heights, Redwood Heights, Seminary) topographical/gps map with historical landmarks noted by dates.  (2)  East San Antonio (Piedmont Pines, Dimond, Laurel, Laundry Farm, Mills, Leona Heights, Redwood Heights, Seminary, Millsmont) Oakland, CA historical reproduction map showing creeks, roads, and property lines, based in part on 1878 New Historical Atlas of Alameda County, California, Illustrated, (Thompson & West), reprinted 1976 by Valley Publishers.  (3)  East Brooklyn Township (Montclair, Piedmont Pines, Oakmore, Dimond, Laurel, Leona Heights, Laundry Farm, Redwood Heights, Mills, Seminary, Millsmont, Eastmont, Oak Knoll) Oakland, CA historical reproduction map showing creeks, roads and property lines, based in part on 1878 New Historical Atlas of Alameda County, California, Illustrated, (Thompson & West), reprinted 1976 by Valley Publishers.)  (The link to the material below is no longer available.)
      <http://pages.prodigy.net/stevenmix/laundry.htm#quarries>

      According to Steven Mix, the Leona Rock quarries, which opened about 1909, are located "a mile up the hill at the present site of Merritt College. Three aerial and cable tramways hauled rock from the quarries, across the Observatory hill, and down into Laundry Farm Canyon to the Car barn site. From there, the railroad then hauled the rock down from the hills. It was used as macadam for local roadways." If you visit the area, you can still see the impressive concrete bunker. This article also mentions the now-closed Gallagher and Burk Quarry. Please use the link above to go to Steven Mix's web site for more history on these quarries.

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California - Leona Quarry (Basalt) (From Mines and Mineral Producers Active in California (1994-1995), Special Publication 103 (Revised 1996), California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology, in cooperation with California Department of Conservation, Office of Mine Reclamation. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

      Mine name: Leona Quarry; Operator: Gallagher & Burk, Inc.; Address & County: 7100 Mountain Blvd., Oakland, CA 94605; Phone: (510) 635-5200; Latitude: 37.78, Longitude: -122.16, and Mine location number: Map No. 3; Mineral commodity: Stone.

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California (Leona Rock Quarries) (Basalt) - "Council to Debate Plan for Turning Oakland Hills Quarry Into Shopping Mall," from the San Francisco Chronicle, Tuesday, March 24, 1998.
    • Oakland, Alameda County - Leona Quarry (Environmental Impact - Books)

      Leona Quarry: Draft Environmental Impact Report, (Oakland, California), by EIP Associates, San Francisco, EIP Associates, 1987.

      Leona Quarry: Final Environmental Impact Report, (Oakland, California), by Environmental Science Associates, Oakland, California, Community and Economic Development Agency, San Francisco, California, Environmental Science Associates, 2002.

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – Leona Quarry Photographs (posted October 4, 2009), presented by Andrew Alden, About Geology. (Scroll down to “The Leona Quarry” section.)

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – Leona Heights – E. B. & A. L. Stone Company (California Improvement Company; Operated by Gallagher & Burk, Inc.)  (Basalt)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland; Photo caption:  “Leona Heights Quarry, photo from "Our Oakland”)

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Mills College Quarry (Gravel) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Mills College Quarry; same owner (as the Leona Heights Quarry: E. B. & A. L. Stone Company, 900 Broadway, Oakland). Near the college grounds; opened about 1892. The rock is a red gravel and clay mixture, and is used as top dressing for garden and side walks, without crushing. Electric trains, both broad and narrow gauge, enter this and the 'Crusher Quarry.'"

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Mills College Quarry (E. B. & A. L. Stone Company)  (Gravel/Clay)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Piedmont Memorial Company Plant  (The following photograph is from Design Hints For Memorial Craftsmen, March 1929, Minnesota, Dan B. Haslam, Editor and Publisher)
    “The very attractive plant of the Piedmont Memorial Co., Oakland, California. (circa 1929) “The very attractive plant of the Piedmont Memorial Co., Oakland, California. (circa 1929)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Piedmont Paving Company's Quarry (Sandstone - "Blue Rock") (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Piedmont Paving Company's Quarry; C. D. Bates, Jr., secretary, Macdonough Building, Fourteenth street and Broadway, Oakland. About three fourths of a mile above the head of Lake Merritt and one fourth of a mile from Wildwood avenue. It was opened in 1878 by the Alameda Macadamizing Company, and reopened by the present management about 1892. The rock is a grained, metamorphosed sandstone, bluish in color, locally termed 'blue rock.' It is used chiefly for macadam, but some is utilized for rubble and ballast."

    Ill. No. 137. One face of Piedmont Paving Company's Quarry, Oakland. Ill. No. 137. One face of Piedmont Paving Company's Quarry, Oakland
    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Piedmont Paving Company Quarry (Sandstone / “Blue Rock”)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland (4 miles from), Alameda County, California - Pryal’s Ranch Quarry (The following excerpt is from The Natural Wealth of California Comprising Early History; Geography, Topography, and Scenery; Climate; Agriculture and Commercial products; Geology, Zoology, and Botany; Mineralogy, Mines, and Mining Processes; Manufactures; Steamship Lines, Railroads, and Commerce; Immigration, Population and Society; Educational Institution, Population and Society; Educational Institutions and Literature; Together with a detailed description of each county, its topography, Scenery, Cities and Towns, Agricultural Advantages, Mineral Resources, and Varied Productions, By Titus Fey Cronise, San Francisco: H. H. Bancroft & Company, 1868, pp. 153. (The book is available on Google Books for reading or downloading to your computer in PDF format.)

    “Alameda county contains large quarries of granite, limestone and sandstone, suitable for building purposes. The quarry from which the stone used in erecting the Deaf and Dumb and Blind Asylum was obtained, is situated on Pryal’s ranch, about four miles from Oakland. The supply of this stone in exhaustless. A quarry of close-grained, grayish sandstone, has recently been opened about four miles from Hayward’s. Nearly all the brown sandstone used in San Francisco, is obtained from quarries in this vicinity.”

  • Oakland (about 5 miles from), Alameda County, California - the Ransome Construction Company's Quarry (Basalt) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Ransome Construction Company's Quarry; office, 473 Fourteenth street, Oakland. This quarry is on the Old Fish Ranch road, about 5 miles from the Oakland City Hall. It was opened in April, 1904. A tramway 600 feet long carries rock from the quarry face to the crusher at side of road. The rock is a fine-grained basalt, and is used for macadam and concrete. Some gutter rocks are sorted out. The rock is hauled to Oakland and Berkeley by wagon. Eighteen quarrymen were at work in October, 1904."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Ransome Construction Company Quarry (Basalt)  (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - Red Rock (Macadam) W. H. Maxwell, Owner (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    Red Rock Quarry, located in Oakland, owned by W. H. Maxwell.

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Red Rock Quarry (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Syndicate Quarry (Jasper - Phthanite) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Syndicate Quarry; The Realty Syndicate, 1160 Broadway, Oakland, owner. Located on south side of Buckeye avenue, half a mile northeast of the Catholic cemetery. It was opened about 1901, and has been worked intermittently. The rock is a jasper (phthanite), similar to that in the Blair quarry."

    • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Syndicate Quarry (Jasper / Phthanite)  (Realty Syndicate) (from Oakland “Stone Quarries (Historical),” presented on Oakland Wiki.  Includes map of part of Oakland)
  • Pleasanton (east of), Alameda County, California - the Eliot Gravel Pit (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Eliot Gravel Pit; Southern Pacific Railroad Company, owner. One and three fourths miles east of Pleasanton. The pit is half a mile long and about 300 yards wide, and is operated as gravel is needed for ballast or concrete. The cars are loaded by steam shovel."

  • Pleasanton (between Sunol & Pleasanton), Alameda County, California - Pleasanton Deposit (Limestone) (Excerpt from "Limestone in California," by Clarence A. Logan, California Journal of Mines and Geology, Vol. 43, No. 3, July 1947, California Division of Mines, San Francisco, California, pp. 175-357. Used with permission, California Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey.)

    "Pleasanton deposit is midway between Sunol and Pleasanton on the Western Pacific Railroad. Some lime was burned there about 20 years ago and sold for use on land. No production has been reported in recent years."

  • Rocky Brook Canon, Alameda County, California - the Farwell Sandstone Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Farwell Sandstone Quarry; Wm. Farwell, Berkeley, owner. In Rocky Brook Canon, a tributary of Niles Canon. Idle since 1898. Last used in foundation of Masonic Home, between Niles and Decoto."

  • San Leandro, Alameda County, California - the Estudillo Quarry (Basaltic Rock) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Estudillo Quarry; J. H. Ravekas, owner; at present under lease to the E. B. & A. L. Stone Company, who are preparing to reopen it. Three fourths of a mile from center of San Leandro, at southeast corner of Estudillo and Grand avenues. The stone is an altered basaltic rock, much fractured and with serpentine in seams."

  • San Leandro, Alameda County, California - the San Leandro Quarry (Sandstone - "Blue Rock") (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "San Leandro Quarry; E. B. & A. L. Stone Co., 900 Broadway, Oakland, owner. South and across the canon from the dam at foot of Lake Chabot, and about 2 miles east of San Leandro. It was opened in 1886 by the present owner. The rock is a regular 'blue rock' - a metamorphosed sandstone. At present the overburden, a red rock (jasper), covers the face of the old quarry by an immense slide. The original quarry is abandoned, only the jasper rock from the talus slope being used as a sidewalk material."

  • Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, Alameda County, California - Basalt Lava Rock Quarry (Basalt) (photographs and description) The Preserve is a part of the East Bay Regional Park District. Along the hiking trail, you can see one of the labyrinths in the park on the floor of the rock quarry. A few of the photos that you can see online of the labyrinth are available on Flickr (Photo 1) (Photo 2) and learn more about the quarry that the labyrinth in:  “Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve: Labyrinths Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve: Labyrinths a draw at the bottom of an old quarry,” by Gail Todd, Special to The Chronicle, March 31, 2011, pp. 1-2.  
    • Sibley Volcanic Preserve - Round Top - Basalt Quarries, presented by Andrew Alden, Geology (photograph, history, and description of the area). According to Mr. Alden, the "land around Round Top was basalt quarries until the mid-20th century."
  • Sunol (3 miles from), Alameda County, California - the Sunol Road Quarry (Sandstone) (From The Structural and Industrial Materials of California, Bulletin No. 38, California, State Mining Bureau, San Francisco, California, 1906.)

    "Sunol Road Quarry, 2 miles from Mission San Jose, and 3 miles from Sunol, on west side of road. The rock is a hard, shaly, buff-colored sandstone. The quarry is idle.)"

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