Logo Picture Left SideLogo Picture Right SideLogo Text at Center
Home > Search > Site Map > Alabama > Structures and Monuments in Which Alabama Stone was Used

Structures and Monuments in Which Alabama Stone was Used

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Alabama
    • Alabama - the “Head of Christ,” Sculpture by G. Moretti (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916, pp. 140)
      Plate IX. The “Head of Christ,” by G. Moretti, was the first notable piece of sculpture ever made in cream-white Alabama marble. It was exhibited at the St. Louis Exposition, where it was awarded a silver medal. The “Head” was greatly admired both for its artistic worth and the beauty of the marble in which it was wrought. The “Head of Christ,” by G. Moretti, was the first notable piece of sculpture ever made in cream-white Alabama marble.
    • Alabama - the “Siegfried,” Sculpture by G. Moretti (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916, pp. 144)
      Plate X. This life-size stature (sic) of “Siegfried” by G. Moretti in cream-white Alabama marble, now on exhibition in Florence, Italy, shows the wonderfully possibility of sculpture in this marble. Life-size statue of "Siegfried" by G. Moretti in cream-white Alabama marble. (circa 1916)

      The rich cream tone is in strong contrast to the bluish tone of much of the Italian statuary marble and is much like some of the famous Grecian statuary marbles.

    • Anniston, Alabama - The Church of St. Michael and All Angels (The web site from which the quotation below was taken is no longer available.)
      <http://www.brasenhill.com/stmikesaa/history.html>

      Local materials were used in the construction of the church buildings as much as possible. A narrow gauge railroad, built specifically for this purpose, was used to transport sandstone from Rocky Hollow. Carrara marble was used in the altar, and alabaster was shipped from Italy and England were used in the interior.

    • Anniston, Alabama - the Noble Theatre Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Noble Theatre building.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the American Trust Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916, pp. 196.)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the American Trust Building.

      Plate XXXVII. Main entrance American Trust building, Birmingham, Ala. Alabama “Pavonazetta” panels and Alabama “Cream A” trimmings. Main entrance American Trust building, Birmingham, Ala. Alabama “Pavonazetta” panels and Alabama “Cream A” trimmings. (circa 1916)
    • Birmingham, Alabama - Arrington’s Tomb (photographs and history) presented on the Birmingmaster web site.

      This article was published on September 26, 2001. It describes the tomb being constructed as a memorial for Mayor Arrington constructed in the shape of a pyramid. The article indicates that construction is expected to last for thirty years. At the time the article was written, the Chief Stonecutter was Azhir Safim. Alabaster quarried from quarries located south of town will be used for the outside layer. This quarry was only “newly reopened” in 2001. [I've been told by a Birmingham resident that there is no such structure as Arrington's Tomb. Peggy B. Perazzo]

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Brown-Marx Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Brown-Marx building.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Chamber of Commerce Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Chamber of Commerce building.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the First National Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the First National Bank building.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Highlands Bar & Grill Oyster Bar (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.highlandsbarandgrill.com/about.html>

      This web site indicated that the oyster bar is made of Alabama marble.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Jefferson County Bank Building (Interior & Banking Rooms) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916, pp. 198-199.)
      Plate XXXVIII. Interior Jefferson County Bank, Birmingham, Ala. All Alabama marble, including tiling. Interior of the Jefferson County Bank, Birmingham, Alabama (circa 1916).

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Jefferson County Bank building and the Banking Rooms.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Jemison Real Estate & Ins. Co.’s Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Jemison Real Estate & Ins. Co.’s Office.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Lyric Theatre (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Lyric Theatre.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - Rock Quarry today the Wildflower Garden in the Birmingham Botanical Garden. According to I Love Gardens.com, the wildflower garden was once a rock quarry. (The link to “I Love Gardens” is no longer available.)
      <http://www.ilovegardens.com/Alabama_Gardens/alabama_gardens.html>
    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Union Station (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of Union Station in Birmingham, Alabama.

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the University of Alabama Birmingham - Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building, from “Limestone: Dependable and Adaptable,” by Cory Sekine-Pettite, in Building Stone Magazine, Spring 2007. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available on the web site.)
      <http://www.buildingstonemagazine.com/spring-07/limestone.html>

      Photograph caption: “The University of Alabama, Birmingham, Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building was constructed using Vetter Stone’s Alabama Silver Shadow oolitic limestone. The architect was CUH2A, Princeton, N. J.”

    • Birmingham, Alabama - the Woodward Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Woodward building.

    • Cullman, Cullman County, Alabama – Ave Maria Grotto – the Faux Stalactites  (The information below is from the Encyclopedia of Alabama)

      “…Some of the faux stalactites are fashioned from marble quarried at the Gantt quarry in Sylacauga, Talladega County…..”

    • Dothan, Alabama - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Dothan, Alabama.

    • Fayetteville (near), Talladega County, Alabama – the Fort Williams Cemetery – the Cemetery Stone of Margaret Hamilton Averiett, from “Old Marble Tombstones in Alabama,” by Carolyn Luttrell, in the Alabama Review, July 1950)

      Dr. Edward Gantt had monuments created out of the Sylacauga marble in the shapes of tall shafts and urns. The tombstone for Margaret Hamilton Averiett is described.

    • Fort Payne (northeast of), DeKalb County, Alabama – DeSoto State Park Buildings  (The following excerpt is from the Encyclopedia of Alabama.)

      “Most of the (DeSoto State) park’s buildings date from the 1930s, when the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) undertook construction projects within the park that included a lodge and other visitor structures. Many of these structures are still standing. The stone used to construct the buildings was mined from a quarry on the park property; drill marks can still be seen on some stones along one of the hiking trails. The quarry itself can be reached from the White Trail at the end of the parking lot next to the store.”

    • Gadsden, Alabama - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Gadsden, Alabama.

    • Mobile, Alabama - the United States Post Office (Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, pp. 200-201.)
      Plate XXXIX. United States Post Office, Mobile, Alabama. Exterior and interior in Alabama marble. United States Post Office, Mobile, Alabama. (circa 1916)
      Plate XL. The portico of United States Post Office, Mobile, Alabama, finished in Alabama marble. The portico of United States Post Office, Mobile, Alabama, finished in Alabama marble. (circa 1916)
    • Montgomery, Alabama - the Bell Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Bell building.

    • Montgomery, Alabama – the Confederate Monument on Capitol Hill – the Base & Pedestals  (The following excerpt is from the Encyclopedia of Alabama.)

      “Immediately after laying the cornerstone, the tall, stepped base and integral pedestals for the four statues were built with Alabama limestone from T. L. Fossick’s Rockwood quarry near Russellville, Franklin County, but fundraising and construction progress on the shaft and statuary were slow.  The limestone for the colossal column proved problematic. Available historical documentation is incomplete, but it appears that the stone for the column delivered in 1888 was unsatisfactory, necessitating a second order, possibly at additional expense to the LMA. Recent scientific conservation analysis of the stone in the monument indicates that the limestone in the shaft came from Indiana and not Alabama. Throughout their lengthy memorial efforts, the LMA promoted the monument as being built of ‘native’ (i.e., Alabama) stone. It is unclear whether the LMA knew that the limestone for the column came from Bedford, Indiana, where Doyle’s father owned a quarry, but it is clear that the relationship between the patrons and the artist soured in the late 1880s….”

    • Montgomery, Alabama - Judicial Building - the Rotunda. (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.alalinc.net/library/tour_text/rotunda.cfm>

      Alabama marble, Italian Cremo de la Cotta, and Fior Pesca were used in the floor design. The Alabama-shaped centerpiece was created of rare blue marble, which was used to circle the centerpiece. Marble from Alabama was used "within the ring and outside of the map of Alabama, which is in the center."

    • Montgomery, Alabama - State Archives and History Museum (The following information is taken from "Alabama Travel Tips" presented by Postcards From America, WriteLine.)

      The building in which the State Archives and History Museum is located was built with Tennessee gray marble for the marble walls and staircases and Alabama white marble.

    • Montgomery, Alabama - Union Station (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Union Station in Montgomery, Alabama.

    • Somerville, Somerset County, Alabama - the Somerset County Courthouse. This information is presented on the njcourts.com web site.

      In the “History of Somerset Courthouse” section of this web site, it is stated that courthouse was built with white Alabama marble.

    • Sylacauga (near), Talladega County, Alabama – Cemetery Stones & Monuments of Sylacauga Marble, from “Old Marble Tombstones in Alabama,” by Carolyn Luttrell, in the Alabama Review, July 1950)

      Dr. Edward Gantt had monuments created out of the Sylacauga marble in the shapes of tall shafts and urns. The tombstone for Margaret Hamilton Averiett is described. Some of the these tombstones were signed “E. Gantt, Sylacauga, Ala.”

    • Talladega, Alabama - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabam, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Talladega, Alabama.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Arkansas
    • Hot Springs, Arkansas - the Thompson-Gregory Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Thompson-Gregory building.

    • Little Rock, Arkansas - the Arkansas State Capital Rotunda, presented on the web site of the Arkansas Secretary of State. (The information below was obtained from the “Arkansas State Capitol Virtual Tour.” The link to this tour is no longer available.)
      < http://www.sos.arkansas.gov/tours.html>

      According to the tour, the Rotunda was “The interior (of the rotunda) is constructed of marble from three states. The marble on the floors and walls came from Vermont. The columns around the third floor are Colorado marble, and the grand staircases are Alabama marble.”

      • Arkansas State Capitol Virtual Tour
      • Little Rock, Arkansas - the Arkansas State Capital (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

        Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Arkansas State Capital.

    • Little Rock, Arkansas - the Pulaski County Court House (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Pulaski County Court House.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Connecticut
    • New Haven, Connecticut - the Connecticut Savings Bank Building (Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior of the Connecticut Savings Bank building.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Florida
    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Aetna Building, presented by Newspad.

      According to this news release, the stones used in the construction of the Aetna Building are as follows: a large quantity of Georgia marble, 30,000 cubic feet of Alabama limestone, and 3,420 cubic feet of pink marble from North Carolina.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Atlantic National Bank Building (Exterior & Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior and interior of the Atlantic National Bank Building.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Burbridge Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Burbridge Hotel.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the City Engineering Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the City Engineering building.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Florida Life Insurance Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Florida Life Insurance building.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Seminole Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Seminole Hotel.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the St. James Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the St. James building.

    • Jacksonville, Florida - the Windle Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Windle Hotel.

    • Pensacola, Florida - the Sacred Heart Hospital (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Sacred Heart Hospital.

    • Pensacola, Florida - the San Carlos Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the San Carlos Hotel.

    • Pensacola, Florida - Union Station (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of Union Station in Pensacola, Florida.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Georgia
    • Americus, Georgia - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Americus, Georgia.

    • Atlanta, Georgia - the Forsyth Street Theatre Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Forsyth Street Theatre building.

    • Atlanta, Georgia - the Georgian Terrace (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Georgian Terrace.

    • Atlanta, Georgia - the Healy Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Healy building.

    • Atlanta, Georgia - the Hurt Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Hurt building.

    • Atlanta, Georgia - the Lowry National Bank - the Banking Rooms (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Banking Rooms of the Lowry National Bank.

    • Macon, Georgia - the Dempsey Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Dempsey Hotel.

    • Millen, Georgia - the Jenkins County Court House (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabam, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Jenkins County Court House.

    • Savannah, Georgia - the Savannah Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Savannah Hotel.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Illinois
    • Chicago, Illinois – the Ogden Armour Residence, from A brief history of Sylacauga Marble, by Ruth Beaumont Cook, B. B. Comer Memorial Public Library Foundation, 2009, pp. 9.

      According to this book, marble quarried in Alabama, was used on the exterior of the Ogden Armour residence in Chicago by 1916.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Continental & Commercial Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Continental & Commercial Bank building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Federal Life Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Federal Life building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Fields Store (Interior), Team Room (Interior), and Fountain (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Fields Store and Team Room and the Fountain.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Insurance Exchange Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Insurance Exchange building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Kesner Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior the Kesner building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Lytton Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Lytton building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Ogden Armour Residence (Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior of the Ogden Armour Residence.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Peoples Gas Light and Coke Co. Building (photographs and history)

      (The following article and photographs are from The Peoples Gas Light and Coke Co. BuildingMine and Quarry Magazine, Sullivan Machinery Co., Publisher, Chicago, Illinois, Vol. V. No. 3 - February, 1911, pages 463 - 466.) The building was constructed of steel frames and girders and was finished about 1910. A colonnade of 18 solid polished granite columns were used on the front of the building. The granite was "supplied by the Webb Granite and Construction Company and the granite was quarried and turned by the Rockport Granite Company of Rockport, Massachusetts, from their 'Sea Green' quarry." The building is "finished or sheathed up to and including the third floor with pink granite from Milford, Massachusetts. Above that terra cotta tile was used to represent granite.

      A large amount of marble was used in the interior of the building "in the corridor floors, wainscots and fixtures." For the wainscots on all floors except the first, Alabama white marble was used. This marble was quarried from the quarries of the Alabama Marble Company of Sylacauga, Alabama. Grecian marble was used on the main floor of the building except for the Alabama marble used at the entrance in the columns. "The floors of the corridors and toilet rooms throughout the building (were) Green Pentelikon stone." The architects of the building were Messrs. D. H. Burnham & Co.

      • Chicago, Illinois - the Peoples Gas Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

        Alabama marble was used for the Peoples Gas building.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the University Club (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the University Club.

    • Chicago, Illinois - the Westminster Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Westminster building.

    • Navoo, Illinois - the Navoo Illinois Temple (photograph and history)

      As of July, 2001, the Navoo temple was still under construction. The original temple was constructed with limestone which was quarried from a site west of the temple. The waters of the Keokuk Dam submerged most of the original quarry. Church officials chose limestone quarried from Russellville, Alabama, a subsidiary of Minnesota.s Vetter Stone Company, to use for the present temple as it was felt it was a close match to the limestone used in the original temple.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Indiana
    • Danville, Indiana - the Hendricks County Court House (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Hendricks County Court House.

  • Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Kentucky
    • Louisville, Kentucky - the City Hall Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the City Hall building.

    • Louisville, Kentucky - the City Hospital (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the City Hospital.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Louisiana
    • Baton Rouge, Louisiana - the State Capitol (photographs and history) Alabama limestone was used in the construction of the 34-story Louisiana Capitol.
    • New Orleans, Louisiana - the Benevolent Knights of America Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Benevolent Knights of America building.

    • New Orleans, Louisiana - Metairie Cemetery - the Tomb of Eugene Lacosst and his Mother (This information is taken from “Historic and ornate tombs found in Metairie Cemetery,” Clarion Herald Publishing Company, August 25, 2004.) (The link from which the following information was taken is no longer available.) <http://clarionherald.org/20040825/stall.htm>

      Eugene Lacosst chose to have the tomb he created for himself and his mother to be a replica of a “cardinal’s tome in the church of Santa Croce in Florence, Italy.” He chose to have the intricately carved tomb to be built of a solid block of cream-colored Alabama marble.

    • New Orleans, Louisiana - the Whitney Central Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Whitney Central Bank building.

    • Shreveport, Louisiana - the Ward Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Ward building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Maryland
    • Baltimore, Maryland - the Maryland Institute Building (Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior of the Maryland Institute building.

    • Kensington, Maryland - Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Temple (photograph and history)

      The basic structure of the temple was of concrete. White Alabama marble was used to clad the exterior.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Michigan
    • Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan - the General Motors Building (renamed Cadillac Place) (photographs) (The following information was presented in the document, “Economic Development: The Deal Is Done…And What A Deal It Is!" (The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.newcenter.com/newsletters/newsltr8_00_pg5.pdf >

      Italian tavernelle marble and Alabama marble were used to face the lobbies and most of the corridor walls. Gray Tennessee marble was used to cover the floors; and Bedford, Indiana, limestone was used to cover the exterior of the building.

    • Detroit, Michigan - the Kresge Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Kresge building.

    • Detroit, Michigan - the Whitney Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Whitney building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Minnesota
    • Duluth, Minnesota - the Alworth Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Alworth building.

    • Minneapolis, Minnesota - the First National-Soo Line Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the First National-Soo Line building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Mississippi
    • Greenville, Mississippi - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Greenville, Mississippi.

    • Hattiesburg, Mississippi - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

    • Vicksburg, Mississippi - the Alabama State Memorial in the Vicksburg National Military Park. The following information is provided on the National Park Service web site for the Vicksburg National military Park:

      "The Alabama State Memorial is located on the south loop of Confederate Avenue at milepost 13.6 of the park tour road. The memorial cost $150,000 when it was sculpted in 1951 by Steffan Thomas of Stone Mountain, GA. The bronze sculpture represents seven heroic men from Alabama being inspired by a woman who represents the state itself. The casting rests upon a base of Weiblin grey granite from Elberton City Quarries, Inc., Elberton, GA.

      "The granite comes from the same quarries that were used in the construction of the Memorial Arch at Vicksburg National Military Park and the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. The memorial was dedicated on July 19, 1951."

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Missouri
    • St. Louis, Missouri – “Head of Christ” Sculpture by G. Moretti (from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama , 1916, pp. 140-141)
      Plate IX. The “Head of Christ,” by G. Moretti, was the first notable piece of sculpture ever made in cream-white Alabama marble. It was exhibited at the St. Louis Exposition, where it was awarded a silver medal. The “Head” was greatly admired both for its artistic worth and the beauty of the marble in which it was wrought. The “Head of Christ,” by G. Moretti, was the first notable piece of sculpture ever made in cream-white Alabama marble. (circa 1916)
    • St. Louis, Missouri – City Club of St. Louis & Missouri Hotel – Arcade & Entrance (Union Marble and Tile Company Advertisement from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, October 1927, Vol. 5, No. 6, pp. 54.)

      Union Marble & Tile Company, 1109-27 South Seventh Blvd., St. Louis, MO.

      William C. Fox, General Manager

      T. P. Barnett Co., Architects. Humes-Deal Co., General Contr’s.

      (Photo caption) Arcade and Entrance to City Club of St. Louis and Missouri Hotel. Alabama, Carthage and York Fossil marbles were used extensively throughout this building, and these materials were fabricated and erected by us.

    • St. Louis, Missouri - the Union Marble and Tile Company (Advertisement) (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, April 1925, Vol. 2, No. 12, pp. 61.)

      Union Marble and Tile Company

      William C. Fox, Gen. Mgr.

      1109-27 South Seventh Blvd., St. Louis, MO.

      Alabama and Westfield Green Marble was used in this Main Entrance to the St. Louis University High School, St. Louis, Mo. Barnett, Haynes & Barnett, Architects. Marble was used extensively throughout this building and was furnished by the Union Marble and Tile Co.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Nebraska
    • Omaha, Nebraska - the Central Market (from Stone Magazine, April 1924, Vol. XLV, No. 4, pp. 229)

      (Photo caption) New Central Market, Omaha, Neb., Showing a generous and Well Selected Use of Marble to create an Attractive Effect and Insure Cleanliness. Counter Walls of Madre Veined Alabama, Base of Westfield Green and Trim of Napoleon Gray Marble Furnished by Tompkins-Keil (sic) Marble Company.

      • Omaha, Nebraska - the Central Market (from “Marble As An Interior Finish,” by John Stephen Sewell, Birmingham, Alabama, in Throvgh The Ages Magazine, February 1925, Vol. 2, No. 10, pp. 23-31.)

        (Photo caption, pp. 28) The New Central Market at Omaha, Nebraska, is a model of cleanliness with its counters, walls, base and trim of marble. The counters and walls are of Madre Veined Alabama; the base of Westfield Green, the trim of Napoleon Gray.

    • Omaha, Nebraska - the Omaha Grain Exchange Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the New Omaha Grain Exchange building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in New Jersey
    • Newark, New Jersey - the Pennsylvania Station - Window in the Main Waiting Room (photographs and descriptions) (The information below is presented on the Philadelphia Chapter of the PRRT&HS.) (The link to the information below is no longer available on this web site.)
      <http://www.prrths.com/Phila_Newark_Page5.htm>

      The window at the westerly end of the main waiting room is filled with “sheets of variegated translucent Alabama Marble.”

    • Somerville, New Jersey - the Somerset County Court House (Exterior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior of the Somerset County Court House.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in New York
    • New York City, New York - the Bank of America Building - Column Base & Panel (from Stone Magazine, February 1926, Vol. XLVII, No. 2, pp. 108)

      (Photo caption) Column Base and Panel of Napoleon Gray Marble in New Bank of America Building, 44 Wall Street, New York. Floor of Belgian Black and Madre Cream Alabama Marbles. Furnished by Tompkins Kiel Marble Co. Marble Contractors: McGrathy & Sons. Architects: Trowbridge & Livingston.

    • New York, New York - the City Hall, New York City, in Lower Manhattan between Broadway & Park Row (history and photographs), presented on the view on cities web site.

      The present City Hall in Lower Manhattan was completed in 1811 and officially opened in 1812. It was constructed to replace the previous city hall which was constructed in 1700. According to this article, the present “...City Hall is a blending of two distinct periods of architecture. While the inside can best be described as American Georgian, the exterior is decidedly French Renaissance....The exterior of City Hall is clad with Alabama limestone above a Missouri granite base.”

    • New York, New York - the Continental Building (Interior) at 80 Maiden Lane (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Continental Building at 80 Maiden Lane, New York, New York.

    • New York, New York - the Harriman National Bank Building (Interior) (formerly the Night and Day) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Harriman National Bank building. (Formerly the Night and Day.)

    • New York, New York - the Knickerbocker Trust Company Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Knickerbocker Trust Company building.

    • New York, New York - the Trust Company of America Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Trust Company of America building.

    • New York, New York - the Western Union Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Western Union building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in North Carolina
    • Charlotte, North Carolina - the Commercial Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Commercial Bank Building.

    • Durham, North Carolina - the Durham County Court House (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Durham County Court House.

    • Raleigh, North Carolina - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Raleigh, North Carolina.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Ohio
    • Youngstown, Ohio - the First National Bank (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the First National Bank.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Oklahoma
    • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma - the State Capitol (photograph and history)
    • The following stones were used in the construction of the Capitol building: Indiana limestone was used on the exterior of the building. Pink granite from Troy, a southern Oklahoma town, was used for the base of the building on the exterior. Alabama marble was used for the floors throughout the capital, and the wall bases and stairways are of Vermont marble. The outside steps and tables along the Grand Staircase are created from black granite from Cold Springs, Oklahoma. (Further information on the stones used in building the state capitol is available on the Seminole Nation, Indian Territory and History & Genealogy web site.)
      • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma - the Floors in the Oklahoma State Capitol (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

        Alabama marble was used for the floors of the Oklahoma State Capitol.

    • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma - the United States Post Office (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the United States Post Office in Oklahoma City.

    • Tulsa, Oklahoma - the Tulsa Hotel (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Tulsa Hotel.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Pennsylvania
    • Erie, Pennsylvania - the Marine Bank (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Marine Bank.

    • Milford, Pennsylvania – “Kiel Kill Kare” Fountain  (from “Garden Furniture From Earliest Times, Marble Has Been the Favorite Material for Beautifying Formal Gardens,” in Through the Ages Magazine, July 1926, pp. 28)
      A fountain of Alabama marble at ‘Kiel Kill Kare.’ Milford, Pennsylvania.” “A fountain of Alabama marble at ‘Kiel Kill Kare.’ Milford, Pennsylvania.” "Through the Ages," July 1926
    • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - the City Hall (photographs and history) (This information was presented on the Department of Public Property’s Virtual City Hall web site. The link from which the following information was obtained is no longer available.)
      <http://www.phila.gov/property/virtualcityhall/vch.asp?map_name=councilchambers>)

      White Alabama marble was used to cover the “columns, pilasters, cornices rostrum bases, wainscoting, panels framing walls, and gallery railings.”

      • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - the Common Council Chamber (Interior) of the Philadelphia City Hall (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

        Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Common Council Chamber of the City Hall.

      • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - the Select Council Chamber of the City Hall (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

        Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Select Council Chamber of the City Hall.

    • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - the Lafayette Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Lafayette building.

    • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - the Widener Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Widener.

    • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - the Harry Davis Theater (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Harry Davis.

    • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - the William Penn Hotel Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the William Penn Hotel.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Tennessee
    • Chattanooga, Tennessee - the American National Bank and Trust Company Building (736 Market Street)

      The bank was established in 1912 and moved to the present site in 1915. The present building, constructed in 1963, replaced another building, which was constructed in 1928. Flame-finished gabbro of dark "granite" from Wisconsin, was used on the lower two stores. White Alabama marble was used for the interior pillars. The lobby staircase was constructed of "highly fractured dark green Vert Tinos marble from Greece. Light brown Italian travertine was used on the interior walls. Marble-chip terrazzo was used for the floors. (See the photograph section, 28. American National Bank.) (From Building Stones of Downtown Chattanooga, (Tennessee), by Robert Lake Wilson, 1979. The digital PDF version is available through the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Geology Program, Department of Physics, Geology and Astronomy.)

    • Chattanooga, Tennessee - the Criminal Justice Building (5th and Walnut Streets)

      Light gray oolitic limestone from Russellville, Alabama, was used on the upper floors of the building. Gabbro or black "granite" from the Transvaal in South Africa was used on the lower three floors. Light gray Georgia marble was used for the lobby floor and steps. The building was completed in 1976. (See the photograph section, 34. Criminal Justice.) (From Building Stones of Downtown Chattanooga, (Tennessee), by Robert Lake Wilson, 1979. The digital PDF version is available through the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Geology Program, Department of Physics, Geology and Astronomy.)

    • Chattanooga, Tennessee - the Department of Education Building (319 Oak Street)

      Bedford Indiana Limestone was used as a base and for the arches. Blocks of pink sandstone from Sand Mountain, Alabama, was used for the façade of the building, which was constructed in 1929 as a part of the original first Baptist Church. (See the booklet for an explanation for the cavities seen in the sandstone.) (See the photograph section, 37. Department of Education.) (From Building Stones of Downtown Chattanooga, (Tennessee), by Robert Lake Wilson, 1979. The digital PDF version is available through the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Geology Program, Department of Physics, Geology and Astronomy.)

    • Chattanooga, Tennessee - the First Centenary United Methodist Church (401 McCallie Avenue)
      The church building was constructed in 1972. "Ever textured light gray oolitic lime stone" from the Rockwood quarry near Russellville, Alabama, was used for the entire exterior. The Kate West Chapel was built in 1951. Bedford Indiana Limestone was used in the construction. Alabama Limestone was used in the construction of the educational wing. (See the photograph section, 3. First Centenary United Methodist.) (From Building Stones of Downtown Chattanooga, (Tennessee), by Robert Lake Wilson, 1979. The digital PDF version is available through the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Geology Program, Department of Physics, Geology and Astronomy.)
    • Chattanooga, Tennessee - the First Tennessee Bank Building (710 Market Street)
      The original building was constructed on the present site in 1905 by the Hamilton National Bank. In 1966 the present structure was completed. Opalescent Minnesota "granite" ("really a quartz monzonite) was used in the construction. Tennessee "Crab Orchard" sandstone was used for the lobby floor. White Alabama marble panels were used near the elevators on the upper floors. (See the photograph section, 30. First Tennessee Bank.) (From Building Stones of Downtown Chattanooga, (Tennessee), by Robert Lake Wilson, 1979. The digital PDF version is available through the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Geology Program, Department of Physics, Geology and Astronomy.)
    • Memphis, Tennessee - the Peabody Hotel - the Lobby (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, possibly April 1927, Vol. 4, No. 12, pp. 55.)

      Alabama Marble Company

      Main Office and Plant: Gantt’s Quarry, Alabama

      Sales Department: 1701 Avenue A, Birmingham, Alabama

      Producers of all grades of Alabama Marble, Manufacturers and Contractors for interior marble work in any kind of marble. Inquiries for prices and estimates should be addressed to the Sales Department, Birmingham, Alabama.

      View of Lobby of Peabody Hotel, Memphis, Tenn. W. W. Ahlschlager, Architect.

      Interior marble work finished and set in place by Alabama Marble Company, Gantt’s Quarry, Alabama. Marble base, Belgian Black; wall marble above, Rose St. Genevieve; curb of fountain, Black and Gold. Fountain is Roman Travertine, made of one block specially quarried and imported for this purpose.

      Alabama Cream A. A recognized standard among Interior White marbles. Unsurpassed for decorative and utilitarian purposes. Fine-grained, with Creamy-White background and moderate clouding. Impervious, non-staining, weather-proof and durable. Carves perfectly; takes and holds any polish from dull gloss to brilliant luster. The Alabama Marble Company has supplied millions of dollars’ worth of Alabama marble in hundreds of buildings without causing a single day’s delay on any one of them.

    • Nashville, Tennessee - the Doctors’ Office Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Doctors’ office building.

    • Pulaski, Tennessee - the Giles County Court House (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Giles County Court House.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Texas
    • Corpus Christi, Texas - the Corpus Christi Cathedral. This information is presented on the Handbook of Texas Online web site.

      White Alabama marble was used for the communion rail of hand-wrought iron and marble that separates the nave from the sanctuary. Other stones used in the Cathedral include the two statues of Italian Carrara marble, the walls of gray Carthage veinless marble, and a “four-foot-high wainscot of cream-colored Tavernelle Clair marble, capped and based with verde antique marble from Maryland.” Terrazzo of a cream-color was used with a border of Spanish tile on the floor.

    • Dallas, Texas - the Commonwealth Banking Room (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Commonwealth Banking room.

    • Dallas, Texas - the Cotton Exchange (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Cotton Exchange.

    • Dallas, Texas - the Criminal Court Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Criminal Court building.

    • Galveston, Texas - the Scottish Rite Cathedral (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Scottish Rite Cathedral.

    • Houston, Texas - the Carter Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Carter building.

    • Houston, Texas - the Kress Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Kress building.

    • Paris, Texas - the First National Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the First National Bank building.

    • Wichita Falls, Texas - the First National Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the First National Bank building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Virginia
    • Alexandria, Virginia - the First National Bank Building (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the exterior of the First National Bank building.

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Washington, D. C.
    • Washington, D.C. - the Abraham Lincoln Memorial (photograph)

      White Colorado marble was used in construction of the exterior, and Indiana limestone was used for the interior walls. Pink Tennessee marble was used on the floor, and Alabama marble for the ceiling. The Wildernet.com web site states that “...panels of Alabama marble soaked in paraffin to make them translucent.”

    • Washington, D.C. - the Army and Navy Club (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Army and Navy Club.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Cosmos Club (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Cosmos Club.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Metropolitan Bank Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the interior of the Metropolitan Bank building.

    • Washington, D.C. - the National Gallery of Art West Building (photograph)

      The exterior of the building was built using light-pink marble from Tennessee. The floors were verde antique marble from Vermont. The columns in the rotunda were built using brecciated marble from Carrara, Italy. The restrooms were built with marble from Missouri. The fountains at each end were built with travertine marble from Jasper County, Missouri. The walls of the galleries were built with fossil-bearing limestone from Colbert County, Alabama.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Southern Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior the Southern Building.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Supreme Court Building (photograph and history)

      The exterior of the Supreme Court Building was constructed of Vermont marble. Crystalline flaked, white Georgia marble was used in the four inner courtyards. A creamy-colored Alabama marble was used above the basement level, the walls and floors of all of the corridors and entrance halls, either partially or wholly.

    • Washington, D.C. - the United States Capital - the Hall of Columns, presented by the Architect of the Capitol web site.

      The original floor was made up of “Minton encaustic tiles from England.” After they became too badly worn, they were replaced in the early 1920s with the present floor tiles of “white marble from Alabama and black marble from New York.”

      • Washington, D.C. – the United States Capitol – the large Bust of Abraham Lincoln located in the Capitol Complex, from A brief history of Sylacauga Marble, by Ruth Beaumont Cook, B. B. Comer Memorial Public Library Foundation, 2009, pp. 6.

        According to this book, the large marble bust of Abraham Lincoln, which was carved by Gutzon Borglum in 1908, was carved from Alabama marble.

    • Washington, D.C. – the United States Supreme Court Building – the Walls & Floors of all Corridors, the Entrance Halls above the basement level, and 36 Interior Columns, from A brief history of Sylacauga Marble, by Ruth Beaumont Cook, B. B. Comer Memorial Public Library Foundation, 2009, pp. 18.

      According to this book, primarily creamy Alabama marble was used for the walls and floors of all of the corridors and entrance halls above the basement level…(and) the thirty-six interior columns…were quarried…from Alabama marble.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Washington D.C. Temple of the Church of Latter Day Saints (photograph and history)

      The outside of the temple is covered with Alabama marble.

    • Washington, D.C. – the Washington Monument - the Memorial Stone from Alabama, from A brief history of Sylacauga Marble, by Ruth Beaumont Cook, B. B. Comer Memorial Public Library Foundation, 2009, pp. 4.

      The marble stone that was donated to the Washington monument by the M. W. Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the State of Alabama was quarried from Gantt’s Quarry, according to History of Talladega County, by Brooks Russell, 1928.

    • Washington, D.C. - the Washington Monument - the Alabama Memorial Stone, presented by the National Park Service (photograph and history)

      The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Alabama Memorial Stone entry reads as follows and can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

      The Alabama stone in the Washington Monument can be viewed in “WAMO Stones Section 2” at the above web address.

      Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument at the following web address.

      “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

      “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

      The Alabama Stone in the Washington Monument:

      "Donor: The State of Alabama.

      "Location: 40-Foot Level, West Wall, 2nd Landing

      "Dimensions: 4 feet by 2 feet

      "Inscriptions: "Alabama. A Union of Equality, As Adjusted by the Constitution."

      "Material: Native marble

      "Sculptor: Information not available

      "Carver: J.M.N.B. Nix & Co. of Wetumpka, Alabama

      "Date: 1850

      "More Information: A Joint resolution of December 4, 1849, authorized the Governor to contract for and order a solid and beautiful specimen of marble. Governor Henry Watkins Collier was notified on April 20, 1850, that the block was available for inspection at the State Penitentiary at Watumpka, on April 29th.

      "A state warrant was issued from the contingent fund of the Governor for $155.30. It was thought that the best means of transportation for the stone was by rivers, as the passageway was navigable from Wetumpka to Mobile. On May 28, 1850, the block of marble was forwarded from Alabama. It was noted in the Washington National Monument Society Records that the block of stone was received during the week of August 6, 1850.

      "Related Categories: States, Marble, The State of Alabama and 40-Foot Level.

      "Sources: Park Files"

  • The Finished Products from Alabama Stone in Wisconsin
    • Milwaukee, Wisconsin - the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Building (Interior) (excerpt from Preliminary Report on The Crystalline and Other Marbles of Alabama, Bulletin 18,” by William F. Prouty, Geological Survey of Alabama, 1916)

      Alabama marble was used for the interior of the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance building.

[Top of Page]