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Names and Origins of Stone - I

Name of Stone Origin Color Comments
I.M.V. Industria De Marmor Venzencia     “See Tavernelle.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iberian Agate “Quarried near villa Nova d’Ourem, Portugal ” “Variegated dark red, yellow and slate color.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iberian Travertine Spain   Interior and exterior (12)
Ibirama Granite Brazil   (5)
Ibn-Son-Abed Quarries (location)     “See Mizzeh Akhbar.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Icarai Granite Brazil   (5)
Idaho Marbles “Quarried at Spring Basin, Cassia County, Idaho” & “A deposit of dark gray with dull yellow lines, with an occasional white vein, is mentioned by Merrill as occurring near Paris, Bear Lake County.” USA   “A small amount of marble for local use is quarried at Spring Basin, Cassia County, Idaho; and a deposit of dark gray with dull yellow lines, with an occasional white vein, is mentioned by Merrill as occurring near Paris, Bear Lake County.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Igvara Mander Jaisalmer State     “See Abur Stone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ijamsville Slate Ijamsville area, Maryland   (9)
Illinois Limestone     “No siliceous crystalline rocks of any kind are to be found within the state limits. (Merrill) A stone known as Athens Stone from the Washington Ledge Quarry near Joliet was used extensively for floors, etc., but is no longer available. See Joliet Limestone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Illman Mountains (Amoazonite) (location) “Found among the granite rocks in the neighborhood of Niyask on the Illman Mountains, in the south part of the Ural Range, Russia.”   “The Amoazonite used in the making of small ornaments was until recent years almost exclusively from this district. The present supply is chiefly from the United States. See Amazonite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Image Stone of Indian     “Indian Steatite is used locally for all kinds of decorative work. The finer varieties are used almost exclusively for the carving of idols, hence the name Pratima Culler (Image Stone); while the coarser varieties are known as Pot Stone, and are frequently used in making vessels or ports. See Steatite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imezio-Colonnare     “Imezio-Fasciato Schietto and Imezio-Zonale are names sometimes given to Hymettian.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Impala African Black Granite South Africa   Interior and exterior (12)
Imperial Bardiglio Marble (Bardiglio Imperiale) Tuscany, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Imperial Beige Marble Greece   (5)
Imperial Black Granite Australia   (5)
Imperial Blue Granite Vermont, USA Dark-bluish gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924
Imperial Brown Granite Brazil (Bahia)   (5)
Imperial Crown Marble China   (5)
Imperial Gray Marble or Carthage Imperial Gray “Carthage Marble and White Lime Company Quarry, near Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri.” USA “Light shade of gray slightly clouded with darker shades. (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., 1907, Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Gray     “See Carthage Imperial Gray. “ (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Green Marble “Bancroft Quarries, Hastings County, S. Ontario, Canada ” “Banded with dull white and green waves.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Green Marble South Ontario, Canada “A fine grain marble consisting of dull white and green crystals with wave like and eradic markings.” Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 4, April, 1924
Imperial Grey Marble Mexico   (5)
Imperial Marble     “See Fleur De Pech, violet and gold.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Marble In the Danby Region of Vermont, USA Clear white or very light cream, clouds of light yellow or pinkish. Quarried in Western Vermont ca 1932. Used as exterior and interior marble. (10)
Imperial Pink Marble Brazil (Bahia)   (5)
Imperial Porphyry     “Same as Red Porphyry.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Quarry (location)     “See Danby.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Imperial Red Granite India   (5)
Imperial White Granite India   (5)
Imported Verde Antique     “A vague term used by American importers which may well apply to any Verde Antique not produced in America.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Index Granite State of Washington, USA Light gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 3, Mar., 1924 (for building & monumental work)
India Dolerite     “See Black Dolerite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
India Felsite     “See Green Felsite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
India Quartzite     “See Green Quartzite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
India Steatite     “See Steatite (Soap Stone).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indian Absolute Black Granite India   (5)
Indian Black Diamond Granite Town of Addison, on Yoho Bay in Maine, USA Very dark gray shade, with slight brownish tinge (5)
Indian Dakota Granite India   Interior and exterior (12)
Indian Granite Isle, Minnesota, USA Light gray Quarried by Cold Spring Granite Co. (1)
Indian Gray Marble “Quarries in Patiala, Punjab District, India” “Black and white mottling.” “Another gray marble from India known as Gray Bichia.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indian Juperana Granite India   (5)
Indian Marbles and Stones or Marbles of India     Indian Marbles and Stones or Marbles of India: Abri, Abur Stone, Badal Stone, Black Bichia, Gray Bichia, Gray Makrana, Green Felsite, Indian Gray, Krimchi, Kurkura, Nowshera, Pink Makrana, Sabalgarh, Sangkhutoo, Steatite, Sungmosa” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indian Pipestone or Catlinite “Is found in various places in Minnesota and Wisconsin. The principal source is at Pipestone City, Minnesota.” USA   (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., 1907, Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indian Pipestone     “See Catlinite.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indian River Slate Washington County, New York, area. Red, grey, purple, and black slate, as well as other variations. Indian River slate is some of the most highly sought after red slate that is marketed throughout the world. The valley contains Red, Grey, Purple, and Black slate, as well as other variations. Our nearby neighbors in Bomoseen, Vermont, have a large cache of purple and green slate (more common). More information can be obtained from the Geological Society of America which has some information about the Indian River Valley dated (1968). (This information was contributed by Duane Davis.) The following is the article Duane referred to: “Taconic Stratigraphy in Northern Washington County, New York,” by George Theokritoff, Geological Society of America Bulletin, pp. 171-190.
Indiana Limestone AKA Gray Indiana Limestone Lawrence County, Indiana (southern Indiana), USA   Geological name: Salem limestone
Indiana Oolitic Limestone Lawrence County, Indiana, USA    
Indiana Portland Sandstone Indiana, USA Gray-blue Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 9, September, 1923 )
Indiano Olano Onyx “Quarried at Indiano Olono, Como, Italy.” “Banded dark yellow and white.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indorado Marble Inkley Marble Quarries Company Quarry in the SW ¼ Sec. 36, T. 38 N., R. 8 E., Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, USA. “A darker gray marble streaked and clouded at places with bluish-gray and yellowish-brown areas, and mottled with white sections through fossils. Stylolites are prominent and dark-gray to black.” Indorado or Inkley Vein marble. From Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946.
Indurated Stone     “An artifical (sic) stone used in England.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Indwenha Hills     “See Port shepstone marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
InkMarble     “Melana or Ink Marble. Name applied to Pentelic Blue” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Inkley Vein Marble Inkley Marble Quarries Company Quarry in the SW ¼ Sec. 36, T. 38 N., R. 8 E., Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri, USA. “A darker gray marble streaked and clouded at places with bluish-gray and yellowish-brown areas, and mottled with white sections through fossils. Stylolites are prominent and dark-gray to black.” Indorado or Inkley Vein marble. From Missouri Marble, by Norman S. Hinchey, Report of Investigations No. 3, Missouri Geological Survey and Water Resources, Rolla, Missouri, 1946.
Intrecciato     “See Bigio Antico Intrecciato.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Inverness-shire Marbles     “See Skye Marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Inyo Marble “Quarries near Keller, Ingo* (sic) County, California...” USA (“Ingo” should be “Inyo”)   “Quarries near Keller, Ingo (sic) County, California, have been in operation for a number of years and many fine variegated samples are available. We have no record of available blocks or slabs of any particular grade.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ioannina Marble Greece Beige (7)
Iona Marbles “Quarried on the Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.” “Pure white ground mass, veined, dappled and specked with light bright green. Occasionally blue-black and indigo veins replace the green. (Watson). Blagrove describes a variety of Iona marble as gray and white, sometimes with yellowish-white spots or veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iona (Serpentine) “Quarried on the Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland.” “Light green, slightly variegated.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ionic Braided Brindisi (Fasano) Apulia Region, Italy   (12)
Ionic Flowery Brindisi (Fasano) Apulia Region, Italy   (12)
Ionic Red Braided Bari (Trani) Apulia Region, Italy   (12)
Ionic Red Filetto Marble (Filetto Rosso Jonico) Apulia, Italy   Interior (12)
Iowa City Marble “Quarried near Iowa City, Iowa.” USA   “Iowa City Marble or Bird’s-Eye Marble.” “Fossil corals consolidated by carbonate of lime. According to Merrill, this stone takes a good polish and is very beautiful, but cannot be obtained in blocks weighing more than a few pounds.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iowa Limestone     “The calcareous rocks of Iowa, according to Merrill, are as a rule non-crystalline, dull in color and with few qualities that render them desirable for ornamental purposes. Madrepore Marble, Iowa, and Iowa City Marbles are three exceptions.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iowa Marble “Quarried near LeGrand, Marshall County, Iowa.” USA “Light yellowish-buff or brown, with dark veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
“Iowa Marble” or “Bird’s-eye-marble” Near Le Grand, Marshall County, Iowa. Light yellowish, buff, or brown sub-Carboniferous magnesian limestone. “This is nothing more than fossil coral ‘(Acervularia Davidsoni) imbedded in the common Devonian limestone and often perfectly consolidated by carbonate of lime so that it may be polished like ordinary marble.” From Report of the United States National Museum Under the Direction of the Smithsonian Institutions For the Year Ending June 30, 1886, pp. 378.
Ipanema Beige Granite Brazil Beige (5)
Ipoh Quarries (location)     “See Veined Perak and White Perak.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ipplepen Gray     “See Gray Ipplepen.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ipplepen Marbles     “See Gray Ipplepen, Little Beltor Pink, Little Beltor Yellow and Ipplepen Red.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Ipplepen Red “Barton Quarrie at Ipplepen, Devonshire, England” “Red and gray with interlacing light pink veins. A few very faint fossils are noticeable.” “Ipplepen Red or Red Ipplepen.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Iridian Granite Isle, Minnesota, USA White Quarried by Cold Spring Granite Co. (1)
Irish Black Marble “Quarried near Springhill, Carlow County, Ireland.” “Dark gray with numerous fragments of light gray encrinital stems.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Black Marble “ Royal Oak Quarries, Bagnalstown, Carlow County, Ireland.” “Pure black, no fossils.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Black Marble “Donaghcumper Quarries, near Celbridge, Kildare County, Ireland.” “Deep black, fine grained, no fossils.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Black Marble “Rosbrien Quarries, Limerick, Ireland.” “Deep black with occasional fragments of white fossils.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Black Marble “Parkmoor Quarries, Limerick County, Ireland.” “Similar to Irish Black from Springhill Quarries.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Dove Marble or Dove Marble (Irish) “ Johnstown Quarries, near Formay County, Cork, Ireland.” “Blue-gray, with slender white veins and markings. (Watson)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Drab Marble “Carrick Quarries, near Edenderry, County Kildare, Ireland.” “Dark drab.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Granite Ireland Principal varieties are: (County Dublin) light and pinkish gray; (Counties Carlow & Wicklow) light to dark gray; (County Wexford) light to yellowish gray; (County Down) light greenish-gray to pinkish-gray; (County Galway) dark gray to red; (County Donegal) silvery-gray and red. Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 12, Dec., 1924 (“Is quarried in various districts and is widely used for building and monumental purposes.”)
Irish Gray Marble “Clerhane Quarries, King’s County, Ireland.” “Gray, filled with fairly large crinoids.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Gray Marble “Moate Quarries, near Athlone, Westmeath County, Ireland.” “Dark gray with white veins.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Green     “See Ballynachinch Quarries, Connemara Lissoughter Quarries, Streamstown Quarries.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Limestone Ireland Varies from dark gray to blue-black Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 10, Oct., 1924 (“A compact, fine-grained stone, often fossiliferous...Much of it takes a high polish and tools white, so it is largely used for monumental and carved work as well as for building.”)
Irish Marbles     “These marbles, with few exceptions, are the compact limestones of the carboniferous age. One exception is the Green Connemara Marbles of Galway, classed as serpentine by some geologists, as Ophiolites and Ophicalcites by others. For the marbles of: Armagh County, see Red Armagh. Carlow County, see irish Black, quarried near Springhill and at the Ryal Oak Quarries. Cord County, See Irish Dove, Little Island, Middleton and Red Cork. Donegal County, see Dunlewy. Galway County, see Connemara, Galway Black and Galway Gray. Kerry County, see Golden Breccia. Kildrare County, see Irish Black (Donagmcumper Quarry) and Irish Drab. Kilkenny County, see Black Madrepore, Gray Fossil, Kilkenny Black and Kilkenny Black Fossil. King’s County, see Irish Black (Rosbrian and Parkmoor Quarries).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish Rose Marble     “See Cork Red.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irish White     “Same as Pinka Grenna.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Irpina Breccia Avellino (Grottaminarda) Campania Region, Italy   (12)
Isabelle Campan “Quarried between Cannes and Villartel, Aude, France.” “Strong bright red with translucent spots of orange red and some white spots.” “(do not confuse with Campan Isabelle). (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isabelle Du Var Marble “Quarry near Estendar, Var, France.” “Lightt brownish-yellow tinged with red.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isabelle Marble “A marble by this name is quarried at Cierp, Haute Garonne, France, and another at Montroughe, Seine, France.”   “This is the French name for a color somewhat between white, yellow and flesh color...Jaspe Du Var is sometimes called Isabelle.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isabelle Marbles “Quarried at Montrouge, Seine, France.”   “Montrouge or Isabelle Marbles.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag. (circa 1920s), Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isere Marbles     “See Echaillon Blanc, Echaillon Jaune, Echaillon Rose, Rose Des Alpes (Susanne), Rose Des Alpes (Helen) and Rosche De Ratz Girolomo.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island Home Quarry     “”Island Home quarry or Island House Pike Quarry - See Gray Pink (Tennessee).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Chios Marble     “See Porta Santa.” Some archeologists claim that Africano marble was also found on the isle of Chios. The general opinion is that it was quarried in Asia Minor.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Corsica (location)     “In addition to the Corsican marbles listed, a Bardidiglio Fiorito is quarried on this island of which we have no description.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Elba (location)     “See Cipollino (Italian).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Euboea (location)     “See Cipollino (Greek).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Iona (location)     “See Iona.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Majorca (location)     “See Mallorca.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Man (location)     “See Poolvash Black.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Marble Alaska     “Island of Marble Alaska or Marble Island - See Gravena and Tokeen.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Marble     “See Marble Island.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Nippon Marbles     “See Black and White Japanaise and White Negato.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Palmaria Marble     “See Black and Gold.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Paros Marble     “See Parian.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA) Island of Prince of Wales (location)
Island of Prince of Wales (location)     “Alaska. Has large undeveloped marble deposits.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Romblon (location)     “See Romblon.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Scyros (location)     “Island of Scyros or Island of Skyros Marble. See Skyros Marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Skye Marble (location)     “See Skye Marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island of Tinos or Tenos (location)     “See Tinos Marble.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Island Red Granite China   (5)
Isle La Motte In Lake Champlain, Vermont, USA   “See Swanton Black.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isle La Mott Black Marble “Quarried on the Isle La Motte in Lake Champlain, Vermont.” USA “Dark grayish black.” “Swanton Black or Ebony, Isle La Mott, Vermont Black, Fish Black...Takes low polish.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Isle La Motte Limestone Isle La Motte, Vermont, USA    
Isle Royal Sandstone Minnesota, USA Brown or reddish color Stone Magazine, Vol. XLIV, No. 9, Sept, 1923 (resembles Connecticut Brownstone. Other names for this same stone: Fond du Lac and Sault Ste Marie.)
Issorie Green Marble (Verde Issorie) Valle d’ Aosta, Italy   Interior (12)
Istrian Stone On the Island of Istria “The colors vary from light brown or fawn to a delicate cream tint, microcrystalline in texture, and in some cases fossiliferous” “Limestones found on the Peninsula of Istria and used for building purposes are also used as ornamental stones and sold to the trade under various names...microcrystalline in texture, and in some cases fossiliferous...This material has been used for nearly two thousand years, perhaps longer. For those listed see Dark Roman, Girolomo, Light Roman, Orsera, Repen Zola and San Guista.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Istrian Stone (Pietra D’istria) Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Italy   Interior and exterior (12)
Itaera Granite Brazil (Bahia)   (5)
Italian Alabaster     “See Florentine Alabaster.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Antique Red Marble (Rosso Antico D’Italia) Linguria, Italy   Interior (12)
Italian Breccia     “Same as Breccia Violetto.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Brown Onyx (Onice Italiano Marrone) Tuscany, Italy   Interior (12)
Italian Cipollin Marble or Cipollino Italian or Cipollino D’Elba Marble “Quarried on the Island of Elba off the Coast of Italy.” “Very light pale green with irregular bands and narrow waving veins of darker shade.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) 1907; 1994 the MIA)
Italian Cipollino     “See Cipollino (Italian).” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Green Marble “Pigli Quarries, near Genoa, Liguria, Italy.” “Dark green with wavy veins and markings.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Griotte     “See Griotte d’Italie.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Marbles     “Italian Marbles are usually divided into classes as follows: Statuary - three grades; Breccias - listed under local names; Monotones - listed under local names; Serpentines - listed under local names; White - in four grades listed under White Italian; Dove Marbles - listed under local names; Travertines - listed under local names; Other stones, Onyx and Alabaster are listed under local names.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Onyx Marble According to Merrill, large deposits of Cave Onyx are found in various parts of Italy.”A rich honey-yellow deposit in caverns at Basca. Cuneo Province; at Indiano, Olona, in the province of Como; at Albino in the Val Setiana Provide of Bergamo; Pisogne, Province of Brescia; near Brescia; at San Giavanni Battista, Province of Genoa; near Siena, at Castelnova dell Abbate in the Commune of Monte Alcino (See last column.) “According to Merrill, large deposits of Cave Onyx are found in various parts of Italy, some of which have been worked to a more or less extent. Among the known deposits is a rich honey-yellow deposit in caverns at Basca, Cuneo Province. A banded dark yellow variety is found at Indiano, Olona, in the province of Como. At albino in the Val Setiana Province of Bergamo slabs of considerable superficial area, but limited thickness, have been quarried. A yellow-brown variety is obtained from Stalactites at Pisogne, Province of Brescia, and a dark brown variety from near Brescia. A stone described by Jervis as being beautiful and gorgeous from Monte Gazzo at San Giavanni Battista, Province of Genoa, has been used for centuries and known as Alabastro Del Gazzo. Near Siena there is a cavern where large masses of cave marble have been procured, and at Castelnova dell Abbate in the Commune of Monte Alcino, considerable quantities are found.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Pavonazzo     “See Pavonazzo.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Red Serpentine     “See Rosso Di Levanto.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Serpentine     “Italian Serpentine or Ophicalcites - See: Egyptian Green, Italian Green, Rosso Di Levanto, Verde Di Genova, Verde Di Levanto, Verde Di Prato.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Skyros No. 14     “Italian Skyros No. 14 or Italian Tipo Brecia Skyros - See Montalta Opal Brechi.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Statuary Marble     “See Statuary.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian Tipo Caen Stone     “See Italian Caen Stone.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italian White Marble     “See White Italian.” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italio Marble “Green Mountain Quarry, West Rutland, Vermont.” “Blush-white tint with widely distributed dashes, veins and clouds of darker shade. (Vermont State Geological Survey)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Italio Marble West Rutland, Vermont, USA A light marble with a bluish tint, many spots, and dashes scattered over the surface of a darker shade. Quarried in Western Vermont ca 1932. (10)
Iverbrie Granite Scotland Very dark gray Stone Magazine, Vol. XLV, No. 12, Dec., 1924 (“Used mainly for building.”)
Ivory Cream Marble (Crema Marfil) Spain   Interior and exterior (12)
Ivory Gold Granite Nigeria   (5)
Ivory Marble Malaysia   (5)
Ivory White Alpine (Sambughetto) Novara, Piedmont Region, Italy   (12)
Ivory White Granite Nigeria   (5)
Izernore Onyx “Quarries at Izernore, Ain, France.” “Bluish-gray” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)
Izeste Marble “Quarried near Izeste, Valle D’Ossau, Basses-Pyrenees, France.” “Black with numerous sections of Hippurites. (Watson)” (from “List of the World’s Marbles,” Through The Ages, mag., (circa 1920s) Nat. Assoc. of Marble Dealers/MIA)


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