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Structures and Monuments in Which Alaska Stone was Used

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Alaska

  • Alaska (southeastern part of), Alaska – Tombstones and Small Blocks of Marble from Ham Island Quarries (circa 1907) (Marble) Excerpt from “The Building Stones and Materials of Southeastern Alaska,” by Charles W. Wright, in Mineral Resources of Alaska: Report on Progress of Investigations in 1907, Bulletin 345, by Alfred H. Brooks and Others, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, 1908, pp. 122.

    Ham Island.

    “Ham Island lies at the junction of Blake Channel and Bradfield Canal, 25 miles southeast of Wrangell. It is about a mile and a half wide and consists largely of crystalline limestones with interstratified beds of calcareous schist striking N. 35° W. and dipping 75° NE….”

    “Two distinct varieties of marble are found – one fine grained and pure white, the other very coarse grained and pale blue...Much of the marble appears to be free from impurities.”

    “Two groups of claims have been located on this island, the Woodbridge-Lowery group on the west side and the Miller group on the east side. On the former the marble quarried is principally of a white, finely crystalline variety, but at the Miller property the deposit, exposed in a bluff 40 feet high and 100 feet long, is of a coarsely crystalline texture and a bluish color. On both of these properties considerable exploratory work has been done, and large blocks of the marble have been quarried, from which tombstones and small blocks have been chiseled and polished for local use. The properties are favorably located both for quarrying and transportation.”

    • Alaska (southeastern part of) – Marble Blocks from Ham Island Used for Small Blocks Locally (circa 1908) (Marble) Excerpt from “Building Stones and Materials,” Mineral Resources of Alaska: Report on Progress of Investigations in 1908, Bulletin 379, By Alfred H. Brooks and Others, Department of the Interior, United States Geological Survey, 1909, 84-85.

      “The Ham Island marble properties, in the Wrangell mining district, were bonded early in September, and a crew of men was employed to determine the extent of the deposits on this island…Except small blocks for local use, there was no production from this locality.”

    • Southeast, Alaska – Cemetery Monuments of Marble (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

      “A small quantity of Alaska marble is used locally for monuments, for which it is said to be entirely suitable….”

      “Two groups of claims on Ham Island, owned originally by Woodbridge & Lowery and by Mr. Miller, have been purchased by the Vermont Marble Co. (see fig. 5) and are being thoroughly prospected by that company, but up to 1914 the results had not warranted opening a commercial quarry. Many large blocks of marble were quarried by the former owners, and from these blocks tombstones and small blocks have been cut and polished by hand for local use.”

  • Juneau, Alaska - the Alaska State Capitol (The previous information was presented on the Alaska.com web site.) (The web address from the following information was taken is no longer available.)
    <http://www.alaska.com/akcom/trivia/trivcom/symbols/story/3005293p-3029500c.html>

    The building has brick-faced reinforced concrete. Indiana limestone was used for the lower façade, and the four columns at the portico and the interior trim are of marble quarried in southeastern Alaska. These marbles are light and dark Tokeen marbles quarried at Tokeen, Prince of Wales Island. The construction of the building began in September 1929 and was completed in February 1931. Click here to view the Alaska State Legislature's web site that includes more photographs and history of the Alaska State Capitol. This web site includes a capitol video tour.

    This is a very interesting article in which the author describes the Tokeen marble used for the building's exterior columns and interior trim and the early marble industry in Alaska. The Vermont Marble Company in Vermont became interested in the marble deposits as early as 1899 after the company was notified by Alaskan prospectors who “told of mountains of marble.” The author states that “The first marble ever quarried in Alaska is said to have come from Ham Island near Wrangell before the turn of the 20th Century….” The quarries remained active until after World War I when marble went out of style.

    The following locations in Alaska are described in this article: Marble deposits on Prince of Wales Island and throughout the islands of southeastern Alaska. Marble was quarried at Calder by Alaska Mining. The Vermont Marble Co. became involved in with Mr. Fox, the original quarrier who maintained their Tokeen camp on Marble Island. Marble Island, also known as Fox Island, is an island of marble where blocks of quarried marble can still be seen lying on the island today, according to the article.

    • Juneau, Alaska – Our State Capitol Building, in the “Kid’s Corner” section.

      “Ground was broken September 18, 1929. The future capitol building was completed on February 2, 1931, and formally dedicated on February 14, 1931….”

      “…Construction is of brick-faced reinforced concrete. The lower façade is faced with Indiana limestone. The four columns of the portico and the interior trim are of light and dark Tokeen marble from quarries at Tokeen, Prince of Wales Island, in Southeast Alaska. Alaska has one of the few capitol buildings that lacks a dome.”

    • Juneau, Alaska – the Alaska State Capitol Building, on Wikipedia

  • Ketchikan, Alaska – the Holy Name Catholic Church (The following information is from the Holy Name Catholic Church web site in the “About Us” section.)

    According to this web site, the ground breaking ceremony for the new church was held on October 21, 1984. The marble from which the cornerstone for the church was created was quarried on nearby Marble Island.

  • Nome area, Alaska – the Nome Seawall, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, “Where to Go” section.

    “Cape Nome is a massive granitic outcrop that is much more resistant to weathering than surrounding lands.  Local Alaska Native corporations quarry the rock and truck or barge it to large-scale construction projects up and down the coast.  Nome’s seawall is built from this granite.  Amidst considerable construction or quarry activity, birds continue to nest or roost on the rock faces….”

  • Wrangell, Alaska – the St. Philip’s Episcopal Church – the Altar (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    “A small quantity of Alaska marble is used locally for monuments, for which it is said to be entirely suitable. A handsome altar in St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Wrangell was fashioned (except the cross) from white marble obtained from Ham Island, Calder, and Tokeen, Alaska. The body of the altar has received a hone finish; the cross, which is of polished Italian marble, is mounted on a base of polished marble from Tokeen. There is apparently no essential difference between these pieces of Italian and Alaskan marble.”

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in

  • Phoenix, Arizona - the Luhrs Building - the Floor, Base, Treads & Risers (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, January 1926, Vol. 3, No. 9, pp. 56)

    Salomone-O’Brien Marble Co., Knoxville, Tennessee

    The illustration shows the elevator lobby of the Luhrs Building, Phoenix, Arizona. The marble in this treatment was erected by us for the Lautz Missouri Marble Company. The floor, base, treads and risers are of Carthage marble; the balance is of Alaska Tokeen, a very colorful marble.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in California

  • California - Wainscotings, Ceilings, Floor Tiles, Moldings, Fixtures, Rails, Balustrades, etc. (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    “Small quantities of marble have been shipped to the United States from the quarries of the Alaska, El Capitan, Mission, and Alaska-Shamrock companies, but by far the greater part of the output has come thus far from the quarry of the Vermont Marble Co. on Marble Island. The product of this quarry is shipped to the electrically driven mill owned by the company at Tacoma, Wash., where the rough blocks are sawed into smaller blocks for turning and planning and into slabs three-quarters of an inch to 1 inch thick for polishing. The slabs and sawed blocks are worked up into wainscotings, ceilings, floor tiles, moldings, fixtures, rails, balustrades, and a variety of forms for interior finish and decoration. The market for these products is principally in the cities of the Pacific Coast States, but it extends as far eastward as the Atlantic seaboard.”

  • Berkeley, Alameda, California – University of California, Berkeley - the Campanile – Sather Tower – the Pyramid at the Peak (The following information is from University of California, Berkeley: An Architectural Tour and Photographs, by Harvey Helfand, photographs by Harvey Helfand, contributor Harvey Helfand, Princeton Architectural Press, 2002, ISBN 1568982933, 9781568982939, pp. 46.)

    According to this book, the floors and roof of the tower is faced with Raymond Granite from the quarries at Raymond, Madera County, California. White Alaska marble was used to surface the pyramid at the peak of the tower. By 1927 granites were seen in the granite facing, and rusted anchors caused chunks of the Alaskan marble to fall off of the tower.

  • Fresno, Fresno County, California – the Griffith McKenzie Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Griffith McKenzie building.

  • Fresno, Fresno County, California – the Rowell Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Rowell building.

  • Inglewood, Los Angeles County, California – the Community Mausoleum - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Community Mausoleum building.

    • Inglewood, Los Angeles County, California - the Community Mausoleum (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

      Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Community Mausoleum.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Black Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Black building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Brockman Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Brockman building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Haas Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Haas building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Hollingworth Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Hollingworth building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – Isaacs Building – Floors, Stairs, & Walls (Photograph from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)
    Plate XXV. Lobby of Isaacs Building, Los Angeles, Calif.; floors, stairs, and walls of Tokeen marble (Tokeen, Alaska). Photograph of lobby of the Isaacs building in Los Angeles, California; floors, stairs, and walls of Tokeen marble from Tokeen, Alaska, circa 1920.
  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Los Angeles Investment Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Los Angeles Investment building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Marsh-Strong Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Marsh-Strong building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Merchants National Bank Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Merchants National Bank building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Southern Pacific Passenger Station - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Southern Pacific Passenger Station building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Title Insurance and Trust Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Title Insurance and Trust building.

  • Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California – the Van Buys Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Van Nuys building.

  • Modesto, Stanislaus County, California - the Community Mausoleum (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Community Mausoleum.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Bankers Investment Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Bankers Investment building.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Federal Realty Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Federal Realty building.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Harrison Hotel and Apartments Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Harrison Hotel and Apartments building.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Oakland Manual Training School Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Oakland Manual Training School building.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California – the Realty Syndicate Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Realty Syndicate building.

  • Oakland, Alameda County, California - the Realty Syndicate Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Realty Syndicate building.

  • Presidio, San Francisco County, California - the United States General Hospital (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the United States General Hospital.

  • Sacramento, Sacramento County, California – the Capital National Bank Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Capital National Bank building.

  • Sacramento, Sacramento County, California – the Forum Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Forum building.

  • Sacramento, Sacramento County, California – the Travelers Hotel - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Travelers Hotel building.

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the Central Mortgage Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Central Mortgage building.

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the Spreckels Theater - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Spreckels Theater building.

  • San Diego, San Diego County, California – the United States Post Office Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the United States Post Office building.

  • San Francisco, California – the Flatiron Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Flatiron building.

  • San Francisco, California – the Hobart Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Hobart building.

  • San Francisco, California – the Odd Fellows Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Odd Fellows building.

  • San Francisco, California – the Sharon Estate Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Sharon Estate building.

  • Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California – the Community Mausoleum Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Community Mausoleum building.

  • Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, California - the Community Mausoleum (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Community Mausoleum.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Hawaii

  • Honolulu, Hawaii – the Pearl Harbor Naval Hospital Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Pearl Harbor Naval Hospital building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Idaho

  • Boise, Idaho – the Gem Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Gem building.

    • Boise, Ada County, Idaho - the Gem Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

      Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Gem building.

    • Boise, Idaho - the Idaho State Capitol (The link from which this information was obtained is no longer available.) <http://www.idahocapitolcommission.org/trivia.html>

      Most of the external construction material was sandstone from a quarry on Table Rock, east of Boise, which the state purchased for use in building the capitol building. For the interior, four types of marble were used: Red marble from Georgia, gray marble from Alaska, green from Vermont, and the black marble is from Italy.

      • Boise, Idaho – the Idaho State Capitol - About the History of Idaho’s Capitol, Phase One: The Central Portion (1905-1912), presented by the Idaho Capitol Commission, in PDF format.

        According to this document, “The interior marble finishes for the entire central portion were supplied, set and cut by the Vermont Marble Company. The marbles used in the interior are described. The following is a description of two of the marbles used: “…Brocadillo marble was selected for the wainscoting and upper wall panels at the staircases and corridor, except for the bases, architraves, wainscot caps, molding and major door castings. These latter ornamental components, in addition to treads, risers, balustrades, floor tiles and floor borders, were of a white marble softly clouded with gray, from Tokeen, Alaska….”

    • Boise, Idaho – the Idaho State Capitol - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

      According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Idaho State Capitol building.

  • Lewiston, Idaho – the United States Post Office - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the United States Post Office building.

  • Moscow, Idaho – the United States Post Office - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the United States Post Office building.

  • Moscow, Latah County, Idaho - the United States Post Office Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the United states Post Office building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Massachusetts

  • Boston, Massachusetts – the Orpheum Theater Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Orpheum Theater building.

  • Boston, Massachusetts - the Orpheum Theater (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Orpheum Theater.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Minnesota

  • St. Paul, Minnesota – the Great Northern Railway Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Great Northern Railway building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Montana

  • Great Falls, Montana – the Ford Commercial Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Ford Commercial building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Nebraska

  • Omaha, Nebraska - the El Beudor Apartments (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, August 1923, Vol. 1, No. 4, pp. 42.)

    Executed and installed by Sunderland Bros. Co.

    Operators of up-to-date Marble Mills at Omaha, Nebraska, and Sioux City, Iowa.

    Main Offices: Sunderland Bldg., Omaha, Nebraska

    (Photo caption) Lobby of El Beudor Apartments, Omaha. James T. Allan, Architect. Floor of Napoleon Gray Tile, base and Border of Verde Antique, stair of Alaska Tokeen and Gravina.

  • Omaha, Nebraska - the Sunderland Building - Elevator Lobby Floor Border (from Throvgh The Ages Magazine, January 1926, Vol. 3, No. 9, pp. 49)

    (Photo caption) Elevator lobby, Sunderland Bldg., Omaha. The floor is buff monotone, with a Napoleon Gray border. The base is Westfield Green; the die and trim, Alaska marble. Furnished and installed by Sunderland Bros. Co. The architect was Geo. B. Prinz. Sunderland Bros. Company, Marble Department. Main Offices, Sunderland Bldg., Omaha, Nebraska.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Ohio

  • Cleveland, Ohio - the Cleveland Union Station (photograph and history) The following is from The Cleveland Union Station - A Description of The New Passenger Facilities and Surrounding Improvements, The Cleveland Union Terminals Co. and The Cleveland Terminals Building Co., 1930 (PDF). (Source: Cleveland State University Library.)

    Construction of the station and buildings started in 1922. Botticino marble was used to finish the walls of the Traction Lobby and Tennessee marble was used on the floors. At the south end of the East Traction Concourse there is the restaurant. Belgian Black and Alaska Token marble were laid in a pattern for the floor.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Oregon

  • Columbia River Gorge, Oregon – the Vista House at Crown Point - Friends of Vista House (photographs and history)
  • The Dales, Oregon – the Dalles County Courthouse Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Dalles County Courthouse building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Charlotta Court Building – Entrance - Decorative Work (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    “The Alaska-Shamrock Marble Co. reports having furnished marble from Dickman Bay for decorative work in the entrance to the Charlotta Court and to the Majestic Theater buildings in Portland, Oreg.”

  • Portland, Oregon – the Littman-Wolfe Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Littman-Wolfe building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Majestic Theater Building – Entrance – Decorative Work (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    “The Alaska-Shamrock Marble Co. reports having furnished marble from Dickman Bay for decorative work in the entrance to the Charlotta Court and to the Majestic Theater buildings in Portland, Oreg. (See Pl. XXVI.)”

    Plate XXVI. Entrance to Majestic Theater, Portland, Oreg., decorated with colored marble from Dickman Bay. Photograph of entrance to Majestic Theater, Portland, Oregon, decorated with colored marble from Dickman Bay, Alaska, circa 1920.
  • Portland, Oregon – the Multnomah Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Multnomah building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Oregon Journal Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Oregon Journal building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Selling Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Selling building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Spaulding Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Spaulding building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Stevens Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Stevens building.

  • Portland, Oregon – the Wilcox Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Wilcox building.

  • Portland, Oregon - the Yeon Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Yeon building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Pennsylvania

  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – the Finance Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Finance building.

  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania – the City and County Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the City and County building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Utah

  • Ogden, Weber County, Utah - the Eccles Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

    Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Eccles building.

  • Provo, Utah County, Utah – the Utah County Court House (history and photographs) (The following information is from the Utah county web site.)

    According to this web site, Alaska marble tiles laid with borders of gray Tennessee marble were used on the floors of the main corridors of the Utah County Courthouse. Alaskan marble was also used for the balustrades around the corridors, and gray Tennessee marble was used for the stairs as well as the toilet partitions. Pink Syros scagliola was used for the wainscoting down the stairs.

  • Salt Lake City, Utah – the Empress Theater Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Empress Theater building.

  • Salt Lake City, Utah – the National City Bank Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the National City Bank building.

  • Salt Lake City, Utah – the Newhouse Hotel Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Newhouse Hotel building.

  • Salt Lake City, Utah – University of Utah – Corridor (Photograph from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)
    Plate XXIV. Corridor, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, decorated with Tokeen marble (Tokeen, Alaska). Photograph of corridor at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, decorated with Tokeen marble from Tokeen, Alaska, circa 1920.
  • Salt Lake City, Utah – the Walker Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Walker building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Washington State

  • Washington - Wainscotings, Ceilings, Floor Tiles, Moldings, Fixtures, Rails, Balustrades, etc. (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    “Small quantities of marble have been shipped to the United States from the quarries of the Alaska, El Capitan, Mission, and Alaska-Shamrock companies, but by far the greater part of the output has come thus far from the quarry of the Vermont Marble Co. on Marble Island. The product of this quarry is shipped to the electrically driven mill owned by the company at Tacoma, Wash., where the rough blocks are sawed into smaller blocks for turning and planning and into slabs three-quarters of an inch to 1 inch thick for polishing. The slabs and sawed blocks are worked up into wainscotings, ceilings, floor tiles, moldings, fixtures, rails, balustrades, and a variety of forms for interior finish and decoration. The market for these products is principally in the cities of the Pacific Coast States, but it extends as far eastward as the Atlantic seaboard.”

  • Bellingham, Washington – the United States Post Office Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the United States Post Office building.

  • North Yakima, Washington – the United States Post Office Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the United States Post Office building.

  • Olympia, Thurston County, Washington – the Washington State Capitol
  • Seattle, Washington – the Artic Club Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Artic Club building.

    • Seattle, King County, Washington - the Arctic Club Building (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

      Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the Artic Club building.

    • Seattle, King County, Washington – the Arctic Club Hotel, 700 Third Avenue (The following information was obtained from the Hotel-online.com web site.)

      “The Historic Arctic Building in Seattle Being Transformed into a 120-room Hotel,” March 30, 2007. According to this article, the foyer and stairwells of the Arctic building is lined with Alaskan marble.

  • Seattle, Washington – the Bank of California Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Bank of California building.

  • Seattle, King County, Washington – the old Federal Building (photograph and history), presented on the GSA web site.

    According to this web site, the Federal Office building is of Art Deco architecture and the “…public lobby floor is covered with dark red terra-cotta tile with cross strips and baseboards of Tokeen marble from Alaska. Walls are clad in light gray Wilkinson sandstone, and a coffered ceiling tops the space….”

  • Seattle, Washington – the Haight Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Haight building.

  • Seattle, Washington – the Hoge Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Hoge building.

  • Seattle, Washington – the King County Courthouse - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the King County Courthouse building.

    • Seattle, King County, Washington - the King County Courthouse (The following information is from the article, “The State Capitol and Its Marble and Keeping the Capital in Juneau,” by June Allen, October 20, 2004, in Sit News online: Stones in the News, Ketchikan, Alaska.)

      Marble quarried in Alaska was used in the construction of the King County Courthouse.

    • Seattle, Washington – the King County Courthouse (The following information was obtained from the King County web site.)

      According to this web site:

      “In 1914, the new courthouse construction was under way. Together with contractors Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging, architect A. Warren Gould constructed a five-story steel frame and reinforced concrete structure….”

      “The first five stories of the courthouse are a typical example of civic building design in early 20th century America. The style is beaux arts, which was the conservatively acceptable style for any civic building of the period.

      “The builders proudly employed the use of locally obtained and manufactured materials. For example, the second floor terra cotta architrave was made from materials from the Renton Clay and Coal Company; the granite used on the exterior came from a Snohomish County quarry; the bronze light fixtures, window frames and balustrades were made in Seattle ; and the Alaskan marble was cut by a company in Tacoma.”

  • Seattle, Washington – the King County Courthouse – “Loading dock is like no other -- full of white Alaskan marble: County courthouse's restoration weighed,” by Neil Modie, P-I Reporter, Thursday, June 8, 2006, Seattlepi.com.

    According to this article, “ The King County Courthouse may be America’s only public building with a trash-filled loading dock made of elegant, irreplaceable Alaskan white marble….” The marble used in the construction of the courthouse came from an Alaskan quarry is was long since closed.

  • Seattle, Washington – the L. C. Smith Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the L. C. building.

  • Seattle, Washington – the Lyons Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Lyons building.

  • Seattle, Washington – the McCormick Hotel - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the McCormick Hotel building.

  • Seattle, Washington – the Merrill Apartments – the Exterior Trim (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the exterior trim of the Merrill Apartments building.

  • Seattle, King County, Washington - the Smith Building / Tower

    (See: Seattle, King County, Washington - the L. C. Smith Building above.)

  • Tacoma, Washington – the National Realty Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the National Realty building.

  • Tacoma, Washington – the Perkins Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Perkins building.

  • Tacoma, Washington – the Tacoma Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Tacoma building.

  • Walla Walla, Washington – the Walla Walla County Courthouse - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Walla Walla County Courthouse building.

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Washington D.C.

  • Washington, D.C. - the Washington Monument Memorial Stones - the Alaska Memorial Stone, presented by the National Park Service (photograph and history)

    The National Park Service web site presents the memorial stones in placed in the interior of the Washington Monument. The Memorial Stone entry reads as follows and can be viewed on the National Park Service’s web site in either the “Album” or the “Slide Show.”

    The information and photograph of the stone from Alaska for the Washington Monument can found in “WAMO Stones Section 5.”

    The Washington Monument web site has recently been redesigned. Below is an description that was available on the National Park Service web site in January 2008 that describes the Memorial Stones in the Washington Monument:

    “A unique feature of the Washington Monument is the 193 memorial stones that adorn the interior of the monument. Starting in July 1848 the Washington National Monument Society invited states, cities and patriotic societies to contribute Memorial Stones. The Society listed some requirements to be followed. They asked that the stone be durable, a product of the state’s soil, and meet the following dimensions; four feet long, two feet high and 18 inches thick. These stones pay tribute to the character and achievements of George Washington. These traits are not only admired by Americans but by people the world over as seen by the number of stones donated by foreign countries. Below is a list of stones donated by state. In the near future all the stones will be online.

    “While viewing the stones please keep in mind that the Washington Monument has undergone extensive renovation over the last three years. A key component of the project has been the restoration of the memorial stones. Over the years the stones have been damaged by moisture and vandalism. The pictures that follow show the condition of the stones before their restoration. In the upcoming months new images will be added highlighting the restored stones.”

    The following information regarding the stone and photograph of the stone from Alaska in the Washington Monument can be found in WAMO Stones Section 5:

    “A stone from Hawaii was sent in 1935. The stone from Alaska, set at the 450-ft. level in 1982, is the upper-most stone in the monument.”

    Documented material history: no written documentation found.

    Additional documented material information: “The official state stone comes from Jade Mountain in northwest Alaska, courtesy of the Northwest Alaska Native Association.”

    Images:

    Name: Alaska

    Level: 450-ft.

    Donor: State of Alaska

    Dates: 1982/1982

    Original materials: jadite, bronze plaque, black material in letters of plaque

    Dimensions: 2' x 4'

    Sculptor/Carver: not known

    Original inscription: The Great Land On the 250th anniversary of his birth, Alaska placed the last state stone in this monument honoring George Washington February 22, 1982 [abbr.]

    2000 NPS slides

The Finished Products from Alaska Stone in Canada

  • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada – the Pacific Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Pacific building.

  • Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada – the Rogers Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Rogers building.

  • Victoria, British Columbia, Canada – the Sayward Building - Interior (The following information is from Mineral Resources of Southeastern Alaska, Bulletin 682, by Ernest F. Burchard, U. S. Geological Survey, 1920.)

    According to the above-cited book, marble from Tokeen, Alaska, was reported to have been used in the interior work of the Sayward building.

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